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Learn about Disabilities Coloring Book for Children

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Learn about Disabilities Coloring Book for Children Powered By Docstoc
					      A coloring book for children produced by
the Butler County Board of Developmental Disabilities
         © Butler County Board of Developmental Disabilities 2012
Dear Parents and Caregivers,

This coloring book was created to help
young children learn that children who have
developmental disabilities like to have fun, play
with friends, learn at school and do things just
like all children.

Did you know that the Butler County Board of
Developmental Disabilities serves more than
2,000 people with disabilities in Butler County?
We support people of all ages - the oldest
person we support is 86 years old! We included
a few illustrations that show how adults with
disabilities live independently with supports in
the community, have jobs and learn new things.

At the back of the book we have included helpful
tips on how to communicate with a person who
has a disability.

If you would like more information about people
with developmental disabilities or information
about the services we provide, please visit
www.butlerdd.org or call 1-800-874-0268.




                                      © Butler County Board of Developmental Disabilities 2012
Susie has muscular dystrophy. Muscular
dystrophy causes physical disabilities.
Susie uses a wheelchair. Susie loves going
to the library and picking out new books to
read!
                               © Butler County Board of Developmental Disabilities 2012
John has autism. Autism causes intellectual
disabilities. Sometimes John is quiet in class
and sometimes he is loud. After school, John
loves to ride his bike!

                                 © Butler County Board of Developmental Disabilities 2012
Sally has a disability called Down syndrome.
Sometimes a special teacher at school helps
her to learn. Sally loves to bake cupcakes
with her mom!

                               © Butler County Board of Developmental Disabilities 2012
Pam has a hearing disability. She is deaf.
That means she cannot hear. Pam talks by
making signs with her hands. She has taught
her friend Jenny some signs!

                               © Butler County Board of Developmental Disabilities 2012
Jack has a visual disability. He is blind. He
uses a cane. His cane helps him walk without
tripping over things that could make him fall
and get hurt. Jack loves walking in the park!

                                © Butler County Board of Developmental Disabilities 2012
Sarah has epilepsy. Sometimes Sarah has
seizures. She likes to listen to music with
her sister. They love to dance!


                               © Butler County Board of Developmental Disabilities 2012
Sam has multiple sclerosis. Multiple
sclerosis causes physical disabilities. Sam
uses a walker to help keep his balance while
he walks. He loves going to the movies!

                                © Butler County Board of Developmental Disabilities 2012
A developmental disability lasts for a person’s
whole life. Betsy had a brain injury when she
was younger. She is an adult now. She wears
a helmet to protect her brain. Betsy goes to
Liberty Center to learn new things. She is
learning how to cook!
                                  © Butler County Board of Developmental Disabilities 2012
William has an intellectual disability.
Sometimes it is hard to understand him
when he talks. Doctors don’t always know
what causes disabilities. William works at
the grocery store. He bags groceries and
gets carts from the parking lot!
                             © Butler County Board of Developmental Disabilities 2012
Karen has cerebral palsy. Cerebral palsy
causes physical disabilities. Karen uses a
wheelchair and a computer to communicate.
She points to a button on the computer and
it talks for her. Karen lives in a house with
two roomates. She loves being independent!

                                © Butler County Board of Developmental Disabilities 2012
Sometimes people make fun of people who
have disabilities. You should never make fun
of someone who has a disability.




People who have disabilities are just like you.
They like to have fun, play with their friends
and learn new things. They like to do lots of
the same things that you like to do!




                                  © Butler County Board of Developmental Disabilities 2012
What kinds of things do you like to do with
your friends and family? Draw a picture of
yourself doing something fun!


                               © Butler County Board of Developmental Disabilities 2012
TIPS FOR PARENTS! Think PEOPLE FIRST!
Language is a reflection of how people see each other.
That’s why the words we use have the power to hurt.
People First Language is sensitive and accurate, helps
break down barriers and fosters mutual respect, open
lines of communication and acceptance.
Use these guidelines on People First Language:
  * Say “a person with a disability” not “a disabled person”.
  * Words like “victim”, “afflicted”, “crippled”,and sickness,
    “suffering from” communicate disease
                                                  “patient” and

    which disabilities are not.

  * People withpity.
    courage or
                disabilities are not super human models of


  * It should go as “retarded”, “dumb”, “lame”derogatory
    words such
                 without saying that obviously
                                               and “defected”
    should never be used.

  * A person with wheelchair”.
    “confined to a
                   a disability “uses a wheelchair” and is not


  * Replace thewho does not have a “typical” when referring
    to someone
               term “normal” with
                                   disability.

  * Use “congential birth defect” instead of “birth defect”.
  * Use “has a disability” instead of “handicapped” or
    “disabled”.

  * Use “deaf”
    imparied”.
                 or “hard of hearing” instead of “hearing


  * Use “Down syndrome” and never “Mongol” or “Mongoloid”.
  * Use “person of small (or short) stature” instead of “dwarf”
    or “midget”.

  * Use “mental illness” “lunatic”.
    “crazy”, “maniac” or
                         or the specific diagnosis instead of


  * Use “man (or woman) with epilepsy” instead of “epileptic”.
For more information, visit www.butlerdd.org/respect.

                                             © Butler County Board of Developmental Disabilities 2012
© Butler County Board of Developmental Disabilities 2012

				
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Description: A coloring book produced by the Butler County Board of Developmental Disabilities in Ohio. The book gives broad outlines for different types of disabilities plus includes tips for parents about how to communicate with someone who has a disability. For more information visit www.butlerdd.org/respect