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Master of Science in Computer Science

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									               Program Proposal



                Submitted to the
South Carolina Commission on Higher Education

                    by the
     College of Charleston, South Carolina

                   for the
Bachelor of Science in Discovery Informatics




     ____________________________________
                Lee Higdon, President
    College of Charleston/University of Charleston



               ___________________
                       Date
Discovery Informatics                                                                   College of Charleston


    CLASSIFICATION

              New Program Proposed: Discovery Informatics
            Academic Units Involved: School of Sciences and Mathematics
                                      School of Business and Economics
                                      School of Education
                                      School of Humanities & Social Sciences
                             Degree: Bachelor of Science
     Proposed Date of Implementation: Fall 2005
                      Hours Required: 66 to 77 semester hours (depending on cognate area)
                           CIP Code: 11.0199 Computer and Information Sciences, Other.


    The College of Charleston proposes an interdisciplinary Bachelor of Science degree program in the
    emerging field of Discovery Informatics (DI).

    MISSION STATEMENT
        The mission of the program in Discovery Informatics is to provide undergraduates with
        education and training in the emerging discipline of discovery informatics, which integrates
        mathematics and computer science for the quantification and manipulation of information from
        a cognate area of application (e.g., biology, sociology, kinesiology). Emphasis is placed on
        merging strong foundations in information theory, mathematics and computer science with
        current methodologies and tools in a cognate application area.

    JUSTIFICATION

    Purpose
        The nearly ubiquitous use of computers (and their increasing speed), networks (and their
        increasing bandwidth) and storage devices (and their increasing size) enables people and
        organizations to economically generate and store massive amounts of data. Data are generated
        from observations, analysis, communications and transactions from multiple global contexts
        including people, finance, commodities, and research. Databases and data warehouses index
        and store this data locally or in a distributed architecture globally. Real time data sources are
        also increasing in number and availability. Concomitantly, business and governments need to
        extract new information from these data sets, which will be increasingly valuable in all aspects
        of their operations.

        Large and often high-dimensional datasets are increasingly important in numerous fields.
        Common examples of these datasets can be found in DNA sequencing, microarrays, proteomics,
        meteorology, astronomy, medicine, remote sensing, sociology, education, political science,
        finance, and consumer transactions. One of the largest repositories of data is represented by the
        total content of the web and activities on the Internet. The discipline of Discovery Informatics
        has emerged to answer the new and challenging problems presented by these datasets.

        The growing interest in analyzing and mining these datasets is increasing the need for
        quantification in the research associated with these disciplines. However, the traditional analysis
        techniques taught in mathematics and computer science today do not generally apply or scale to
                                                   Page 1
Discovery Informatics                                                                     College of Charleston


        these problems because of the dataset size. The field of Discovery Informatics has emerged as a
        new discipline over the past decade to address the analysis of large datasets. No undergraduate
        programs and only a handful of graduate programs exist specifically to prepare students with the
        skills and knowledge necessary to enter this growing and important field.

        Tools and techniques have been developed to automate the mining and synthesis of new
        knowledge. As a component of the proposed program, students will build skills in tool
        development and application for decision support, confirmation, prediction, forecasting and
        estimation. Artificial intelligence approaches (e.g., machine learning, pattern matching,
        classification and cluster analysis, neural networks) and statistical approaches (e.g., statistical
        classification and clustering, nonparametric density estimation and regression, model selection
        and adaptive procedures, bootstrapping, cross-validation) are also being developed. Discovery
        Informatics is a rigorous, multidisciplinary program, which will be the catalyst and enabler for
        discoveries that might otherwise go undiscovered and for knowledge that would otherwise
        remain unknown.

        Students will select one cognate to complete early in the program to assure the integration of
        course material, appropriate course scheduling, and for the required capstone research
        experience. Cognates will initially be offered by the Departments of Biology, Physics and
        Astronomy, Physical Education and Health, Economics and Finance, Management and
        Marketing, and Sociology and Anthropology. Cognates are identified by a name related to the
        research area in their respective disciplines and not by name of the host department. It is
        conceivable that a department may host more than one DI cognate. The identification and
        inclusion of additional cognate areas is made possible by a framework for cognate definition and
        a mechanism for cognate review and approval, the tactical implementation of which will be a
        duty of the DI steering committee. New cognates are being considered by the Departments of
        Accounting, Art History, Arts Management, Biology, Chemistry and Biochemistry, Computer
        Science, Economics, Finance, Geology, Marketing, Music, Studio Art, and Theatre, but are not
        part of this original proposal.

    Program Objectives
        To provide a highly selective program to students from South Carolina and across the nation.
        To prepare students for graduate work at the PhD level in knowledge discovery / discovery
         informatics.
        To prepare students for a computationally sophisticated workforce.
        To provide an integrated program involving math, statistics, computer science and cognate
         areas
        To mount a program that can earn national distinction through its quality and uniqueness.

    Program Need and Significance
        The worlds of science and business are changing drastically and rapidly. Both now depend upon
        the ability to analyze and learn from huge amounts of collected and streaming data. The
        proposed College of Charleston Discovery Informatics degree will be a ground-breaking
        program that specifically challenges students to be leaders in the next stage of the information
        revolution of knowledge and acquisition knowledge management.



                                                   Page 2
Discovery Informatics                                                                     College of Charleston


    Centrality to Mission of the College of Charleston
        The College of Charleston is in a unique position to offer an undergraduate degree program of
        national caliber in Discovery Informatics. The college’s nationally accredited programs, its
        diversity across the liberal arts, its unmatched number of Commendations of Excellence from
        the State, and its high caliber faculty attest to and validate the position of leadership. A national
        leadership position established by the interdisciplinary Discovery Informatics program is
        strategically consistent with the college’s Fourth Century Initiative and the State’s economic
        growth strategy.

        In 2002, the College of Charleston Board of Trustees and under the leadership of President Lee
        Higdon, approved the College’s new Fourth Century Initiative (4CI), focusing on increasing the
        quality of our liberal arts and science experience for all undergraduates at the College. The goals
        of the 4CI include decreased class size, lower student-faculty ratio, increased research
        opportunities, and increased course offerings, all of which are addressed in and supported by this
        proposal. Additional information about the 4CI can be found at
        http://www.cofc.edu/4thcentury/.

        The value of undergraduate research is widely accepted as a focal point of a quality liberal arts
        education. The College of Charleston is committed to a campus-wide program of funded
        undergraduate research. The focus on research as a learning experience is one of the College’s
        Fourth Century Initiatives. As such, the research experience, provided to every discovery
        informatics major through a senior capstone research project, complements and strengthens the
        College’s research goal for undergraduates. Additional information about the funded
        undergraduate research program and its philosophy can be found at www.cofc.edu/ur.

    Relationship to Other Programs at the College of Charleston
        The interdisciplinary nature of this program is emphasized in the structure of the curriculum and
        the objectives of the program. For each cognate, the degree program is based on the
        involvement of three departments: Computer Science, Mathematics, and the department hosting
        the cognate. The disciplines of computer science and mathematics are central to the program for
        all cognates.

        The relationship between Discovery Informatics and the mathematics program is strong. The
        B.S. program in Mathematics (with an emphasis in Discrete Mathematics) is most closely
        aligned, but the Discovery Informatics program is significantly different and clearly
        distinguishable by its emphasis on advanced statistical methods.

        The relationship between Discovery Informatics and the computer science program is also
        strong. The programs share computer programming and database courses. As with mathematics,
        Discovery Informatics remains distinctive from the B.S in Computer Science, B.A. in Computer
        Science, and the B.S. in Computer Information Systems.

        The relationship between Discovery Informatics and each cognate discipline is designed to give
        DI students the background to understand the nature of the data sets in that field including the
        context in which the sets are collected. Each cognate will focus the Discovery Informatics
        student in the application field leading to a research project in the senior year.


                                                    Page 3
Discovery Informatics                                                                                    College of Charleston


        For the foreseeable future, the program’s implementation and assessment will be guided and
        managed by both the Mathematics and the Computer Science Departments through a steering
        committee with faculty members from both departments and all cognate areas. An advisory
        committee of industry representatives and graduate faculty from departments offering graduate
        degrees in related areas is also planned.

    Relationship to Other Programs in South Carolina
        At this time, there are no other programs in South Carolina specifically implementing the
        proposed curriculum in Discovery Informatics. Existing programs offered by state-supported
        institutions of higher education were reviewed to assess program duplication. The review was
        based on CHEI601P INVENTORY CROSSWALK OF CLASSIFICATION OF INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMS,
        distributed by the SC Commission on Higher Education. In addition, specific programs in
        mathematics and computer science were examined through the public descriptions provided
        through university and college websites.

        No informatics programs or programs by the names of Discovery Informatics, Knowledge
        Discovery, Knowledge Discovery in Datasets, or similar degree programs at the undergraduate
        level were found in a search of current SC programs.

        A PhD program in Biomedical Informatics is hosted by the Medical University of South
        Carolina (MUSC). The DI program is expected to complement this degree program by serving
        as a feeder program. MUSC has been both supportive and encouraging throughout the
        development of this proposal.

        The most closely aligned initiative is being developed at Clemson University. The Center for
        Modeling and Simulation (a graduate center) is founded on scientific discovery through
        computational science and specifically in large-scale simulation and data modeling. The
        undergraduate DI program complements the Center and could ultimately be expected to be a
        resource for new graduate students and for possible research collaborations.

        The University of South Carolina has graduate course work in computational science. Although
        a graduate level offering, the best example of a course offered by USC that is aligned with the
        DI program is illustrated in the course description for USC’s CSCI 564.
                CSCI 564: Computational Science: Introduction to computational science. Vector, parallel,
                distributed and massively parallel architectures. Parallel algorithms, scientific visualization, and
                techniques for solving scientific problems.
                http://www.cse.sc.edu/acadinfo/undergradcourses/564.shtml
        Research in the areas of bioinformatics and genomics is taking place in many universities across
        South Carolina, including Coastal Carolina, the Medical University of South Carolina, Clemson
        and the University of South Carolina, among others. The DI program is expected to provide
        graduates with cognates in biology who can complement and accelerate statewide research
        programs related to knowledge discovery through informatics techniques with biological data.


    ENROLLMENT



                                                           Page 4
Discovery Informatics                                                                   College of Charleston


    Admissions Criteria
        This proposal for an undergraduate program in Discovery Informatics provides a unique and
        timely opportunity for students with high quantitative aptitude and ability. This undergraduate
        program will represent the only such program in the United States. It will draw from top
        students who may have traditionally been attracted to, but may be incompletely served by,
        programs in traditional computer science, statistics, management information systems and
        mathematics. The profile of the students in this program is expected to be consistent with the
        top ten percent of the students at the College of Charleston. There are no additional admissions
        criteria specific to this program.

        Students who major in Discovery Informatics would likely be good candidates for majors in
        mathematics or computer science. They are expected to have an aptitude for mathematics and
        computer science. But unlike many students who pursue computer science or mathematics
        degree programs, Discovery Informatics students will also have a strong interest in an
        application area.

    Projected Total Enrollments
        Total enrollment in Discovery Informatics is expected to be small. The program requirements in
        mathematics, computer science and a cognate will limit the program to academically talented
        students who are eager to develop competencies in three areas in one undergraduate degree
        program.

    Admissions Policy
        The College of Charleston does not implement program-specific admissions policies except for
        students entering the Honors Program.


    Enrollment Projections
        We expect top math and computer science students to be attracted to the Discovery Informatics
        program at the College of Charleston. Because the program is unique and serves a rapidly
        developing field, we anticipate steady and increasing enrollment of such students from both
        South Carolina and elsewhere. In this estimate we assume that annual new student enrollments
        will increase from approximately 11 students in the first year to 15 students after five years. In
        addition, we believe that approximately four currently enrolled students will switch from other
        majors to Discovery Informatics in each of the first two years. In following years this number is
        reduced to two per year.

        Because of rapid growth in the field of Discovery Informatics, it is likely that more students
        could be recruited over this five-year period, but we anticipate a sustained enrollment of
        approximately 50 majors.

                                 PROJECTED TOTAL ENROLLMENT

     YEAR                 FALL                          SPRING                         SUMMER


                                                  Page 5
Discovery Informatics                                                                            College of Charleston



                  Headcount           Credit       Headcount      Credit Hours       Headcount             Credit
                                      Hours                                                                Hours


    2005 – 06             8               64           9               90                3                    9

    2006 – 07            20               200         22              220                4                   12

    2007 – 08            33               330         35              350                7                   21

    2008 – 09            47               470         50              500                8                   24

    2009 – 10            50               500         50              500                8                   24


    Projected New Enrollments
        Because of the uniqueness and challenges of the Discovery Informatics program, the program is
        expected to draw new students into the college who might not have matriculated otherwise. The
        program will be marketed across the state and nationally to attract highly qualified students. The
        estimated new enrollments are intentionally small. The actual new enrollments will strongly
        depend on marketing and recruiting efforts.


                                      ESTIMATED NEW ENROLLMENT

      YEAR                         FALL                        SPRING                            SUMMER

                        Headcount         Credit      Headcount             Credit     Headcount         Credit Hours
                                          Hours                             Hours

    2005 – 06                 5             64             1                  3              2                 3

    2006 – 07                 5             70             2                  6              2                 6

    2007 – 08                 7            100             2                  6              2                 6

    2008 – 09                 8            120             3                  9              2                 6

    2009 – 10                 10           120             3                  9              2                 6

    CURRICULUM
        Listed below are the required courses for a Bachelor of Science degree in Discovery Informatics
        followed by the curriculum for a minor option in Discovery Informatics. The core requirements
        for the major consist of courses in mathematics (26 hours), computer science (19 hours), and
        discovery informatics (9 hours). All courses in the DI core develop student mastery in the
        emerging discipline of discovery informatics. Only those courses indicated by “new” will
        involve the creation of a new course. While a DISC course designation for the purpose of cross
        listing mathematics, computer science and cognate courses could be made for each course
                                                      Page 6
Discovery Informatics                                                                   College of Charleston


        required in the proposed program, such a cross listing will not be established in order to
        emphasize the interdisciplinary nature of this program. The catalog course descriptions for new
        and existing courses are located in the Appendix.

        The four new DISC courses in the proposed program are designated independently of
        mathematics and computer science because of the way in which these courses will introduce
        students to the discipline and, for the major, conclude the learning experience with a research-
        oriented, capstone course in discovery informatics.

        One cognate is required to complete the major program. Each cognate has been designed to
        require between four to six courses. The cognates are under the supervision of a faculty member
        who will oversee the students in his/her cognate in the host departments. In the future, host
        departments can propose changes to their cognates with approval from the DI steering
        committee and the normal curricular approval process within the College of Charleston.

    DI MAJOR (66-77 credit hours)
        The major in DI consists of a total of 66 to 76 credit hours composed of 18 core courses (54
        credit hours) plus the courses in one cognate area, representing between 12 and 22 cognate hours
        depending on the cognate selected by the student.

    Core Requirement (54 credit hours)
        Discovery Informatics (9 credit hours)
        DISC 101        Introduction to Discovery Informatics (new) (3 credit hours)
        DISC 210        Dataset Organization and Management (new) (3 credit hours)
        DISC 495        Discovery Informatics Capstone (new) (3 credit hours)
        Computer Science (19 credit hours)
        CSCI 220        Computer Programming I (3 credit hours)
        CSCI 221        Computer Programming II (3 credit hours)
        CSCI 222        Computer Programming I Laboratory (1 credit hour)
        CSCI 230        Data Structures and Algorithms (3 credit hours)
        CSCI 310        Advanced Algorithms (new) (3 credit hours)
        CSCI 334        Data Mining (new) (3 credit hours)
        CSCI 470        Principles of Artificial Intelligence (3 credit hours)
        Mathematics (26 credit hours)
        MATH 120        Introductory Calculus (4 credit hours)
        MATH 220        Calculus II (4 credit hours)
        MATH 203        Linear Algebra (3 credit hours)
        MATH 207        Discrete Structures I (3 credit hours)
        MATH 250        Statistical Methods I (3 credit hours)
        MATH 350        Statistical Methods II (3 credit hours)
        MATH 440        Statistical Learning I (new) (3 credit hours)
        MATH 441        Statistical Learning II (new) (3 credit hours)



                                                   Page 7
Discovery Informatics                                                                   College of Charleston


    Cognate Requirement (12-22 credit hours)
        Ten cognates have been designed by departments in the liberal arts and sciences, business and
        education. Each student majoring in discovery informatics will select one cognate to complete.


        Biomechanics (22 credit hours)
        BIOL 111        Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology (3 credit hours)
        BIOL 111L       Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology Lab (1 credit hour)
        BIOL 112        Evolution, Ecology, and Biology of Organisms (3 credit hours)
        BIOL 112L       Evolution, Ecology, and Biology of Organisms Lab (1 credit hour)
        BIOL 202        Human Anatomy (4 credit hours)
        PHYS 101        Introductory Physics (3 credit hours)
        PHYS 101L       Introductory Physics Laboratory (1 credit hours)
        PEHD 330        Kinesiology (3 credit hours)
        PEHD 440        Biomechanics (3 credit hours)
        Customer Relationship Management Cognate (15 credit hours)
        ECON 201        Principles of Macroeconomics (3 credit hours)
        ECON 202        Principles of Microeconomics (3 credit hours)
        DSCI 232        Business Statistics (3 credit hours)
        MKTG 302        Marketing Concepts (3 credit hours)
        MKTG 320        Marketing Research (3 credit hours)
        e-Commerce Cognate (18 credit hours)
        ACCT 203        Financial Accounting (3 credit hours)
        ACCT 204        Managerial Accounting (3 credit hours)
        DSCI 232        Business Statistics (3 credit hours)
        DSCI 300        Management Information Systems (3 credit hours)
        DSCI 306        Introduction to Electronic Commerce (3 credit hours)
        MKTG 333        Purchasing and Supply Chain Management (3 credit hours)
        Economics Cognate (15 credit hours)
        ECON 201        Principles of Macroeconomics (3 credit hours)
        ECON 202        Principles of Microeconomics (3 credit hours)
        ECON 317        Microeconomic Analysis (3 credit hours)
        ECON 318        Macroeconomic Analysis (3 credit hours)
        ECON 419        Introduction to Econometrics and Forecasting (3 credit hours)
        Exercise Physiology (16 credit hours)
        BIOL 111        Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology (3 credit hours)
        BIOL 111L       Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology Lab (1 credit hour)
        BIOL 112        Evolution, Ecology, and Biology of Organisms (3 credit hours)
        BIOL 112L       Evolution, Ecology, and Biology of Organisms Lab (1 credit hour)
        BIOL 201        Human Physiology (4 credit hours)
        PEHD 340        Exercise Physiology and Lab (4 credit hours)
        Molecular Biology Cognate (16 credit hours)
        BIOL 111        Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology (3 credit hours)

                                                  Page 8
Discovery Informatics                                                                College of Charleston


        BIOL 111L       Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology Lab (1 credit hour)
        BIOL 112        Evolution, Ecology, and Biology of Organisms (3 credit hours)
        BIOL 112L       Evolution, Ecology, and Biology of Organisms Laboratory (1 credit hour)
        BIOL 212        Genetics (3 credit hours)
        BIOL 212L       Genetics Laboratory (1 credit hour)
        BIOL 311        Advanced Genetics (3 credit hours)
        BIOL 311L       Advanced Genetics Laboratory (1 credit hour)

        Organismal Biology Cognate (15 credit hours)
        BIOL 111     Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology (3 credit hours)
        BIOL 111L Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology Lab (1 credit hour)
        BIOL 112     Evolution, Ecology, and Biology of Organisms (3 credit hours)
        BIOL 112L Evolution, Ecology, and Biology of Organisms Lab (1 credit hour)
        And two 300-legel Biology Courses selected by the biology cognate advisor. Example:
                     BIOL 341 General Ecology (4 credit hours)
                     BIOL 350 Evolution (3 credit hours)
        Physics and Astronomy Cognate (18 credit hours)
        PHYS 201        General Physics I (4 credit hours)
        PHYS 202        General Physics II (4 credit hours)
        PHYS 311        Stellar Astronomy and Astrophysics (3 credit hours)
        PHYS 330        Introduction to Modern Physics I (3 credit hours)
        PHYS 370        Experimental Physics (4 credit hours)
        Sociology Cognate (15 credit hours)
        SOCY 101        Introduction to Sociology (3 credit hours)
        SOCY 202        Introduction to Social Institutions (3 credit hours)
        SOCY 260        Development of Social Thought (3 credit hours)
        SOCY 271        Introduction to Social Research (3 credit hours)
        SOCY 371        Social Research Practicum (3 credit hours)
        Supply Chain Management Cognate (18 credit hours)
        ECON 201        Principles of Macroeconomics (3 credit hours)
        ECON 202        Principles of Microeconomics (3 credit hours)
        DSCI 232        Business Statistics (3 credit hours)
        MKTG 302        Marketing Concepts (3 credit hours)
        MKTG 333        Purchasing and Supply Chain Management (3 credit hours)
        TRAN 312        Global Logistics (3 credit hours)


    Cognate Descriptions
        The computational techniques and theoretical reasoning developed in the required Discovery
        Informatics courses should provide much of what the students will need to enter this growing
        field; however, their understanding will be greatly enhanced by the cognate requirements which
        provide them with knowledge in an application area. The cognate provides an introduction to the
        vocabulary and problem spaces in the cognate discipline for Discovery Informatics tool use and
        development. Students will learn to communicate between the disciplines of the cognate,
                                                    Page 9
Discovery Informatics                                                                   College of Charleston


        mathematics and computer science. The students will have an opportunity to integrate their
        Discovery Informatics skills and the material from their cognate courses in their capstone
        project. Cognates require between 12 and 23 credit hours in addition to the core DI
        requirements. Students must complete one of the following cognates.



        Biomechanics Cognate (School of Education) (22 credit hours)

        The Department of Physical Education and Health offers an opportunity for students in the area
        of Discovery Informatics to plan, collect, and analyze data pertaining to the physics of human
        motion. In order to complete this cognate area, students will first need to take BIOL 111 and
        BIOL 112 with the mandatory laboratories to satisfy their general education requirements, and
        then take BIOL 202 (Human Anatomy), PHYS 101 (Introductory Physics), PEHD 330
        (Kinesiology), and PEHD 440 (Biomechanics) to fulfill their cognate requirements. Data
        associated with these classes could include, but will not be limited to: kinematics of normal and
        pathological gait, kinematics of other types of human movement including golf and tennis, and
        the kinetic analysis of movement and how the kinematics and kinetics might be combined to
        solve a particular issue.



        Customer Relationship Management Cognate (School of Business and Economics) (15 credit
        hours)

        The Department of Management and Marketing offers an opportunity for students in the area of
        Discovery Informatics to plan, participate in and assist in analyzing data associated with the
        study of customer relationship management. Those who successfully gather, analyze,
        understand, and act upon customer information are among the winners in this new information
        age. The benefits associated with discovery informatics applications in CRM include customer
        profitability, customer acquisition, cross-selling, customer retention, customer segmentation and
        customer scoring.



        e-Commerce Cognate (School of Business and Economics) (18 credit hours)

        The Department of Management and Marketing offers an opportunity for students in the area of
        Discovery Informatics to plan, participate in and assist in analyzing data associated with the
        study of e-commerce. Those who successfully gather, analyze, understand, and act upon e-
        procurement information are among the winners in this new information age. The benefits
        associated with discovery informatics applications in e-commerce include improved marketing
        intelligence, enhanced decision making, reduced operational and administration costs, and
        improved visibility of customer demand.



        Economics Cognate (School of Business and Economics) (15 credit hours)

        The Department of Economics & Finance offers an opportunity for students in the area of
        Discovery Informatics to plan, participate in and assist in analyzing data associated with the
                                                  Page 10
Discovery Informatics                                                                   College of Charleston


        study of economics and finance. Improved methods for interpreting the vast amount of data
        available concerning the macro-economy and financial markets is important to both business
        leaders and government policy-makers. Specific courses required to provide a content
        background for these students are Principles of Macroeconomics (ECON 201), Principles of
        Microeconomics (ECON 202), Microeconomics Analysis (ECON 317), Macroeconomics
        Analysis (ECON 318) and Introduction to Econometrics and Forecasting (ECON 419). These
        classes will present the student with the basic problems economics addresses, the tools of
        economic analysis, and some of the most widely used data in economics.



        Exercise Physiology Cognate (School of Education) (16 credit hours)

        This cognate, offered by the Department of Physical Education and Health, provides Discovery
        Informatics students with the opportunity to plan, collect, and analyze large datasets that pertain
        to the performance of the physiological systems that are most affected by the stress of physical
        activity. In order the complete this cognate area, students will first need to take BIOL 11 and
        BIOL 112 with the mandatory laboratories to satisfy their general education requirements, and
        then take BIOL 201 (Human Physiology), and PEHD 340 (Exercise Physiology) to fulfill their
        cognate requirements. Data associated with these classes will include, but will not be limited to:
        the physiology of fitness, nutrient metabolism and energy production, diet modification for
        physically active individuals, pulmonary function and spirometry, electrocardiography,
        endocrinology, and the determinants of VO2 max.

        Molecular Biology Cognate (School of Sciences and Mathematics) (16 credit hours)

        Bioinformatics makes use of large genetic datasets to address questions in biology at the cellular
        and molecular level. To expose DI students to training in bioinformatics, we suggest that
        students take Biology 111 and 112 with the mandatory laboratories to satisfy their general
        education requirements. For the cognate courses we recommend Biology 212 and 311 with
        laboratories. These two courses provide introductory and advanced training in genetics,
        respectively.



        Organismal Biology Cognate (School of Sciences and Mathematics) (15 credit hours)

        Historically DI has been relevant to biology through the field of bioinformatics, but large
        datasets can be found in many biological sub-disciplines that focus upon levels of organization
        higher than the cell. Large datasets, particularly ecological time-series and imagery, have
        proliferated in environmental biology. For students to receive the training they would need to
        apply DI approaches to organismal-level subfields, we recommend that students take Biology
        111 and Biology 112 as part of their general education and choose two 300-level courses (for
        example, ecology (BIOL341) and Evolution (BIOL 350)) from the biology department’s
        offerings through consultation with their cognate advisor. Many 300-level biology courses
        require one year of chemistry (Chemistry 111 and 112) as prerequisites. If the courses identified
        with the student’s cognate advisor have this prerequisite, the cognate will require up to 23 credit
        hours, else it will require a minimum of 14 credit hours.


                                                  Page 11
Discovery Informatics                                                                  College of Charleston


        Physics and Astronomy Cognate (School of Sciences and Mathematics) (18 credit hours)

        The Physics and Astronomy cognate, offered by the Department of Physics and Astronomy,
        provides students with a working knowledge of basic physics and astronomy as well as some
        familiarity with associated data types. Students in this cognate would take Physics 201 and
        Physics 202 to satisfy their general education requirements, and then take Physics 311 (Stellar
        Astronomy and Astrophysics, Physics 330 (Modern Physics), and Physics 370 (Experimental
        Physics). The department is also in the process of expanding course offerings in computational
        physics; it is expected that anticipated computational physics courses would replace some of the
        aforementioned courses and/or would serve as ideal cognate requirements when implemented.



        Sociology Cognate (School of Humanities and Social Sciences) (15 credit hours)

        The Department of Sociology and Anthropology offers the sociology cognate. Sociology is a
        quantitative discipline, and much of the current research in this field is based upon querying
        large databases. To provide the training that DI students interested in sociology would require,
        students pursuing the sociology cognate will take SOCY 101 as part of their general education
        social science requirement. For the remainder of the cognate courses, we require SOCY 202,
        SOCY 260, SOCY 271 and SOCY 371.



        Supply Chain Management Cognate (School of Business and Economics) (18 credit hours)

        The Department of Management and Marketing offers an opportunity for students in the area of
        Discovery Informatics to plan, participate in and assist in analyzing data associated with the
        study of supply chain management. Those who successfully gather, analyze, understand, and act
        upon the supply chain gain competitive advantage in the marketplace.


    Sample MAJOR Curriculum
                          Year 1                                            Year 2
               Fall                   Spring                      Fall                    Spring

           MATH 220 (4)               MATH 207 (3)               DISC 101 (3)             MATH 350 (3)
             CSCI 220 (3)             MATH 250 (3)              MATH 203 (3)               DISC 210 (3)
             CSCI 222 (1)               CSCI 221 (3)             CSCI 230 (3)         Natural Science (4)
            ENGL 101 (3)               ENGL 102 (3)            Language III (3)         Language IV (3)
           Language I (3)             Language II (3)             History I (3)            History II (3)
       General Elective (2)

                   14 Credits              15 Credits                15 Credits                 16 credits

                          Year 3                                             Year 4




                                                 Page 12
Discovery Informatics                                                                   College of Charleston


               Fall                   Spring                      Fall                     Spring

            MATH 440 (3)              MATH 441 (3)                CSCI 470 (3)               DISC 495 (3)
              CSCI 310 (3)             CSCI 334 (3)             DI Cognate (3)        Social Science II (3)
      Natural Science II (4)          DI Cognate (3)        Social Science I (3)         Humanity IV (3)
            Humanity I (3)            DI Cognate (3)           Humanity III (3)       General Elective (3)
            DI Cognate (3)            Humanity II (3)       General Elective (3)      General Elective (3)

                   16 Credits              15 Credits                15 Credits                  15 Credits


    Note: The sample curriculum schedule above allows the student to take all required courses for the
    Discovery Informatics degree and to meet all General Education requirements in eight semesters
    with a total of 122 credits for graduation. Some of the courses listed above as fulfilling the general
    education requirement are also presumed to be courses that are cognate requirements. Thus, even
    though only 12 hours above are specifically indicated as counting towards the cognate requirement,
    there can be as many as 22 hours of cognate coursework in the sample curriculum above by using
    General Elective course slots. Note also that this curriculum presumes that the students will have
    entered the College having already taken AP Calculus, a reasonable assumption for the type of
    student we hope to attract. However, students who have not yet had calculus can complete the
    requirements with a slightly modified curriculum involving some mathematics courses taken during
    the summer of the first year. All cognates proposed can be completed in eight semesters.




                                                  Page 13
Discovery Informatics                                                                    College of Charleston


    DI MINOR (18-19 credit hours)
        The Discovery Informatics program is also accessible to students in any other major. The DI
        minor is intended to provide to students an introduction to the field by developing their
        quantitative abilities in statistics and in data mining and giving students a broad overview of the
        field with some practical applications of data mining, programming and databases.

        The primary goal of the DI minor is to increase the quantitative and analytical learning outcomes to
        students of all degree programs at the College of Charleston who complete this minor. The
        curriculum of the minor is to expose students to the nature of discovery informatics and to build a
        small skill set in data mining.

        Discovery Informatics (6 credit hours)
        DISC 101: Introduction to Discovery Informatics (new) (3 credit hours)
        DISC 201: Introduction to Databases and Data Mining (new) (3 credit hours)
        Computer Science (3 credit hours)
        CSCI 130: Visual Basic for Applications (3 credit hours)
        Mathematics (9-10 credit hours)
        Either:
            MATH 105: Calculus for Business and the Social Sciences (3 credit hours)
            MATH 120: Introductory Calculus (4 credit hours)

        MATH 250: Statistical Methods I (3 credit hours)
        MATH 355: Bayesian Statistical Inference (new) (3 credit hours)

    The DI minor requires 18-19 credit hours depending on the calculus course taken. Of these hours, six
    math hours will also count toward general degree requirements. Unlike most degree programs at the
    college, the number of DI minors could exceed the number of DI majors.




                                                  Page 14
Discovery Informatics                                                                     College of Charleston


    FACULTY
    The following table lists the qualified faculty members who will participate in the DI program. They
    represent the faculty in the primary areas of mathematics and computer science as well as the faculty
    who will lead each cognate.


      List Staff by Rank (e.g.            Highest                     Field of Study          Teaching in
     Professor #1, Professor #2,          Degree                                             Field (Yes/No)
     Associate Professor #1, etc)         Earned

    Associate Professor #6            Ph.D.                 Biology                          Yes

    Assistant Professor #4            Ph.D.                 Computer Science                 Yes

    Associate Professor #3            Ph.D.                 Computer Science                 Yes

    Associate Professor #4            Ph.D.                 Computer Science                 Yes

    Associate Professor #5            Ph.D.                 Computer Science                 Yes

    Professor #2                      Ph.D.                 Computer Science                 Yes

    Assistant Professor #5            Ph.D.                 Economics                        Yes

    Assistant Professor #1            Ph.D.                 Mathematics                      Yes

    Assistant Professor #2            Ph.D.                 Mathematics                      Yes

    Assistant Professor #3            Ph.D.                 Mathematics                      Yes

    Associate Professor #1            Ph.D.                 Mathematics                      Yes

    Associate Professor #2            Ph.D.                 Mathematics                      Yes

    Professor #1                      Ph.D.                 Mathematics                      Yes

    Professor #3                      Ph.D.                 Physics                          Yes

    Associate Professor #7            Ph.D.                 Sociology                        Yes

    Associate Professor #8            Ph.D.                 Physical Education & Health      Yes


    The number of new faculty needed depends on the total student enrollment in the program. While
    total enrollment stays below 60 students, only one new faculty member will be needed. When
    enrollment reaches 100 students, a total of two new faculty members will be needed. Given student
    enrollment projections, we anticipate that the first new faculty member will begin their duties in the
    Fall Semester of the fourth year of the program, with the second new faculty member beginning in

                                                  Page 15
Discovery Informatics                                                                College of Charleston


    the Fall Semester of the year following that academic year when total student enrollment reaches


                           UNIT ADMINISTRATION/FACULTY/STAFF SUPPORT


      YEAR                      NEW                    EXISTING                      TOTAL


                        Headcount     FTE     Headcount         FTE        Headcount           FTE


                                             Administration

    2005 – 06                                      1            0.25

    2006 – 07                                      1            0.25

    2007 – 08                                      1            0.25

    2008 – 09                                      1            0.25

    2009 – 10                                      1            0.25


                                                 Faculty

    2005 – 06               0          0           2            0.75            2              0.75

    2006 – 07               0          0           4              1.5           4               1.5

    2007 – 08               0          0           6              2.0           6               2.0

    2008 – 09               1         0.75         8            1.625           9              2.375

    2009 – 10               1         0.75         8            1.625           9              2.375


                                                   Staff

    2005 – 06                                      1            0.25

    2006 – 07                                      1            0.25

    2007 – 08                                      1            0.25

    2008 – 09                                      1            0.25

    2009 – 10                                      1            0.25



                                                Page 16
Discovery Informatics                                                                    College of Charleston


        100 or more students (but a second new faculty member is not shown in the table).
        Qualifications for both new faculty members include a Ph.D. in one of the Mathematical
        Sciences with particular expertise in theory and applications of knowledge discovery tools and
        statistical learning theory. These new faculty will have a solid understanding of statistical
        methods for analyzing large, high-dimensional data, probability and stochastic processes, and
        modern methods in statistical and computational learning theory. Evidence of expertise includes
        a publication record of national distinction in these areas. Additionally, these new faculty will
        have extensive computer and programming experience.

        [Note: The italicized text in this document is from the CHE program proposal form and remains
        herein for clarity.] In the case of currently-employed faculty or administrators, an explanation of
        proposed changes in assignment and of the extent to which each new assignment may require
        the addition of new positions to fulfill the former assignment.

        There will be no significant changes in assignments of currently employed faculty or
        administrators. To cover new courses, it may be necessary to hire adjunct faculty in years one
        through three, prior to new faculty recruitment.

        A statement of the institutional plan for faculty development as it may relate specifically to the
        proposed program, including but not limited to released time for research, consulting,
        conferences, or curriculum development

        The institutional definition of the full-time equivalents (FTE)

        Faculty members at the College of Charleston are expected to teach the equivalent of 12 contact
        hours each academic year. Twelve contact hours = 1.00 Instructional FTE. However, with a
        recommendation from the department chair, a faculty member who has an active research
        program may receive a one-course reduction in each semester from his/her dean. In the School
        of Sciences and Mathematics, faculty members have the opportunity for an additional course
        reduction supported by external research funding. All tenure-track and instructional faculty are
        expected to have a professional growth program. There are no summer teaching obligations for
        faculty at the College of Charleston. Faculty members are encouraged to pursue their research
        agendas in the summer months and to work with undergraduates in their research endeavors.

        Faculty members are encouraged to present research results at an appropriate professional
        meeting. Travel costs for research presentations are often covered by the department of the
        faculty member or by the dean or provost in some cases.

        The Summer Undergraduate Research program, funded through President Higdon’s Fourth
        Century Initiative and the College of Charleston Foundation, provides research support for
        undergraduates involved in research projects with faculty. Approximately 20 awards are
        presented to undergraduate students for summer support annually. Students in the DI program
        will be eligible for SUR awards and are expected to be highly competitive.

        Course reductions for faculty and financial support for undergraduates involved in research
        provide the infrastructure for a successful deployment of the cognate research areas and
        appropriate support for the required capstone course, DISC 495.



                                                  Page 17
Discovery Informatics                                                                       College of Charleston


    PHYSICAL PLANT
        No additional physical plant is required for this program except for office space for new faculty.
        The DI program students will use existing teaching and research spaces available in
        mathematics, computer science and the departments hosting the program cognates. It is
        anticipated that the program will start small and remain relatively small.

    EQUIPMENT
        No additional equipment is needed for the courses in the DI program. Specific research
        instrumentation and computational platforms exist already or will be funded by faculty research
        grant activity. The current major equipment already in place for the DI core includes:

        Beowulf Cluster: A 48 node, parallel computer administered by the Department of Computer
        Science.

        Oracle: A database installation supporting relational models and XML extensions.

        Computing laboratories: Mathematics, Physics and Computer Science host computer
        laboratories, services and software development tools that will be made available to the DI
        program.

        Network infrastructure on campus is a gigabit switched infrastructure. High bandwidth service
        such as Internet2 would facilitate data transfer rates for local processing of large, remote data
        sets, but this degree program does not depend on access to the Abilene backbone at this time.

    LIBRARY RESOURCES
        Discovery Informatics is an emerging discipline. A standard does not yet exist by the ALA for
        holdings in relationship to the program being proposed. Regarding collections and assets, the
        ALA/ACRL website states:

                        There is no absolute standard for the size of a collection in undergraduate
                        libraries. The essential criterion is that the collections (or access to
                        information outside of the collection) adequately support the needs of the
                        primary clientele. The collection policy should adequately describe the
                        collection goals and be evaluated with the following factors considered:

        Does the collection profile adequately support the undergraduate curriculum? Yes

        Does the size and depth of the collection adequately support the size and need of the
        undergraduate population? Yes in Computer Science, Mathematics and the cognates, all of
        which are currently supported by the College of Charleston collection.

        Are materials appropriately available and accessible for reserve users? Yes

        Are collections effectively included in the catalog? Are comparable standards of bibliographic
        access followed for undergraduate library collections as in the overall library system? Yes

        Are collections housed and arranged efficiently and effectively for use by the primary clientele?
        Yes

                                                      Page 18
Discovery Informatics                                                                    College of Charleston


        Are collections available and accessible to all users? Yes.

        Do circulation policies and practices permit effective access for users? Yes

        Are access policies posted to ensure that all users are aware of services and restrictions? Yes

        Do appropriate withdrawal policies and practices exist which adequately address the need for
        collection maintenance? Yes

        Are interlibrary loan and other document-delivery services provided for undergraduates to give
        them access to materials not owned by the institution? Yes

        Do undergraduates have adequate access to electronic networks for accessing information?
        Yes

    Computer Sciences Department Library Assessment
        Computer Science holdings in the Robert Scott Small Library consist of over 3,995 monographs
        and more than 44 print journal subscriptions (see below). In addition to traditional print
        resources, faculty and students have access to a variety of internet and CD-ROM services
        including the ACM Digital Library (full text of every article ever published by the ACM),
        Internet and Personal Computing Abstracts, MathSciNet (Mathematical Reviews on-line),
        Current Contents—Engineering, Computing and Technology, and the Applied Science and
        Technology Index. The Library also subscribes to 61 electronic books from Safari Tech Books
        Online.

    Department of Mathematics Library Assessment
        Mathematics holdings in the Robert Scott Small Library consist of over 8,100 and 71 print
        journal subscriptions, sixty-five print and fifty-four electronic (see attached). These numbers do
        not include the over 3,900 volumes in the computer sciences. In addition to traditional print
        resources, faculty and students have access to a variety of on-line services including MathSciNet
        and Applied Science and Technology Abstracts.

        Library statistics for holding in computer science and mathematics are located in the Appendix.

    ACCREDITATION
        No accreditation is currently available for this program. Neither licensure nor certification is
        available for graduates of this program by any public or private agency.

    ESTIMATED COST
        The estimated cost by year for the first five years of the program is given in the following table.
        An explanation of funding sources follows.

        No special state appropriations will be required or requested in the support of this proposed
        degree program.


                                                   Page 19
Discovery Informatics                                                                            College of Charleston




                                            ESTIMATED COSTS BY YEAR


                 CATEGORY                       1st          2nd          3rd         4th         5th        TOTALS

    Program Administration                     $3,000       $3,000       $3,000       $3,000      $3,000      $15,000

    Faculty Salaries                                  $0           $0           $0   $60,000     $60,000     $120,000

    Graduate Assistants                               $0           $0           $0          $0          $0         $0

    Clerical/Support Personnel                        $0           $0           $0          $0          $0         $0

    Supplies and Materials                     $5,000       $5,000       $5,000       $5,000      $5,000      $25,000

    Library Resources                                 $0    $2,000       $2,000       $2,000      $2,000       $8,000

    Equipment                                         $0           $0           $0          $0          $0         $0

    Facilities                                        $0           $0           $0          $0          $0         $0

    Other (New course development)             $7,500       $7,500              $0          $0          $0    $15,000

    TOTALS                                    $15,500      $17,500      $10,000      $70,000     $70,000     $183,000


                                          SOURCES OF FINANCING BY YEAR

    Estimated FTE Revenue Generated from              $0           $0           $0          $0          $0         $0
    the State (See footnote)

    Tuition Funding (New students only)       $22,433      $27,329      $38,821      $48,665     $50,611     $187,859

    Other State Funding (Legislative                  $0           $0           $0          $0          $0         $0
    Approp.)

    Reallocation of Existing Funds            ($6,933      ($9,829      ($28,821     $21,335     $19,389      ($4,859)
                                                    )            )             )

    Federal Funding                                   $0           $0           $0          $0          $0         $0

    Other Funding (Endowment, Auxiliary               $0           $0           $0          $0          $0         $0
    etc)

    TOTALS                                    $15,500      $17,500      $10,000      $70,000     $70,000     $183,000

    Footnote: Given the current State fiscal situation, it is not realistic to expect that any new funds
              would be realized as a result of these credit hour enrollments.

                                                       Page 20
Discovery Informatics                                                           College of Charleston


    INSTITITIONAL APPROVAL
    The approval form with original signatures and dates is attached.

    Deanna Caveny          Chair, Department of Mathematics
    Jon Hakkila            Chair, Department of Physics and Astronomy
    Maureen Hays           Chair, Department of Sociology and Anthropology
    Thomas Langley         Chair, Department of Physical Education and Health
    Paul Marino, Chair     Chair, Department of Biology
    George Pothering       Chair, Department of Computer Science
    Kent Gourdin           Chair, Department of Management and Marketing
    John Morgan            Chair, Department of Economics and Finance


    Samuel M. Hines        Dean, School of Humanities and Social Sciences
    Norine Noonan          Dean, School of Sciences and Mathematics
    Robert Pitts           Dean, School of Business and Economics
    Frances Welch          Dean, School of Education


    Priscilla D. Burbage   Vice-President for Fiscal Services


    Deborah Boyle, Chair Faculty Curriculum Committee
    Robert Mignone         Speaker of the Faculty


    Elise Jorgens          Provost, Academic Affairs
    Lee Higdon             President
    Robert W. Marlowe      Chair, Board of Trustees




                                                 Page 21
Discovery Informatics                                                                   College of Charleston


    Appendix

    Course Catalogue Descriptions
    Computer Science

        CSCI 130: Visual Basic for Applications (3 credit hours). A programming course using Visual
        Basic to access the programmable object libraries in productivity applications. Using a
        consistent integrated development environment, students will learn how to automate tasks and
        how to develop custom applications. Special topics covered include VB control structures, the
        object models, Active X controls, interface design, debugging and event handling. Prerequisites:
        None.

        CSCI 220: Computer Programming I (3 credit hours). An introduction to programming and
        problem-solving using Java. Topics include data types, variables, assignment, control structures
        (selection and iteration), arrays, methods, classes, and an introduction to object-oriented
        programming. Lectures three hours per week. Prerequisites: MATH 111 or equivalent; co-
        requisite: CSCI 222.

        CSCI 221: Computer Programming II (3 credit hours). This course further develops object-
        oriented programming introduced in CSCI 220. Topics include file input/output, inheritance and
        polymorphism, exceptions, error handling, and algorithm analysis. Data structures include lists,
        stacks, and queues. Algorithms include searching and sorting. Lectures three hours per week.
        Prerequisites: CSCI 220 and 222.

        CSCI 222: Computer Programming I Laboratory (1 credit hour). This course is designed to
        apply the concepts being covered in CSCI 220. Exercises will be assigned each week within a
        structured setting. Laboratory three hours per week. Prerequisites or co-requisite: CSCI 220.

        CSCI 230: Data Structures and Algorithms (3 credit hours). This course reviews and develops
        the abstract data type as a mathematical model. Data structures and algorithms are developed as
        concrete realizations of the objects and operations of the abstract data type. Topics include a
        review of basic data structures, trees and graphs, and analysis of the efficiency of algorithms.
        Prerequisite: CSCI 221 and MATH 207.

        CSCI 310: Advanced Algorithms (new) (3 credit hours). A course that covers algorithms,
        focusing on problem complexity, approximation and classification with an emphasis on
        optimization. Algorithms covered include evolutionary algorithms (genetic algorithms),
        simulated annealing, gradient descent, discrete optimization, branch-and-bound, dynamic and
        stochastic programming, combinatorial optimization, and approximation algorithms.
        Prerequisite: CSCI 230.

        CSCI 334: Data Mining (new) (3 credit hours). A course covering data mining concepts and
        methodologies. Topics include decision tables, decision trees, classification rules, association
        rules, clustering, pattern analysis, statistical modeling, and linear modeling. Other topics may
        include data warehousing and data cleaning and recent techniques for text mining and web
        mining. Prerequisite: CSCI 230.

        CSCI 470: Principles of Artificial Intelligence (3 credit hours). A course introducing the
        principles of artificial intelligence, especially basic techniques for problem-solving and
                                                  Page 22
Discovery Informatics                                                                    College of Charleston


        knowledge representation. Among topics covered are search strategies and heuristics, resolution,
        production systems, rule-base systems, expert systems, natural language processing, semantic
        nets and frames. Artificial intelligence programming techniques will also be introduced,
        particularly in Lisp or Prolog. Prerequisite: Computer Science 325, 330 and Mathematics 307.

    Discovery Informatics

        DISC 101: Introduction to Discovery Informatics (new) (3 credit hours). Introduction to the use
        of computer based tools for the analysis of large data sets for the purpose of knowledge
        discovery. Students will learn to understand the Discovery Informatics process and the
        difference between deductive hypothesis-driven and inductive data-driven modeling. Students
        will have hands-on experience with various OLAP and DM software and complete a project
        using real data. Prerequisites: None.

        DISC 201: Introduction to Databases and Data Mining (new) (3 credit hours). A course
        introducing the concepts of databases, data warehouses and flat files, the statement query
        language (SQL), the data mining process, result evaluation techniques, and informatics tools for
        text processing, clustering and supervised learning. Prerequisites: MATH 250 and either CSCI
        130 or CSCI 220.

        DSCI 210: Dataset Organization and Management (new) (3 credit hours). A course to develop
        an understanding of databases and the management of data for information extraction. Concepts
        of database include the relational and entity relation models, storage (local and distributed), and
        access (SQL). The preparation and management of datasets for analysis is also covered and
        includes data cleaning, reorganization, security and access. Prerequisite: CSCI 220.

        DISC 495: Discovery Informatics Capstone (new) (3 credit hours). A capstone course for the
        application of knowledge discovery and data mining tools and techniques to large data
        repositories or data streams. This project-based course provides students with a framework in
        which students gain both understanding and insight into the application of knowledge discovery
        tools and principles on data within the student’s cognate area. Prerequisites: DSCI 201, CSCI
        470, and MATH 441.

     Mathematics

        MATH 105: Calculus for Business and the Social Sciences (3 credit hours). A one-semester
        course designed to introduce the basic concepts of calculus to students who are not majoring in
        mathematics or the natural sciences. Emphasis will be on applications of calculus to various
        disciplines. Not intended for those who plan to take additional calculus courses. Prerequisites:
        MATH 101 or placement.

        MATH 120: Introductory Calculus (4 credit hours). The techniques of calculus will be stressed.
        Topics include functions, limits and continuity, derivatives, the Mean Value theorem,
        applications of derivatives, the Riemann integral, application of the integral, the fundamental
        theorem of integral calculus, and logarithmic and exponential functions. F, S, Su. Prerequisite:
        MATH 111 or placement.

        MATH 220: Calculus II (4 credit hours). Differentiation and integration of trigonometric
        functions, techniques of integration, indeterminate forms, l'Hopital’s rule, Taylor's formula,

                                                  Page 23
Discovery Informatics                                                                     College of Charleston


        sequences, infinite series, plane curves, and polar coordinates Prerequisite: MATH 120 or both
        MATH 105 and MATH 115.

        MATH 203: Linear Algebra (3 credit hours). Systems of linear equations, vector spaces, linear
        dependence, bases, dimension, linear mappings, matrices, determinants, and quadratic forms.
        Prerequisites: MATH 220 or MATH 120 with permission of instructor.

        MATH 207: Discrete Structures I (3 credit hours). Theoretical concepts applicable to the theory
        of computing. Topics covered will be from the areas of: formal logic and proofs, sets, matrix
        algebra, relations and functions, recurrence relations, and graph theory. Prerequisite: MATH
        105, 111 or 120.

        MATH 250: Statistical Methods I (3 credit hours). Topics covered include descriptive statistics,
        probability, probability distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing, correlation, simple linear
        regression. Statistical quality control, analysis of variance, and other topics will be introduced as
        time permits. A statistics software package will be used. Prerequisites: MATH 111, MATH 120,
        or permission of the instructor.

        MATH 350: Statistical Methods II (3 credit hours). Statistical methods with topics selected from
        regression, correlation, analysis of variance, non-parametric statistic, and other models.
        Prerequisites: MATH 120 and 250.

        MATH 355: Bayesian Statistical Inference (new) (3 credit hours). The Bayesian philosophy
        towards statistical inference uses prior information about a problem before data has been
        collected. After data has been observed, this prior information is updated consistently with the
        observed data. Bayesian statistics can successfully handle complex statistical models where
        classical statistical methodology is inadequate. Topics covered include: Bayes theorem,
        DeFinetti representation, Bayes factors in hypothesis testing, Bayesian set estimation,
        hierarchical and empirical Bayes models, admissibility of Bayes decision rules, MCMC and
        Gibbs sampling. Prerequisites: MATH 250.

        MATH 440: Statistical Learning I (new) (3 credit hours). Introduction to various approaches to
        statistical learning including empirical processes, classification and clustering, nonparametric
        density estimation and regression, model selection and adaptive procedures, bootstrapping and
        cross-validation. Prerequisites: Math 205, 221, and 350.

        MATH 441: Statistical Learning II (new) (3 credit hours). Neural networks, nearest neighbor
        procedures, Vapnik-Chervonenkis dimension, support vector machines, structural risk
        minimization induction, regularization methods, and boosting and bagging in classification and
        regression. Prerequisite: Math 440.

        Cognate Courses
        Biomechanics

        BIOL 111: Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology (3 credit hours). A foundation course for
        science majors emphasizing the concepts of structure and function in biological systems at the
        molecular and cellular levels. Topics include biochemistry, biochemical and molecular
        evolution, cell function, respiration, photosynthesis, genetics, and molecular biology. Lectures
        three hours per week. Co-requisite: BIOL 111L.
                                                   Page 24
Discovery Informatics                                                                  College of Charleston


        BIOL 111L: Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology Lab (1credit hour). Laboratory course
        to accompany BIOL 111. Co-requisite: BIOL 111.

        BIOL 112: Evolution, Ecology, and Biology of Organisms (3 credit hours). A foundation course
        for science majors providing an introduction to evolution and ecology, and a study of the major
        groups of organisms with an emphasis on their structure, function, and evolutionary
        relationships. Lectures three hours per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 111; Co-requisite: BIOL 112L.

        BIOL 112L: Evolution, Ecology, and Biology of Organisms Lab (1credit hour). Laboratory
        course to accompany BIOL 112. Co-requisite: BIOL 112.

        BIOL 202: Human Anatomy (4 credit hours) An introduction to the gross and microscopic
        anatomy of the major organ systems of the human body. Lectures three hours per week;
        laboratory three hours per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 111, BIOL 111L, BIOL 112, and BIOL
        112L.

        PHYS 101: Introductory Physics I (3 credit hours) A general physics course intended for those
        students who plan to take only one physics sequence. Subjects covered are: mechanics (vectors,
        linear and rotational motion, equilibrium, and gravitational fields); heat (mechanical and
        thermal; properties of solids, liquids, and gases); and wave motion. Upon completion of 101
        with a grade of B or better and successful completion of MATH 120 a student may transfer to
        PHYS 202. Lectures three hours per week. Prerequisites and co-requisites: PHYS 101L is a co-
        requisite or prerequisite.

        PHYS 101L: Introductory Physics Laboratory (1 credit hours) A laboratory program to
        accompany PHYS 101. Laboratory three hours per week. Prerequisite and co-requisite: PHYS
        101 is a co-requisite or prerequisite for PHYS 101L.

        PEHD 330: Kinesiology (3 credit hours). This course explores the techniques of human motion
        analysis. Particular emphasis is placed on the anatomical, mechanical, and physical principles of
        motion analysis. Prerequisite: BIOL 202.

        PEHD 440: Biomechanics (3 credit hours). The course will focus on the mechanical basis of
        human movement, with some consideration given to the anatomical constraints that influence all
        types of human movement, from athletic to pathological. Topics covered will include:
        kinematics of movement (linear and angular), kinetics (linear and angular), equilibrium and fluid
        mechanics. Prerequisites: PEHD 201, PEHD 330, BIOL 202, PHYS 101.



        Customer Relationship Management Cognate Courses

        ECON 201: Principles of Macroeconomics (3 credit hours). The foundation of aggregate
        economic analysis is presented, including identification of basic social goals, money and credit
        systems, and theories of national income, employment and economic growth, and international
        interdependence. Prerequisites: None.

        ECON 202: Principles of Microeconomics (3 credit hours). The structure of the market is
        presented, including product and factor pricing, allocation of resources and distribution of
        income, market equilibrium analysis, and analysis of domestic and international problems and
        policies. Prerequisites: ECON 201.
                                                 Page 25
Discovery Informatics                                                                  College of Charleston


        DSCI 232: Business Statistics (3 credit hours). Advanced statistical analysis with applications in
        business and economics utilizing relevant computer software. Topics include business
        applications in descriptive and inferential statistics emphasizing selected topics such as simple
        and multiple regression, analysis of variance, time series analysis and non-parametric
        techniques. Prerequisites: MATH 104/250.

        MKTG 302: Marketing Concepts (3 credit hours). This course develops an appreciation for the
        complexities of establishing and implementing marketing strategies. Areas of study include
        consumer behavior, product/service mixes, branding and packaging, channels of distribution,
        pricing, advertising and salesmanship. Prerequisites: Junior standing; ECON 201, 202.

        MKTG 320: Marketing Research (3 credit hours). A course that establishes the relationship
        between models, information systems and marketing decisions. The practical application of
        behavioral and statistical methods for the purpose of obtaining and analyzing relevant marketing
        information is also examined. Prerequisites: Junior standing; ECON 201, 202; MATH 104;
        DSCI 232, MKTG 302.



        e-Commerce Cognate Courses

        ACCT 203: Financial Accounting (3 credit hours). A survey of accounting information essential
        for external parties to make business decisions about an organization. Prerequisites: Sophomore
        standing.

        ACCT 204: Managerial Accounting (3 credit hours). A survey of accounting information critical
        for planning, control and business decision-making within an organization. Prerequisites: ACCT
        203.

        DSCI 232: Business Statistics (3 credit hours). Advanced statistical analysis with applications in
        business and economics utilizing relevant computer software. Topics include business
        applications in descriptive and inferential statistics emphasizing selected topics such as simple
        and multiple regression, analysis of variance, time series analysis and non-parametric
        techniques. Prerequisites: MATH 104/250.

        DSCI 300: Management Information Systems (3 credit hours). A survey of transaction
        processing systems, management information systems and decision support systems.
        Introduction of systems analysis concepts and methodologies for information system design and
        development. Prerequisites: ACCT 203,204; DSCI 232; MATH 104/250.

        DSCI 306: Introduction to Electronic Commerce (3 credit hours). An introduction to the theory
        and practice of doing business over the Internet and World Wide Web. Topical coverage will
        include an overview of the economic foundations, infrastructure, technologies and business
        strategies of E-Commerce. Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing; ACCT 203,204; DSCI 232;
        MATH 104/250.

        MKTG 333: Purchasing and Supply Chain Management (3 credit hours). The planning,
        organization, operation and evaluation of the procurement function, and the acquisition and
        management of materials. Emphasis areas include quality and quantity considerations, supplier


                                                 Page 26
Discovery Informatics                                                                   College of Charleston


        selection decisions, pricing policies, legal and ethical implications, and standards and
        measurement of performance. Prerequisites: Junior Standing.



        Economics Cognate (15 credit hours)

        ECON 201: Principles of Macroeconomics (3 credit hours). The foundation of aggregate
        economic analysis is presented, including identification of basic social goals, money and credit
        systems, and theories of national income, employment and economic growth, and international
        interdependence. Prerequisites: None.

        ECON 202: Principles of Microeconomics (3 credit hours). The structure of the market is
        presented, including product and factor pricing, allocation of resources and distribution of
        income, market equilibrium analysis, and analysis of domestic and international problems and
        policies. Prerequisites: ECON 201.

        ECON 317: Microeconomic Analysis (3 credit hours) A study of the analytical techniques used
        in investigating the determination of product and factor prices under different market structures
        to include analysis of consumer behavior, production theory, and market structures, and factor
        pricing. F. Prerequisites: Junior standing; ECON 201, 202, MATH 105 or 120.

        ECON 318: Macroeconomic Analysis (3 credit hours) A study of classical, Keynesian, and post-
        Keynesian economics involving the issues of consumption, monetary and fiscal policy, growth,
        interest, and liquidity. S. Prerequisites: Junior standing; ECON 201, 202, MATH 105 or 120.

        ECON 419: Introduction to Econometrics and Forecasting (3 credit hours) An introductory
        survey of the use of statistical and mathematical methods in economic analysis. Prerequisites:
        Junior standing; ECON 201, 202, MATH 104 or 250, DSCI 232 or permission of instructor.



        Exercise Physiology
        BIOL 111: Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology (3 credit hours). A foundation course for
        science majors emphasizing the concepts of structure and function in biological systems at the
        molecular and cellular levels. Topics include biochemistry, biochemical and molecular
        evolution, cell function, respiration, photosynthesis, genetics, and molecular biology. Lectures
        three hours per week. Co-requisite: BIOL 111L.

        BIOL 111L: Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology Lab (1credit hour). Laboratory course
        to accompany BIOL 111. Co-requisite: BIOL 111.

        BIOL 112: Evolution, Ecology, and Biology of Organisms (3 credit hours). A foundation course
        for science majors providing an introduction to evolution and ecology, and a study of the major
        groups of organisms with an emphasis on their structure, function, and evolutionary
        relationships. Lectures three hours per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 111; Co-requisite: BIOL 112L.

        BIOL 112L: Evolution, Ecology, and Biology of Organisms Lab (1credit hour). Laboratory
        course to accompany BIOL 112. Co-requisite: BIOL 112.


                                                  Page 27
Discovery Informatics                                                                 College of Charleston


        BIOL 201 Human Physiology (4 credit hours) An introduction to the structure and function of
        the major organ systems of the human body. Lectures three hours per week; laboratory three
        hours per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 111, BIOL 111L, BIOL 112, and BIOL 112L.

        PEHD 340: Exercise Physiology and Lab (4 credit hours). The major objective of this course is
        to assist the student in gaining an understanding and appreciation of the physiological and
        metabolic adaptations accompanying physical work. Prerequisite: BIOL 201.



        Molecular Biology Cognate Courses

        BIOL 111: Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology (3 credit hours). A foundation course for
        science majors emphasizing the concepts of structure and function in biological systems at the
        molecular and cellular levels. Topics include biochemistry, biochemical and molecular
        evolution, cell function, respiration, photosynthesis, genetics, and molecular biology. Lectures
        three hours per week. Co-requisite: BIOL 111L.

        BIOL 111L: Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology Lab (1credit hour). Laboratory course
        to accompany BIOL 111. Co-requisite: BIOL 111.

        BIOL 112: Evolution, Ecology, and Biology of Organisms (3 credit hours). A foundation course
        for science majors providing an introduction to evolution and ecology, and a study of the major
        groups of organisms with an emphasis on their structure, function, and evolutionary
        relationships. Lectures three hours per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 111; Co-requisite: BIOL 112L.

        BIOL 112L: Evolution, Ecology, and Biology of Organisms Lab (1credit hour). Laboratory
        course to accompany BIOL 112. Co-requisite: BIOL 112.

        BIOL212: Genetics (3 credit hours). The basics of the science of heredity. The course
        encompasses Mendelian genetics, the molecular basis of inheritance, changes in chromosome
        number and structure, gene mapping, mutations and population genetics. Population and
        quantitative genetic approaches are applied to clarify the understanding of evolution.
        Prerequisites: BIOL 111/111L and 112/112L.

        BIOL212L: Genetics Laboratory (1 credit hour): An introduction to the principles of heredity
        using common experimental organisms. Recent techniques in molecular genetics are also
        covered. Laboratory 3hrs/wk. Prerequisite: BIOL 111, BIOL 111L, BIOL 112, and BIOL 112L.
        Co-requisite BIOL 212.

        BIOL 311: Advanced Genetics (3 credit hours). The basics of the science of heredity. The course
        encompasses Mendelian genetics, the molecular basis of inheritance, changes in chromosomal
        number and structure, microbial genetics, mutations, and population genetics. Lectures three
        hours per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 111, BIOL 111L, BIOL 112, and BIOL 112L.

        BIOL 311L: Advanced Genetics Laboratory (1 credit hour). An introduction to the principles of
        heredity using common experimental organisms. Recent techniques in molecular genetics are
        also covered. Laboratory three hours per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 111, BIOL 111L, BIOL 112,
        and BIOL 112L. Co-requisite: BIOL 311.


                                                 Page 28
Discovery Informatics                                                                   College of Charleston


        Currently BIOL 212 is in review as part of curriculum reform in Biology. This course should
        come on line in Fall 2005. BIOL 311’s course description should change to reflect that this
        course will be ‘Advanced Genetics’. This change should also take place by Fall 2005.



        Organismal Biology Cognate Courses

        BIOL 111: Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology (3 credit hours): A foundation course for
        science majors emphasizing the concepts of structure and function in biological systems at the
        molecular and cellular levels. Topics include biochemistry, biochemical and molecular
        evolution, cell function, respiration, photosynthesis, genetics, and molecular biology. Lectures
        three hours per week. Co-requisite: BIOL 111L.

        BIOL 111L: Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology Lab (1 credit hour). Laboratory course
        to accompany BIOL 111. Co-requisite: BIOL 111.

        BIOL 112: Evolution, Ecology, and Biology of Organisms (3 credit hours). A foundation course
        for science majors providing an introduction to evolution and ecology, and a study of the major
        groups of organisms with an emphasis on their structure, function, and evolutionary
        relationships. Lectures three hours per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 111; Co-requisite: BIOL 112L.

        BIOL 112L: Evolution, Ecology, and Biology of Organisms Lab (1 credit hours). Laboratory
        course to accompany BIOL 112. Co-requisite: BIOL 112.

        BIOL 341: General Ecology (4 credit hours). Consideration of organisms and their
        environmental relationships. Lectures three hours per week; laboratory three hours per week.
        Additional Prerequisite: BIOL 111, BIOL 111L, BIOL 112, and BIOL 112L and one year of
        chemistry.

        BIOL 350: Evolution (3 credit hours). A study of the mechanism and patterns of plant and
        animal evolution, with emphasis on the species level of organization. Lectures three hours per
        week. Prerequisite: BIOL 111, BIOL 111L, BIOL 112, and BIOL 112L.



        Physics and Astronomy Cognate Courses

        PHYS 201: General Physics I (4 credit hours). Introduction to principles of physics primarily for
        scientists and engineers. Subjects covered are mechanics (vectors, linear and rotational motion,
        equilibrium, and gravitational fields); heat (mechanical and thermal properties of solids, liquids,
        and gases); and wave motion. Lecture three hours per week; laboratory three hours per week.
        Prerequisite or co-requisite: MATH 120 or equivalent or permission of instructor.

        PHYS 202: General Physics II (4 credit hours). A continuation of PHYS 201. Subjects covered
        are: electricity (electric fields, AC and DC circuits); magnetism; light (geometric and physical
        optics, spectra); and modern physics (relativity and nuclear physics). Lectures three hours per
        week; laboratory three hours per week. Prerequisite: PHYS 201 or HONS 157. Prerequisite or
        co-requisite: MATH 220 or equivalent or permission of instructor.


                                                  Page 29
Discovery Informatics                                                                     College of Charleston


        PHYS 311: Stellar Astronomy and Astrophysics (3 credit hours). The basic concepts of the
        physics of stars and stellar systems are explored. Topics covered include stellar interiors, stellar
        atmospheres, stellar spectra, star formation, stellar evolution, stellar remnants, variable stars, and
        binary stars. Lectures three hours per week. Prerequisites: PHYS 206 and PHYS 202 (PHYS 102
        and MATH 220 may replace PHYS 202 with permission of instructor).

        PHYS 330: Introduction to Modern Physics I (3 credit hours). An introduction to atomic and
        nuclear physics. Topics include: relativity, atomic theory, x-rays, wave particle duality, and
        elements of quantum mechanics. Lectures three hours per week. Prerequisite: PHYS 202 or
        HONS 158. Prerequisite or co-requisite: Math 221 or permission of the instructor.

        PHYS 370: Experimental Physics (4 credit hours). An opportunity for students to develop
        experimental, analytical, and research techniques through lecture and extensive laboratory
        experiences. Scientific report writing will be stressed. Prerequisite: PHYS 330 or permission of
        the instructor.



        Sociology Cognate Courses

        SOCY 101: Introduction to Sociology (3 credit hours). An introduction to the study of the
        individual and society as mutually influencing systems.

        SOCY 202: Introduction to Social Institutions (3 credit hours). The study of the nature,
        structure, and function of the major institutions developed and maintained by society to serve its
        ends. Prerequisite: SOCY 101.

        SOCY 260: Development of Social Thought (3 credit hours). A study of the development of
        sociology as a body of knowledge and of the various “classical” attempts to define the problems
        and boundaries of a science of human social behavior. Prerequisite: SOCY 101.

        SOCY 271: Introduction to Social Research (3 credit hours). An examination of the
        assumptions, strategies, and techniques sociologists use for systematically observing the social
        world. Prerequisite: SOCY 101.

        SOCY 371: Social Research Practicum (3 credit hours). An opportunity for students to develop
        the specific skills necessary for planning and implementing research in sociology. Students will
        plan and carry out a piece of research using professional statistical analysis packages.
        Prerequisites: SOCY 101, 202, 260, and 271.



        Supply Chain Management Cognate Courses

        ECON 201: Principles of Macroeconomics (3 credit hours). The foundation of aggregate
        economic analysis is presented, including identification of basic social goals, money and credit
        systems, and theories of national income, employment and economic growth, and international
        interdependence. Prerequisites: None.

        ECON 202: Principles of Microeconomics (3 credit hours). The structure of the market is
        presented, including product and factor pricing, allocation of resources and distribution of
                                                   Page 30
Discovery Informatics                                                                  College of Charleston


        income, market equilibrium analysis, and analysis of domestic and international problems and
        policies. Prerequisites: ECON 201.

        DSCI 232: Business Statistics (3 credit hours). Advanced statistical analysis with applications in
        business and economics utilizing relevant computer software. Topics include business
        applications in descriptive and inferential statistics emphasizing selected topics such as simple
        and multiple regression, analysis of variance, time series analysis and non-parametric
        techniques. Prerequisites: MATH 104/250.

        MKTG 302: Marketing Concepts (3 credit hours). This course develops an appreciation for the
        complexities of establishing and implementing marketing strategies. Areas of study include
        consumer behavior, product/service mixes, branding and packaging, channels of distribution,
        pricing, advertising and salesmanship. Prerequisites: Junior standing; ECON 201, 202.

        MKTG 333: Purchasing and Supply Chain Management (3 credit hours). The planning,
        organization, operation and evaluation of the procurement function, and the acquisition and
        management of materials. Emphasis areas include quality and quantity considerations, supplier
        selection decisions, pricing policies, legal and ethical implications, and standards and
        measurement of performance. Prerequisites: Junior Standing.

        TRAN 312: Global Logistics (3 credit hours). An introduction to logistics management that is
        concerned with the coordination of physical flow through the firm from raw materials to the
        delivery of finished goods to the user or consumer. Special emphasis will be placed on the
        impact of intermodal transportation on logistics systems. Prerequisites: Junior standing; ECON
        201, 202; MATH 104; DSCI 232, MKTG 302.

    Associated Professional Societies

           Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) www.acm.org
           ACM Special Interest Group on Knowledge Discovery in Data and Data Mining (ACM
            SIGKDDS) www.acm.org/sigkdd/

    Library Statistics for the Computer Science Department

                  Library Funds Expended for Computer Science Materials

                  Budget Year             Books                 Journals

                  2002-03                 $16,150               $20,287
                  2001-02                 $19,649               $21,936
                  2000-01                 $21,545               $20,385
                  1999-00                 $21,841               $17,370
                  1998-99                 $18,952               $14,000
                  1997-98                 $16,256               $12,783
                  1996-97                 $16,876               $12,351
                  1995-96                 $13,985               $12,351
                  1994-95                 $12,434               $9,623

                                                  Page 31
Discovery Informatics                                                           College of Charleston


                  Monographs Added for Computer Science

                  2002-03         152
                  2001-02         174
                  2000-01         278
                  1999-00         271
                  1998-99         221
                  1997-98         223
                  1996-97         285
                  1995-96         201
                  1994-95         176

                  Print Journal Subscriptions for Computer Science

                  ACM Guide to Computing Literature
                  ACM SIGPLAN Notices
                  ACM Transactions on Computer Systems
                  ACM Transactions on Database Systems
                  ACM Transactions on Graphics
                  ACM Transactions on Information Systems
                  ACM Transactions on Mathematical Software
                  ACM Transactions in Modeling & Simulation
                  ACM Transactions on Programming Languages and Systems
                  ACM Transactions on Software Engineering and Methodology
                  Acta Informatica
                  ADA Letters (ACM)
                  Artificial Intelligence
                  Assoc. for Computing Literature. ACM Guide to Comput.Lit.
                  Byte
                  Communications of the ACM
                  Computer Architecture News (ACM)
                  Computer Communication Review (ACM)
                  Computer Personnel (ACM)
                  Computers and Society
                  Computers in Human Services
                  Computing Reviews (see ACM Transactions ...)
                  Computing Surveys (see ACM Transactions ...)
                  Database
                  Dr. Dobbs
                  Dr. Dobb's Journal of Software Tools for the Prof. Program.
                  IEEE Computer Graphics & Applications
                  IEEE Design and Test of Computers
                  IEEE Expert Magazine
                  IEEE MICRO
                  IEEE Software
                  IEEE Transactions on Computers
                  IEEE Transactions on Knowledge and Data

                                                Page 32
Discovery Informatics                                                      College of Charleston


                  IEEE Transactions on Parallel and Distributed Systems
                  IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine
                  IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering
                  Intelligence
                  Journal of Digital Imaging
                  Journal of The Association for Computing Machinery
                  Journal of The Electrochemical Society
                  LISP Pointers
                  P C Magazine
                  Perspectives in Computing
                  Society for Computer Applications In Radiology
                  Software Engineering Notes
                  Software: Practice and Experience


    Library Statistics for the Department of Mathematics

                   Library Funds Expended for Department of Mathematics

                   Budget Year            Books                 Journals

                   2002-03                $26,857               $21,793
                   2001-02                $29,317               $29,137
                   2000-01                $23,166               $25,866
                   1999-00                $21,882               $21,363
                   1998-99                $19,066               $20,486
                   1997-98                $18,402               $20,486
                   1996-97                $20,904               $20,116

                   Monographs Added for Mathematics Materials

                   2002-03                 383
                   2001-02                 440
                   2000-01                 410
                   1999-00                 385
                   1998-99                 361
                   1997-98                 354
                   1996-97                 655
                   1995-96                 324

                  Print Journal Subscriptions for Mathematics

                  Advances in Applied Mathematics
                  American Mathematical Monthly
                  American Mathematical Society. Abstracts of Papers
                  American Mathematical Society. Notices
                  American Statistician
                  Annals of Mathematics
                                                  Page 33
Discovery Informatics                                                            College of Charleston


                  Annals of Probability
                  Annals of Pure And Applied Logic
                  Annals of Statistics
                  Ars Combinatoria
                  Australasian Journal of Combinatorics
                  Australian Mathematical Society. Journal. Series A
                  Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society
                  Canadian Mathematical Bulletin
                  College Mathematics Journal
                  Complex Variables: Theory and Applications
                  Current Mathematical Publications
                  Ergodic Theory & Dynamical Systems
                  Fibonacci Quarterly
                  Houston Journal of Mathematics
                  Indian Journal of Mathematics
                  Indian Mathematical Society. Journal
                  Indiana University Mathematics Journal
                  International Journal of Mathematics and Mathematical
                  Israel Journal of Mathematics
                  JASA, Journal of the American Statistical Association
                  Journal d'Analyse Mathematique
                  Journal for Research in Mathematics Education
                  Journal of Approximation Theory
                  Journal of Combinatorial Designs
                  Journal of Combinatorial Mathematics and Combinatoria
                  Journal of Differential Equations
                  Journal of Differential Geometry
                  Journal of Elasticity
                  Journal of Mathematical Analysis and Applications
                  Journal of Mathematical Biology
                  Journal of Multivariate Analysis
                  Journal of Recreational Mathematics
                  Journal of Symbolic Logic
                  Journal of the Indian Mathematical Society
                  Journal of Undergraduate Mathematics
                  London Mathematical Society. Bulletin
                  Mathematica Japonica
                  Mathematical Gazette
                  Mathematical Intelligencer
                  Mathematics Magazine
                  Mathematics Teacher
                  Mathematics Teaching in the Middle School
                  Michigan Mathematical Journal
                  NCTM News Bulletin c/w National Council Of Teachers of Mathematics Membership
                  Numerical Methods for Partial Differential Equations
                  Pacific Journal of Mathematics
                  Proceedings of the London Mathematical Society

                                               Page 34
Discovery Informatics                                                   College of Charleston


                  Revue Roumaine de Mathematiques Pures et Appliquees
                  Rocky Mountain Journal of Mathematics
                  Sankhya; Series B
                  Sankhya; The Indian Journal of Statistics. Series A
                  SEM Newsletter
                  Semigroup Forum
                  SIAM Journal on Applied Mathematics
                  SIAM Journal on Control and Optimization
                  SIAM Journal on Mathematical Analysis
                  SIAM Journal on Numerical Analysis
                  SIAM Review
                  Theoretical Population Biology
                  Topology
                  Topology and Its Applications
                  Topology Proceedings
                  UME Trends




                                                Page 35
Discovery Informatics                                                                                    College of Charleston



    College of Charleston Libraries as Compared to the Association of College and Research
    Libraries’ Standards

                   The Collections (size)

                   Formula A

                        Basic Collection                                                 85,000
                        Allowance/FTE Faculty (100 x 456 FTE Faculty-Fall 2000)          45,600
                        Allowance/FTE Student (15 x 9,566 FTE Students-Fall 2000)        143,490
                        Allowance/Undergraduate Major (350 x 38 majors)                  13,300
                        Allowance/Masters degree (6,000 x 13 masters)                    78,000
                                                     Minimum Volumes            365,470 (A)
                                                     80% of minimum             292,376 (B)
                                                     65% of minimum             237,556 (C)
                                                     50% of minimum             182,735 (D)

                   The College of Charleston Libraries have 597,443 volume equivalents (164 %).

                        Total Volumes calculated as:
                                                          Total Book Volumes* = 463,609
                                                          Bound Serials Volumes      = 62,553
                                                          Fiche (712,811)            = 71,281
                                                          Total Volumes       = 597,443

                   *includes cataloged fiche and film; Avery, OMT material; DRA barcode (item) count
                   ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                   The Collections (Growth)

                        Growth should be at least 5% of the collection per year
                         5% of 597,443=               29,872 minimum (A)
                                                      23,897 80%              (B)
                                                      19,417 65%              (C)
                                              14,936 50%              (D)

                   The College of Charleston Libraries added 19,958 volumes 99/00 (67%)

                   cataloged volumes (from DRA item count)                            16,865
                   bound serial volumes                                                2,810
                   uncataloged film                                                       13
                   uncataloged fiche (2,704/10)                                          270
                                           Total Volumes Added                        19,958

                   II.         Staffing (Formula B)

                   1 Librarian per 500 FTE Student (9,566 FTE/500)                                 =     19.1

                                                          Page 36
Discovery Informatics                                                                       College of Charleston


                   1 Librarian per each 100,000 volumes (597,433/100,000)              = 6.0
                   1 Librarian per each 5,000 volumes added (19,958 /5,000)            = 4.0
                     Minimum FTE Librarians                                       29.1 (A)
                                                      75% of minimum              21.8(B)
                                                      60% of minimum              17.5(C)
                                                      50% of minimum              14.6(D)

                   The College of Charleston Libraries has 18 FTE Librarians (62 %)

                   Support staff should be no less than 65% or 54.0 FTE of total recommended staff (83.1
                   FTE)
                                           Minimum FTE Support Staff          = 54.0 (A)
                                                      75% of minimum          = 40.5 (B)
                                                      60% of minimum          = 32.4 (C)
                                                      50% of minimum          = 27.0 (D)

                   The College of Charleston Libraries has 23 FTE support staff (42.5%).


                   III.         Facilities - Space (including Marine Resources Library)

                        Seating (one seat for five FTE Student)
                        9,566 FTE Student/5                                        =         1,913 seats

                   The Robert Scott Small Library has 614 seats (@ tables, carrels, computers) and Marine
                   Resources Library has 60 seats for patrons              = 35.2 %

                        Space for readers (1,913 seats x 25 sq. ft./seat)            =       47,825 sq. ft.

                        Space for books
                         .10 sq. ft. for first 150,000 volumes                       =      15,000 sq. ft.
                         .09 sq. ft. for next 150,000 volumes                        =      13,500 sq. ft.
                         .08 sq. ft. for remaining 297,443 volumes           =       23,795 sq. ft.
                          Total sq. ft. for books                            =       52,295 sq. ft.

                        Space for Staff
                         .125 x (Space for readers + Space for books)        =       12,515 sq. ft.

                        Readers, Books and Staff
                                      Minimum square feet                    =     12,635 sq. ft. (A)
                                      75% of minimum                         =      84,476 sq. ft. (B)
                                      60% of minimum                         =      67,581 sq. ft. (C)
                                      50% of minimum                         =      56,318 sq. ft. (D)

    The Robert Scott Small Library Building has 72,930 sq. ft. One wing on the ground floor (6,479 sq.
    ft.) is used for general classes; the other wing (6,479) is a computer lab and library classroom. The
    library and computer lab occupy 66,451 sq. ft. in the building.

                                                        Page 37
Discovery Informatics                                                                 College of Charleston



                   The MRL Library has 4,808 sq. ft.

                   The College of Charleston Libraries occupy 71,259 sq. ft. between the two locations or
                   63% of the required minimum.

                   Note: The College is building a new 144,555 sq. ft library (128% of the required
                   minimum). The new facility should be open in early 2005.




                                                  Page 38

								
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