Images of the Decaying Austrian Empire by ert554898

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									  Images of the
Decaying Austrian
    Empire.
   This slideshow is mainly visual images.
              The objectives are:
• Is to expose you to the story of Sissi, Empress Elizabeth of
  Austria…
• See pictures of her celebrated beauty.
• Learn how her cousin Ludwig, a troubled homosexual, built
  beautiful castles in the Bavarian Alps
• Learn about Rudolf, her son’s, suicide pact with another
  young woman, and Sissi’s own assassination.
• Sissi’s life was lived in the backdrop of a decadent, artistic,
  moody “fin de siecle” (end of the century) Vienna
The Wittelsbachs were just one of the royal
   families in Germany. They were the
    Bavarian Royal Family. They were
  “clannish” and not afraid to intermarry.
 Some say that lead to a trait of “madness”
       or melancholy (depression).
  Sissi was sent to marry her first cousin,
 Franz Joseph, who was put on the throne
after the revolutions of 1848. She was only
15 and unprepared for the physical side of
   marriage. She also had a controlling
   mother in law who made her life hell.
I have awoken in a dungeon,
With fetters on my wrists.
My longing grows ever stronger.
And Freedom! thou, turned away from
me.....
Check out the next photoshopped slide,
 whose picture did they superimpose?
    First tragedy: Elizabeth closely
identified with her misunderstood, gay
 cousin Ludwig II of Bavaria. A great
 patron of the arts, including Wagner,
Ludwig was a troubled spendthrift who
  left a legacy of gorgeous castles to
 Bavaria… Ludwig committed suicide
             by drowning—
 The second great tragedy was the
suicide of her son, Rudolph, and his
      mistress, Mary Vetsera.

   He shot her, then stayed by the
body that night, and in the morning,
 shot himself. He was Sissi’s only
 son and the heir to the throne was
             no more…
 Maria Vetsara was the unlucky young
 noblewoman who became his mistress.
  She was so stupid and dazzled by the
Prince that she agreed to the suicide pact.
On the next slide is her last note—the joint
    suicide has been made to seem very
  romantic and tragic. It is the subject of
ballets, books, and film. Not very romantic
 when you consider that you are now dead
        in the ground at a young age.
  The next heir was now Franz Joseph’s
 nephew. The emperor did not really like
him because Franz Ferdinand had married
   to a noblewoman beneath him. As a
 Hapsburg, he should have married “up”
                 instead.
More tragedy awaited the emperor. When
 his wife, Sissi went on vacation, she was
stabbed by an anarchist. Anarchists were
kind of like terrorists. They killed a lot of
world leaders between 1890 and 1914 for
various reasons. Sissi was stabbed with a
 stilleto knife and walked for a bit before
           she collapsed and died.
   Elizabeth’s life was tragic—and it
reflected the tensions of her husband’s
 aging empire, and empire that would
  end at the close of World War I…in
 1914, the Empire collapsed when the
 heir, Franz Ferdinand was killed by a
            Serbian Assassin.

								
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