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					Sourcing Seafood
 A Professional’s Guide to Procuring   FIRST EDITION
   Ocean-friendly Fish and Shellfish
Sourcing Seafood
A Professional’s Guide to Procuring
Ocean-friendly Fish and Shellfish
First Edition, 2004



CO-AUTHORS: Howard Johnson, Peter Redmayne and Seafood Choices Alliance


EDITORIAL BOARD: Mike Boots, Joey Brookhart, Valerie Craig,
Stephanie Crane, Rachel Hopkins, Bruce McKay, Douglas Meyer, Brendan O’Neill


DESIGNER: Janin/Cliff Design, Inc., Washington D.C.


COPY EDITOR: Jean Brodsky Bernard


ILLUSTRATOR: All fish and shellfish illustrations are the artistry of
B. Guild/ChartingNature


COVER PHOTOS: FRONT COVER: Hauling lobster traps in Boothbay Harbor, Maine,
courtesy of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; Steve Malinowski of
Fisher’s Island Oyster Farm, courtesy of Sarah Malinowski; Fennel-cured wild salmon
photographed by BATTMAN, courtesy of Chef Rick Moonen, Restaurant RM; and farmed
American caviars, courtesy of Caviar Emptor. Back Cover: Rick Oltman with wild salmon
of Cape Cleare Fishery, courtesy of Stephen L. Davis.
                                Sourcing Seafood
                                  A Professional’s Guide to Procuring                                                          FIRST EDITION
                                    Ocean-friendly Fish and Shellfish



INTRODUCTION .................................................................. 3

PARTNERS ......................................................................... 6

GLOSSARY OF FISHING AND AQUACULTURE TERMS ....... 7

SEASONALITY ................................................................... 12

THE FISH & SHELLFISH GUIDE ........................................ 13

Abalone (farmed)................................14            Pollock, Alaska ....................................54
Arctic Char ...........................................16     Sablefish (Black Cod)......................... 56
Catfish, U.S. (farmed) .........................18            Salmon, Chinook
Caviars, American................................20              (King/wild Pacific)......................... 58
Clams ...................................................22   Salmon, Chum (wild Pacific) ............ 60
Cod, Pacific .........................................24      Salmon, Coho (wild Pacific) ..............62
Crab, Dungeness..................................26           Salmon, Pink (wild Pacific) ................64
Crab, Jonah & Rock .............................28            Salmon, Sockeye (wild Pacific) ..........66
Crab, King (Alaska) .............................30           Sardines................................................68
Crab, Snow...........................................32       Scallops, Bay & Sea ..............................70
Crab, Stone ..........................................34      Shrimp, Northern Pink .......................72
Crawfish ...............................................36    Shrimp (Spot Prawns), Trap-caught ...74
Flounder, Summer (Fluke) .................38                  Shrimp, U.S. (farmed).........................76
Halibut, Pacific ....................................40       Sole, Pacific ..........................................78
Lobster, American ...............................42           Striped Bass (wild & hybrid) ..............80
Lobster, Spiny (Rock) ..........................44            Sturgeon, White (farmed)...................82
Mackerel, Atlantic & Spanish ............. 46                 Tilapia, U.S. (farmed) .........................84
Mahimahi (Dolphinfish)....................48                  Trout, Rainbow (farmed) ....................86
Mussels (farmed).................................50           Tuna, Ahi (Yellowfin & Bigeye) ..........88
Oysters .................................................52   Tuna, Albacore.....................................90

SUPPLIER DIRECTORY (By Species) ............................... 93

SUPPLIER INDEX (Alphabetical Listing) ...................... 136




                                                                          The Fish and Shellfish Guide                     1
2   Sourcing Seafood
                                                                                Introduction




S       eafood Choices Alliance is pleased to present Sourcing Seafood, A Professional’s
        Guide to Procuring Ocean-Friendly Fish and Shellfish. This sourcebook identifies
over 300 suppliers of sustainable seafood as well as valuable information on seafood
                                                                                               “Increasingly, we have
                                                                                               come to understand that
                                                                                               the wealth of the nation is
species. By identifying better practices and the sources for these products, Seafood           its air, water, soil, forest,
Choices Alliance supports differentiation in the marketplace so that these suppliers           minerals, lakes, oceans,
are rewarded with increased demand. It is our hope that this and successive editions           scenic beauty, wildlife
of Sourcing Seafood will encourage suppliers to promote ocean-friendly fishing and             habitats, and biodiversity.
aquaculture methods.                                                                           Take away this resource
    Sourcing Seafood is divided into two parts. The first section contains background          base and all that is left is
information on many ocean-friendly seafood items, from farmed abalone to wild                  a wasteland.”
salmon. The second part is a directory of primary suppliers of the seafood items pro-
filed in the first section. Sourcing Seafood represents a snapshot of the ocean-friendly       —Gaylord Nelson,
supply. The profiles of both species and suppliers will be updated periodically as new         former U.S. senator,
information becomes available.                                                                 former governor of
    The information regarding the status of a species and how it is fished or farmed           Wisconsin, and founder
reflects the most current research available from conservation, government, academic,          of Earth Day
scientific, and industry sources. In keeping with its title, this sourcebook covers only
those species that are better environmental choices in seafood—those that are fished
or farmed in a way that involves little or no impact on the environment and whose
numbers are considered to be ample. The suppliers listed are primary suppliers—
processors that buy from fishing boats, individual fishermen who market directly,
and fish and shellfish farmers. In some cases, cooperatives and associations have
been included as well to aid in identifying additional sources. While not every suppli-
er may sell directly to individual restaurants or small buyers, the original handler of
your seafood is the best source for information on fishing methods, availability, and
distribution of product.
    There was a time not so long ago when many thought the ocean was so vast that it
could absorb whatever was put into it and replenish whatever was taken from it.
Today, we know how wrong those assumptions were. Many fisheries have reached
maximum capacity, and some historically important ones have collapsed; nearly one-
quarter of the fish caught worldwide are discarded as unusable; and aquaculture is
expanding rapidly in a regulatory vacuum, in many cases to the detriment of the
coastal environment worldwide.
    At the same time, demand for seafood continues to grow, along with the planet’s
human population. It is ever more apparent that the health of individuals and soci-
eties alike is inextricably linked to the health of food sources, including the ocean.
Consumers are beginning to demand food that not only tastes good but is better for
the environment.
    As the international association for ocean conservation, Seafood Choices
Alliance—comprising 40 conservation and education institutions and more than

                                                       The Fish and Shellfish Guide        3
    1,800 food sector professionals—promotes consumption of seafood while preserving
    this precious natural resource for future generations of seafood lovers.
       The seafood choices movement has come a long way from its beginnings just a few
    years ago. Once on the fringes of industry, today the movement is at its very core.
    Indeed, it’s now a global movement, with efforts in Canada, Australia, New Zealand,
    the United Kingdom, Germany, Switzerland and the Netherlands, in addition to
    those in the United States.
       By working together, conservationists and individuals from the seafood sector can
    protect the future of our ocean resources and, by extension, the seafood industry
    itself. When it comes to seafood, Seafood Choices Alliance is the only place where
    these two groups can come together to pursue the shared goals of a healthy ocean
    and an abundant seafood supply.

    HOW TO USE SOURCING SEAFOOD
    Where does black cod come from and how is it sold? When is fresh king salmon
    available? What kinds of farm-raised seafood are environmentally responsible choices?
    Are there suppliers or producers of wild or farmed striped bass in my area? Sourcing
    Seafood helps busy professionals answer these and other important questions.
        Begin by browsing the species pages in the first section to learn more about a par-
    ticular fish’s or shellfish’s seasonality, buying tips, product forms, conservation notes,
    health information, and interesting facts. The species pages are arranged alphabetical-
    ly, also noting whether it comes from wild or farmed sources. And if you’re confused
    about the fish lingo, you can flip to the glossary for definitions of commonly used
    terms and explanations of fishing gear and farming practices.
        Or flip to the second part of this book and look up suppliers for your favorite
    seafood items. The directory is arranged alphabetically, by both species and supplier,
    to facilitate buying. Sourcing Seafood provides full contact information for each sup-
    plier listed.

    A NOTE TO USERS
    The Seafood Choices Alliance compiled this list of suppliers from our research and
    discussions with those in both the conservation community and seafood industry.
    The Alliance does not, however, endorse or certify these businesses. This guide merely
    seeks to highlight those businesses offering better environmental choices in seafood.
    We strongly encourage you to visit supplier web sites, engage in conversations with
    these fishermen or farmers, and ask questions about their operations. In the end, it is
    up to you to determine your own level of comfort with your food sources.
       This sourcebook represents the first attempt to incorporate ocean-friendly seafood
    supply information into one comprehensive guide. By no means does this edition list



4   Sourcing Seafood
every single ocean-friendly seafood supplier. As anyone who handles seafood knows,
fisheries and farming operations are complex in their management. This first edition
is a product of the information available at the time of its development; updated
future editions will ensure continued accuracy. Finally, there may be disagreement
between conservationists and industry insiders about the level of sustainability of
certain farming or fishing practices and the effectiveness of current management
systems. Sourcing Seafood recognizes the complexity of the issues. Users should view
this sourcebook as one more tool enabling the buyer to make the best purchasing
decisions possible.
    Future editions of this guide will benefit from suggestions and input from all inter-
ested parties, including fisheries groups, aquaculture organizations, suppliers, and
buyers. The seafood business is changing constantly, particularly as more individuals
recognize the importance of sustainability and better practices. In future editions we
hope to include additional species that may not be considered ocean-friendly today
but that, through improvements in fishing and farming methods or management
schemes, might be tomorrow.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
Sourcing Seafood would not have been possible without the support of many organiza-
tions and individuals. Seafood Choices Alliance wishes to thank The David and Lucile
Packard Foundation, particularly Mike Sutton, for its generous support. A special
thank you to seafood industry veterans Howard Johnson and Peter Redmayne for
their writing and painstaking research of ocean-friendly seafood suppliers. We would
also like to express our appreciation to SeaWeb, especially Vikki Spruill and Dawn
Martin for their leadership and over-arching vision, without which the Seafood
Choices Alliance would not exist. We wish to acknowledge Lisa Dropkin of Edge
Research for her contribution to a greater understanding of the seafood marketplace.
We are most grateful to Janin/Cliff Design, Inc. for its expertise and patience and to
our editor, Jean Brodsky Bernard, for her diligence. All fish and shellfish illustrations
are the artistry of B.Guild/ChartingNature, www.chartingnature.com.
   Conservation partners whose research and expertise provided invaluable informa-
tion on the status of the species covered in this book include Blue Ocean Institute,
Caviar Emptor, Environmental Defense, Monterey Bay Aquarium, and the SeaWeb
Aquaculture Clearinghouse. We thank these organizations and all Alliance partners
for their significant contributions.
   We would also like to thank the many individuals and businesses in the seafood
industry that offer the ocean-friendly seafood items featured on the following pages,
thereby supporting a lasting and diverse supply of seafood for generations to come.
We dedicate Sourcing Seafood to you.



                                                         The Fish and Shellfish Guide       5
Par tners in Ocean-friendly
Seafood Choices




            T     he following conservation organizations, academic institutions, zoos and aquar-
                  ia are partners in the Seafood Choices Alliance. Please contact organizations in
            your area or visit these websites for more information on ocean-friendly seafood. Visit
            www.seafoodchoices.com for more information on each partner listed below.

            Alliance for Environmental Innovation • Boston, MA • 617–723–2996 • www.environmentaldefense.org/alliance
            Alaska Oceans Program • Anchorage, AK • 907–929–3553 • www.alaskaoceans.net
            The Antarctica Project • Washington, DC • 202–234–2480 • www.asoc.org
            The Aquaculture Clearinghouse • Providence, RI • 401–272–8822 • www.aquacultureclearinghouse.org
            Blue Ocean Institute • Cold Spring Harbor, NY • 877–BOI–SEAS • www.blueoceaninstitute.org
            Caviar Emptor • Washington, DC • 202–483–9570 • www.caviaremptor.org
            Center for Food Safety • Washington, DC • 202–547–9359 • www.centerforfoodsafety.org
            Chefs Collaborative • Boston, MA • 617–236–5200 • www.chefscollaborative.org
            Coastal Alliance for Aquaculture Reform • Vancouver, BC • 604–696–5044 • www.farmedanddangerous.org
            Conservation Law Foundation • Boston, MA • 617–350–0990 • www.clf.org
            Earth Pledge • New York, NY • 212–725–6611 • www.earthpledge.org
            Ecotrust • Portland, OR • 503–227–6225 • www.ecotrust.org
            Environmental Defense • New York, NY • 212–505–2100 • www.environmentaldefense.org
            Friends of Clayoquot Sound • Tofino, BC • 250–725–4218 • www.ancientrainforest.org
            Greenpeace • Washington, DC • 800–326–0959 • www.greenpeace.org
            Gulf Restoration Network • New Orleans, LA • 504–525–1528 • www.gulfrestorationnetwork.org
            Industrial Shrimp Action Network • Tacoma, WA • 253–539–5272 • www.shrimpaction.com
            Institute for Agriculture & Trade Policy • Minneapolis, MN • 612–870–0453 • www.iatp.org
            Institute for Fisheries Resources • San Francisco, CA • 415–561–3474 • www.ifrfish.org
            John G. Shedd Aquarium • Chicago, IL • 312–939–2435 • www.sheddaquarium.org
            Local Harvest • Santa Cruz, CA • 831–475–8150 • www.localharvest.org
            Marine Fish Conservation Network • Washington, DC • 202–543–5509 • www.conservefish.org
            Marine Stewardship Council • Seattle, WA • 206–691–0188 • www.msc.org
            Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch • Monterey, CA • 831– 647–6873 • www.seafoodwatch.org
            National Environmental Trust • Washington, DC • 202–887–8800 • www.environet.org
            Natural Resources Defense Council • New York, NY • 212–727–2700 • www.nrdc.org
            New England Aquarium • Boston, MA • 617–973–5200 • www.neaq.org
            Passionfish • Pacific Grove, CA • 831–655–3311 • www.passionfish.net
            Pew Institute for Ocean Science • Miami, FL • 305–421–4163 • www.pewoceanscience.org
            Public Citizen • Washington, DC • 202–546–4996 • www.shrimpactivist.org
            Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science • Miami, FL • 305–361–4000 • www.rsmas.miami.edu
            SeaWeb • Washington, DC • 202–483–9570 • www.seaweb.org
            Shifting Baselines • Hollywood, CA • 323–960–4517 • www.shiftingbaselines.org
            South Carolina Aquarium • Charleston, SC • 843–720–1990 • www.scaquarium.org
            Sustainable Fishery Advocates • Santa Cruz, CA • 831–247–2822 • www.sustainablefishery.org
            Wildlife Conservation Society • Bronx, NY • 718–220–5100 • www.wcs.org
            World Wildlife Fund • Washington, DC • 202–293–4800 • www.worldwildlife.org




        6   Sourcing Seafood
                                           Glossar y of Fishing and
                                               Aquaculture Terms



Fisheries Management Terms:

Bycatch
This is the fish and other marine life that is incidentally caught with the targeted
species in a fishery. Typically discarded dead at sea, bycatch includes seabirds, marine
mammals, turtles, juveniles of the targeted species, and even fish sought after in other
fisheries. Approximately one-quarter of the global fishery catch is discarded each year
as bycatch.

Fisher y Management Council
The Fishery Conservation and Management Act of 1976, as amended, created the
eight regional councils that are responsible for developing Fishery Management Plans
(FMPs) in the federal waters of those regions. Each council consists of representatives
from each state in the region and up to 19 members from various stakeholder groups.
The eight regions are New England, Mid-Atlantic, South Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico,
Caribbean, Pacific, North Pacific, and Western Pacific.

Marine Stewardship Council
The MSC is an independent, global, non-profit organization that recognizes, via a
certfication program, well-managed fisheries and harnesses consumer preference for
seafood products bearing the MSC label of approval.

Overfishing
Overfishing occurs when the rate of fishing is greater than the level required to meet
the management goal or maximum sustainable yield. In other words, overfishing
occurs when a population of fish is caught faster than it can replenish itself through
reproduction.

Sustainable Fisheries Act
(also the Magnuson-Stevens Act)
The 1996 Sustainable Fisheries Act amended the habitat provisions of the Magnuson
Act. The renamed Magnuson-Stevens Act calls for direct action to stop or reverse the
continued loss of fish habitats. Toward this end, Congress mandated the identifica-
tion of habitats essential to managed species and measures to conserve and enhance
this habitat. The Act requires cooperation among NOAA Fisheries, regional Fishery
Management Councils, fishing participants, and federal and state agencies to protect,
conserve, and enhance essential fish habitat.




                                                        The Fish and Shellfish Guide       7
    Common Gear Types:

    Dredge
    Used mainly to target shellfish, dredges employ a heavy mesh to suck up everything
    from the seafloor. The gear is dragged along the bottom, and the shellfish are held in
    a sort of bag or sieve that allows the water, sand, or mud to run out. Boat dredges vary
    in weight and size, but they are usually fairly heavy and their effect on bottom habi-
    tats is a major concern.

    Drift Net
    A large gill net ranging in length up to 40 miles, a drift net is suspended vertically
    with floats and allowed to drift freely in the open ocean. The United Nations has
    banned the use of drift nets in international waters because of their nonselective
    catch characteristics. Drift nets in U.S. waters are limited to 1.5 miles in length.

    Gill Net
    A gill net’s mesh size allows the heads of fish to pass through the openings, but the
    gills are caught. Many states, including Texas, Louisiana, Florida, and California, have
    banned the use of gill nets in their coastal waters. Like drift nets, gill nets are associat-
    ed with bycatch because they are nonselective. In some cases, however, regulations
    establish where nets can be placed in the water or what time of day they can be set to
    help reduce the chances of catching nontargeted species.

    Harpooning
    Harpooning is a surface method that requires considerable effort to locate and chase
    individual fish, as opposed to fisheries methods that target schools of fish. Harpoons,
    which target high-value fish, are handheld or fired from a gun. Because harpoons are
    aimed at individual fish, bycatch is not a concern.

    Hook-and-Line
    Analogous to the rod and reel used by recreational anglers, the hook-and-line
    method attracts fish by natural or artificial bait (lures) placed on a hook fixed to the
    end of a line, or snood, on which fish are caught. Hook-and-line units may be used
    singly or in large numbers.

    Longline
    A longline consists of many short lines, each baited with a hook, suspended vertically
    from a main line that is dragged horizontally through the water. Longlines can carry
    thousands of hooks and stretch as long as 40 miles. This method is generally associat-
    ed with moderate to high bycatch, depending on how many hooks there are and
    where and when the lines are set. Longlines set for tuna, for instance, also catch
    swordfish, shark, turtles, and seabirds (the last are attracted to the baited hooks as
    they are put in the water).




8   Sourcing Seafood
Pole
Fish caught by this method are first attracted to bait fish thrown into the water; in the
midst of the ensuing feeding frenzy, fish are caught on hooks attached to a pole and
poled aboard. This fishing method is used worldwide to capture surface-swimming
tuna such as yellowfin and skipjack.

Purse Seine
A net usually set by two boats and used to catch open-sea or pelagic fish. The boats
encircle a school of fish, then the bottom of the net is drawn together like a purse. As
with any net, the size of the mesh determines which species is targeted. The “dolphin-
safe” logo resulted from public awareness of the bycatch of dolphins associated with
purse seines used in the Pacific tuna fishery.

Traps and Pots
These are used to trap fish in a confined environment. Traps are often designed and
baited to catch a particular species, as in a crab pot, lobster pot, tuna trap, and fyke
net. There is little or no bycatch associated with traps.
   Pots are a type of trap designed to catch fish or crustaceans; they take the form of
cages or baskets. Pots are made of various materials, such as wood, wicker, metal
rods, or wire netting, and have one or more openings or entrances. They are usually
laid on the bottom, with or without bait, singly or in rows, and are connected by
ropes (buoy lines) to buoys on the surface which indicate their position.

Trawl
A trawl is a sock-shaped net with a wide mouth tapering to a small, pointed end
(sometimes called the cod end) that is towed behind a vessel at any depth. This
method is more indiscriminate than others because the net scoops up everything in
the trawl’s path.
   A factory trawler is a large stern trawler, typically 150 to 300 feet in length,
equipped with onboard facilities for gutting, filleting, freezing, and storing fish and
for processing fish oil and fish meal.

Trolling
This is a type of hook-and-line method described above in which several unconnected
lines, each hooked and baited, are slowly dragged behind the vessel.



Aquaculture Terms:

Aquaculture
Aquaculture is the farming of aquatic species, such as fish and shellfish, in salt, brack-
ish, or freshwater. Farming implies private ownership and enhancement of produc-
tion by stocking, feeding, providing protection from predators, and other manage-
ment measures. According to the Food and Agricultural Organization’s latest figures,
about one-third of the seafood consumed worldwide is farm-raised.



                                                         The Fish and Shellfish Guide        9
About one-third of seafood      Effluent
consumed worldwide is           The waste stream flowing from an aquaculture facility. Wastes can include: particulate
farm-raised.                    matter from fecal material and uneaten food; nutrients; and chemicals and drugs,
                                such as pesticides, disinfectants, and antibiotics.

                                Feed Conversion Ratio (FCR)
                                The ratio of the gain in wet body weight of fish to the amount of dry feed fed to the
                                fish. Currently, farming of carnivorous fish results in a net loss of fish or protein,
                                since these fish require fish oil and fish meal for feed. Even with improvements in
                                feed and breeding, three pounds or more of wild fish are still required to produce
                                one pound of farmed salmon or other carnivorous fish. Farming herbivorous and
                                omnivorous fish, such as catfish and tilapia, results in a net gain of fish or protein,
                                since these fish rely on a plant-based diet.

                                Fish Meal
                                The primary protein source for farmed carnivorous fish. Small pelagic fish, such as
                                anchovy, herring, sardine, sand eel, sprat, and capelin, are caught, processed into fish
                                meal pellets, and fed to farmed fish.

                                Flow-through System (Raceway)
                                A flow-through system, or raceway, is a type of aquaculture system in which water is
                                diverted from nearby streams or pumped from wells into concrete troughs or tanks
                                where fish are held. The water flows through a series of raceways before being dis-
                                charged, usually with some form of wastewater treatment.

                                Longline, Racks, and Raft
                                These are suspended, or off-bottom, aquaculture methods used to rear mollusks such
                                as oysters. Farming mollusks with these techniques generally results in little environ-
                                mental impact because no additional feed is needed and little waste is produced.
                                Since the mollusks are not farmed on the ocean bottom, they do not need to be
                                collected by dredging, a method that can damage the seafloor.

                                Netpen System
                                A type of fish farm that consists of mesh enclosures (or sometimes cages), typically
                                placed in coastal areas. The outside structures may be rigid or semi rigid. There is no
                                effective barrier between the netpen interior and the ocean, so wastes are emitted
                                directly into the surrounding waters. This system also creates the potential for farmed
                                individuals to escape into the wild and spread disease to wild populations.
                                Carnivorous fish, such as salmon, are commonly farmed using net pens.

                                Organic (as it applies to seafood)
                                According to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), “organic” is a
                                labeling term that denotes agricultural products that are grown or made under the




                             10 Sourcing Seafood
authority of the Organic Foods Production Act. The principal guidelines for organic
production are to use materials and practices that enhance biodiversity and that inte-
grate the parts of the farming system into an ecological whole.
    Currently, no aquaculture-specific organic standards exist in the U.S., and there is
much confusion about the current state of organic fish farming. According to some fish
farmers, until such standards are developed, producers may obtain organic certification
and market their products as organic as long as they comply with USDA’s general
organic livestock rules. This has been the case for two shrimp farmers in the U.S., and
it is expected that more shrimp farmers, as well as some tilapia and catfish farmers, may
follow. Others contend, however, that because no specific standards exist, it is impossi-
ble to have an organically certified product, especially when not all organic principles
are followed. They argue that fish, such as salmon, raised on feed that includes nonor-
ganic ingredients such as fish meal made from wild-caught fish and preserved with syn-
thetic chemicals do not meet the definition of organic. Many producers and consumers
are looking to USDA’s National Organic Standards Board to resolve these issues.
    Organic aquaculture standards have been developed in several other countries, and,
as a result, aquaculture products certified to these standards and labeled as organic have
started to show up in U.S. markets. However, one should note that these products do
not meet USDA organic standards, which, as stated above, do not yet exist for seafood.

Polyculture and Integrated Aquaculture
The farming of two or more species in the same aquaculture system; it may involve
animals, plants, or plants and animals together. These methods can improve the envi-
ronmental performance of aquaculture because waste products are used instead of
discharged into the environment.

Pond System
One of the earliest forms of aquaculture., ponds can be either natural or artificially
constructed. Managing the waste discharges properly can reduce the impact of ponds
on the environment. Catfish, carp, and tilapia are most commonly cultured in ponds.

Recirculating System
Recirculating systems are closed, or semi closed, aquaculture systems in which most
of the water is recycled through the system and very little is discharged. Water that
would otherwise be discharged with wastes is treated and reused within the system.
Recirculating systems limit other environmental impacts, such as escapes and disease
interactions, but they are costly to operate and are highly dependent on electricity or
other power sources.




                                                         The Fish and Shellfish Guide 11
Seasonality

                                                                   Spring
                                            Winter                                      Summer
                                                                      Fall

          Abalone (farmed) • Year-round
          Arctic Char • Farmed: Year-round • Wild: Fall
          Catfish, U.S. (farmed) • Year-round
          Caviar, Paddlefish (US farmed) • Year-round, but quantity varies
          Caviar, Rainbow Trout (US farmed) • Year-round, but quantity varies
          Caviar, White Sturgeon (US farmed) • Year-round, but quantity varies
          Caviar, Salmon • May–Nov
          Caviar, Whitefish • Year-round
          Clams • Year-round
          Cod, Pacific • Fall–Winter (Alaska)
          Crab, Dungeness • Almost year-round • peaking Dec–Jan (West Coast) • Jun–Jul (Alaska and British Columbia)
          Crab, Jonah & Rock • Jonah: Year-round • Rock: Summer
          Crab, King (Alaska) • Last two weeks of Aug (Aleutian Is.) • last two weeks of Oct (Bristol Bay)
          Crab, Snow • Apr–Aug
          Crab, Stone • Oct 15–May 15 (Florida)
          Crawfish • Nov–Jun (Louisiana) • Summer (Pacific Northwest)
          Flounder, Summer (Fluke) • Summer (inshore fishery) • Winter (offshore fishery)
          Halibut, Pacific • Mar 1–Nov 15
          Lobster, American • Year-round • peaking Summer–Fall (U.S.) • peaking May–Jun and Dec (Canada)
          Lobster, Spiny (Rock) • Year-round
          Mackerel, Atlantic & Spanish • Year-round
          Mahimahi (Dolphinfish) • Year-round • Mar–May and Sep–Nov (Hawaiian troll fishery)
          Mussels (farmed) • Blue: Winter–Spring • Mediterranean: Spring–Fall
          Oysters • Year-round
          Pollock, Alaska • Sporadic, Fall–Winter
          Sablefish (Black cod) • Mar 1–Nov 30
          Salmon, Chinook (King) • May–Sep • Winter (Alaska troll fishery)
          Salmon, Chum • Jun–Nov
          Salmon, Coho • Jul–Oct
          Salmon, Pink • Jul–Aug
          Salmon, Sockeye • May–Sep • peaking in July
          Sardines • Year-round (Pacific)
          Scallops, Bay & Sea • Bay: Fall • Sea: Mar–Dec
          Shrimp, Northern Pink • 4–6 weeks beginning in Jan (New England)
          Shrimp (Spot Prawns), Trap-Caught • Oct (Alaska) • Spring–Summer (British Columbia)
          Shrimp, U.S. (farmed) • Seasonal, Fall (fresh)
          Sole, Pacific • Year-round
          Striped Bass • Wild: peaking Mar–Jul • Hybrid: Year-round
          Sturgeon, White (farmed) • Year-round
          Tilapia, U.S. (farmed) • Year-round
          Trout, Rainbow • Year-round
          Tuna, Ahi (Yellowfin & Bigeye) • Year-round
          Tuna, Albacore • Year-round • Summer–Fall (West Coast troll fishery)




       12 Sourcing Seafood
Fish and Shellfish Guide




                           Fish and Shellfish Guide
                                      The Fish and Shellfish Guide




Abalone (farmed)................................14            Pollock, Alaska ....................................54
Arctic Char ...........................................16     Sablefish (Black Cod)......................... 56
Catfish, U.S. (farmed) .........................18            Salmon, Chinook
Caviars, American................................20              (King/wild Pacific)......................... 58
Clams ...................................................22   Salmon, Chum (wild Pacific) ............ 60
Cod, Pacific .........................................24      Salmon, Coho (wild Pacific) ..............62
Crab, Dungeness..................................26           Salmon, Pink (wild Pacific) ................64
Crab, Jonah & Rock .............................28            Salmon, Sockeye (wild Pacific) ..........66
Crab, King (Alaska) .............................30           Sardines................................................68
Crab, Snow...........................................32       Scallops, Bay & Sea ..............................70
Crab, Stone ..........................................34      Shrimp, Northern Pink .......................72
Crawfish ...............................................36    Shrimp, U.S. (farmed).........................74
Flounder, Summer (Fluke) .................38                  Shrimp (Spot Prawns), Trap-caught ...76
Halibut, Pacific ....................................40       Sole, Pacific ..........................................78
Lobster, American ...............................42           Striped Bass (wild & hybrid) ..............80
Lobster, Spiny (Rock) ..........................44            Sturgeon, White (farmed)...................82
Mackerel, Atlantic & Spanish ............. 46                 Tilapia, U.S. (farmed) .........................84
Mahimahi (Dolphinfish)....................48                  Trout, Rainbow (farmed) ....................86
Mussels (farmed).................................50           Tuna, Ahi (Yellowfin & Bigeye) ..........88
Oysters .................................................52   Tuna, Albacore.....................................90




                                                                          The Fish and Shellfish Guide 13
Abalone (farmed)




HIGHLIGHTS
●   World supply of
    abalone (farmed and
                                  W          ho knew that an “herbivorous marine gastropod” with a Latin name
                                             that sounds like bad breath could taste so good? A single-shell mollusk
                                  from the genus Haliotis, abalone is a gastropod, an order that includes snails, whelks,
    wild): 18,000 metric          and sea slugs. Worldwide, there are over one hundred species of abalone.
    tons (MT)                        The California coastline is ideal abalone habitat. In the 1950s and ’60s, the state’s
●   Farmed abalone from           commercial catch was almost 5,000 metric tons of red, black, and pink abalone.
    China and Taiwan:             However, flawed management strategies, a devastating disease, and, possibly, an
    approx. 9,000 MT              increase in the sea otter population (abalone predators) have decimated California’s
●   Australia is the largest      abalone populations. Although a small sport fishery for red abalone still occurs in
    producer of wild              northern California, the state has had no commercial abalone fishery since 1997 and
    abalone: annual catch         the U.S. has banned commercial catch of wild abalone nationwide.
    is about 5,000 MT                To meet demand for this prized delicacy, abalone farming has grown substantially
●   Wild abalone illegally        in the past decade, especially in China and Taiwan, which produce more than 90
    poached: approx.              percent of the world’s farmed abalone. All U.S.-raised abalone are from California,
    3,000 MT                      which produces only 200 MT (half is exported live to Asia). U.S. production is expected
                                  to increase gradually over the next decade, and Canada is also hoping to start farmed
                                  abalone production in British Columbia.



                                  CONSERVATION NOTES
                                      n the 1990s, illegal catch of abalone exploded as Asian demand grew. Today, worldwide
                                  I   populations are a fraction of what they once were, and some experts estimate that one-
                                  third of the abalone traded in the world today is caught illegally.
                                       The good news is that abalone farmers have made great strides in producing abalone in
                                  a sustainable manner. In China, the largest abalone farms grow their own kelp to feed the
                                  abalone, while in other areas, farmers use wild kelp. While taking kelp from the wild is usual-
                                  ly a sustainable process, some scientists are concerned about the impact of removing kelp
                                  because of its importance in providing food and habitat for other species.



                                  IN SEASON
                                  ●    Available year-round*                                            SPRING

                                  *Supply is limited and prices are high.
                                                                                      WINTER                               SUMMER




                                                                                                         FALL




                               14 Sourcing Seafood
PRODUCT FORM
●   Live
●   Processed, tenderized meats (fresh, frozen,
    and canned)




BUYING TIPS
●   In the market, farmed abalone is between two and three inches.
●   If abalone is over four inches, it’s likely to be imported wild abalone or poached
    from California.
●   Live abalone is readily available on the U.S. market and a Mexican farm now offers it.
●   When tenderized and cooked, abalone has a mild, slightly sweet flavor with a firm
    but tender texture.
●   Tenderized cuttlefish steaks are sometimes passed off as “abalone steaks.” If you’re
    not sure of your products origin, check for needle marks—a sure sign that your
    abalone is the real thing.




                                                                                             See page 93 for the list of
                                                                                             Abalone suppliers.
                                                         The Fish and Shellfish Guide 15
Arctic char

                                   Salvelinus alpinus




HIGHLIGHTS
●   Arctic char is the most
    northerly freshwater
                                   A       rctic char, spelled “charr” in Canada, is a member of the Salmonid family. It
                                           resembles a salmon in appearance but is genetically more closely linked to
                                   trout. While some stocks of Arctic char migrate to the ocean and return to freshwater
    fish that is sold (500         to spawn, others spend their entire life in freshwater. Unlike Pacific salmon, Arctic
    miles south of the             char does not die after spawning.
    North Pole)                       In the wild, these fish enter saltwater in the spring and spend the summer gorging
●   Wild char is found in          themselves on feed fish like capelin and Arctic cod. In the fall, they return to freshwa-
    Arctic Circle nations          ter lakes and rivers, weighing 30 to 50 percent more than when they left. In many
    (Canada, Iceland,              cases, char does not feed during winter months; it lives off the fat accumulated the
    Greenland, Russia,             previous summer.
    and U.S.)
●   Two-thirds of the world’s
    Arctic char supply is
    farmed                         CONSERVATION NOTES
    Top farmed producers:              and-based, closed-cycle systems used to farm Artic char are considered to be among
●
    Canada and Iceland             L   the most environmentally responsible fish farming designs, as they do not significantly
                                   pollute surrounding waters or affect nearby wild populations through escape or disease
                                   transmission.
                                       Similar to other farmed carnivorous fish, farmed Arctic char feed contains fish meal, fish
                                   oil, and varying levels of a synthetic version of natural carotenoid pigments (used to give
                                   the flesh a pinkish hue). Continued use of wild fish for feed is unsustainable; however,
                                   diets using a larger proportion of grain are being developed.
                                       In northern Canada, local Inuit of Nunavut participate in a closely monitored commercial
                                   Arctic char fishery with 220,000 pounds of commercial production. Commercial production
                                   only takes place after the community’s food requirements have been met, and fishermen
                                   use passive gear such as shore-set surface gill nets, fish weirs, and traps.
                                       The Canadian fishery is currently being evaluated by the Marine Stewardship Council for
                                   sustainability certification.



                                   IN SEASON
                                   ●   Farmed: Available year-round,                                    SPRING

                                       but sometimes difficult to find in
                                       the market                                     WINTER                               SUMMER

                                   ●   Wild: Fall (limited to 1–2 months)
                                                                                                         FALL




                                16 Sourcing Seafood
PRODUCT FORM                                                                                    THE PERFECT
FRESH (FARMED AND WILD):                                                                        SUBSTITUTE
●   Head on and gutted, or fillets                                                              Most Arctic char is sold
                                                                                                at the foodservice level,
FROZEN:                                                                                         where chefs often choose
●   An Icelandic company also offers frozen fillets                                             it as a better environmen-
    o   Fresh (wild): Headed and gutted, or filleted (inconsistent)                             tal choice than similar-
    o   Frozen (wild): Headed and gutted, or filleted                                           tasting farmed salmon.
                                                                                                The taste of Arctic char
                                                                                                is generally considered
   Although it has been farmed for well over a decade, farmed char production                   somewhat milder than
remains quite small. Farmers have had considerable difficulty selecting char that               either king or Atlantic
consistently perform well because of its complex genetic makeup. Until farmers can              (farmed) salmon, and its
solve these problems, supply of Arctic char will remain relatively limited.                     high fat content makes
                                                                                                it suitable for dry heat
BUYING TIPS                                                                                     cooking methods such
●   Arctic char is expensive and is not available from many seafood distributors.               as broiling and grilling.
●   Quality is relatively consistent for farmed char.                                           It also makes an excellent
●   Flesh color (wild and farmed) varies from a pale orange-pink to a bright red,               smoked product.
    depending on the region or amount of pigment in feed (farmed).
                                                                                                DISTINGUISHING
RULES FOR WILD CHAR:                                                                            BETWEEN WILD
●   Char caught in late summer or fall is fattier and more flavorful.                           AND FARMED:
●   As a rule larger char have more oil and, hence, more flavor.                                ●   Farmed char has
●   Processing in remote coastal areas is challenging, and quality can be inconsistent.             redder skin with cream-
                                                                                                    colored spots.
                                                                                                ●   Wild char has more
                                                                                                    silver-colored skin.




                                                                                                See page 93 for the list of
                                                                                                Artic Char suppliers.
                                                              The Fish and Shellfish Guide 17
Catfish, U.S. (farmed)

                                  Ictalurus punctatus




HIGHLIGHTS
●   The U.S. farm bill
    (2003) specifies that
                                  H        undreds of catfish species are found in warm and temperate regions through-
                                           out the world, but none is more beloved by U.S. consumers than the channel
                                  catfish, farmed mostly in the Mississippi Delta region. And catfish seems to have
    only native U.S. catfish      gone from regional favorite to national food trend almost overnight. In 1970, U.S.
    can be marketed as            catfish production barely reached five million pounds. Today, U.S. farmed catfish
    “catfish”                     is the fifth leading seafood consumed in the U.S., with sales reaching a record 662
●   U.S. farmed catfish is        million pounds (live weight) in 2003.
    the fifth most consumed           Now the backbone of the U.S. aquaculture industry, U.S. farmed catfish gets high
    species in the U.S.           marks from conservation groups for its reputation as a sustainably farmed fish. In the
●   U.S. catfish farming          U.S., channel catfish is raised in large freshwater ponds with little waste discharge,
    is concentrated in            and escape of fish is controlled.
    Mississippi, Alabama,             In the market, you’ll find two additional catfish species, both farmed in Vietnam’s
    Arkansas, and                 Mekong Delta region and marketed as basa or tra. Many Vietnamese catfish farmers
    Louisiana                     use float cages in rivers, which may lead to discharge of waste and escape of fish into
                                  local waterways. U.S. imports of Vietnamese catfish fillets have decreased sharply due
                                  to high tariffs enacted by the U.S. government after U.S. catfish farmers successfully
                                  filed trade suits, alleging unfair competition.




                                  CONSERVATION NOTES
                                       nlike carnivorous fish, which require fish meal and oil for feed, U.S. farmed catfish is
                                  U    fed 90 percent grain-based feed, with soybeans as the primary ingredient (although
                                  feed formulas may contain some fish meal). Vietnamese farmers have traditionally used a
                                  diet of ground fish, but the trend is toward grain-based feeds similar to those used by U.S.
                                  catfish farmers.
                                      Catfish farms are a lure for predatory birds, and bird kills (legal and illegal) are not
                                  uncommon on catfish farms.



                                  IN SEASON
                                  ●   Available throughout the year                                        SPRING




                                                                                       WINTER                                    SUMMER




                                                                                                            FALL




                               18 Sourcing Seafood
PRODUCT FORM                                                                                                     A NEW PLAYER
U.S. FARMED CATFISH                                                                                              Chinese fish farmers
●   Fillets, fresh or frozen (2–12 ounces)                                                                       recently started growing
    o   Usually include belly flap or “nugget”                                                                   and exporting channel cat-
    o   “Shank” fillets have flap removed                                                                        fish, the U.S. native
    o   “Strips” are finger-size strips cut from regular or shank fillets                                        species. Given China’s
●   Gutted whole fish, fresh or frozen                                                                           record in developing new
●   Dressed fish, steaks, and nuggets (a co-product of the production of shank fillets)                          species, this could mean
●   Frozen available marinated or breaded                                                                        a rapidly increasing supply
                                                                                                                 of channel catfish in the
                                                                                                                 near future. Conservation
BUYING TIPS                                                                                                      groups have not yet evalu-
●   Most catfish processors test catfish before they gather them to ensure algae have                            ated Chinese catfish farms
    not caused an “off” or muddy flavor.                                                                         for environmental impacts.
●   Processing cooperatives or private companies usually provide the finished product
    (purchased directly from catfish farmers).




ASSOCIATIONS
The Catfish Institute (TCI)
P.O. Box 924, Indianola, MS 38751, Phone: 662–887–2988, Web Site: www.catfishinstitute.com
The Catfish Institute, formed in 1985 to promote farmed U.S. catfish, offers recipes and promotional material.




                                                                                                                 See page 94 for the list of
                                                                                                                 Catfish suppliers.
                                                                            The Fish and Shellfish Guide 19
Caviars, American




HIGHLIGHTS
●   Many varieties of great
    American caviars are
                                 T     he sole term, caviar, can only be used for the eggs of sturgeon and paddlefish.
                                       Roe from other fish, such as whitefish, salmon, or trout, is technically not caviar
                                 and must be identified as salmon caviar or trout caviar to avoid any misrepresentation.
    available in the mar-           While not part of the typical American seafood diet, caviar enjoys a strong follow-
    ket: white sturgeon,         ing among high-end consumers in search of a gourmet experience. Historically osetra
    paddlefish, whitefish,       and beluga sturgeon from the Caspian Sea region of Russia and Iran have been the
    salmon, and trout            major source of caviar sold in the U.S. However, this caviar’s expensive price tag has
    caviar. Of these, white      resulted in overfishing and illegal trading of Caspian caviar, placing fish like beluga
    sturgeon, paddlefish,        sturgeon in danger of extinction.
    and trout are farmed.           In recent years American producers have offered a number of alternatives to
●   Caviar has a shelf life      Caspian caviar that have found favor with caviar lovers. Caviar varieties produced
    of two weeks to a year       from sturgeon and paddlefish farmed in the United States taste very good and are
    if it is handled and         environmentally sustainable: a win-win situation for culinary professionals and con-
    refrigerated properly.       sumers who are concerned about the sharp decline of sturgeon populations in the
                                 Caspian Sea. Unique roes from farmed trout and wild Alaska salmon are also making
                                 caviar lovers do a doubletake, and these great tasting roes are less expensive than
                                 Caspian caviars.




                                 CONSERVATION NOTES
                                      aviar from farmed white sturgeon provides an environmentally friendly alternative to
                                 C    caviar from threatened Caspian sturgeon and North American sturgeon stocks. White
                                 sturgeon farms, located in California, are closed-system tank farms that have minimal
                                 environmental impact. Salmon caviar is also available from well-managed wild salmon
                                 fisheries, and trout caviar is available from environmentally friendly fish farms in the U.S.



                                 IN SEASON
                                 ●   Farmed caviar (trout, sturgeon, and                               SPRING

                                     paddlefish) is available through the
                                     year, with some variability in quantity        WINTER                                SUMMER

                                     of supply
                                 ●   Salmon caviar is gathered during wild                              FALL

                                     salmon season (roughly May–November)
                                 ●   Whitefish caviar is produced between
                                     October and December, but sold
                                     year-round.


                              20 Sourcing Seafood
PRODUCT FORM
●   By the ounce, usually in jars and tins                                                    A HALT ON
●   Salmon caviar is also available in plastic tubs                                           CASPIAN
                                                                                              CAVIAR TRADE
                                                                                              In early September 2004,
                                                                                              the United Nations’
                                                                                              Convention on International
BUYING TIPS                                                                                   Trade in Endangered
●   White Sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus): Native to the west coast, white sturgeon        Species (CITES) effectively
    caviar is farmed in California. White sturgeon is raised for about 10 years until large   halted global trade of
    enough so that both the eggs and the meat can be used. In blind taste tests, caviar       Caspian Sea sturgeon
    from farmed white sturgeon was most similar in taste to osetra caviar.                    caviar, including prized
●   Paddlefish (Polyodon spathula): Native to North America and close cousin of the           beluga caviar. At that time,
    sturgeon, paddlefish is considered an endangered species, making it illegal to            CITES had refused to
    remove it from the wild. One U.S. company, Osage Catfisheries, has the necessary          approve most caviar export
    permit to trade in farmed paddlefish products, including caviar. Paddlefish produce       quotas for 2004—the first
    small to medium, gray eggs.                                                               time it had done so since
●   Salmon: Sold in Japan as ikura (eggs) or sujiko (roe skeins), salted salmon caviar is     it began monitoring the
    now widely available in the U.S. Eggs from chum salmon (also called keta) are             trade in 1998. CITES
    considered the most desirable, due to their thin membrane, tender texture, and            explained Caspian nations
    attractive orange color. Most salmon caviar is a product of Alaska’s wild fishery;        were in violation of an
    however, Lake Michigan produces some chinook salmon roe, which is large and               international sturgeon
    orange-red in color.                                                                      conservation agreement
●   Trout: Mostly farmed, but not widely available, brook and rainbow trout roe is            that requires them to
    orange and smaller than salmon caviar. In some cases, rainbow trout roe can also          reach consensus on the
    be sticky.                                                                                division of basin-wide
●   Whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis): Hand-fished under strict quotas from the lakes        quotas and to take illegal
    of Northwest Montana. Has a rich apricot hue and a mild flavor.                           fishing into consideration
                                                                                              when determining those
                                                                                              numbers. CITES said the
                                                                                              freeze on exports from
                                                                                              the Caspian Sea will
                                                                                              remain in place until the
                                                                                              states have complied with
                                                                                              the agreement.




                                                                                              See page 95 for the list of
                                                                                              American Caviar suppliers.
                                                          The Fish and Shellfish Guide 21
Clams




HIGHLIGHTS
●   The ocean quahog can
    live to be over 200
                                 S       urf clam (Spisula solidissima) and ocean quahog (Arctica islandica): These
                                         two large offshore clams support the largest clam fishery in the U.S. Each year
                                 processors slice, dice, and chop almost 100 million pounds of meat from these clams
    years old                    into a variety of value-added products, including clam chowders and breaded clam
●   Clams, like oysters and      strips. The fishery for these clams is managed by individual transferable quotas
    some other bivalves,         (ITQs), and landings have been stable in recent years at very high levels. These clams
    have the ability to          are collected using big vessels that tow large hydraulic dredges. Small ocean quahogs,
    produce pearls               collected inshore, are marketed as mahogany clams or golden necks.
                                    Hardshell-clam (Mercenaria mercenaria): Depending on size, hard-shell clams may
                                 be sold as Little Necks, cherrystones, topnecks, quahogs, or chowders. Little Necks, the
                                 tenderest and most expensive, are most often eaten raw on the half shell or steamed.
                                 Cherrystone clams can be eaten raw, but are usually steamed. Topneck and chowder
                                 clams are normally ground up and served in value-added clam products like stuffies.
                                    On the U.S. East Coast, hard clams are farmed and collected at the Little Neck-size
                                 grade or smaller. In the wild, hard clams are collected by hand dredge, tong, or rake.
                                 U.S. production of hard-shell clam meat is about 10 million pounds a year.
                                    Manila clam (Venerupis philippinarum): Manila clams were introduced initially by
                                 accident to the West Coast of the U.S. from Japan in the 1930s. Most Manila clams in
                                 the market come from cultured beds in the inside waters of Washington state. In



                                 CONSERVATION NOTES
                                      s filter feeders, clams require clean, unpolluted water. At the same time, clams act as
                                 A    filters and can actually improve the quality of the water in which they grow.
                                     Clam farming uses the bottom of bays and estuaries where “seed” clams are spread
                                 and grown to market size. Many species are collected with tongs, rakes, and handheld
                                 dredges, which have significantly less impact on the seafloor than large hydraulic dredges
                                 used to collect surf clams and ocean quahogs.



                                 IN SEASON
                                 ●   Year-round availability, with greatest                            SPRING

                                     supply during warm weather
                                                                                     WINTER                             SUMMER




                                                                                                        FALL




                              22 Sourcing Seafood
PRODUCT FORM                                                                                                                  WHAT DO
FRESH:                                                                                                                        CLAMS AND
●   Live (farmed clams are almost always sold live)                                                                           TREES HAVE
●   Shucked meat                                                                                                              IN COMMON?
                                                                                                                              It is common knowledge
FROZEN:                                                                                                                       that you can discover the
●   On the half shell                                                                                                         age of a tree by counting
●   Shucked meat                                                                                                              its rings, but did you know
                                                                                                                              that you can do the same
                                                                                                                              with a clam? Like a tree,
British Columbia, Manilas are cultured and collected from wild beds. Almost always                                            the older the clam is, the
sold live, Manilas are considered to be very tender and sweet (although they are rarely                                       more difficult it is to deter-
eaten raw). They are gathered by hand rake, and production in the U.S. is about one                                           mine its age because the
million pounds of meat a year.                                                                                                growth rings can be very
   Soft-shell clam (Mya arenia): A very popular (and expensive) clam that is dug by                                           close together.
hand in New England and the Chesapeake Bay—and also called steamer clam and
belly clam—the soft-shell is most often served either steamed in the shell or as fried
meat. Attempts to farm soft-shells have not been successful, but production of wild
soft-shells is relatively stable at about two to three million pounds of meat a year.

BUYING TIPS
●   You can buy clams by the piece, pound, or bushel (volume weight). Avoid buying
    by the bushel, however, as the definition of a bushel can vary among suppliers.
●    You can find the best shelf life and meat yield in the winter, which is often when
    prices are lowest due to reduced demand from coastal resorts.
●    Shelf life declines considerably in the summer after the clam spawns.                                                            HEALTH
                                                                                                                                      ADVISORY
                                                                                                                              Paralytic shellfish poison-
                                                                                                                              ing (PSP) is caused by
                                                                                                                              eating bivalve shellfish
ASSOCIATIONS                                                                                                                  that is contaminated with
BC Shellfish Growers Association                                                                                              algae containing harmful
350 (B) Robson Street, Nanaimo, BC V9R 2V5 Canada, Phone: 250–714–0804, Web Site: www.bcsga.ca,
                                                                                                                              toxins. The toxin that
Executive Director: Pamela Parker • Represents scallop, clam, and oyster growers in British Columbia.
                                                                                                                              causes PSP cannot be
East Coast Shellfish Growers Association
1623 Whitesville Road, Toms River, NJ 08755, Phone: 732–349–1152, Web Site: www.ecsga.org • Relatively new
                                                                                                                              destroyed by cooking or
organization representing shellfish growers in New England and the mid-Atlantic states.                                       freezing. Inquire with your
Pacific Coast Shellfish Growers Association                                                                                   supplier about routine
120 State Ave. NE, PMB #142, Olympia, WA 98501, Phone: 360–754–2744, Web Site: www.pcsga.org, Executive                       testing of products.
Director: Robin Downey • The largest shellfish association in North America, PCSGA represents local, state, and federal
interests of oyster, clam, mussel, scallop and geoduck growers from Alaska, British Columbia, Washington, Oregon,
California, Mexico, and Hawaii and is involved in environmental protection, shellfish safety and health issues, technologi-
                                                                                                                              See page 98 for the list of
cal advances, and international marketing and research, among other concerns.
                                                                                                                              Clam suppliers.
                                                                             The Fish and Shellfish Guide 23
Cod, Pacific

                                   Gadus macrocephalus




HIGHLIGHTS
●   Pacific cod is a “cousin”
    of Atlantic cod
                                   P       acific cod is very similar to its famous cousin, Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua).
                                           While the two species are used interchangeably in the marketplace, Pacific
                                   cod has a slightly higher moisture content and a less firm texture than Atlantic cod.
●   Two-thirds of Pacific          Although Pacific cod is found from California to Alaska and from northern Japan to
    cod is caught in               Russia, about two-thirds of the cod catch comes from Alaskan waters. There are also
    Alaskan waters                 two small trawl fisheries in Washington state and British Columbia.
●   Trawlers catch most               More than 80 percent of Alaska’s Pacific cod is caught in the Bering Sea, where the
    Pacific cod, although          quota is split among trawlers (48 percent), longline boats (42 percent), and pot boats
    some is caught by              (10 percent). In the Gulf of Alaska, Pacific cod are caught by trawlers based in Kodiak,
    longlines or pot boats         Alaska. Trawlers also dominate Japanese and Russian Pacific cod fisheries, although
                                   there is a longline fishery in Russian waters.
                                      While they can weigh more than 50 pounds, most Pacific cod caught commercially
                                   is between five and 15 pounds.




                                   CONSERVATION NOTES
                                       n the last decade, Alaska catches of Pacific cod have been stable, with a quota set each
                                   I   year following an assessment of Pacific cod populations. The fishery closely monitors
                                   bycatch and can be shut down if excessive levels of nontarget species (such as halibut)
                                   are caught.
                                        Alaska’s longline Pacific Cod fishery has applied for certification by the Marine
                                   Stewardship Council.



                                   IN SEASON
                                   ●    Alaskan: Fall and winter, although other                           SPRING

                                        west coast fisheries catch Pacific Cod
                                        all year round.                                 WINTER                              SUMMER




                                                                                                            FALL




                                24 Sourcing Seafood
PRODUCT FORM                                                                                                                 WHEN
FRESH:                                                                                                                       “REFRESHED”
●   Limited quantity; fillets (from processors in Kodiak and Seward, Alaska,                                                 MEANS
    or trawlers in Washington state and British Columbia)                                                                    “PREVIOUSLY
                                                                                                                             FROZEN”
FROZEN:                                                                                                                      New England processors
●   Majority is headed and gutted, skinless, boneless fillets (from shore-based plants)                                      purchase large amounts
●   Much smaller portion is fillets (from factory trawlers)                                                                  of headed and gutted cod,
                                                                                                                             then “refresh” it and sell
                                                                                                                             it as fillets year-round.
BUYING TIPS                                                                                                                  Most of this cod has
●   The quality of this fish can vary substantially depending on how well it was                                             been treated with sodium
    handled at sea.                                                                                                          tripolyphosphate to ensure
●   The highest quality is produced by freezer longliners, which process fish on board                                       that it retains its moisture.
    a short time after bringing it aboard.                                                                                      Some Pacific cod in
●   Factory trawlers can produce a high-quality product as well, if tows are short and                                       the market may even be
    fish is processed promptly.                                                                                              “twice frozen.” The U.S.
●   Most Alaskan trawlers delivering to shore-based processing plants hold their fish                                        imports about 25 million
    in refrigerated seawater tanks. Since the fish is not bled, its meat is normally not                                     pounds of cod from China,
    as white.                                                                                                                which purchases frozen
                                                                                                                             headed and gutted cod
                                                                                                                             from Russia or Alaska,
                                                                                                                             thaws it, fillets it, freezes
                                                                                                                             it, and exports it back to
                                                                                                                             the U.S.




ASSOCIATIONS
Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute (ASMI)
311 N. Franklin St., Suite 200, Juneau, AK 99801, Phone: 800–478–2903, Fax: 907–465–5572, Web Site:
www.alaskaseafood.org Email: info@alaskaseafood.org • The Institute promotes Alaska cod in addition to other
Alaskan seafood products. Its Web site contains a variety of useful information, including recipes, promotional materials,
and a directory of Alaska cod suppliers.

Pacific Seafood Processors Association
1900 W. Emerson St., #205, Seattle, WA 98119, Phone: 206–281–1667, Web Site: www.pspafish.net,
Email: info@pspafish.net • Represents the interests of floating and shore-based processors operating from Oregon to
the North Pacific.



                                                                                                                             See page 100 for the list of
                                                                                                                             Pacific Cod suppliers.
                                                                             The Fish and Shellfish Guide 25
Crab, Dungeness

                                Cancer magister




HIGHLIGHTS
●   Many consider the
    Pacific fisheries for
                                T     he most popular crab on the West Coast, Dungeness crab is fished from
                                      Alaska to northern California. Named after a fishing town on a spit of land on
                                Washington’s Strait of Juan de Fuca, Dungeness crab can weigh over four pounds,
    Dungeness to be the         though in heavily fished areas weights average closer to two pounds. Dungeness also
    most sustainably            has a relatively high meat yield: 25 percent. Its attractive size and sweet meat have
    managed of the              made Dungeness increasingly popular in recent years. China, for example, now
    world’s crab fisheries      imports more than 15 million pounds of live Dungeness a year.
                                   Dungeness crab fishermen have experienced high catch levels in recent years, with
                                landings in the U.S. and Canada reaching a record of almost 100 million pounds in
                                2003. In terms of U.S. crab fishery landings, the Dungeness fishery is second only to
                                blue crab. In the U.S., Washington state has the largest Dungeness fishery, followed
                                by Oregon, California, and Alaska.
                                   Adult Dungeness is reddish-brown in color, with short, thick legs. It reaches sexual
                                maturity at age three, and mating typically occurs in the summer.




                                CONSERVATION NOTES
                                    n most areas, there is no set quota on Dungeness crab. Instead, the fishery is managed
                                I   through permitting systems, pot limits, and time and area closures, and fishermen are
                                only allowed to land male crabs over a certain size. In California, Oregon, and Washington
                                state, the minimum size carapace is 6 1/4 inches. The circular pots used to catch
                                Dungeness crab are highly selective, so bycatch is not an issue with this fishery.
                                     The Oregon Dungeness crab fishery has applied for certification by the Marine
                                Stewardship Council.



                                IN SEASON
                                ●    Caught almost year-round, but peak                              SPRING

                                     production occurs in December and
                                     January on the West Coast.                    WINTER                              SUMMER

                                ●    Supply is also ample in June and July,
                                     when fisheries off southeast Alaska                              FALL

                                     and British Columbia are in full swing.




                             26 Sourcing Seafood
PRODUCT FORM
FRESH:
●   Live
●   Whole cooks
●   Sections or clusters
●   Picked meat


FROZEN:
●   Whole cooks
●   Sections or clusters
●   Picked meat



BUYING LIVE DUNGENESS
When buying live Dungeness, allow for some dead loss. Typically, processors want a
five percent dead loss allowance, so take that into account when negotiating price.

BUYING TIPS
●   A large portion of Dungeness labeled as fresh crabmeat is actually picked from
    meat that was frozen in December and January, when production peaks and prices
    are at their lowest.
●   If you want truly fresh meat, plan to pay more since prices are higher after January.
    If you’re buying frozen sections, be careful of crab processed in early December—
    in some years, crabs from the ocean fishery have not filled out completely after
    molting and their meat yield tends to be low.




ASSOCIATIONS                                                                                                                  HEALTH
Oregon Dungeness Crab Commission                                                                                              ADVISORY
P.O. Box 1160, Coos Bay, OR 97420, Phone: 541–267–5810, Fax: 541–267–5771, Web Site: www.oregondunge-
                                                                                                                      The “crab butter” and
ness.com, Email: info@oregondungeness.com • This Commission promotes Dungeness crab caught by vessels fishing
from Oregon ports. The Commission Web site contains valuable information for retailers and restaurateurs as well as   internal organs of this
tips on crab quality and handling.                                                                                    species may contain a
Pacific Coast Federation of Fishermen’s Associations (PCFFA)                                                          natural toxin that, when
P.O. Box 29370, San Francisco, CA 94129, Phone: 415–561–5080, Fax: 415–561–5464, Web Site: www.pcffa.org,
                                                                                                                      ingested, can result in
Email: fishlifr@aol.com
                                                                                                                      paralytic shellfish poison-
                                                                                                                      ing (PSP).
                                                                                                                      See page 101 for the list of
                                                                                                                      Dungeness Crab suppliers.
                                                                         The Fish and Shellfish Guide 27
Crab, Jonah & Rock

                                 Cancer irroratus and C. borealis




HIGHLIGHTS
●   A Jonah crab has
    rough “teeth” along
                                 O        nce considered bait-robbing pests by lobstermen who routinely killed them
                                          and tossed them back, rock and Jonah crab are valuable bycatch of the lobster
                                 fishery, with their own directed commercial fisheries now emerging.
    the sides of its shell,         Atlantic rock crab and Jonah crab are two common crabs found on the East Coast
    while a rock crab has        from Labrador to South Carolina. Rock crabs, the smaller of the two species, are
    smooth-edged teeth           caught mainly in the summer by inshore fishermen, while Jonahs are caught year-
●   Rock crabs are some-         round by inshore and offshore lobster boats. In Canada, there continues to be an
    times referred to as         offshore, though sporadic, fishery for Jonah crab.
    peekytoe crabs                  The claw and leg meat from rock crab is pink with a sweet, delicate flavor, quite
                                 similar to Dungeness crab. Jonah meat is more uniformly white with a mild flavor.




                                 CONSERVATION NOTES
                                     ittle is known about the size of rock and Jonah crab populations since their fisheries are
                                 L   relatively limited and, thus, have not attracted the attention of fisheries scientists.
                                 There is no set quota for these crabs; instead, these fisheries are managed by a minimum
                                 size limit and only males may be caught.
                                     Catches of both species fluctuate widely. In the case of rock crab, reported catches in
                                 New England plummeted from four million pounds in 2000 to just 600,000 pounds the fol-
                                 lowing year, probably a result of a short lobster fishing season. In general, rock and Jonah
                                 catches are lower during a shorter lobster season, as these shellfish are mostly a bycatch
                                 of the lobster fishery.



                                 IN SEASON
                                 ●   Rock crab: catch is highest in summer,                              SPRING

                                     during peak lobster fishing periods
                                 ●   Jonah crab: usually available year-             WINTER                                    SUMMER

                                     round, depending on weather condi-
                                     tions                                                                FALL


                                                                                                        SPRING




                                                                                     WINTER                                    SUMMER




                                                                                                         FALL
                              28 Sourcing Seafood
PRODUCT FORM
ROCK CRAB:
●   Fresh or frozen, almost always cooked; packs
    of leg, body, or combination meat


JONAH CRAB:
●   Fresh or frozen, almost always cooked; packs of leg, body, or combination
    meat; whole claws available either fresh or frozen, sold separately



BUYING TIPS
●   With only a handful of processors specializing in this fishery, the quality of Jonah
    and rock crabmeat is very consistent.
●   Jonah claws are relatively large and can be an inexpensive substitute for stone
    crab claws.

IT’S ALL IN THE NAME
Crab connoisseurs may not be very familiar with the rock crab, but they are sure to
recognize the name of the peekytoe crab, even though rock and peekytoe are one and
the same. As was the case for Patagonian toothfish (marketed as Chilean sea bass), a
simple change in its market name transformed the rock crab from an unlikely menu
item to a highly sought after seafood. Good news if you’re a lobster fishermen, but
not if you’re a rock (aka peekytoe) crab.




                                                                                              See page 102 for the list of
                                                                                              Jonah and Rock Crab suppliers.
                                                            The Fish and Shellfish Guide 29
Crab, King (Alaska)

                                 Paralithodes camtschaticus




HIGHLIGHTS
●   Over half of the U.S.
    supply of king crab
                                 K       ings crabs are found throughout the world in colder waters, but the name king
                                         crab is synonymous with Alaska, where a fishery for king crabs was developed
                                 in the 1950s. Three species of king crab have traditionally been fished in Alaska,
    comes from Russia’s          including red king crab, the largest and most common species, which can reach 20
    Far East fisheries           pounds. Red king accounts for about 75 percent of the Alaska catch, and about half
●   Among all king crab          of the red king catch is typically caught in Bristol Bay.
    species, only male              The remote waters of the Aleutian Islands contain a significant fishery for golden
    crabs can be legally         king crab, the smallest of the Alaska king crabs. The blue king crab fishery once yielded
    collected                    catches of ten million pounds a year, but the fishery has been closed since 1999 due
●   Only about one-quarter       to low numbers of juveniles surviving until reproductive maturity.
    of king crab is edible,
    primarily the legs and
    claws
                                 CONSERVATION NOTES
                                      opulations and catches of king crab can fluctuate wildly. In Alaska, for example, king
                                 P    crab catches have declined from a record 140 million pounds in 1980 to less than 20
                                 million pounds in recent years. Some scientists theorize that fish predation and a warmer
                                 ocean may be responsible for the crash, though overfishing may also have played a role.
                                 Since 1981, the U.S. government has closed large areas of Alaska to king crab fishing in
                                 the hope that populations in these areas will rebound. Strict quotas have been set in areas
                                 that remain open.
                                     The Russian (North Pacific) king crab fishery is not as well-managed; illegal fishing there
                                 is widespread and populations are in decline.
                                     Norway has a problem for which Russia and Alaska could only hope. In the late 1990s,
                                 North Atlantic king crab populations increased so dramatically that some biologists are
                                 now concerned that this non-native population is too big and may have an adverse impact
                                 on the local environment. In fact, to stop growth, Norway is considering an unrestricted fish-
                                 ery in which both male and female crab can be fished.



                                 IN SEASON
                                 Fresh (primarily cooked):                                             SPRING

                                 ●   Last two weeks of August for Aleutian
                                     Island golden king crab                         WINTER                               SUMMER

                                 ●   Last two weeks of October for Bristol
                                     Bay red king crab fishery                                          FALL




                              30 Sourcing Seafood
PRODUCT FORM                                                                                                                A DANGEROUS
●   Almost all crab is cooked                                                                                               PROFESSION
    immediately after landing                                                                                               King crab fishermen have
●   Some is delivered live to processing plants, which                                                                      one of the most danger-
    brine and freeze it in clusters. These clusters are then shipped to reprocessors, who                                   ous jobs in the world. An
    bandsaw the frozen clusters into individual legs and claws and grade them accordingly                                   extremely short season,
●   King crab is sold by number of legs per ten pounds                                                                      along with gale force
●   Frozen is available all year                                                                                            winds and freezing water
                                                                                                                            temperatures, make this a
* Coming soon: a longer supply of fresh king crab. The Alaska crab fishery is moving away                                   treacherous occupation.
from the derby-style short season, which could mean a longer season, thus enabling                                          However, changes are on
processors to ship fresh clusters.                                                                                          the horizon. Alaska is
                                                                                                                            attempting to “rationalize”
                                                                                                                            the king crab industry,
  The same three species of king crab are fished in Russia’s North Pacific waters as                                        meaning that the season
well. Both Russia and Norway also have a commercial fishery for red king crab in the                                        could be extended and
North Atlantic, where the species was introduced by the Russian government in the                                           unpredictable derby-day
1960s.                                                                                                                      weather may be avoided.


BUYING TIPS
●   Shore-based plants have greater supplies of fresh water, so they generally produce a
    less salty product than fishermen that process onboard.
●   Expect packers to include up to ten percent broken legs and/or shoulders in a
    shipment.
●   Check the glaze: acceptable glaze is three percent or less for king crab. Perform
    periodic net weight tests to ensure you’re not paying for water instead of meat.




ASSOCIATIONS
Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute (ASMI)
311 N. Franklin St., Suite 200, Juneau, AK 99801, Phone: 800–478–2903, Fax: 907–465–5572, Web Site:
www.alaskaseafood.org, Email: info@alaskaseafood.org • ASMI promotes all major Alaska seafood, including king
crab. The Web site contains a variety of useful information, including recipes, promotional materials, and a directory of
Alaskan crab suppliers.




                                                                                                                            See page 103 for the list of
                                                                                                                            King Crab suppliers.
                                                                             The Fish and Shellfish Guide 31
Crab, Snow

                                Chionoecetes opilio




HIGHLIGHTS
●   Most snow crab con-
                                A       s connoisseurs are well aware, snow crabs are highly popular and are prized
                                        for their sweet taste and delicate texture as well as for their affordability com-
                                pared to other crab species such as king crab.
    sumed in the U.S. is            A number of species of snow crabs are fished commercially in both the North
    imported, with Canada       Atlantic and North Pacific, yet the one most closely identified with the snow crab
    accounting for over 80      name, and the largest fishery by far, is C. opilio. Snow crab is fished commercially off
    percent of the market       Atlantic Canada (where it is also called Queen crab), Alaska, Russia, and Greenland.
    share, followed by              Snow crab populations off Alaska began to decline in the late 1990s and have not
    Russia and Greenland        yet recovered. Currently, a majority of U.S. imports are from the Canadian snow crab
                                fishery. Catches off Canada’s Atlantic Coast have exceeded 200 millions pounds a
                                year since 1999. In September 2004, however, scientists reported a 98 percent decline
                                in snow crabs in at least one area around Newfoundland, and while there is much
                                speculation about the reasons for this decline, some scientists point to overfishing.
                                There is concern that too many mature males are being caught, which does not leave
                                enough sexually mature males in the water to sustain the population. The fisheries
                                council has been asked to draft a long-term conservation plan for snow crabs, which
                                is likely to include quota reductions.




                                CONSERVATION NOTES
                                     anadian snow crab stocks have been at very high levels for more than a decade, which
                                C    some scientists attribute to the collapse of cod stocks in the region (cod is a major
                                predator of snow crab). As stated above, however, the Canadian snow crab fishery is experi-
                                encing major declines in catch compared to this recent high. Since 1991, snow crab catches
                                off Alaska have collapsed from 330 million pounds to just 25 million pounds.
                                    Because it is fished by pot, the snow crab fishery has very limited environmental impact
                                and minimal bycatch.



                                IN SEASON
                                ●   Canadian supply is most plentiful from                           SPRING

                                    April until August.
                                                                                   WINTER                              SUMMER




                                                                                                      FALL




                             32 Sourcing Seafood
PRODUCT FORM
FRESH:
●   Clusters (not readily available)


FROZEN:
●   Clusters (sections)
●   Picked frozen meat



   A smaller snow crab, red snow crab (C. japonicus), is fished off Russia and Japan
and is sometimes exported to the U.S. These fisheries are highly variable and not well
regulated, however.
   Snow crabs typically average about two pounds and yield sections (clusters) mostly
between five and eight ounces each.

BUYING TIPS
●   Best-quality, high-price snow crab comes from the Gulf of St. Lawrence, where
    some Canadian processors use cryogenic freezers that produce a superior product,
    but most of this crab goes to the Japanese market.
●   Snow crab should be checked for excess glaze and broken pieces—the industry
    standard for broken pieces is 10 percent.




ASSOCIATIONS
Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute (ASMI)
311 N. Franklin St., Suite 200, Juneau, AK 99801, Phone: 800–478–2903, Fax: 907–465–5572, Web Site:
www.alaskaseafood.org, Email: info@alaskaseafood.org • The Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute promotes snow
crab, among other Alaskan seafood. The ASMI Web site contains a variety of useful information, including recipes,
promotional materials, and a directory of Alaska snow crab suppliers.

Pacific Seafood Processors Association
1900 W. Emerson St. #205, Seattle, WA 98119, Phone: 206–281–1667, Web Site: www.pspafish.net, Email:
info@pspafish.net • The Pacific Seafood Processors Association represents the interests of floating and shore-based
processors operating from Oregon to the North Pacific.



                                                                                                                      See page 103 for the list of
                                                                                                                      Snow Crab suppliers.
                                                                          The Fish and Shellfish Guide 33
Crab, Stone

                                 Menippe adina and M. mercenaria




HIGHLIGHTS
●   Stone crab claws are
    often cooked right on
                                 T      alk about a renewable resource. In the stone crab fishery, fishermen haul up
                                        their pots, pluck a stone crab out, tear off its claw, and toss it back to grow
                                 another claw. If the claw has a length of at least two inches, one or both may be
    the crabbing boats and       removed from a male or non-egg-bearing female.
    are always sold cooked           Several species of stone crab are found from North Carolina to Mexico’s Yucatan
●   A stone crab can             Peninsula, but more than 90 percent of the catch is the common stone crab, which
    regenerate its claws         is fished in Florida waters from October to May. Although stone crab is fished along
    up to four times in          much of Florida’s coast, most landings occur off the southern half of Florida’s west
    a lifetime                   coast.
●   Almost all stone crabs           In about one year, a larger stone crab can regenerate a claw that’s about two-thirds
    claws are collected          its original size. A smaller crab can take three years to grow a claw that just meets the
    from the waters off the      legal market size. Surveys of crab buyers indicate that about 20 percent of the claws
    coast of Florida             purchased from fishermen are from crabs that had already been declawed once.




                                 CONSERVATION NOTES
                                      tone crabs have quite astonishing reproductive rates, spawning up to 13 times a year.
                                 S    Minimum claw size regulations make it possible for female stone crabs to go through
                                 one or two breeding seasons before they are caught.
                                     While the stone crab population is generally believed to be in good condition, landings
                                 of Florida stone crab have been below historical levels (about six million pounds) during the
                                 past few years. Due to insufficient data, biologists are uncertain why landing numbers are
                                 down, although the decrease is believed to be caused by more fishing by both recreational
                                 and commercial fishermen. To combat the problem, Florida fishery managers are adapting
                                 measures to reduce fishing effort by decreasing the number of pots currently being used.



                                 IN SEASON
                                 ●   Florida stone crab season:                                       SPRING

                                     October 15–May 15
                                                                                    WINTER                              SUMMER




                                                                                                       FALL




                              34 Sourcing Seafood
PRODUCT FORM
●   Always cooked, either fresh or frozen




BUYING TIPS
●   Timing is everything: claws should be cooked shortly after removal from the crab
    to prevent the meat from sticking to its shell.
●   Fresh stone crab claws have a shelf life of only three to four days, so it can be
    difficult to ship them out of state.
●   Beware of imposters. Chilean and Mexican rock crab, for example, is occasionally
    sold as stone crab. Compared side by side, the rock crab has similar black-tipped
    claws, but the Florida stone crab is larger, smoother, and more orange in color.




                                                                                         See page 104 for the list of
                                                                                         Stone Crab suppliers.
                                                       The Fish and Shellfish Guide 35
Crawfish




HIGHLIGHTS
●   There are over 500
    species of crawfish
                                W           hether you call them crayfish, crawfish, crawdads, or mud bugs, these little
                                            crustaceans look and taste a bit like lobster. In Cajun country, where craw-
                                fish is a cause for celebration, the locals “pinch the tails and suck the heads” with
●   More than 90 percent        legendary gusto.
    of U.S. crawfish pro-          Believe it or not, there is a good chance the crawfish you’re eating is farmed and is
    duction comes from          not from the U.S. unless you’re in Louisiana. The U.S. currently produces 15 to 20
    Louisiana, and most of      million pounds (live weight) of (mostly red swamp) crawfish, 90 percent of which is
    it is consumed locally      produced in Louisiana and consumed in the state. In addition, over half of the total
●   In 2002, the U.S.           U.S. production is farmed. Red swamp crawfish, however, is also farmed in China,
    imported 15 million         which exported about 15 million pounds of this crustacean to the U.S. in 2002.
    pounds of farmed               There is a small quantity of wild crawfish on the market—both red swamp
    crawfish from China         (Procambarus clarkii) and white river (P. acutus). This is collected from swamps, rivers,
                                lakes, or flooded rice fields in the Southeast. There is also a small commercial craw-
                                fish fishery in the Pacific Northwest for signal crawfish (Pacifasticus leniusculus), a
                                larger species that has also been introduced to Europe, where it is farmed.




                                CONSERVATION NOTES
                                       hile there have been no formal stock assessments, populations of wild crawfish
                                W      appear to be healthy and catch is largely a function of weather. In dry years, for
                                example, crawfish catch declines sharply.
                                    Wild crawfish is caught in shallow-water pots, so the fishery has minimal environmental
                                impact.
                                    Crawfish farmers usually use a polyculture system, where they grow semiaquatic feed
                                plants such as rice in ponds, which they also use to farm the crawfish.



                                IN SEASON
                                ●   Live wild crawfish and fresh crawfish                              SPRING

                                    meat from Louisiana are available from
                                    November until June.                            WINTER                                  SUMMER

                                ●   Limited supplies from the Pacific
                                    Northwest are available in the summer                               FALL

                                    months.




                             36 Sourcing Seafood
PRODUCT FORM                                                                                                    STATE
FRESH U.S. (FARMED OR WILD):                                                                                    CRUSTACEAN
●   Whole cooked                                                                                                In 1983 the governor of
●   Cooked tail meat                                                                                            Louisiana designated the
                                                                                                                crawfish the state crus-
FROZEN (MOSTLY FROM CHINA, YEAR-ROUND):                                                                         tacean, becoming the first
●   Cooked tail meat                                                                                            state to have an official
                                                                                                                crustacean. While it may
                                                                                                                seem strange for a state
BUYING TIPS                                                                                                     to adopt a crustacean, as
●   Best buys are in early spring when supplies are plentiful and quality is highest.                           a multimillion dollar a year
●   In May or June the prices are better, but shells are thicker in late spring, making the                     industry in Louisiana, the
    crawfish harder to peel and hot, stagnant water can produce crawfish with a                                 crawfish was awarded the
    muddy taste.                                                                                                honor for its commercial
●   When buying live crawfish, don’t accept more than five percent dead loss.                                   and cultural importance.




ASSOCIATIONS:                                                                                                           HEALTH
Louisiana Seafood Promotion and Marketing                                                                               ADVISORY
1600 Canal St., Ste. 210, New Orleans, LA 70112, Phone: 504–568–5693, Fax: 504–568–5668,                        The “crab butter” and
Web Site: www.louisianaseafood.com, Email: tracy@louisianaseafood.com • Promotes Louisiana seafoods. Web site
provides recipes, promotion ideas and links to suppliers.                                                       internal organs of this
                                                                                                                species may contain a
                                                                                                                natural toxin that, when
                                                                                                                ingested, can result in
                                                                                                                paralytic shellfish poison-
                                                                                                                ing (PSP).
                                                                                                                See page 105 for the list of
                                                                                                                Crawfish suppliers.
                                                                      The Fish and Shellfish Guide 37
Flounder, Summer (Fluke)

                                Paralichthys dentatus




HIGHLIGHTS
●   Part of flounder’s
    scientific nomencla-
                                S     ummer flounder, a popular East Coast flatfish, fished from Maine to Florida,
                                      is often called fluke because of its distinctive shape. In the summer, fluke
                                migrates inshore, where it is caught in large numbers by recreational fishermen,
    ture, dentatus, refers      hence the name summer flounder. This fish can grow quite large, with females reach-
    to its full supply of       ing more than 20 pounds (males rarely grow larger than five pounds).
    sharp teeth                    Summer flounder has a mild flavor and delicate texture. When cooked, summer
●   One of the largest          flounder turns almost pure white.
    summer flounder ever
    caught measured four
    feet and weighed 30
    pounds
●   Summer flounder can
    live a relatively long
    life, with the oldest
    recorded age of             CONSERVATION NOTES
    20 years                         ummer flounder is managed as a distinct species by several agencies, including the
                                S    New England Fishery Management Council and the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries
                                Commission (ASMFC). According to the ASMFC, summer flounder numbers are “once again
                                approaching record highs.” Although populations of summer flounder have rebounded from
                                their low levels of the early 1990s, numbers of many other East Coast flatfish, such as
                                Atlantic halibut and yellowtail flounder, are still considered to be well below optimal levels.
                                    Summer flounder is taken in pound nets (stationary gear type) and gill nets in the estu-
                                arine waters of Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina and trawl fishery fleets along the
                                U.S. coast from Massachusetts to North Carolina.
                                    Trawling for summer flounder can damage seabeds and result in bycatch of nontargeted
                                species. Fishery management agencies try to monitor these effects and regulate areas and
                                methods of operation. For example, summer flounder trawlers are required to use turtle
                                excluder devices (TEDs).



                                IN SEASON
                                ●   Offshore fishery: winter                                           SPRING

                                ●   Inshore fishery: summer
                                                                                    WINTER                                SUMMER




                                                                                                        FALL




                             38 Sourcing Seafood
PRODUCT FORM
FRESH:
●   Whole
●   Dressed fillets


FROZEN:
●   Fillets



BUYING TIPS
●    It’s no fluke that summer is the best time to land a good deal on summer flounder.
    Landings are heaviest then because this big flatfish moves inshore in its annual
    migration.
●   The highest-quality summer flounder is caught in pound nets in the mid-Atlantic
    states. This fish is often sold live, and significant numbers are exported live to
    Japan, where they are consumed as sashimi.
●   Fillets are usually available in size ranges from one to three ounces to six to eight
    ounces, although some suppliers offer small, medium, large, and jumbo sizes.
                                                                                                                            HEALTH
                                                                                                                            ADVISORY
                                                                                                                    Consumption advisory
                                                                                                                    due to PCB levels,
                                                                                                                    based on Environmental
                                                                                                                    Protection Agency (EPA)
                                                                                                                    and state health
                                                                                                                    advisories:
                                                                                                                    ●   Women should limit
                                                                                                                        their intake to one
                                                                                                                        meal per month
                                                                                                                    ●   Men should limit
ASSOCIATIONS                                                                                                            their intake to one
Virginia Marine Products Board                                                                                          meal per month
554 Denbigh Blvd, Newport News, VA 23608, Phone: 757–874–3474, Fax: 757–886–0671,
                                                                                                                    ●   Children ages 0–6
Web Site: www.virginiaseafood.org, Email: llvasfd@pilot.infi.net • The Virginia Marine Products Board promotes a
variety of seafoods caught off state waters, including summer flounder. Information and promotional materials are       should not eat any
available through the Virginia Marine Products Board.                                                                   flounder
                                                                                                                    ●   Children ages 6–12
                                                                                                                        should limit their
                                                                                                                        intake to less than
                                                                                                                        one meal per month
                                                                                                                    See page 105 for the list of
                                                                                                                    Summer Flounder suppliers.
                                                                           The Fish and Shellfish Guide 39
Halibut, Pacific

                                 Hippoglossus stenolepis




HIGHLIGHTS
●   Average size: 10–60
    pounds, three feet long
                                 H       alibut is the largest of the flatfish. Two species are fished commercially: Pacific
                                         halibut and Atlantic halibut. Of the two species, Pacific halibut is far more
                                 abundant. Pacific halibut is found primarily along the west coast of North America,
●   Maximum age:                 from northern California to Alaska, with the commercial fishery occurring primarily
    42 years                     in Alaska and British Columbia.
●   Range: California to            There is a smaller fishery for Pacific halibut in the western North Pacific off north-
    Alaska                       ern Japan and Russia. China processes Japanese- and Russian-caught halibut and
●   Historically, Pacific        exports several million pounds of frozen halibut fillets to the U.S.
    halibut has weighed as          Atlantic halibut was once common in U.S. waters, but it is now very rare due to
    much as 500 pounds           overfishing. In the 1950s, Atlantic halibut landings peaked at almost 25 million
                                 pounds; in 1999 landings were approximately 25,000 pounds. The commercial
                                 Atlantic halibut fishery is currently closed in the U.S., though the species is caught
                                 incidentally in other fisheries and is fished recreationally.
                                    In 1995, an individual quota system replaced “derby fishing”(intensive fishing for
                                 short periods) for Pacific halibut. This means that fishermen may fish their quota
                                 anytime between March 1 and November 15, thus providing a supply of fresh Pacific
                                 halibut for much of the year.




                                 CONSERVATION NOTES
                                     acific halibut is considered to be abundant. In North America, halibut is caught in long-
                                 P   line fisheries and is regulated by the International Pacific Halibut Commission (IPHC),
                                 a joint United States-Canada endeavor. Each year the IPHC determines the status of the
                                 halibut population and establishes a quota for the fishing season. The Marine Stewardship
                                 Council is currently assessing the Pacific halibut fishery for certification as a “sustainable
                                 and well-managed” fishery.



                                 IN SEASON
                                 ●   March 1 through November 15.                                      SPRING




                                                                                    WINTER                                SUMMER




                                                                                                        FALL




                              40 Sourcing Seafood
PRODUCT FORM                                                                                                                 WHY’S MY
FRESH:                                                                                                                       HALIBUT SO
●   Distributors usually buy whole, fresh, gutted fish                                                                       CHALKY?
    and sell it as boneless fletches or steaks (bone-in and boneless)                                                        Pacific halibut meat is
●   There are about four fletches per fish, weighing up to 20 pounds or more per fletch                                      sometimes found to be
●   Fletches from larger fish are usually cut into smaller pieces                                                            “chalky”—a condition
●   Smaller “chicken” halibut (10–20 pounds) is sometimes sold whole                                                         associated with “a denatu-
                                                                                                                             ration of muscle proteins”
FROZEN:                                                                                                                      that appears more often
●   Usually sold headed and gutted and as steaks or fletches                                                                 in late summer and in fish
●   Frozen fletches normally run eight to twelve pounds                                                                      caught farther south. The
●   Steaks typically are offered in four to ten ounces                                                                       good news is it occurs in
                                                                                                                             only about one percent of
HALIBUT “CHEEKS”:                                                                                                            halibut. Chalkiness is easy
●   A sweet-flavored delicacy cut from head area next to gills, with texture similar to crab                                 to spot in fillets—the meat
●   Range from three ounces to more than a pound, depending on the size of the fish                                          is white instead of translu-
                                                                                                                             cent. While this is accept-
                                                                                                                             able for applications like
BUYING TIPS                                                                                                                  fish and chips, most buyers
●   When fresh is not available, distributors thaw headed and gutted halibut, and then                                       don’t want to pay as much
    fillet or steak it—a process known as “refreshing.”                                                                      for chalky fish.
●   Previously frozen cooks about 30 percent faster than fresh, which is why frozen
    halibut has a reputation for being dry.




                                                                                                                                     HEALTH
                                                                                                                                     ADVISORY
                                                                                                                             Consumption advisory
                                                                                                                             due to mercury levels.
ASSOCIATIONS                                                                                                                 According to the U.S. Food
International Pacific Halibut Commission                                                                                     & Drug Administration:
P.O. Box 95009, Seattle, WA 98145, Phone: 206–634–1838, Fax: 206–632–2983,
                                                                                                                             ●   Children age 0–6
Web Site: www.iphc.washington.edu, Email: info@iphc.washington.edu • The IPHC Web site has information on the
regulatory aspects of the halibut fishery, including quotas and fishing dates.                                                   should limit intake to
Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute (ASMI)
                                                                                                                                 three meals per month
311 N. Franklin St., Suite 200, Juneau, AK 99801, Phone: 800–478–2903, Fax: 907–465–5572,                                    ●   Children age 6–12
Web Site: www.alaskaseafood.org, Email: info@alaskaseafood.org • ASMI promotes the Alaskan halibut fishery (along
                                                                                                                                 should limit intake to
with other sustainable Alaskan fisheries) and offers a variety of useful information, including recipes, promotional mate-
rials, and a directory of Alaska halibut suppliers.                                                                              four meals per month.


                                                                                                                             See page 106 for the list of
                                                                                                                             Pacific Halibut suppliers.
                                                                             The Fish and Shellfish Guide 41
Lobster, American

                                   Homarus americanus




HIGHLIGHTS
●   Although often called
    Maine lobster, the
                                   T     he American lobster is not only one of the most popular seafoods in the U.S.,
                                         but it also comprises one of the most valuable fisheries, generating dockside
                                   revenues of almost $300 million yearly. This combination of value and popularity
    American lobster is            has resulted in significant concern regarding the sustainability of the fishery.
    found from Canada to              American lobster, also known simply as Maine lobster, is a bottom-dwelling marine
    North Carolina                 crustacean that is distributed widely over the continental shelf from the mid-Atlantic
●   The brain of a lobster is      to Labrador. It takes five to eight years for American lobster to reach sexual maturity
    about the same size as         and it can live almost 100 years. In both Canada and the U.S., American lobster is
    that of a grasshopper.         caught in traps. A smaller quantity is caught as bycatch by trawlers.
●   Lobsters’ teeth are in            Fishing removes nearly all American lobsters shortly after they mature. Since the
    their stomach, not in          species grows very slowly, and matures late, it may be quite vulnerable to unfavorable
    their mouth                    environmental conditions and overfishing.




                                   CONSERVATION NOTES
                                        number of regulatory safeguards are in place to maintain sustainability of the lobster
                                   A    fishery in the U.S. and Canada, including catch limitations on size (carapace length)
                                   and sex (“berried” females with extruded eggs must be returned), trap design requirements
                                   (e.g., escape ports), and limits on the number of traps used in the fishery.
                                       Some concerns remain, however. Currently, a majority of the lobster catch has barely
                                   reached maturity with lobsters generally weighing just over one pound. In addition, it appears
                                   that larger male lobsters are becoming scarce. And of serious concern is a disease that
                                   has decimated lobster numbers off Long Island and appears to be moving northward.



                                   IN SEASON
                                   ●   Off the U.S. coast, American lobster                             SPRING

                                       is caught year-round, peaking in the
                                       summer and early fall.                         WINTER                               SUMMER

                                   ●   In Canada, seasons vary by fishing
                                       area. Landings peak in May and June                               FALL

                                       and again in December after the fishery
                                       opens in southwestern Nova Scotia.




                                42 Sourcing Seafood
PRODUCT FORM
FRESH:
●   Live


FROZEN:
●   Whole cooked
●   Raw tails
●   Cooked meat
●   Cooked claws



BUYING TIPS
●   If you’re looking for a deal, the best time to buy is in May, when the Canadian
    Gulf of St. Lawrence season opens and summer demand has not kicked in yet.
    After Labor Day is also good because catches in Maine are still decent, and
    demand from the summer coastal resorts drops off dramatically.
●   If you’re buying lobsters from Maine in the early summer, be prepared to encounter
    soft-shell lobsters (also known as shedders), which can have pretty poor meat fill.

MAXIMUM SIZE REGULATIONS?
It may seem crazy, but along with minimum size regulations, maximum size regula-
tions prohibit lobster fisheries from catching exceptionally large lobsters. The maxi-
mum size limit is imposed to protect the breeding stock.

                                                                                                                                HEALTH
                                                                                                                                ADVISORY
                                                                                                                        Consumption advisory
                                                                                                                        due to mercury levels.
                                                                                                                        According to the U.S.
                                                                                                                        Food and Drug
ASSOCIATIONS                                                                                                            Administration:
Maine Lobster Promotion Council                                                                                         ●   Children ages of 0–6
382 Harlow Street, Bangor, ME 04401, Phone: 207–947–2966, Fax: 207–947–3191,
                                                                                                                            should limit their
Web Site: www.LobsterFromMaine.com, Email: info@LobsterFromMaine.com, Kristen Millar, Executive Director •
A state agency, the Maine Lobster Promotion Council is responsible for market development of Maine lobster through          intake to two meals
promotional and educational activities. The Council is involved in a variety of training programs for foodservice and       per month
retail, including proper handling, preparation, and serving of lobster.
                                                                                                                        ●   Children 6–12 should
                                                                                                                            limit their intake to
                                                                                                                            four meals per month


                                                                                                                        See page 108 for the list of
                                                                                                                        American Lobster suppliers.
                                                                           The Fish and Shellfish Guide 43
Lobster, Spiny (Rock)

                                Panulirus spp.




HIGHLIGHTS
●   The United States
    imports 87 percent
                                T     he terms “rock” and “spiny” lobster are sometimes used interchangeably. Spiny
                                      lobster is often marketed as “warmwater” tails (mostly from Caribbean nations,
                                California, or the coasts of Central and South America) or “coldwater” tails (from
    of its spiny/rock           Australia, New Zealand, or South Africa). This lobster does not have the characteristic
    lobster—mostly from         large front claws of the American lobster; it has a spiny, hard shell for protection
    Australia, Caribbean        (hence its name). Some populations of these lobsters are overfished while some are
    countries (mostly the       very well-managed. See below for more information concerning spiny lobsters avail-
    Bahamas, Honduras,          able on the U.S. market.
    Nicaragua), and Brazil         Caribbean Spiny Lobster (Panulirus argus): The largest fishery for spiny lobster,
●   Conservation organi-        Caribbean sources comprise about 65 percent of the U.S. spiny lobster market. It is
    zations rate U.S.           found in warm waters from Bermuda to Brazil. Almost all of the U.S. commercial
    (California, Florida)       catch comes from the Florida Keys, where levels appear to be steady and management
    spiny lobster and West      has been effective in maintaining the population. Many populations of Caribbean
    Australia rock lobster      spiny lobster, however, are heavily fished and there are significant concerns regarding
    as good environmental       widespread illegal catch and catch of undersized and egg-bearing lobsters.
    choices                        West Australian Rock Lobster (Panulirus cygnus): The second largest spiny lobster
                                fishery, this lobster comprises about seven percent of the U.S. spiny lobster market.
                                The fishery that supplies this highly sought-after species is certified as sustainable by
                                the Marine Stewardship Council.
                                   California Spiny Lobster (Panulirus interruptus): Most found between Point
                                Conception, California and Magdalena Bay, Baja California, where the population
                                is most dense. There are enough of these lobsters to support a small, well-managed



                                CONSERVATION NOTES
                                Spiny lobsters are caught with traps and by hand. While bycatch is generally not severe,
                                there can be significant mortality of lobsters that are handled poorly or discarded because
                                they are not the legal size.



                                IN SEASON
                                ●   While there are seasonal peaks in
                                    both warmwater and coldwater lobster
                                    production, the bulk of the catch is
                                    converted to frozen tails so there is
                                    a good supply year-round.




                             44 Sourcing Seafood
PRODUCT FORM                                                                                DETERMINING
FRESH:                                                                                      THE SEX OF A
●   Live                                                                                    SPINY LOBSTER
                                                                                            Female spiny lobsters
FROZEN:                                                                                     have very small claws on
●   Whole (blanched or fully cooked)                                                        their rear legs that are
●   Raw tails and meat                                                                      used for tending their
                                                                                            eggs, which are carried
                                                                                            under their tails. Just look
fishery in southern California (U.S.). The Mexican fishery for spiny lobster is certified   for the claws to determine
as sustainable by the Marine Stewardship Council.                                           if your lobster is a female.


BUYING TIPS
●   With such a pricey product, some less scrupulous suppliers have made fortunes
    selling excess glaze or meat that has been injected with water.
●   Coldwater tails sell for a substantial premium over warmwater tails, so suppliers
    occasionally try to pass the warmwater tails off as coldwater. Fortunately, it’s easy
    to spot the difference: warmwater tails are smooth with a greenish-colored shell
    with spots, while coldwater tails have a rough shell, with a deep reddish-purple
    color.
●   Large numbers of Caribbean spiny lobsters are caught by divers who separate the
    tails and hold them on ice. If the boats stay out too long, the result is a mushy
    textured, inferior product.




                                                                                            See page 110 for the list of
                                                                                            Spiny Lobster suppliers.
                                                          The Fish and Shellfish Guide 45
Mackerel, Atlantic & Spanish

                              Scomber scombrus (Atlantic) and
                              Scomberomorous maculates (Spanish)



HIGHLIGHTS
●   Atlantic mackerel is
    the largest mackerel
                              S       everal important members of the Scombridae family swim the waters off the
                                      U.S. Atlantic mackerel (Scomber scombrus), king mackerel (Scomberomorus cavalla),
                              Spanish mackerel (Scomberomorus maculates), and chub mackerel (Scomber japonicus)
    fishery in the U.S.       are all fished commercially in the U.S.
                                 The largest mackerel fishery in the U.S., with over 50 million pounds landed in
                              2002, is Atlantic mackerel, which is found in large schools on both sides of the North
                              Atlantic. Caught off the U.S. coast from New Jersey to Maine, mackerel averages one
                              to two pounds. The fishery for Spanish mackerel is much smaller by comparison:
                              Florida fishermen catch about five million pounds in a typical year, with individual
                              fish averaging two to three pounds. Florida also accounts for most of the king mack-
                              erel supply in the U.S., with annual catches averaging about two million pounds.
                              Kings are substantially larger and can grow to 70 pounds, but most of the commercial
                              catch averages five to 20 pounds.




                              CONSERVATION NOTES
                                   .S. mackerel fisheries appear to be well managed and sustainable at current levels.
                              U    In the case of Atlantic mackerel, market conditions, rather than size of the resource,
                              usually dictates catch levels. Purse seining and trawling have been the primary catch methods
                              for these two species, and, because they are pelagic schooling fish that are caught in the
                              upper level of the water column, bycatch in these fisheries has not been a major issue.
                                  Before 1995 there was a significant gill net fishery for Spanish mackerel in Florida
                              waters. However, since that time, a ban on commercial fishing nets in this region has
                              resulted in a switch to hook-and-line fishing gear and, thus, lower catch levels in Florida.



                              IN SEASON
                              ●   Both Atlantic and Spanish mackerel                                SPRING

                                  are fished year-round, although fish
                                  caught in the summer and fall has a            WINTER                                  SUMMER

                                  higher oil content.
                                                                                                     FALL




                           46 Sourcing Seafood
PRODUCT FORM
FRESH AND FROZEN:
●   Whole
●   Fillets
●   Headed and gutted



BUYING TIPS
●   In the U.S., where most mackerel is landed in high-volume fisheries, the focus is
    more on quantity, than quality, although it is possible to find higher-quality fish
    from smaller-volume fisheries.
●   The best Atlantic mackerel is landed in the fall in trap fisheries off New England.
    After a summer of heavy feeding, this fish has high oil content and is excellent
    grilled.
●   Like many tuna, if mackerel is handled poorly (lack of ice or refrigeration),
    histamines can result, leading to a higher risk of scromboid poisoning

MERCURY IN MACKEREL                                                                                HEALTH
Mercury levels in mackerel vary drastically by species. The U.S. Food and Drug                     ADVISORY
Administration (FDA) has issued a mercury warning advising women and children              Consumption advisory for
(0–12 years old) not to consume any king mackerel and suggests that men limit their        Spanish mackerel due to
intake to less than one meal per month. However, there is no mercury advisory for          mercury levels. According
Atlantic mackerel, a species with one of the highest levels of the beneficial omega-3      to the Food & Drug
fatty acids.                                                                               Administration:
                                                                                           ●   Women should limit
                                                                                               their intake to two
                                                                                               meals per month
                                                                                           ●   Men should limit their
                                                                                               intake to two meals
                                                                                               per month
                                                                                           ●   Children ages 0–6
                                                                                               should limit their
                                                                                               intake to one meal
                                                                                               per month
                                                                                           ●   Children ages 6–12
                                                                                               should limit their
                                                                                               intake to one meal
                                                                                               per month


                                                                                           See page 111 for the list of
                                                                                           Mackerel suppliers.
                                                         The Fish and Shellfish Guide 47
Mahimahi (Dolphinfish)

                                  Coryphaena hippurus




HIGHLIGHTS
●   Mahimahi is also
    marketed as dolphin,
                                  H        awaiian for “strong-strong” (in reference to its great strength as a swimmer),
                                           mahi often goes by other names, such as dorado in Latin America and dolphin
                                  or dolphinfish in the southeastern U.S. But don’t be fooled by its Hawaiian roots;
    dolphinfish, and dorado       mahi is found globally in tropical and subtropical waters and is available fresh from
●   Mahi is available year-       many sources, within and outside the U.S.
    round, with peak abun-           One of the largest fisheries for mahi is off Ecuador, with small-boat, handline fish-
    dance in late spring          ermen landing 25 million pounds in a good year. The U.S. has a relatively small mahi
    and summer                    fishery, which produces about two million pounds a year, two-thirds of which is
●   Taiwan is the leading         caught by Hawaiian fishermen.
    supplier of mahi to the          The best—and most expensive—mahi comes from the Hawaii troll fishery, which
    U.S. market, followed         has less environmental impact than mahi hook-and-line fisheries. While most of
    by Ecuador, Peru and          these fish are sold to high-end restaurants in Hawaii, a limited amount is “exported”
    Costa Rica                    to the mainland.
●   In spite of its domestic         Mahimahi is a mild, sweet-tasting fish that is very popular in restaurants through-
    mahi fishery, the U.S.        out the U.S.
    imports 25 million
    pounds of frozen fillets
    each year
                                  CONSERVATION NOTES
                                        ahi populations are believed to be abundant and healthy due to their fast growth rate,
                                  M     high reproductive capacity, and the fact that they reach reproductive maturity by six
                                  months. During spawning, female mahi can produce a quarter-million eggs or more.
                                      Most mahimahi is caught by hook and line (both handline and longline) conducted by
                                  small boats in directed fisheries, which have minimal bycatch. Significant amounts of mahi
                                  are also caught as a bycatch in tuna longline fisheries. Mahi appears to be able to with-
                                  stand a fair amount of fishing pressure; however, mahi is highly migratory and there are no
                                  current, long-term stock assessments for mahi. Also, there are no fishery management
                                  plans for the species, suggesting that overfishing could be a problem in the future.



                                  IN SEASON
                                  Available year-round                                                 SPRING

                                  ●   Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico supply is
                                      most plentiful from April through August       WINTER                               SUMMER

                                  ●   Central and South American fisheries
                                      run November though March                                         FALL

                                  ●   Hawaiian troll fishery runs from
                                      March–May and September–November




                               48 Sourcing Seafood
PRODUCT FORM                                                                                       BIG FISH,
FRESH:                                                                                             VORACIOUS
●   Whole                                                                                          EATER
●   Headed and gutted                                                                              Mahi gains an average
●   Fillets                                                                                        of ten percent of its body
                                                                                                   weight per day, and in
FROZEN:                                                                                            favorable conditions it can
●   Mostly fillets, both whole fillets and individual portions                                     grow to three feet or more
                                                                                                   in its first year—making it
                                                                                                   one of the fastest-growing
BUYING TIPS                                                                                        fish in the sea. Dolphinfish
●   Look for brightly colored skin when buying mahi; if color has faded to a dull gray,            feed aggressively in pairs,
    the fish is past its prime. If you’re buying fillets, high-quality meat will still have a      small packs, and schools
    pinkish hue.                                                                                   on flying fish, squid, and
●   When buying fresh mahi, it’s best to buy headed and gutted fish for maximum                    whatever forage fish is
    shelf life.                                                                                    most abundant.
●   The best deals on mahi are available in the late fall and early winter when catches
    off Ecuador and Costa Rica are at their peak.
●   Mahimahi can be a tasty substitute for overfished species such as snapper and
    grouper.




                                                                                                           HEALTH
                                                                                                           ADVISORY
                                                                                                   Consumption advisory
                                                                                                   due to mercury levels.
                                                                                                   According to the U.S. Food
                                                                                                   & Drug Administration:
                                                                                                   ●   Children age 0–6
                                                                                                       should limit intake to
                                                                                                       three meals per month
                                                                                                   ●   Children age 6–12
                                                                                                       should limit intake to
                                                                                                       four meals per month


                                                                                                   See page 112 for the list of
                                                                                                   Mahimahi suppliers.
                                                                 The Fish and Shellfish Guide 49
Mussels (farmed)




HIGHLIGHTS
●   Almost half of the
    mussels imported into
                                  M        ussels are cultured in approximately 40 countries around the globe, with
                                           four species accounting for the bulk of world production:
                                     Blue Mussels—These mussels have a moderate flavor and a firmer texture than
    the U.S. are live blue        clams. The farmed variety has a thinner, darker shell than wild blue mussels and is
    mussels from Atlantic         usually collected at a shell size of 2–3 inches.
    Canada, primarily                Mediterranean Mussels—Long a European favorite, these mussels are now grown
    Prince Edward Island          on the west coast of the United States. They are usually collected at 2.5–3.5 inches,
●   Of the remaining              but they can be found in larger sizes. Mediterranean mussels tend to yield about
    imports, most of              15 percent more meat than blue mussels.
    the supply is frozen             Green Mussels—Not to be confused with New Zealand greenshells, these are
    greenshell mussels            produced in Thailand and generally sold as frozen meat or cooked on the half shell.
    on the half shell from        Wild green mussels are a problem in Florida, where they foul bridges, docks, and
    New Zealand                   boats.
●   U.S. mussel producers,           New Zealand Greenshell Mussels—Also referred to as a greenshell or greenlip
    located mostly in             mussel, this mussel is about 30 percent larger than a blue mussel. It is usually export-
    New England and               ed individually frozen (after steaming) on the half shell or as frozen meats, smoked,
    Washington state,             or other products.
    sell almost all of their
    production live
                                  CONSERVATION NOTES
                                      ndividual mussels filter approximately 10–15 gallons of seawater daily to extract enough
                                  I   plankton for nutrients. Mussel farmers depend on a clean and healthy environment, as
                                  these filter feeders only thrive in top-quality water. Closures of mussel farming areas can
                                  occur from time to time if testing indicates the presence of harmful algal toxins.
                                       Culturing mussels on suspended ropes in the water column generally has little environ-
                                  mental impact. While mussels can be dredged from the sea bottom, this method typically
                                  has significant environmental impact.




                                  IN SEASON
                                  ●    Blue mussels: winter through                                    SPRING

                                       early spring
                                  ●    Mediterranean mussels: spring                 WINTER                               SUMMER

                                       through fall
                                                                                                        FALL


                                                                                                       SPRING




                                                                                     WINTER                               SUMMER




                                                                                                        FALL
                               50 Sourcing Seafood
                                                                                                                        HELPFUL HINTS
                                                                                                                        Depending on the species,
PRODUCT FORM                                                                                                            time of year, and culture
●   Blue mussels: live and frozen, both as meats and cooked in the shell; precooked,                                    method, a mussel’s meat-
    vacuum-packed are becoming available                                                                                to-shell ratio ranges from
●   Mediterranean mussels: live and frozen, both as meats and cooked in the shell                                       20 percent in bottom-
●   Greenshell mussels: individually frozen (after steaming) on the half shell, as frozen                               cultured blue mussels to
    meats, smoked, or other products; small quantities of live greenshells are also available.                          50 percent in rope-grown
                                                                                                                        greenshell mussels.
* The most important steps in processing mussels are purging to remove sand or grit and                                 Rope-grown mussels tend
sorting to eliminate dead mussels. Some producers also hold mussels in tanks of water                                   to have thinner, cleaner
that are treated with ultraviolet light, which destroys harmful bacteria, a process known as                            shells and a higher meat-
“depuration.”                                                                                                           to-shell ratio.
                                                                                                                        ●   Mussels in good condi-
                                                                                                                            tion can live up to two
BUYING TIPS                                                                                                                 weeks after they are
●   Remember: spawning mussels aren’t the best for eating in terms of texture (mushy)                                       collected.
    and meat yield, and, after a mussel spawns, its shelf life is greatly reduced.                                      ●   A mussel isn’t neces-
                                                                                                                            sarily dead if its shell
AS A RULE:                                                                                                                  is gaping. To check,
●   Blue mussels are best in the winter and early spring (summer spawners).                                                 immerse the mussel in
●   You can switch to Mediterranean mussels in the spring, summer, and fall (winter                                         fresh water. If its shell
    spawners).                                                                                                              closes, it’s alive.
●   New Zealand’s greenshell and green mussels are usually frozen, so season isn’t
    generally a concern.
                                                                                                                                HEALTH
                                                                                                                                ADVISORY
                                                                                                                        Paralytic shellfish poison-
                                                                                                                        ing (PSP) is caused by
                                                                                                                        eating bivalve shellfish
ASSOCIATIONS                                                                                                            that is contaminated with
Pacific Coast Shellfish Growers Association (PCSGA)                                                                     algae containing harmful
Olympia, Washington, Web Site: www.pcsga.org • The largest shellfish association in North America representing the
                                                                                                                        toxins. The toxin that
interests of shellfish growers from British Columbia, Alaska, Washington, Oregon, California, Mexico, and Hawaii. The
PCSGA is a good source of information about environmental issues, shellfish safety and health issues, technological     causes PSP cannot be
advances, and marketing and research.                                                                                   destroyed by cooking or
PEI Aquaculture Alliance                                                                                                freezing. Inquire with your
Charlottetown, PEI, Canada, Web Site: www.aquaculturepei.com • The Alliance, which includes the PEI Cultivated
                                                                                                                        supplier about routine
Mussel Growers Group, promotes Prince Edward Island (Canada) aquaculture and provides contacts and promotional
materials for PEI blue mussel growers.                                                                                  testing of products.
Greenshell.com
Blenheim, New Zealand, Web Site: www.greenshell.com • Greenshell.com is the promotional arm of the New Zealand
                                                                                                                        See page 113 for the list of
Mussel Industry Council, Ltd., and is responsible for promoting New Zealand greenshell mussels.
                                                                                                                        Mussels suppliers.
                                                                           The Fish and Shellfish Guide 51
Oysters




HIGHLIGHTS
●   Most Eastern oysters in
    the market are wild, but
                                  T     wo species of oysters dominate the U.S. supply: Eastern oysters and Pacific oysters.
                                        The taste of oysters is strongly influenced by the characteristics of local waters,
                                  and species tend to be marketed by origin. Other species commonly found include the
    a number of hatcheries        Olympia oyster, the Japanese Kumamoto oyster, and the European flat oyster. Oysters
    now produce seeds for         are the most common farmed shellfish in the world.
    oyster farmers                   Eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica): Fished and farmed from Atlantic Canada to
●   On the west coast of          the Gulf of Mexico and represents about 80 percent of U.S. oyster production. Most
    North America, almost         are collected from the wild, but overfishing, habitat degradation, and disease have
    all oysters are farmed        driven wild catch levels in some areas to record lows. Farmed Eastern oysters, grown
    from seeds, which             using a rudimentary form of aquaculture where farmers transport oysters from nursery
    largely derive from           areas to grow-out areas, are considered a good environmental choice.
    non-native species               European (flat) oyster (Ostrea edulis): Sometimes called Belon oysters, in reference
                                  to a once-major production area. Disease and pollution have decimated populations,
                                  and European production is a small fraction of what it once was. Small farming opera-
                                  tions have introduced flat oysters to New England, California, and Washington state.
                                     Kumamoto oyster (Crassostrea sikamea): Native to Kumamoto Bay, Japan, this
                                  oyster was introduced to the west coast of North America after World War II. Today,
                                  they are farmed from British Columbia to northern California and are relatively
                                  expensive due to more labor intensive farming practices.



                                  CONSERVATION NOTES
                                       ysters farmed in nets, trays, or racks suspended in the water column are considered
                                  O    good environmental choices, though farms may use non-native species. The oyster is
                                  a filter feeder—it filters algae and may augment local water quality conditions. It does not
                                  require feed, so there is no net loss of wild fish as is the case with carnivorous fish farm-
                                  ing. Oyster farming requires little or no drugs or other chemicals. The collection of oysters
                                  from the ocean bottom may be detrimental to bottom habitat and associated organisms.



                                  IN SEASON
                                  ●   Available year-round; periodic closure of                         SPRING

                                      some oyster beds may occur due to
                                      local water conditions                         WINTER                                SUMMER




                                                                                                         FALL




                               52 Sourcing Seafood
PRODUCT FORM
FRESH:
●   Live
●   Meat


FROZEN:
●   Meat or half shell



   Olympia oyster (Ostrea lurida): The Olympia oyster is found from Alaska to Baja
California, although Washington is the only state that has produced Olympias on a
commercial scale. Overfishing and pollution have reduced catch levels to less than
one percent of former levels. A few growers in Washington state have had some                                                  HEALTH
success farming Olympias, but production remains limited.                                                                      ADVISORY
   Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas): Comprises 98 percent of world farmed oyster                                     Oysters may carry the
production. Native to Japan, it is now farmed extensively in Washington state, British                                 Vibrio vulnificus bacteri-
Columbia, Europe, and the Pacific Rim. Most growers use hatchery seeds and raise                                       um, a naturally occurring
the oysters on the ocean bottom or on trays or ropes suspended in the water column.                                    bacterium that is in high-
                                                                                                                       est concentrations in
BUYING TIPS                                                                                                            summer months, which
●   If stored at 36–40° F in a moist environment, oysters can be kept up to two weeks                                  can be fatal when con-
    after they are collected, however, shelf life is shorter after spawning in the summer.                             sumed by people with
●   As a rule, Olympia oysters command the highest price, followed by European oys-                                    compromised immune
    ters, Kumamotos, Pacific oysters, and Eastern oysters.                                                             systems. Health officials
●   By law, a live-oyster shipment must include identification of the oysters’ origin and                              recommend cooking oys-
    collection date; it is illegal to discard this tag sooner than 90 days after delivery.                             ters thoroughly to elimi-
                                                                                                                       nate any harmful bacteria.
                                                                                                                       Paralytic shellfish poison-
                                                                                                                       ing (PSP) is caused by
                                                                                                                       eating bivalve shellfish
ASSOCIATIONS                                                                                                           that is contaminated with
Pacific Coast Shellfish Growers Association                                                                            algae containing harmful
120 State Ave. NE, PMB #142, Olympia, WA 98501, Phone: 360–754–2744, Web Site: www.pcsga.org,
                                                                                                                       toxins. The toxin that
Executive Director: Robin Downey • The largest shellfish association in North America. Shellfish growers in Alaska,
British Columbia, Washington, Oregon, California, Mexico, and Hawaii and is involved in environmental protection.      causes PSP cannot be
British Columbia Shellfish Growers Association
                                                                                                                       destroyed by cooking or
350 (B) Robson Street, Nanaimo, BC V9R 2V5 Canada, Phone: 250–714–0804, Web Site: www.bcsga.ca,                        freezing. Inquire with your
Executive Director: Pamela Parker • Represents scallop, clam, and oyster growers in the province.
                                                                                                                       supplier about routine
East Coast Shellfish Growers Association                                                                               testing of products.
1623 Whitesville Road, Toms River, NJ 08755, Phone: 732–349–1152, Web Site: www.ecsga.org • A relatively
small association representing oyster and mussel growers. Its Web site provides links to a number of nongovernmental
associations.
                                                                                                                       See page 114 for the list of
                                                                                                                       Oyster suppliers.
                                                                           The Fish and Shellfish Guide 53
Pollock, Alaska

                                 Theragra chalcogramma




HIGHLIGHTS
●   Alaskan pollock goes
    by many names:
                                 T      he versatility of Alaska pollock is demonstrated in dishes from fish sticks to
                                        sushi. This adaptability to many flavors or preparations has made Alaska pollock
                                 one of the largest food fisheries in the world. Fisheries for Alaska pollock operate on
    walleye pollock, bigeye      both sides of the Bering Sea—in the Gulf of Alaska and in Russia’s Sea of Okhotsk—
    pollock, bigeye cod,         with landings totaling over six billion pounds.
    snow cod, whiting,              Although Alaska pollock can grow to more than 20 pounds, most of the fish land-
    tomcod, and Pacific          ed in the commercial fishery is less than three pounds. A member of the cod family,
    pollock                      Alaska pollock has lean, white flesh that becomes opaque when cooked. A close rela-
●   In Japan, Alaskan            tive, Atlantic pollock, is fished on both sides of the North Atlantic. Atlantic pollock is
    pollock roe (momijiko)       larger and has a higher oil content and grayer flesh than the Pacific species.
    is often salted and             Most Alaska pollock is sold as either fillets or as surimi. It’s also the fish most
    colored with red             often used in retail breaded and battered fish items. A very mild-tasting fish, high-
    vegetable dye                quality Alaska pollock produces an excellent, moist fillet comparable to sole.

                                 CONSERVATION NOTES
                                      ccording to the National Marine Fisheries Service, the agency responsible for managing
                                 A    pollock populations, numbers of Alaska pollock in the eastern Bering Sea population
                                 appear to be nearing record levels. Pollock in Russia’s sector of the Bering Sea is over-
                                 fished, with catches declining significantly over the past decade.
                                     Alaska pollock is caught by mid-water trawls, which have no impact on the sea floor.
                                 These trawlers process pollock at sea into fillets, headed and gutted product, or surimi.
                                     In September 2004, the Marine Stewardship Council certified as sustainable the Bering
                                 Sea Aleutian Islands (BSAI) pollock fishery. A decision on certification of the Gulf of Alaska
                                 pollock fishery is still pending. Several conservation organizations and scientists, however,
                                 remain concerned that current fishing levels significantly reduce an important food source
                                 for the endangered Steller sea lion and are preventing its recovery. To reduce food competi-
                                 tion, large near-shore areas around the sea lion rookeries of the Bering Sea, Aleutian
                                 Islands, and the Gulf of Alaska are now off-limits to trawling.



                                 IN SEASON
                                 ●   Available sporadically, generally in the                          SPRING

                                     fall and winter
                                                                                    WINTER                                SUMMER




                                                                                                        FALL




                              54 Sourcing Seafood
PRODUCT FORM
FRESH:
●   Available, but not common


FROZEN:
Mostly fillets
●   Twice-frozen
●   Single-frozen, deep-skinned, or with fat layer intact



BUYING TIPS
●   The highest-quality fillets are frozen at sea but are generally priced the same as
    fillets frozen by Alaska shore plants.
●   Removing the fat layer results in a whiter fillet that more closely resembles cod.
    This also means a lower meat yield, so prices are generally higher for deep-skinned
    fillets.
●   The quality of pollock-derived imitation seafood varies widely. Less expensive
    products may include cornstarch and have high water content, with correspond-
    ingly less fish content.




ASSOCIATIONS
At-Sea Processors Association
4039 21st Avenue West, Suite 400, Seattle, WA 98199, Phone: 206–285–5139, Fax: 206–285–1841,
Web Site: www.atsea.org, Email: apa@atsea.org • The At-Sea Processors Association represents the interests of the
large vessels that catch and process Alaska pollock. Its Web site also contains useful information about Alaska pollock.

Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute (ASMI)
311 N. Franklin St., Suite 200, Juneau, AK 99801, Phone: 800–478–2903, Fax: 907–465–5572,
Web Site: www.alaskaseafood.org, Email: info@alaskaseafood.org • The Institute promotes all major Alaska seafoods,
including pollock. Its Web site contains a variety of useful information, including recipes, promotional materials, and a
directory of Alaska pollock producers.




                                                                            The Fish and Shellfish Guide 55
Sablefish (Black Cod)

                                Anoplopoma fimbria




HIGHLIGHTS
●   75 percent of the
    sablefish catch is
                                Y       ou might know sablefish by a few different names, but don’t be fooled.
                                        Sablefish is referred to as black cod, but it’s not a member of the cod family.
                                It’s also labeled, butterfish—in reference to its smooth, rich texture—but it’s not true
    landed off Alaska           butterfish either. Instead, sablefish belongs to the family, Anoplopomatidae, which
●   High oil content and        includes only sablefish and skillfish.
    mild flavor make                Sablefish is found from central Baja California to the eastern Bering Sea, with
    sablefish a perfect         about 75 percent of landings taken off Alaska. Japan is a major importer of sablefish
    substitute for Chilean      (more than 50 percent of the U.S. catch is exported to Japan) and pays a premium
    sea bass                    price for this highly desirable fish. In recent years, however, more U.S. consumers
●   Sablefish can be found      have begun to appreciate its unique flavor. Kasu cod, or sablefish marinated in sake
    in depths close to          leeks and grilled, is making its way into U.S. restaurants. Cold-smoked sablefish has
    5,000 feet                  also become a popular delicacy.
                                    Commercial sablefish fisheries in the U.S. and Canada use trawls, longlines, and
                                traps, with 80 percent of landings caught by longline fishermen.




                                CONSERVATION NOTES
                                    he Alaska sablefish fishery is managed by the North Pacific Fisheries Management
                                T   Council, which has established an annual individual fishing quota (IFQ) to ensure that
                                the sablefish fishery remains sustainable. Canada manages its fishery in a similar manner.
                                    Sablefish from Alaska and British Columbia receives high marks from conservation
                                organizations, since these fisheries are considered well managed and their populations
                                appear healthy. In fact, the Marine Stewardship Council is currently assessing the Alaska
                                sablefish fishery for sustainability certification.
                                    Other West Coast sablefish fisheries do not receive such high marks, due to manage-
                                ment concerns and fishing overcapacity.



                                IN SEASON
                                ●   March 1 to November 30: West Coast                              SPRING

                                    trawlers experience a small amount of
                                    sablefish bycatch because they target             WINTER                          SUMMER

                                    other species, thus making some
                                    sablefish available for most of the year.                        FALL




                             56 Sourcing Seafood
PRODUCT FORM                                                                                                             PARENT OF
FROZEN:                                                                                                                  THE YEAR
●   Headed and gutted, widely available                                                                                  Sablefish can live up to
                                                                                                                         94 years, and usually
FRESH:                                                                                                                   reach reproductive maturity
●   Headed and gutted, limited availability March–November                                                               by age six. Females can
                                                                                                                         spawn three to four times
ALSO AVAILABLE:                                                                                                          per season, with a seven-
●   Fillets, normally pinbone-in, skin-on, fresh or frozen                                                               year-old female laying up
●   Vacuum-packed kasu cod fillets                                                                                       to 100,000 eggs. But wait
●   Cold-smoked fillets                                                                                                  another 13 years or so,
                                                                                                                         and egg production may
                                                                                                                         increase tenfold, to about
BUYING TIPS                                                                                                              a million eggs!
●   Large sablefish bring a premium price; its fillet yield is higher and it tends to have
    higher oil content.
●   Fish caught off Alaska tend to be much larger (average five to seven pounds) than
    those from the West Coast (average two to three pounds).
●   Longliners bleed and freeze fish at sea, resulting in a high-quality, expensive product.
●   Canadian trap-caught sablefish tends to be relatively large and very high quality.
●   Sablefish from small trawlers is rarely bled and is prone to bruising, so it’s lower
    priced.




ASSOCIATIONS
Canadian Sablefish Association
406–535 Howe Street, Vancouver, BC, Canada, V6C 2Z4, Phone: 604–915–9117, Fax: 604–638–0116,
Web Site: www.canadiansablefish.com • This is an association of Canadian sablefish license holders, promoting wild
sablefish. The Web site provides background information and recipes.

Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute
311 N. Franklin St., Suite 200, Juneau, AK 99801–1147, Phone : 800–478–2903, Web Site:
www.AlaskaSeafood.org Email: info@AlaskaSeafood.org • Provides information, promotional materials and recipes,
and a directory of Alaskan seafood suppliers, including sablefish suppliers.

Pacific Coast Federation of Fishermen’s Associations (PCFFA)
P.O. Box 29370, San Francisco, CA 94129, Phone: 415–561–5080, Fax: 415–561–5464, Web Site: www.pcffa.org
Email: fishlifr@aol.com • A federation of port and fishermen’s associations from San Diego to Alaska, assuring fisher-
                                                                                                                         See page 118 for the list of
men’s rights and fighting for the survival of commerical fishing as a way of life.
                                                                                                                         Sablefish suppliers.
                                                                           The Fish and Shellfish Guide 57
Salmon, Chinook (King/wild Pacific)

                                  Oncorhynchus tschawytscha




HIGHLIGHTS
●   Five species of wild
    Pacific salmon are
                                  C      hinook salmon, found from the Yukon River in Alaska to central California,
                                         is the largest of the five Pacific species. Also known as “king” salmon, this giant
                                  averages 11 to 18 pounds, though it can grow substantially larger.
    readily available in the         Chinook commands the highest price of the five species, sought after for its high
    U.S. market: chinook,         oil content (which varies by region). The amount of oil is directly related to the
    sockeye, coho, chum,          distance the salmon has to swim to spawn—the greater the distance, the greater its
    and pink                      oil content. Yukon River king salmon, for example, may swim 2,000 miles in 60 days
●   Chinook comprises             (over 33 miles per day!) to reach its spawning ground in Canada. When caught in the
    less than 4 percent of        sea, before entering the river, this salmon can have as much as 25 percent oil content,
    the total wild Pacific        which makes for extremely rich meat.
    salmon catch                     Most Chinook is caught by trollers (hook and line), but a significant amount is
                                  also caught by gill netters.




                                  CONSERVATION NOTES
                                       lthough many salmon stocks on the Pacific Coast are threatened with extinction, others
                                  A    are in very good shape. Wild Alaskan salmon stocks are in especially good condition,
                                  with Alaskan salmon fisheries comprising more than 85 percent of wild Pacific salmon
                                  catches in most years. All wild Alaskan salmon have been certified as sustainable by the
                                  Marine Stewardship Council (MSC), and wild salmon fisheries in British Columbia and
                                  California are currently undergoing MSC assessment.
                                      While a number of Alaska and West Coast salmon fisheries are enhanced with hatchery-
                                  reared fish, the majority of Alaska’s salmon runs are from naturally spawning adult fish.



                                  IN SEASON
                                  ●   May through September (Alaska is the                            SPRING

                                      first to open, and other regions follow)
                                  ●   Alaskan troll fishery is open through         WINTER                               SUMMER

                                      winter
                                                                                                       FALL




                               58 Sourcing Seafood
PRODUCT FORM                                                                                                YOU ARE WHAT
Available in a variety of product forms, depending on                                                       YOU EAT
the species and time of year:                                                                               White king salmon, once
●   Because Alaska salmon runs occur over a relatively short period in extremely remote                     thought to be inferior, is
    regions, over 90 percent of the Alaska catch is either frozen or canned.                                in fact as rich in flavor as
●   Fresh and frozen is mostly available headed and gutted.                                                 its pink-hued siblings.
●   Alaska processors produce frozen fillets, both pinbone-in and boneless, on a small                      Salmon flesh color is
    scale.                                                                                                  affected by its food—
●   Smoked products are available from large Alaskan processors and smaller processors                      king that feeds on sardines
    throughout the rest of the U.S.                                                                         or anchovies has light-
                                                                                                            colored flesh; king that
King is graded under 7, 7–11, 11–18, and 18 up.                                                             eats mostly krill has
                                                                                                            pinker flesh.


BUYING TIPS
The most important thing to keep in mind when buying wild salmon is that no
matter how well fishermen and processors handle their fish, there will still be major
quality differences due to natural variability. The key is not to buy based solely on
species (all chinook is not created equal), but to learn about specific runs and their
characteristics so you can find the perfect salmon for your needs.




ASSOCIATIONS
Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute (ASMI)
311 N. Franklin St., Suite 200, Juneau, AK 99801, Phone: 800–478–2903, Fax: 907–465–5572,
Web Site: www.alaskaseafood.org, Email: info@alaskaseafood.org

BC (British Columbia) Salmon Marketing Council
1100–1200 West 73rd Avenue, Vancouver, BC Canada V6P 6G5, Phone: 604–267–3030, Fax: 604–266–3097,
Web Site: www.bcsalmon.ca, Email: bcsmc@bcsalmon.ca

California Salmon Council
P.O. Box 2255, Folsom, CA 95763, Phone: 916–933–7050, Fax: 916–733–7055, Web Site: www.calkingsalmon.org,
Email: info@calkingsalmon.org

Pacific Coast Federation of Fishermen’s Associations (PCFFA)
P.O. Box 29370, San Francisco, CA 94129, Phone: 415–561–5080, Fax: 415–561–5464, Web Site: www.pcffa.org,   See page 122 for the list of Wild
Email: fishlifr@aol.com                                                                                     Salmon suppliers.
                                                                   The Fish and Shellfish Guide 59
Salmon, Chum (wild Pacific)

                                  Oncorhynchus keta




HIGHLIGHTS
●   Five species of wild
    Pacific salmon are
                                  C       hum salmon has the widest geographic range of all Pacific salmon, with runs
                                          in Japan, Russia, and along the Pacific coast of North America from Washington
                                  state to Kotzebue, Alaska (north of the Arctic Circle). Japan is home to the world’s
    readily available in the      largest chum salmon fishery—annual catch can vary by 25 percent, but in a good
    U.S. market: chinook,         year, Japan catches 300–500 million pounds of chum, all of which come from salmon
    sockeye, coho, chum,          hatcheries. The second-largest chum fishery—Alaskan chum fishery—produces about
    and pink                      85 percent of the U.S. chum catch (the rest is caught in Washington state).
●   In a typical year, chum          The challenge with chum salmon is not in finding it, but in getting what you pay
    accounts for about 15         for. The skin color, flesh color, and oil content of chum vary much more than other
    percent of the U.S.           salmon species. This is because chum spawns close to the ocean, which means it
    wild salmon catch             does not build up a large quantity of oil, so the quality of its flesh can change dra-
                                  matically in a short time. The highest-quality chum salmon is called “silver brite,”
                                  referring to its bright, silver skin color (not to be confused with coho, which is often
                                  called “silver”).
                                     The northern Japanese hatchery-based fishery is run by a cooperative that uses
                                  fish traps, which minimize handling and produce a very high-quality product.



                                  CONSERVATION NOTES
                                       lthough many salmon stocks on the Pacific Coast are threatened with extinction, others
                                  A    are in very good shape. Wild Alaskan salmon stocks are in especially good condition,
                                  with Alaskan salmon fisheries comprising more than 85 percent of wild Pacific salmon
                                  catches in most years. All wild Alaskan salmon have been certified as sustainable by the
                                  Marine Stewardship Council (MSC), and wild salmon fisheries in British Columbia and
                                  California are currently undergoing MSC assessment.
                                      While a number of Alaska and West Coast salmon fisheries are enhanced with
                                  hatchery-reared fish, the majority of Alaska’s salmon runs are from naturally spawning
                                  adult fish.



                                  IN SEASON
                                  ●   Late June (in Alaska) through November                         SPRING

                                      (in Washington state).
                                                                                   WINTER                               SUMMER




                                                                                                      FALL




                               60 Sourcing Seafood
PRODUCT FORM                                                                                                           WHY CHOOSE
Available in a variety of product forms, depending on                                                                  CHUM?
the species and time of year:                                                                                          Chum salmon can be the
●   Because Alaska salmon runs occur over a relatively short period in extremely remote                                best value on the market,
    regions, over 90 percent of the Alaska catch is either frozen or canned.                                           if you find it at just the
●   Fresh and frozen is mostly available headed and gutted.                                                            right time when its skin is
●   Alaska processors produce frozen fillets, both pinbone-in and boneless, on a small                                 bright and meat is deep
    scale.                                                                                                             red. Most chum is sold in
●   Smoked products are available from large Alaskan processors and smaller processors                                 supermarkets, although
    throughout the rest of the U.S.                                                                                    frozen chum portions can
●   Value-added products like marinated steaks and fillets, salmon burgers, and other items                            be purchased wholesale.
    are becoming readily available, especially for chum and pink salmon.                                               Chum has a mild taste
                                                                                                                       and is perfectly suited for
Chum is graded 2–4, 4–6, 6–9, and 9 up.                                                                                grilling on a barbecue.



U.S. buyers are unlikely to find Japanese hatchery-based chum in the market.
  Chum, also referred to as “dog” or “keta” salmon, averages about eight pounds
and is caught mostly by gill nets or purse seiners.

BUYING TIPS
The most important thing to keep in mind when buying wild salmon is that no
matter how well fishermen and processors handle their fish, there will still be major
quality differences due to natural variability. The key is not to buy based solely on
species (all chum is not created equal), but to learn about specific runs and their
characteristics so you can find the perfect salmon for your needs.




ASSOCIATIONS
Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute (ASMI)
311 N. Franklin St., Suite 200, Juneau, AK 99801, Phone: 800–478–2903, Fax: 907–465–5572,
Web Site: www.alaskaseafood.org Email: info@alaskaseafood.org • Promotes major Alaska seafoods, with an
emphasis on salmon. The Web site contains a variety of useful information, including recipes, promotional materials,
and a directory of suppliers.

BC (British Columbia) Salmon Marketing Council
1100–1200 West 73rd Avenue, Vancouver, BC Canada V6P 6G5, Phone: 604–267–3030, Fax: 604–266–3097,
Web Site: www.bcsalmon.ca, Email: bcsmc@bcsalmon.ca • Provides information and materials for wild British
Columbia salmon.



                                                                                                                       See page 122 for the list of Wild
                                                                                                                       Salmon suppliers.
                                                                           The Fish and Shellfish Guide 61
Salmon, Coho (wild Pacific)

                                  Oncorhynchus kisutch




HIGHLIGHTS
●   Five species of wild
    Pacific salmon are
                                  A      lso known as “silver” salmon, coho is caught from Oregon to Alaska, mostly
                                         by trollers and gill netters. The coho supply is the lowest of any wild salmon
                                  species, except chinook. In most years, coho accounts for less than 10 percent of U.S.
    readily available in the      wild salmon catches.
    U.S. market: chinook,            Coho salmon is less expensive than chinook or sockeye, but are still considered
    sockeye, coho, chum,          quite high quality. Among the highest-quality coho in the market are Copper River
    and pink                      coho (best in September) and troll-caught, frozen-at-sea coho. Good-quality coho
●   In most years, coho           should have bright, silvery skin and red flesh, although the skin color of gill net-
    accounts for less than        caught coho (especially from West Coast) is more variable.
    10 percent of U.S. wild          Coho is slightly smaller than chum salmon, averaging about seven to eight
    salmon catches                pounds. Its meat color is a bright red and is considered to be of much higher quality
                                  than chum. Coho that has just started to turn reddish is referred to as “blush” and
                                  may sell at a discount, although it can still be quite high quality (and quite red).
                                  Coho that is fully pigmented is referred to as “redskin” (not to be confused with red
                                  or sockeye salmon).




                                  CONSERVATION NOTES
                                       lthough many salmon stocks on the Pacific Coast are threatened with extinction, others
                                  A    are in very good shape. Wild Alaskan salmon stocks are in especially good condition,
                                  with Alaskan salmon fisheries comprising more than 85 percent of wild Pacific salmon
                                  catches in most years. All wild Alaskan salmon have been certified as sustainable by the
                                  Marine Stewardship Council (MSC), and wild salmon fisheries in British Columbia and
                                  California are currently undergoing MSC assessment.
                                      While a number of Alaska and West Coast salmon fisheries are enhanced with hatchery-
                                  reared fish, the majority of Alaska’s salmon runs are from naturally spawning adult fish.



                                  IN SEASON
                                  ●   Late July to October                                            SPRING




                                                                                    WINTER                               SUMMER




                                                                                                       FALL




                               62 Sourcing Seafood
PRODUCT FORM                                                                                                                   A PERFECT
Available in a variety of product forms, depending on the                                                                      SHADE OF RED
species and time of year:                                                                                                      Coho that has just started
●   Because Alaska salmon runs occur over a relatively short period in extremely remote                                        to turn reddish is referred
    regions, over 90 percent of the Alaska catch is either frozen or canned.                                                   to as “blush” and may sell
●   Fresh and frozen is mostly available headed and gutted.                                                                    at a discount, although it
●   Alaska processors produce frozen fillets, both pinbone-in and boneless, on a small                                         can still be quite high
    scale.                                                                                                                     quality (and quite red).
●   Smoked products are available from large Alaskan processors and smaller processors                                         Coho that is fully pigment-
    throughout the rest of the U.S.                                                                                            ed is referred to as “red-
●   Value-added products like marinated steaks and fillets, salmon burgers, and other items                                    skin” (not to be confused
    are becoming readily available (but mostly for lower-cost chum and pink).                                                  with red or sockeye,
                                                                                                                               salmon). Redskin sells
Coho is graded 2–4, 4–6, 6–9, and 9 up.                                                                                        at a discounted price,
                                                                                                                               because its skin turns
                                                                                                                               a less-desirable, reddish
BUYING TIPS                                                                                                                    hue as well.
The most important thing to keep in mind when buying wild salmon is that no
matter how well fishermen and processors handle their fish, there will still be major
quality differences due to natural variability. The key is not to buy based solely on
species (all coho are not created equal), but to learn about specific runs and their
characteristics so you can find the perfect salmon for your needs.




ASSOCIATIONS
Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute (ASMI)
311 N. Franklin St., Suite 200, Juneau, AK 99801, Phone: 800–478–2903, Fax: 907–465–5572,
Web Site: www.alaskaseafood.org, Email: info@alaskaseafood.org • Promotes major Alaska seafoods, with an emphasis
on salmon. The Web site contains useful information, including recipes, promotional materials, and a directory of suppliers.

BC (British Columbia) Salmon Marketing Council
1100–1200 West 73rd Avenue, Vancouver, BC Canada V6P 6G5, Phone: 604–267–3030, Fax: 604–266–3097,
Web Site: www.bcsalmon.ca, Email: bcsmc@bcsalmon.ca • Provides information and materials for wild British
Columbia salmon.

Pacific Coast Federation of Fishermen’s Associations (PCFFA)
P.O. Box 29370, San Francisco, CA 94129, Phone: 415–561–5080, Fax: 415–561–5464, Web Site: www.pcffa.org,
Email: fishlifr@aol.com • A federation of port and fishermen’s associations from San Diego to Alaska, assuring fisher-
                                                                                                                               See page 122 for the list of Wild
men’s rights and fighting for the survival of commerical fishing as a way of life.
                                                                                                                               Salmon suppliers.
                                                                              The Fish and Shellfish Guide 63
Salmon, Pink (wild Pacific)

                                  Oncorhynchus gorbuscha




HIGHLIGHTS
●   Five species of wild
    Pacific salmon are
                                  P      ink salmon are the smallest of the five wild Pacific species—averaging two to
                                         six pounds—but they are the most abundant (found in Russia and Alaska).
                                  In a good year for pinks, more than half of the U.S. commercial wild salmon catch
    readily available in the      is pink salmon (pink salmon populations are usually higher in odd-number years).
    U.S. market: chinook,         Because pink returns in very large volumes over a short period, most of it is processed
    sockeye, coho, chum,          quickly through canning or freezing. Only a limited volume is sold fresh.
    and pink                         Pink has a paler meat color then other species and a more delicate trout-like texture.
●   Pink salmon form the          As a rule, pink caught in Russian waters has redder flesh than North American pink.
    backbone of Alaska’s             Fresh or frozen pink salmon may be inexpensive, but its quality is often highly
    fisheries                     variable. Before spawning, pink salmon develops a pronounced “hump,” its skin
                                  turns dark, and its meat quality deteriorates.




                                  CONSERVATION NOTES
                                       lthough many salmon stocks on the Pacific Coast are threatened with extinction, others
                                  A    are in very good shape. Wild Alaskan salmon stocks are in especially good condition,
                                  with Alaskan salmon fisheries comprising more than 85 percent of wild Pacific salmon
                                  catches in most years. All wild Alaskan salmon have been certified as sustainable by the
                                  Marine Stewardship Council (MSC), and wild salmon fisheries in British Columbia are
                                  currently undergoing MSC assessment.
                                      While a number of Alaska and West Coast salmon fisheries are enhanced with hatchery-
                                  reared fish, the majority of Alaska’s salmon runs are from naturally spawning adult fish.



                                  IN SEASON
                                  ●   July through August                                             SPRING




                                                                                    WINTER                               SUMMER




                                                                                                       FALL




                               64 Sourcing Seafood
PRODUCT FORM
Available in a variety of product forms, depending on
the species and time of year:
●   Pink is mostly available frozen or canned
●   Fresh, headed and gutted (limited quantity)
●   Some processors develop skinless, boneless blocks and frozen portions. The frozen
    product tends to be very light in color and has a mild flavor.
●   Value-added products like marinated steaks and fillets, salmon burgers, and other items
    are becoming readily available.


Pink is graded 2–4, 4–6, 6–9, and 9 up.




BUYING TIPS
The most important thing to keep in mind when buying wild salmon is that no
matter how well fishermen and processors handle their fish, there will still be major
quality differences due to natural variability. The key is not to buy based solely on
species, but to learn about specific runs and their characteristics so you can find the
perfect salmon for your needs.




ASSOCIATIONS
Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute (ASMI)
311 N. Franklin St., Suite 200, Juneau, AK 99801, Phone: 800–478–2903, Fax: 907–465–5572,
Web Site: www.alaskaseafood.org, Email: info@alaskaseafood.org • Promotes major Alaska seafoods with an
emphasis on salmon. The Web site contains a variety of useful information, including recipes, promotional materials,
and a directory of suppliers.

BC (British Columbia) Salmon Marketing Council
1100–1200 West 73rd Avenue, Vancouver, BC Canada V6P 6G5, Phone: 604–267–3030, Fax: 604–266–3097,
Web Site: www.bcsalmon.ca, Email: bcsmc@bcsalmon.ca • Provides information and materials for wild British
Columbia salmon.



                                                                                                                       See page 122 for the list of Wild
                                                                                                                       Salmon suppliers.
                                                                           The Fish and Shellfish Guide 65
Salmon, Sockeye (wild Pacific)

                                  Oncorhynchus nerka




HIGHLIGHTS
●   Five species of wild
    Pacific salmon are
                                  T      he sockeye fishery is the second-largest—and most valuable—wild salmon fish-
                                         ery in North America. While sockeye is caught commercially from Russia to the
                                  Columbia River. About 75 percent of the global catch comes from Alaskan waters,
    readily available in the      where it is caught by gill net and purse seine fishing boats. The Bristol Bay sockeye
    U.S. market: chinook,         run in western Alaska, the largest single sockeye fishery in the world, produces more
    sockeye, coho, chum,          than half of Alaska’s total catch in a few short weeks each July.
    and pink                         Sockeye weighs about three to ten pounds, with an average of six pounds. Sockeye,
●   Sockeye is economically       also called red salmon, is favored for its bright red meat color and high oil content.
    the most valuable (and        When purchasing sockeye, however, it is best to know its exact source (Bristol Bay,
    second-largest) wild          Frasier River, Copper River, Chignik, etc.) because salmon, like wine, varies greatly
    salmon fishery in             depending on region and production. In general, the farther away from its natal river
    North America                 the fish is caught, the better its quality will be (as oil content will be higher).




                                  CONSERVATION NOTES
                                       lthough many salmon stocks on the Pacific Coast are threatened with extinction, others
                                  A    are in very good shape. Wild Alaskan salmon stocks are in especially good condition,
                                  with Alaskan salmon fisheries comprising more than 85 percent of wild Pacific salmon
                                  catches in most years. All wild Alaskan salmon have been certified as sustainable by the
                                  Marine Stewardship Council (MSC), and wild salmon fisheries in British Columbia are
                                  currently undergoing MSC assessment.
                                      While a number of Alaska and West Coast salmon fisheries are enhanced with hatchery-
                                  reared fish, the majority of Alaska’s salmon runs are from naturally spawning adult fish.



                                  IN SEASON
                                  ●   May through September, peaks in July                            SPRING




                                                                                    WINTER                               SUMMER




                                                                                                       FALL




                               66 Sourcing Seafood
PRODUCT FORM                                                                                                                  COMPETING
Available in a variety of product forms, depending on the                                                                     WITH FARMED
species and time of year:                                                                                                     COHO
●   Because Alaska salmon runs occur over a relatively short period in extremely remote                                       In the 1980s, the Chilean
    regions, over 90 percent of the Alaska catch is either frozen or canned.                                                  salmon farming industry
●   Fresh and frozen is mostly available headed and gutted.                                                                   began sending farmed
●   Alaska processors produce frozen fillets, both pinbone-in and boneless, on a small                                        coho to Japan, and wild
    scale.                                                                                                                    Pacific sockeye gradually
●   Smoked products are available from large Alaskan processors and smaller processors                                        lost its market share in
    throughout the rest of the U.S.                                                                                           Japan. In turn, U.S. sock-
                                                                                                                              eye processors now rely
Sockeye is graded 2–4, 4–6, 6–9, and 9 up.                                                                                    on the domestic market to
                                                                                                                              absorb their high-quality,
                                                                                                                              fresh and frozen sockeye.
BUYING TIPS                                                                                                                   It is likely that the amount
The most important thing to keep in mind when buying wild salmon is that no                                                   of sockeye available in the
matter how well fishermen and processors handle their fish, there will still be major                                         U.S. market will continue
quality differences due to natural variability. For example, a sockeye caught in Bristol                                      to depend on market
Bay Alaska will be smaller and have less oil than a sockeye caught off Central Alaska’s                                       conditions in Japan.
Copper River. The key is not to buy based solely on species (all sockeye is not created
equal), but to learn about specific runs and their characteristics so you can find the
perfect salmon for your needs.




ASSOCIATIONS
Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute (ASMI)
311 N. Franklin St., Suite 200, Juneau, AK 99801, Phone: 800–478–2903, Fax: 907–465–5572,
Web Site: www.alaskaseafood.org, Email: info@alaskaseafood.org • Promotes major Alaska seafoods, with an emphasis
on salmon. The Web site contains useful information including recipes, promotional materials, and a directory of suppliers.

BC (British Columbia) Salmon Marketing Council
1100–1200 West 73rd Avenue, Vancouver, BC Canada V6P 6G5, Phone: 604–267–3030, Fax: 604–266–3097,
Web Site: www.bcsalmon.ca, Email: bcsmc@bcsalmon.ca • Provides information and materials for wild British
Columbia salmon.

Pacific Coast Federation of Fishermen’s Associations (PCFFA)
P.O. Box 29370, San Francisco, CA 94129, Phone: 415–561–5080, Fax: 415–561–5464, Web Site: www.pcffa.org,
Email: fishlifr@aol.com • A federation of port and fishermen’s associations from San Diego to Alaska, assuring fisher-
                                                                                                                              See page 122 for the list of Wild
men’s rights and fighting for the survival of commerical fishing as a way of life.
                                                                                                                              Salmon suppliers.
                                                                              The Fish and Shellfish Guide 67
Sardines

                                  Sardinops sagax




HIGHLIGHTS
●   U.S. landings of Pacific
    sardines have soared
                                  T       he Cannery Row of John Steinbeck may be gone, but sardines are back. In the
                                          1940s, the Pacific sardine (Sardinops sagax) supply collapsed from a combination
                                  of overfishing and unfavorable environmental conditions. Luckily for sardines, this
    from less than two mil-       little fish matures quickly and spawns several times a year, enabling it to withstand
    lion pounds in 1990 to        and recover from these pressures more quickly than other species. Today, sardine
    more than 200 million         populations on both U.S. coasts are healthy.
    pounds in recent years            “Sardine” refers to a number of small fish that are part of the herring family, with
●   Sardines are named            over 20 species sold as sardine worldwide. The Pacific sardine, which is fished from
    after the Italian island      Mexico to British Columbia, is used for everything from fish bait and fish meal to
    of Sardinia in the            fresh or canned fish for human consumption. In California, fresh sardine is also
    Mediterranean                 finding favor with some gourmet chefs and consumers.
                                      Sardines are rich in calcium, protein, iron, potassium, phosphorus, and omega-3
                                  fatty acids.




                                  CONSERVATION NOTES
                                      opulations of the small, plankton-feeding, pelagic sardine species such as sardines are
                                  P   highly variable because they are dependent on ocean conditions. Recent ocean condi-
                                  tions have been perfect for sardines, and populations in many regions along both U.S.
                                  coasts are high. Regulators consider the Pacific sardine population to be at “high abun-
                                  dance” with no overfishing. Sardines are caught by gill net, seine, and mid-water trawl fish-
                                  ing vessels. For Pacific sardines, there is a limited entry of mostly small vessels targeting
                                  the species.



                                  IN SEASON
                                  ●   The Pacific sardine fishery operates                              SPRING

                                      year-round, but most are caught in
                                      summer, when oil content is highest.           WINTER                                SUMMER




                                                                                                         FALL




                               68 Sourcing Seafood
PRODUCT FORM                                                                                PACKED
FRESH:                                                                                      “SARDINE-
●   Whole                                                                                   TIGHT”
                                                                                            One theory about why
FROZEN:                                                                                     sardines are traditionally
●   Whole                                                                                   packed so tightly is that
●   Fillets                                                                                 fish oil is more costly than
                                                                                            the fish itself, so canners
* Also available canned and smoked                                                          choose to fill the space
                                                                                            with fish rather than oil.
                                                                                            Whatever the reason,
BUYING TIPS                                                                                 tight-packing sardines is
●   Fresh sardines can be tricky to buy, since the fish are very perishable and typically   here to stay, even through
    are not handled with the utmost care. However, if you can find them, fresh sardines     they’re now packed in a
    are a sheer culinary delight.                                                           variety of oils, including
●   Steer clear of sardines with red eyes and reddening around their gill plate; both the   olive and soybean.
    eyes and the area around the gills should be clear.
●   Oil content and flavor vary widely during the year—oil content of Pacific sardines
    can fluctuate between 6 and 20 percent. The fattest fish are usually found in
    August and September.




                                                                                            See page 125 for the list of
                                                                                            Sardine suppliers.
                                                        The Fish and Shellfish Guide 69
Scallops, Bay & Sea




HIGHLIGHTS
●   The worst time to buy
    sea scallops is after
                                 U       sually labeled as either bay or sea scallops, there are actually a number of
                                         scallop species available on the U.S. market. True bay scallops (Argopecten
                                 irradians) from New England, however, remain in very short supply; less than 50,000
    they have spawned.           pounds of meats has been landed in recent years.
    The adductor muscle             Sea scallops: Most sea scallops (Placopecten magellanicus) sold in the U.S. are wild-
    is soft, and discolored      caught by boats that use dredges. The largest single fishery for sea scallops is in the
    and sheds moisture           northeast Atlantic from Canada to Virginia, where more than 600 million pounds of
    easily.                      giant sea scallop are caught each year. Cultured sea scallops from Chile and Peru
                                 (Argopecten purpuratus) are also entering the U.S. market.
                                    Bay scallops: Smaller scallops are often marketed simply as bay scallops, a practice
                                 that allows producers to cash in on the cachet of the true bay scallop, a sweet, nutty-
                                 tasting scallop that is produced in very limited quantities in New England and always
                                 sold fresh. The vast majority of bay scallops consumed in the U.S. are farmed in
                                 China, where the true bay scallop was introduced in the late 1980s.
                                    Other available species: Off Alaska, fishermen catch the weathervane scallop
                                 (Patinopecten caurinus), a sea scallop that produces annual catches of about five to 10
                                 million pounds. A lesser-known small scallop, the calico scallop (Argopecten gibbus) is



                                 CONSERVATION NOTES
                                        ild sea scallops are dredged primarily off cobbled and sandy seafloors, which levels
                                 W      structural habitat and often drags up large amounts of bycatch of bottom-dwelling
                                 species such as monkfish and cod.
                                     Scallops farmed on suspended lines have minimal environmental impact and, like other
                                 bivalve mollusks, scallops are filter feeders. Scallops farmed on the seafloor, however, are
                                 often vacuum-dredged—a process that greatly disrupts the seabed and kills or injures
                                 associated bottom-dwelling organisms. In addition, the ecological impact of introducing
                                 non-native scallops, such as bay scallops into China, has been inadequately studied.



                                 IN SEASON
                                 ●   March to December (heaviest late                                 SPRING

                                     spring to early fall), sea scallops
                                 ●   Fall, bay scallops                            WINTER                               SUMMER




                                                                                                       FALL




                              70 Sourcing Seafood
PRODUCT FORM                                                                              SEA SCALLOPS
FRESH:                                                                                    ON THE
●   Whole adductor muscle                                                                 REBOUND
                                                                                          Since a low in the early
FROZEN:                                                                                   1990s, the sea scallop
●   Whole adductor muscle                                                                 population off the coast
●   Half shell with attached roe (coral)                                                  of New England has
                                                                                          increased almost twenty-
                                                                                          fold, benefiting from area
caught in very limited quantities in the southeastern U.S. and is even smaller than the   closures that were enact-
bay scallop. Calico scallop stocks have almost collapsed from fishing pressure, how-      ed to help protect deplet-
ever, and dredging for calicos has disrupted extensive amounts of seafloor habitat.       ed groundfish populations.
                                                                                          In recent years, manage-
BUYING TIPS                                                                               ment of the U.S. sea
●   Judging by the number of menus offering diver scallops, one would think thou-         scallop fishery off the
    sands of individuals catch scallops by hand. In reality, the National Marine          Northeast has evolved to
    Fisheries Service reported less than 100,000 pounds (live weight) of diver-caught     include setting maximum
    scallops in 2002.                                                                     fishing days per year,
●   Instead, the term “diver scallop” is often used to refer to a dry scallop that has    rotating area closures to
    not been treated with sodium tripolyphosphate, a common practice in the               protect and regenerate
    scallop industry. Scallops treated with phosphates absorb and hold more water,        scallop stocks, and issu-
    often 20 percent or more. As a result, phosphate abuse has long been a charac-        ing equipment regulations
    teristic of the scallop business, where even dry scallops are given a quick wash in   (mesh size, etc.). As a
    tripolyphosphate.                                                                     result, sea scallop abun-
                                                                                          dance and catches are
                                                                                          both at record levels.


                                                                                                 HEALTH
                                                                                                 ADVISORY
                                                                                          Paralytic shellfish poison-
                                                                                          ing (PSP) is caused by
                                                                                          eating bivalve shellfish
                                                                                          that is contaminated with
                                                                                          algae containing harmful
                                                                                          toxins. The toxin that
                                                                                          causes PSP cannot be
                                                                                          destroyed by cooking or
                                                                                          freezing. Inquire with your
                                                                                          supplier about routine
                                                                                          testing of products.


                                                       The Fish and Shellfish Guide 71
Shrimp, Nor thern Pink

                               Pandalus borealis




HIGHLIGHTS
●   The northern shrimp,
    or Pandalus borealis,
                               T     he most common species in the Pandalidae family, the northern pink shrimp
                                     (Pandalus borealis) is found in the cold waters of the North Atlantic, North Pacific,
                               and Arctic oceans. In the Atlantic, it is found from Greenland to Massachusetts.
    fishery is the single      Catches off Atlantic Canada have tripled over the past decade to almost 300 million
    largest coldwater          pounds per year, more than half of which is landed off Newfoundland. A small fishery
    shrimp fishery, with       takes place in winter off Maine, where fishermen catch less than five million pounds
    catches of almost 300      per year. In the Pacific, northern shrimp is found from the Bering Sea to Japan. All
    million pounds a year      northern pink shrimp found in the market is taken from fisheries, not shrimp farms.
                               Conservation groups rate Newfoundland northern shrimp as a good environmental
                               choice, as this shrimp is plentiful and well-managed.
                                  Northern pink shrimp is smaller than the more familiar so-called cocktail shrimp
                               found in the tropics, about five to ten centimeters in length. Coldwater shrimp is
                               sweet tasting and some consider it to be more flavorful and moister than the com-
                               mon, tropical variety.
                                  A northern shrimp is born with both male and female sex organs; it begins life as a
                               male and at about four years, it transforms into a female for the rest of its life.




                               CONSERVATION NOTES
                                     ost northern shrimp is caught using otter trawls. While these coldwater shrimp trawl
                               M     fisheries do not catch sea turtles (which inhabit warmer water), bycatch of other
                               species can be a problem in some coldwater shrimp fisheries. The Atlantic trawl fishery—
                               as is the case with most of the pandalid shrimp fisheries—uses a device known as the
                               Nordmore grate, which was introduced in the 1990s. The Nordmore grate greatly reduces
                               the bycatch of groundfish (such as cod), by directing fish to an opening at the top of the
                               trawl net.



                               IN SEASON
                               ●   The New England northern shrimp fish-                            SPRING

                                   ery begins in January and usually lasts
                                   4–6 weeks                                     WINTER                                  SUMMER




                                                                                                     FALL




                            72 Sourcing Seafood
PRODUCT FORM
FRESH:
●   Cooked and peeled
●   Meat, mostly available in the 100/300 size grades


FROZEN:
●   Cooked and peeled (majority of U.S. sales)
●   Meat, mostly available in the 100/300 size grades



BUYING TIPS
●   In Japan, raw northern shrimp is known as ama ebi (or sweet shrimp).
●   A growing percentage of cooked, peeled coldwater shrimp meat is sold fresh.
    Most fresh meat is often sold ungraded.
●   Most processors that produce cooked, peeled meat use processing additives such as
    tripolyphosphates that tend to remove some of the shrimp’s natural flavor.




                                                                                          See page 126 for the list of
                                                                                          Northern Pink Shrimp suppliers.
                                                        The Fish and Shellfish Guide 73
Shrimp (Spot Prawns), Trap Caught




HIGHLIGHTS
●   All spot prawn caught
    on the U.S. West
                                 S      everal species of big coldwater shrimp, which true seafood savants often enjoy
                                        raw, are fished from Washington state to Alaska. Three species are fished com-
                                 mercially—sidestripe shrimp (Pandalopsis dispar), coonstripe shrimp (Pandalus
    Coast are caught using       hypsinotis), and spot shrimp (Pandalus platyceros)—all of which may be marketed as
    pots, which are consid-      spot shrimp or spot prawns. Of the three, spot shrimp is the predominant species.
    ered to be the most          Unlike other shrimp fisheries, which use trawl nets, the fishery for spot shrimp uses
    sustainable fishing          pots. Most of the catch is frozen and exported to Japan, but a growing number of
    method                       chefs in the U.S. are choosing spot shrimp for its unique, sweet taste and its texture.
●   Catches of spot              Bigger spot shrimp, which can average eight to 12 head-on shrimp per pound, produce
    prawns in recent years       shell-on tails in the 21/25 and 26/30 size grade.
    have been at near-              The key to a great spot prawn is not overcooking it. It needs only a minute or two
    record levels, with one      in boiling water to yield the desired firm texture. If you cook it longer, the texture
    million pounds landed        turns mushy.
    in Alaska alone




                                 CONSERVATION NOTES
                                      f all shrimp fishing methods, pots are considered to be the most sustainable, as
                                 O    bycatch and environmental effects are minimized. Spot shrimp fisheries are closed
                                 when the females are bearing eggs and during spawning season. In addition, a strict pro-
                                 gram limits the number of fishermen and pots in the fishery. In both British Columbia and
                                 Alaska, catches of spot prawns in recent years have been at near-record levels, with land-
                                 ings of about 4.5 million pounds and one million pounds, respectively. Although the spot
                                 prawn fishery is not currently undergoing assessment by the Marine Stewardship Council,
                                 industry groups are considering applying for certification.



                                 IN SEASON
                                 ●   Alaska: a short, month-long season                              SPRING

                                     begins in October, although small open-
                                     ings can take place in winter and spring       WINTER                               SUMMER

                                     if the entire quota is not taken in fall
                                 ●   British Columbia: spring and summer.                             FALL




                              74 Sourcing Seafood
PRODUCT FORM
●   Most spot shrimp is frozen raw whole
    in one-kilogram boxes
●   A few Alaska processors sell raw, shell-on tails




BUYING TIPS
●   Most spot prawn is frozen and exported to Japan, where eye appeal is a top priority.
    To ensure that spot shrimp retains its brilliant red color, most of it (especially
    head-on product) is treated with a sulfite-based, antioxidant preservative.
●   Most spot prawn is frozen immediately on the boat, so its quality is
    consistently high.
●   Spot shrimp is never cheap, but prices are best in fall, just after the Alaskan
    season ends.
●   Grading can vary among suppliers, so make sure you get an accurate count per
    pound and don’t rely on terms such as jumbo or extra large.




                                                                                           See page 128 for the list of
                                                                                           Spot Prawn suppliers.
                                                        The Fish and Shellfish Guide 75
Shrimp, U.S. (farmed)




HIGHLIGHTS
●   The U.S. is the largest
    importer of farmed
                                  S       hrimp is the most consumed seafood in the U.S. To fill this burgeoning
                                          demand, U.S. shrimp buyers have had to rely in large measure on imported
                                  product, primarily from environmentally detrimental farming operations in
    shrimp                        Southeast Asia and Latin America.
●   Currently, a handful             A small number of U.S. shrimp farmers have been developing better practices for
    of U.S. shrimp farms          shrimp culture. For example, some of these farmers use closed-system, inland opera-
    have begun to produce         tions rather than farming shrimp along coastal areas. Some have also received organic
    shrimp in a more              certification by meeting current U.S. organic standards for livestock, as there is no
    environmentally friendly      current organic standard for aquaculture. Some of these operations use saltwater,
    manner than foreign           brackish water, or freshwater to raise Pacific white shrimp (Penaeus vannamei) and
    shrimp producers              black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon), while others grow freshwater shrimp
                                  (Macrobrachium rosenbergii).
                                     Driven by European demand, shrimp farmers in Southeast Asia and Latin America
                                  now produce “certified organic shrimp” in increasing quantities. Although still a very
                                  small as a percentage of overall production, this organic farmed shrimp is expected to
                                  grow rapidly in the future. Labeling this shrimp as organic on the U.S. market is quite
                                  controversial however, as the U.S. has no organic standards for aquaculture. (See the
                                  Glossary for more information on current status of the organic label for seafood.)




                                  CONSERVATION NOTES
                                         ost shrimp-farming practices in Southeast Asia and Latin America have numerous
                                  M      environmental and social effects, such as destruction of important coastal habitat,
                                  spread of wastes and antibiotics into the surrounding environment, and competition for
                                  land. Several organizations are working to develop better shrimp-farming standards and
                                  practices, which may result in a greater supply of shrimp farmed with less harmful environ-
                                  mental impact.



                                  IN SEASON
                                  ●   Highly seasonal, with fresh shrimp                               SPRING

                                      available in fall (some farms only
                                      sell locally).                                WINTER                               SUMMER




                                                                                                        FALL




                               76 Sourcing Seafood
PRODUCT FORM
FRESH:
●   Live
●   Whole
●   Headless (shell on or off)


FROZEN:
●   Headless (shell on or off)



BUYING TIPS
●   Buying shrimp from inland shrimp farmers in the U.S. may be frustrating at first.
    Many farmers are small mom-and-pop operations that may or may not answer the
    phone regularly; however, perseverance can pay off in the form of fresh sweetwater
    shrimp with a local cache.
●   Expect to pay a premium for organic shrimp. In the U.S. in particular, shrimp farm-
    ing is an expensive and risky undertaking, and producers have to receive a substan-
    tial enough premium to stay in business. Imported organic shrimp is considerably
    cheaper because the farms producing it have much lower production costs.

HOW IS U.S. FARMED SHRIMP DIFFERENT?
Recently, a handful of U.S. shrimp farms have begun to farm shrimp in a more envi-
ronmentally friendly manner. Some U.S. farms use recirculating closed-water systems
and rear shrimp in tanks, thus eliminating discharge issues; others use ponds located
in inland areas and treat effluent by using settling ponds or use the effluent as a
natural fertilizer for irrigating plants. Several U.S. shrimp farms have received organic
certification for meeting U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) standards for
organic livestock, at least until U.S. standards are developed for organic aquaculture.




                                                                                            See page 129 for the list of U.S.
                                                                                            farmed shrimp suppliers.
                                                        The Fish and Shellfish Guide 77
Sole, Pacific




HIGHLIGHTS
●   Dover and English sole
    are the most popular
                                   P       acific sole is a catchall descriptor for a number of flatfish that are caught in the
                                           waters off Alaska, British Columbia, Washington, Oregon, and California.
                                   Pacific sole is not true sole but is related more closely to the flounder. Whether called
    types of sole in the U.S.      flounder, flatfish, or sole, the Pacific species are abundant in Alaska and can be an
                                   excellent substitute for the more scarce Atlantic flatfish.
                                      Yellowfin sole (Limanda aspera): The most plentiful, and smallest, of the Pacific
                                   sole, yellowfin is taken by factory trawlers fishing the Bering Sea. Since this flounder
                                   averages less than a pound, it results in a small, two- to four-ounce fillet. Most yel-
                                   lowfin is frozen at sea as headed and gutted fish and sent to China, where it is thawed
                                   and filleted before being re-exported to the U.S.
                                      Rock sole (Pleuronectes bilineatus): Larger than yellowfin, rock sole is also caught
                                   by trawlers in the Bering Sea, with females and roe sent to Japan and males sent to
                                   China for reprocessing into fillets.
                                      Flathead sole (Hippoglossoides elassodon): Larger than many of the Pacific sole,
                                   flathead yields four- to six-ounce fillets that are very white with a firm texture and
                                   most closely resemble true European sole.
                                      Alaska plaice (Pleuronectes quadrituberculatus): Although it is caught almost
                                   exclusively as bycatch, Alaska plaice is readily available. A larger-sized flounder that



                                   CONSERVATION NOTES
                                        ince 1987, U.S. groundfish catches in the Bering Sea—which include sole, pollock, and
                                   S    cod—have been limited to a two million metric ton ecosystem cap. Since fishermen
                                   prefer more profitable species like pollock and cod, these flatfish, including sole, have been
                                   fished far below their allowable catch levels, ensuring an abundant flatfish population.
                                       While flatfish populations in this region seem to be doing well, fishing methods for
                                   Pacific sole are a concern. Sole is caught by bottom trawls, which generally have negative
                                   effects on seafloor habitat.



                                   IN SEASON
                                   ●   Available periodically throughout                                 SPRING

                                       the year.
                                                                                      WINTER                                  SUMMER




                                                                                                          FALL




                                78 Sourcing Seafood
PRODUCT FORM
FRESH:
●   Whole, headed and gutted; dressed (head-on, boneless)
●   Fillets (west coast)


FROZEN:
●   Skinless, boneless fillet (usually twice-frozen), in block form or individually frozen (IQF)
●   Whole, headed and gutted; dressed (head-on, boneless)



yields six- to eight-ounce fillets, this fish is considered to be one of the better-quality
flatfish caught off Alaska.
   Dover sole (Microstomus pacificus): Not to be confused with the European Dover
sole (Solea vulgaris), the Pacific Dover sole is larger in size (reaches eight pounds but
usually caught at two pounds or smaller) but lacks the subtle flavor and firm texture
of its European relative.
   Rex sole (Errex zachirus): Available in limited quantities, rex sole has a taste and
texture similar to the East Coast gray sole and is often cooked whole.

BUYING TIPS
●   Quality of flatfish varies greatly; the highest-quality fillets should have uniform
    color and no bruising.
●   When buying Alaska plaice, skinless is best as the skin of this fish harbors bacteria
    that can generate an undesirable odor.




ASSOCIATIONS
Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute (ASMI)
311 N. Franklin St., Suite 200, Juneau, AK 99801, Phone: 800–478–2903, Fax: 907–465–5572,
Web Site: www.alaskaseafood.org, Email: info@alaskaseafood.org • The Institute promotes all major Alaska seafoods,
including North Pacific sole. The ASMI Web site contains a variety of useful information, including recipes, promotional
materials and a directory of Alaskan sole suppliers.

Pacific Seafood Processors Association
1900 W. Emerson St. #205, Seattle, WA 98119, Phone: 206–281–1667, Web Site: www.pspafish.net,
Email: info@pspafish.net • The Pacific Seafood Processors Association represents the interests of floating and shore-
based processors operating from Oregon to the North Pacific.



                                                                                                                           See page 130 for the list of
                                                                                                                           Pacific sole suppliers.
                                                                           The Fish and Shellfish Guide 79
Striped Bass, Wild & Hybrid




HIGHLIGHTS
●   Striped bass along
    the Atlantic coast were
                                 S      triped bass (Morone saxatitis) is a popular east coast commercial and recre-
                                        ational fish. Hybrid striped bass—which results from crossing striped bass
                                 with white bass (M. chrysops)—has a similar appearance to wild striped bass, but it
    formally declared            can be distinguished by its disjointed stripes, different from the smooth, uninterrupt-
    restored in 1995 after       ed stripes of the wild striped bass. The market size of hybrids is about one to three
    being severely depleted      pounds. Hybrid striped bass has a mild texture and a milder flavor than that of its
    during the 1980s by          wild cousin.
    overfishing and poor            Commercial fishermen catch striped bass with a variety of gear, including gill nets,
    water quality                pound nets, haul seines, and hook and line.
●   About two-thirds of the         Hybrid striped bass are grown in freshwater tanks, ponds, and raceways in a num-
    striped bass sold in         ber of states. The largest U.S. facility, in the California desert, recycles 85 percent of
    markets is produced          the water it uses, and accounts for 30 percent of the total U.S. supply. Farming in
    by aquaculture and           inland freshwater ponds also involves minimal environmental risk. A carnivorous
    referred to as hybrid        species, hybrid striped bass is raised on a diet that typically contains 18–35 percent
    striped bass                 fish meal (which is of some concern, as hybrid striped bass require additional wild
                                 fish for feed), with the remainder as grain-based proteins.




                                 CONSERVATION NOTES
                                      triped bass spawn in freshwater, making wetlands habitat a critical element in sustain-
                                 S    ability. At one time the Chesapeake Bay region accounted for nearly 90 percent of the
                                 striper nursery ground. After record catches of almost 15 million pounds in 1973, catches
                                 of stripers fell to less than one million pounds by 1990. Thanks to conservation efforts,
                                 stocks have rebounded and the annual catch has remained steady over the past six years
                                 at approximately six million pounds. Currently, commercial and recreational fisheries are
                                 considered well managed and not overfished.



                                 IN SEASON
                                 ●   Wild: Fished year-round, peak season                            SPRING

                                     is March through June or July.
                                 ●   Hybrid: Produced year-round, although         WINTER                               SUMMER

                                     production is heaviest in fall, when
                                     pond growers in the southeastern U.S.                            FALL

                                     collect fish before winter, when the
                                     growth rate of the hybrid halts.




                              80 Sourcing Seafood
PRODUCT FORM
WILD:
●   Fillets


HYBRID:
●   Live
●   Fresh whole
●   Fresh fillets (year-round)



BUYING TIPS
●   Hybrids grown in earthen ponds can have a muddy taste if growers do not moni-
    tor water quality.
●   While hybrid striped bass prices are relatively stable, there are some good buys in
    the eastern U.S. from time to time when growers harvest their entire ponds.
●   Expect to pay more for hybrid striped bass raised in closed-circulation systems, as
    production costs are higher.

AVAILABILITY OF HYBRIDS
The supply of hybrid striped bass is limited and is priced accordingly. Approximately
12 million pounds (live weight) of hybrid striped bass are farmed in the U.S. annually.
Supply has grown very slowly over the past decade and is unlikely to increase signifi-
cantly in the near future.




                                                                                                  HEALTH
                                                                                                  ADVISORY
                                                                                          There are numerous state
                                                                                          and local advisories cau-
                                                                                          tioning all women, men,
                                                                                          and children about con-
                                                                                          sumption of wild striped
                                                                                          bass due to PCBs, mercu-
                                                                                          ry, and pesticides.
                                                                                          See page 131 for the list of
                                                                                          Striped bass suppliers.
                                                        The Fish and Shellfish Guide 81
Sturgeon, White (farmed)

                                  Acipenser transmontanus




HIGHLIGHTS
●   White sturgeon is also
    called Pacific sturgeon,
                                  S      turgeon, the largest of the bony fish, is easily recognized by its five rows of
                                         bony plates, called scutes, along its body: one row along the mid-back, one
                                  along the middle, and one along the lower body on each side. Various species are
    Oregon sturgeon,              found in U.S. waters and include, for example, Atlantic and shortnose sturgeon along
    Columbia sturgeon,            the East Coast; gulf sturgeon throughout the Gulf of Mexico; and white sturgeon
    and Sacramento                along Pacific shores. While sturgeon is especially known for caviar, some sturgeon
    sturgeon                      meat is served smoked, canned, or fresh.
●   The largest wild white           Similar to its Caspian cousin, various populations of sturgeon, including white
    sturgeon on record            sturgeon, are in danger of extinction in North Americas as a result of overfishing, loss
    weighed more than             of habitat, and restricted access to spawning areas because of dams and pollution.
    1,500 pounds and              The greatest numbers of white sturgeon are in the lower Columbia River, where com-
    was 20 feet long              mercial fishing is allowed. Even though this one population is abundant and stable,
●   Sturgeon grow only            there is some risk of collapse due to its vulnerability to overexploitation and changes
    about one inch per            in the environment.
    year, but it can live            The good news is that sturgeon—primarily white sturgeon—is now farmed along
    100 years or more,            the U.S. West Coast in freshwater, closed-system tanks that release minimal effluent
    allowing it to grow to        into surrounding waterways. Farmed white sturgeon is generally smaller than its
    mammoth size                  wild cousins and can take ten to twelve years to reach a marketable size (about ten
                                  pounds). Farmed sturgeon has a firm, steak-like texture and a very mild flavor. When
                                  cooked, sturgeon meat appears to be almost white.
                                     See Caviar for more information on ocean-friendly, farmed white sturgeon caviar.



                                  CONSERVATION NOTES
                                       onservation organizations recommend farmed white sturgeon (and white sturgeon
                                  C    caviar) as a better environmental choice than wild-caught sturgeon, including the highly
                                  sought after Caspian sturgeon (and their caviar). It is hoped this relatively new supply of
                                  farmed sturgeon will help relieve pressure on wild stocks.



                                  IN SEASON
                                  ●   Processed to order year-round                                     SPRING




                                                                                     WINTER                               SUMMER




                                                                                                         FALL




                               82 Sourcing Seafood
PRODUCT FORM
FRESH:
●   Bullets (head, tail, fins, spines removed)
●   Steaks
●   Fillets



BUYING TIPS
●   White sturgeon’s internal skeleton is composed of cartilage instead of bone,
    making it ideal as a steak or fillet.
●   Most buyers purchase bullets to optimize portions by performing the final cut
    themselves.
●   Farmed sturgeon can have a muddy taste if a farm does not monitor water quality
    appropriately.




                                                                                       See page 132 for the list of
                                                                                       White sturgeon suppliers.
                                                     The Fish and Shellfish Guide 83
Tilapia, U.S. (farmed)




HIGHLIGHTS
●   All tilapia found in the
    U.S. market is farmed
                                  T      ilapia, or “St. Peter’s fish,” is a living relic. References to and drawings of tilapia-
                                         like species date to the time of pharaohs. Some biblical scholars believe that the
                                  fish Jesus multiplied in the Sea of Galilee was none other than tilapia, and tilapia
●   Fresh is usually from         farming may predate the farming of any other fish species.
    Latin America (mostly            Tilapia’s mild taste, adaptability, and relatively low cost have led it become one of
    Ecuador)                      the top 10 seafoods consumed in the U.S. Today, tilapia is farmed on a large scale in
●   Frozen is almost              more than 50 countries, with an annual production of approximately 1.4 million
    always from Asia              metric tons. Most farms are freshwater, although tilapia can survive in both fresh and
    (mostly China)                brackish water.
●   Most common                      Most tilapia is grown in relatively high-density earthen ponds; however, some farms
    species: Nile tilapia         use floating cages in lakes or estuaries. In the U.S., tilapia producers also use extremely
    and Mozambique                environmentally responsible systems, known as closed recirculating systems.
    tilapia




                                  CONSERVATION NOTES
                                      ilapia is a plant eater and can grow quite well on a grain-based diet, so it places no
                                  T   additional pressure on wild fish populations, although some farmers do add a small
                                  amount of fish meal to their feed. The feed conversion ratio for tilapia is excellent, ranging
                                  from 1.2 to 1.7 pounds of dry feed per one pound of tilapia.
                                      Several tilapia growers in the U.S. and Asia are attempting to develop organic tilapia.
                                  This product will likely not be available in the U.S., however, until final farmed standards for
                                  organic seafood are in place.



                                  IN SEASON
                                  ●   Available year-round                                               SPRING




                                                                                      WINTER                                SUMMER




                                                                                                          FALL




                               84 Sourcing Seafood
PRODUCT FORM                                                                                                     A TILAPIA
FRESH:                                                                                                           FRATERNITY
●   Live                                                                                                         Some tilapia farmers
●   Whole                                                                                                        treat their fingerlings with
●   Fillets                                                                                                      methyl testosterone (MT),
                                                                                                                 a hormone that ensures
* U.S. farmers usually produce only fresh whole or live fish, due to strong                                      the entire crop is male.
competition with imported fillets.                                                                               They do this to eliminate
                                                                                                                 breeding, which reduces
FROZEN:                                                                                                          the growth rate of the fish.
●   Whole                                                                                                        While the hormone is
●   Fillets, including value-added, marinated and breaded fillets                                                excreted from the fish
                                                                                                                 within a month and is
* Tilapia fillets are usually available in graded sizes of 3–5 ounces, 5–7 ounces                                deemed safe by the U.S.
(most common), and 7–9 ounces.                                                                                   Food & Drug Administration,
                                                                                                                 some buyers have
                                                                                                                 stopped buying tilapia
BUYING TIPS                                                                                                      treated with MT. Tilapia
●   Tilapia tastes like the water in which it’s raised. The best quality tilapia has a very                      farmers are currently
    clean taste.                                                                                                 researching alternatives
●   Ecuadorian producers sell mostly deep-skinned fillets with the brown fat layer                               to MT treatments.
    removed, while Latin American producers leave the fat layer intact. Skin color
    varies but is unrelated to flesh color or taste
●   Nile tilapia, known as nilotica or black tilapia, has dark skin. Mozambique tilapia,
    or red tilapia, has reddish skin.
●   Most Asian producers treat frozen fillets with carbon monoxide to give it a reddish-
    pink hue. These fillets are often sold as sashimi-quality izumi dai (snapper) tilapia,
    although they are almost never true sashimi quality and definitely not snapper.



ASSOCIATIONS
American Tilapia Association
111 W. Washington St., Suite 1, Charles Town, WV 25414, Phone: 304–728–2167,
Web Site: www.ag.arizona.edu/azaqua/ata.html • Provides general information, including contact information for
local growers




                                                                                                                 See page 132 for the list of
                                                                                                                 Tilapia suppliers.
                                                                         The Fish and Shellfish Guide 85
Trout, Rainbow (farmed)

                                  Oncorhynchus mykiss




HIGHLIGHTS
●   All rainbow trout in the
    U.S. market is farmed
                                  T      here are two types of rainbow trout in the wild: those that live in freshwater and
                                         those that are seagoing. Seagoing rainbow trout, known as “steelhead,” return
                                  to their natal river to spawn, but unlike Pacific salmon, these trout return to the
●   Rainbow trout is the          ocean after they spawn.
    most common trout in             European monks started the tradition of farming trout almost four centuries ago,
    the market                    although trout farming really took off in the second half of the 20th century. Today,
●   Other, less readily           all commercial rainbow trout in U.S. markets is farmed. You might catch wild “steel-
    available farmed              head” in your local market, but it’s pretty rare.
    choices: brown trout             If the rainbow trout in your market is from the U.S., there’s a good chance it was
    and brook trout               grown in concrete raceways (which provide fish with the constantly flowing water they
                                  need to thrive). In 2003, more than 68 percent of the market-size trout sold in the U.S.
                                  originated from the Magic Valley region along Idaho’s Snake River Canyon. Western
                                  North Carolina is also a center of trout farming, with more than 60 commercial farms.
                                     Outside the U.S., as much as one-third of trout is grown in saltwater net pens or
                                  cages; trout farmed in this manner is sold as “steelhead” or “salmon-trout.” Future
                                  increases in U.S. trout supply are likely to be trout farmed in this manner from Chile
                                  and Peru. This is of concern since net pen and cage systems can have harmful
                                  environmental impacts, which include polluting local waterways with fish feces and
                                  uneaten feed.




                                  CONSERVATION NOTES
                                       onservation organizations give a good mark to rainbow trout raised in freshwater
                                  C    ponds or raceways. Still, there is some concern over waste from farms entering local
                                  waterways. Currently, the U.S. EPA is tasked with managing effluent from trout farming
                                  operations, and states such as Idaho have taken on this task at the state level.



                                  IN SEASON
                                  ●   Available year-round, although smaller                          SPRING

                                      regional producers may not have con-
                                      sistent supply                               WINTER                                 SUMMER




                                                                                                       FALL




                               86 Sourcing Seafood
PRODUCT FORM                                                                                                         YOU ARE WHAT
FRESH AND FROZEN:*                                                                                                   YOU EAT
●   Whole, eviscerated with head on                                                                                  Currently, farmed trout
●   Whole boned (head-on, backbone removed but pinbone-in)                                                           is fed feed that includes
●   Skin-on, pinbone-in fillets                                                                                      wild fish meal and fish oil,
●   Skin-on, boneless fillets                                                                                        which puts some pressure
●   Smoked, fresh only                                                                                               on wild fish populations.
                                                                                                                     Periodic inclusion of
* Fresh and frozen rainbow trout is available year-round, through distributors                                       antibiotics and pigments
* A number of online wholesalers also offer fresh and frozen trout products                                          in the feed may also con-
                                                                                                                     cern some buyers. If you
                                                                                                                     share this concern, look
BUYING TIPS                                                                                                          for regional trout farmers
●   Extremely controlled production and processing of farmed trout results in a                                      who avoid animal-based
    uniformly high-quality product.                                                                                  feeds and limit or elimi-
●   For a more regional emphasis, look for locally grown trout in your area. Many                                    nate antibiotics and
    local trout growers, however, sell only on-site or through local farmers markets.                                synthetic pigments.
●   Buyers should be aware that trout raised in earthen ponds may develop an “off-
    flavor” from algae if the pond is not managed correctly or if the trout is not tested
    before going to market.
●   Rainbow trout meat is mild, with a delicate, almost nutlike flavor. Its flesh can be
    white, pink, or orange. When cooked, trout meat has a delicate flake and a pale
    coloration.




ASSOCIATIONS
U.S. Trout Farmers Association
111 West Washington St., Ste. 1, Charles Town, WV 25414, Phone: 304–728–2189, Fax: 304–728–2196,
Web Site: www.ustfa.org, Email: ustfa@frontiernet.net • The United States Trout Farmers Association Web site lists
local trout producers as well as recipes and other information on trout farming.




                                                                                                                     See page 133 for the list of
                                                                                                                     Rainbow trout suppliers.
                                                                          The Fish and Shellfish Guide 87
Tuna, Ahi (Yellowfin & Bigeye)

                                 Thunnus albacares and T. obesus




HIGHLIGHTS
●   Pole-caught ahi results
    in significantly less
                                 F      ound throughout the warm waters of the world, yellowfin tuna (Thunnus
                                        albacares) is best known in a can (as light meat tuna) although it is also popular
                                 eaten raw or lightly seared. High-quality yellowfin and bigeye tuna (Thunnus obesus)
    bycatch than purse           are both marketed using their Hawaiian name, ahi. The largest tuna fishery in the
    seined or longlined ahi      U.S. takes place in the waters off Hawaii, where about 10 million pounds of ahi tuna
                                 are landed each year, about 75 percent of which is bigeye. Yellowfin and bigeye can
                                 grow to over 400 pounds, but most of the commercial catch consists of fish that are
                                 less than 100 pounds.
                                    Approximately 80 percent of eastern Atlantic yellowfin is caught by purse seiners,
                                 with smaller quantities caught in the western Atlantic and Pacific, most of which ends
                                 up in cans. While purse seine vessels have had to adopt fishing methods to substan-
                                 tially reduce dolphin mortality, incidental catch is still high. There is also a bigeye
                                 seine fishery off the west coast of South America that targets immature tuna.
                                    In the U.S., approximately 70 percent of yellowfin catch is longlined. In 2002 and
                                 2003, Hawaii tuna catches were at near record levels. In an effort to reduce turtle and
                                 sea bird bycatch the longline fleet has been forced to alter fishing methods.




                                 CONSERVATION NOTES
                                     he most recent recommendations from conservation groups list pole- or troll-caught ahi
                                 T   as a best environmental choice, since yellowfin and bigeye populations have been sta-
                                 ble and these fishing methods minimize bycatch. Conservation groups are more cautious in
                                 their recommendation of longline ahi, due to concern over bycatch associated with this type
                                 of gear. New evidence suggests that bigeye and yellowfin tuna in the Pacific cannot sustain
                                 additional fishing pressure.



                                 IN SEASON
                                 ●   Available year-round                                           SPRING




                                                                                  WINTER                              SUMMER




                                                                                                     FALL




                              88 Sourcing Seafood
PRODUCT FORM
FRESH:
●   Whole loins or chunks of loins in a
    specified weight


FROZEN:
●   Steaks and whole loins; available treated with tasteless smoke
    (prevents browning of flesh) or untreated



BUYING TIPS
●   Buying fresh ahi can be tricky because grading is very subjective and prices vary
    widely, depending on grade.
●   Top sashimi–grade, fresh ahi is almost always shipped to Japan and brings a
    premium price.
●   Best buys on ahi are normally in late summer and early fall, when Hawaiian
    catches peak.
●   For frozen ahi, it’s best to stick with the tasteless smoke product because the
    alternative is fish that has been treated with carbon monoxide (CO), which can                  HEALTH
    be used to enhance the color of lower-grade tuna.                                               ADVISORY
●   Very limited amounts of pole-caught ahi are available in the market.                    Consumption advisory
                                                                                            due to mercury levels.
                                                                                            According to the U.S.
                                                                                            Food & Drug
                                                                                            Administration:
                                                                                            ●   Women should limit
                                                                                                their intake to four
                                                                                                meals per month
                                                                                            ●   Men should limit their
                                                                                                intake to three meals
                                                                                                per month
                                                                                            ●   Children ages 0–6
                                                                                                should limit their
                                                                                                intake to one meal
                                                                                                per month
                                                                                            ●   Children ages 6–12
                                                                                                should limit their
                                                                                                intake to two meals
                                                                                                per month
                                                                                            See page 134 for the list of
                                                                                            Ahi suppliers.
                                                          The Fish and Shellfish Guide 89
Tuna, Albacore

                                 Thunnus alalulunga




HIGHLIGHTS
●   Albacore tuna is the
    only canned tuna that
                                 W          hile commonly known as the white meat tuna in a can, albacore tuna is
                                            also available fresh and frozen as firm, meaty, omega-3-rich steaks.
                                    Albacore is a medium-size tuna averaging 10 to 40 pounds in the commercial
    is allowed to be mar-        catch. Depending on its size, albacore meat is either light brown or bright pinkish
    keted with the “white”       red. Off the west coast of the U.S., trollers fish for small albacore that have light
    label, rather than the       brown meat. Albacore caught by longline in the South Pacific and Hawaii is usually
    other, familiar “light”      larger and its meat is pinkish red instead of light brown. Longlined albacore is often
    label                        marketed under its Hawaiian name, tombo or tombo ahi. Both large and small albacore
●   The U.S. is the largest      are popular served raw.
    market for canned               While frozen albacore is widely available, obtaining fresh or frozen troll-caught
    tuna in the world            fish may require a little extra effort. During the fishing season, many West Coast fish-
                                 ermen sell their catch directly to consumers at major fishing ports in Washington,
                                 Oregon, and California.




                                 CONSERVATION NOTES
                                      lbacore tuna is widely dispersed and does not “school” in dense quantities like other
                                 A    tuna. Thus most albacore is caught by longline fishing or trolling, rather than by purse
                                 seine. Longline fishing for tuna in the South Pacific and Hawaii is of major concern to
                                 conservation groups and some scientists because it results in the bycatch of endangered
                                 species such as sea turtles and sharks, in addition to many species of billfish, seabirds,
                                 and marine mammals. Trolling results in much less bycatch than longlining.
                                     As is the case with other tuna (and most other migratory, pelagic fish) there is no set
                                 quota for albacore even though albacore populations in the North Atlantic are considered
                                 overfished.



                                 IN SEASON
                                 ●   Troll-caught albacore from the west                               SPRING

                                     coast of the U.S.: mid-summer to early
                                     fall, peak in July and August                  WINTER                                 SUMMER

                                 ●   Tombo albacore: available year-round
                                     from importers                                                     FALL




                              90 Sourcing Seafood
PRODUCT FORM
FRESH:
●   Loins and steaks, headed and gutted (imported)


FROZEN:
●   Loins and steaks, whole fish (limited)



BUYING TIPS
●   Fresh troll-caught albacore should be bled on landing to produce the highest quality
    tuna. This process causes the flesh to remain lighter in color and more appealing.
    If you can see flecks of blood (“ants” in industry jargon), the fish was not bled.
●   All canned albacore is not created equal. Imported canned albacore is cooked
    twice: large canneries cook the fish, pick the meat, can it, and cook it again. On the
    west coast of the U.S., most albacore canneries are small operations that put raw                                                HEALTH
    albacore chunks in the can, then cook them in their own juices.                                                                  ADVISORY
                                                                                                                             Consumption advisory
HISTAMINE WARNING                                                                                                            due to mercury level.
Albacore, along with other tuna, contains the amino acid histidine in its flesh, which                                       According to the U.S.
turns into the common allergen histamine after the fish dies. A toxin, histamine can                                         Food and Drug
cause mild to severe allergic reactions in individuals with sensitivity to this allergen.                                    Administration:
Proper handling of albacore is essential for food safety; albacore stored above 40oF                                         ●   Women should limit
for an extended period will produce histamine (production is faster at higher temper-                                            their intake to three
atures). Histamine cannot be eliminated by cooking, freezing, or smoking contami-                                                meals per month
nated fish.                                                                                                                  ●   Men should limit their
                                                                                                                                 intake to two meals
                                                                                                                                 per month
                                                                                                                             ●   Children 0–12 should
                                                                                                                                 limit their intake to
                                                                                                                                 one meal per month
ASSOCIATIONS                                                                                                                 In contrast, a 2003
Western Fishboat Owners Association (WFOA)                                                                                   Oregon State University
P.O. Box 138 , Eureka, CA 95502, Phone: 707–443–1098, Fax: 707–443–1074, Web Site: www.wfoa-tuna.org,
                                                                                                                             study found that west
Email: wfoa@cox.net • A California-based nonprofit organization representing 400 family owned hook-and-line (troll)
albacore fishing boats, including fishermen from California, Oregon, Washington, British Columbia, Alaska, Hawaii, Tahiti,   coast troll-caught albacore
and New Zealand. The WFOA assists in promoting troll-caught albacore tuna. For a list of albacore fishermen who sell         has low levels of mercury
their fish direct, visit www.albatuna.com.
                                                                                                                             in its edible flesh, well
Pacific Coast Federation of Fishermen’s Associations (PCFFA)
                                                                                                                             within international
P.O. Box 29370, San Francisco, CA 94129, Phone: 415–561–5080, Fax: 415–561–5464, Web Site: www.pcffa.org,
Email: fishlifr@aol.com • A federation of port and fishermen’s associations from San Diego to Alaska, assuring fisher-       standards for mercury
men’s rights and fighting for the survival of commerical fishing as a way of life.                                           levels in fish.
                                                                                                                             See page 134 for the list of
                                                                                                                             Albacore suppliers.
                                                                             The Fish and Shellfish Guide 91
Sourcing Seafood




                   Sourcing Seafood
                                                                     Supplier Director y

                                                                                                             By Species




ABALONE (FARMED):
There are currently only a few U.S. producers of farmed
abalone, but farmers in Hawaii and British Columbia may
have product to offer in the near future.

The Abalone Farm                                                        THE ABALONE FARM
P.O. Box 136
Cayucos, CA 93430 USA                                                   Established in 1968, The Abalone Farm is the largest and
Contact: Brad Buckley                                                   oldest producer of California red abalone in the U.S.
P: 805–995–2495
F: 805–995–0236                                                         The company’s sustainable farming technology includes its
team@abalonefarm.com, www.abalonefarm.com                               own hatcheries and growout tanks that use water pumped
                                                                        from the nearby ocean. Kelp is harvested from nearby
Raises California red abalone (H. rufescens). Offers live 3.5-          beds to feed the abalone under a regulatory system that
ounce abalone (four to five abalone per pound) and abalone              protects kelp beds. Because of monitoring by various
steaks. Contact The Abalone Farm directly to identify local             government agencies and the ecologically sensitive nature
distributors. Product can be purchased online as well.                  of abalone, The Abalone Farm’s aquaculture methods are
                                                                        recognized as environmentally friendly. Products include
Big Island Abalone                                                      Ocean Rose®live abalone and tenderized steaks.
192 Nickerson St. Ste. 305
Seattle, WA 98109 USA                                                   P.O. Box 136
Contact: H. Arai                                                        Cayucos, CA 93430 USA
P: 206–282–9638                                                         Contact: Brad Buckley
F: 206–282–9749                                                         P: 805–995–2495
harai@bigislandabalone.com, www.bigislandabalone.com                    F: 805–995–0236
                                                                        team@abalonefarm.com, www.abalonefarm.com
Big Island Abalone raises the northern Japanese abalone
(Haliotis discus hannai). The company sells live abalone (80-
and 100-gram sizes) in the U.S. and exports to Asia.                  ARCTIC CHAR:
                                                                      Arctic char can be hard to find—it’s expensive and is not
Monterey Abalone Company                                              carried by many seafood distributors. To locate an Arctic
160 Municipal Wharf #2                                                char supplier contact the following producers:
Monterey, CA 93940 USA
P: 831–646–0350                                                       Agassiz Aqua Farms
F: 831–646–0350                                                       277 Lakeshore Rd. E Ste. 205
trevor@montereyabalone.com, www.montereyabalone.com                   Oakville, ON L6J 1H9 Canada
                                                                      P: 877–423–2427
Specializes in live abalone and can ship overnight to most            www.icechar.com
U.S. destinations. Visit the Web site for order forms and
instructions.                                                         Marketed under the “Ice Char” brand, Agassiz Aqua Farms
                                                                      has a production facility in Manitoba, Canada, that uses
                                                                      concrete tanks and springwater. The company claims that
                                                                      no antibiotics or chemical agents are used in the farming
                                                                      process, the water is reused, and the waste products are
                                                                      recycled for organic fertilizers.



                                                                 The Fish and Shellfish Guide 93
Burhop’s Seafood
1515 Sheridan Rd.
Wilmette, IL 60091 USA
Contact: Jeff Burhop
P: 847–256–6400
F: 847–901–4017                                                CAROLINA CLASSICS CATFISH
www.burhops.com
                                                               The largest catfish farm outside the Mississippi Delta
Icelandic USA Inc.                                             region, Carolina Classics Catfish was established in 1986
501 Merritt #7                                                 in eastern North Carolina.
Norwalk, CT 06851 USA
Contact: Tom Sherman                                           A vertically integrated company, Carolina Classics owns its
P: 203–852–1600                                                own feed mill and processing plant to ensure customers
F: 203–229–2228                                                receive the best-tasting, freshest catfish on the market
tsherman@icelandic.com (for chefs), www.icelandic.com          today. Close proximity to major population centers in the
                                                               Northeast means fish that was swimming in the morning
Icelandic offers frozen fillets and portions from farmed       can be on a consumer’s plate the next day. Carolina Classics
Icelandic char.                                                sells fresh and frozen whole IQF catfish and fillets.

West Virginia Aqua LLC                                         P.O. Box 10
P.O. Box 1706                                                  Ayden, NC 28513 USA
Logan, WV 25601 USA                                            P: 252–746–2818
P: 304–752–7006                                                F: 252–746–3947
www.isisarcticchar.com                                         ddering@ccatfish.com, www.ccatfish.com

West Virginia Aqua currently produces about 10,000
pounds of Arctic char per week in 15 tanks using water       Burhop’s Seafood
pumped up from abandoned coal mines. Sold under the          1515 Sheridan Rd.
Isis Arctic Char brand, West Virginia Aqua offers head-on    Wilmette, IL 60091 USA
gutted fish and fillets.                                     Contact: Jeff Burhop
                                                             P: 847–256–6400
                                                             F: 847–901–4017
CATFISH, U.S. (FARMED):                                      www.burhops.com
Catfish is widely available through most fresh and frozen
distributors. Some smaller operations have their own pro-    Carolina Classics
cessing plants, while many larger processors are part of a   P.O. Box 10
cooperative.                                                 Ayden, NC 28513 USA
                                                             P: 252–746–2818
America’s Catch                                              F: 252–746–3947
P.O. Box 584                                                 ddering@ccatfish.com, www.ccatfish.com
Itta Bena, MS 38941 USA
P: 800–242–0041                                              ConFish Inc./Countr y Select Catfish
F: 662–254–9776                                              P.O. Box 271
solons@catfish.com, www.catfish.com                          Isola, MS 38754 USA
                                                             P: 662–962–3101
Aquafarms                                                    F: 662–962–0114
7095 E 134 Rd.                                               sales@countryselect.com, www.countryselect.com
Holdenville, OK 74848 USA
P: 405–379–7227                                              Delta Pride Catfish
F: 405–379–2648                                              P.O. Box 850
                                                             Indianola, MS 38751 USA
                                                             P: 662–887–5401
                                                             F: 662–887–5950
                                                             pwalker@deltapride.com, www.deltapride.com




                             94 Sourcing Seafood
EcoFish, Inc.                                                Simmons Farm Raised Catfish
78 Market St.                                                2628 Erikson Rd.
Portsmouth, NH 03801 USA                                     Yazoo City, MS 39194 USA
P: 603–430–0101 (877–214–FISH)                               P: 662–746–5687
F: 603–430–9929                                              F: 662–746–8625
www.ecofish.com                                              jmiller@simmonscatfish.com, www.simmonscatfish.com

EcoFish offers a variety of seafood products.                Southern Pride Catfish
For a complete list, see their profile on page 133.          P.O. Box 436
                                                             Greensboro, AL 36744 USA
Fish Breeders of Idaho                                       P: 800–343–8046
P.O. Box 479                                                 F: 334–624–5770
Hagerman, ID 83332 USA                                       info@americanprideseafoods.com, www.southernpride.net
P: 208–837–6114
F: 208–837–6254                                              SouthFresh Catfish Processors
fpi@fmt.org                                                  P.O. Box 1238
                                                             Oxford , MS 38655, USA
Haring’s Pride                                               P: 662–513–5484
681 Pete Haring Rd.                                          F: 662–513–0444
Wisner, LA 71378 USA                                         info@southfresh.com, www.southfresh.com
P: 800–467–3474
info@haringspridecatfish.com, www.haringspridecatfish.com
                                                             CAVIARS, AMERICAN
Hear tland Catfish                                           American caviar producers offer many great tasting, envi-
55001 Highway 82W                                            ronmentally-friendly choices in caviar. Be aware that some
Itta Bena, MS 38941 USA                                      suppliers may have limited availability.
P: 662–254–7100
F: 662–254–7155
dan@heartlandcatfish.com, www.heartlandcatfish.com

Prairie Lands Seafood
P.O. Box 235
Pinckneyville, IL 62274 USA                                    SUNBURST TROUT COMPANY
P: 618–357–3474
F: 618–357–6808                                                Lots of fast-flowing, pristine water from the mountains
                                                               of western North Carolina is the key to the success of
Pride of the Pond                                              Sunburst Trout Company.
P.O. Box 609, Hwy. 4
Tunica, MS 38676 USA                                           Today, Sunburst Trout produces a variety of the highest-
P: 800–421–6124                                                quality red trout products, including fresh fillets, hot and
F: 662–363–2970                                                cold hickory-smoked boneless trout fillets, trout caviar, and
                                                               trout cakes. Sunburst Trout takes pride in being environ-
Pride of the South                                             mentally friendly; the company uses only feeds that are
1075 Highway 388                                               low in phosphorus, and all processing waste is made into
Brooksville, MS 39739 USA                                      compost and sold to local farmers for a nominal fee.
P: 662–738–5000
F: 662–738–4040                                                128 Raceway Pl.
pots@catfish.com                                               Canton, NC 28716 USA
                                                               P: 828.648.3010
Prime Line Catfish                                             F: 828.648.9279
Rt. 1, Box 132A, Millington-Binnsville Rd.                     info@sunbursttrout.com, www.sunbursttrout.com
Scooba, MS 39358 USA
P: 662–476–8436
F: 662–746–8625




                                                        The Fish and Shellfish Guide 95
CAVIAR, PADDLEFISH (FARMED):                     Alaskan Marine Resources
                                                 P.O. Box 1976
Collins Caviar                                   Cordova, AK 99574 USA
925 W Jackson Blvd.                              Contact: Charles Smith
Chicago, IL 60607 USA                            P: 425–868–7167
P: 800–226–0342                                  F: 425–868–9764
cavco@collinscaviar.com, www.collinscaviar.com   akmarrsc@yahoo.com

Osage Catfisheries, Inc.                         AQE Fishermen’s Market
1170 Nichols Rd.                                 473 B Katlian St.
Osage Beach, MO 65065 USA                        Sitka, AK 99835 USA
Contact: Steve Kahrs                             P: 877–392–5386
P: 573–348–2305                                  F: 907–747–6155
F: 573–348–1895                                  aqe@gci.net, www.baranofbite.com
fishery@usmo.com, www.osagecatfisheries.com
                                                 Arpeggio’s
                                                 P.O. Box 1039
CAVIAR, SALMON (WILD):                           Cordova, AK 99802 USA
                                                 P: 907–424–3141
10th & M Seafoods                                F: 206–283–6165
1020 M St.                                       chris@arpeggios.com, www.arpeggios.com
Anchorage, AK 99501 USA
Contact: Rob Winfree                             Burhop’s Seafood
P: 800–770–2722                                  1515 Sheridan Rd.
F: 907–272–1685                                  Wilmette, IL 60091 USA
TenMSea@Alaska.net, www.10thandmseafoods.com     Contact: Jeff Burhop
                                                 P: 847–256–6400
Airfresh Seafoods                                F: 847–901–4017
P.O. Box 2523                                    www.burhops.com
Gig Harbor, WA 98335 USA
Contact: Joe Stensgar                            Canadian Fishing Company
P: 253–851–5717                                  Foot of Gore Ave.
F: 253–851–5758                                  Vancouver, BC V6A 2Y7 Canada
sellfish@airfreshseafoods.com                    P: 604–681–0211
                                                 sales@canfisco.com, www.goldseal.ca
Alaska Hook & Line Seafoods
P.O. Box 1172                                    Coal Point Seafood Company
Sitka, AK 99835 USA                              P.O. Box 674
Contact: Dan Stockel                             Homer, AK 99603 USA
P: 907–747–7115                                  Contact: Nancy Hillstrand
F: 907–747–7113                                  P: 907–235–0779
hookak@ptialaska.net                             fish@alaska.net, www.welovefish.com

Alaska Seafood Company                           Collins Caviar
5434 Shaune Dr.                                  925 W Jackson Blvd.
Juneau, AK 99801 USA                             Chicago, IL 60607 USA
P: 907–780–5111                                  P: 800–226–0342
F: 907–780–5140                                  cavco@collinscaviar.com, www.collinscaviar.com
alaskaseafoodcompany@acsalaska.net,
www.alaskaseafoodco.com                          Cossack Caviar
                                                 P.O. Box 267
                                                 LaConnor, WA 98257 USA
                                                 Contact: Leis Carlson
                                                 P: 360–466–0176
                                                 F: 360–466–1029
                                                 npetzold@lonetreesf.com, www.cossackcaviar.com



                           96 Sourcing Seafood
Deep Creek Custom Packing Inc.                            CAVIAR, TROUT (FARMED):
P.O. Box 229
Ninilchik, AK 99639 USA
Contact: Jeff Berger
P: 907–567–3980
F: 907–567–1041
dccp@ptialaska.net, www.deepcreekcustompacking.com
                                                            BLIS LLC
Interior Alaska Fish Processors
2400 Davis Rd.                                              BliS offers discriminating chefs and retailers Omble de
Fairbanks, AK 99701 USA                                     Fontaine, a semiwild smoked brook trout and roe drawn
P: 907–456–3885                                             from proprietary brood stock.
F: 907–456–3889
akhunt@ptialaska.net, www.santassmokehouse.com              The trout is fed a diet of specially formulated feed and
                                                            allowed to swim free in low-density, spring-fed limestone
Nor thern Keta Caviar Co.                                   ponds enriched with a natural population of freshwater
2601 Channel Dr.                                            shrimp and mayflies. In addition, BliS offers wild steelhead
Juneau, AK 99801 USA                                        and salmon caviar from sustainable fisheries. When sourc-
Contact: Elisabeth Babich                                   ing a product, BliS first learns about the condition of the
P: 907–586–6095                                             fish habitat and then determines if it can be brought to
F: 907–586–6094                                             market according to the company’s ethical and sustainable
caviar@alaska.net, www.northernketa.com                     standards.

Snug Harbor Seafoods                                        250 Parkway Dr., Ste. 150
P.O. Box 701                                                Lincolnshire, IL 60069 USA
Kenai, AK 98611 USA                                         P: 847–325–5482
Contact: Brenda Stoops                                      sstllrd@aol.com, www.bliscaviar.com
P: 907–283–6122
F: 907–283–6127
snug@alaska.net, www.snugharborseafood.com                Blis Caviar
                                                          263 Washington Blvd. #2
Wild Alaska Smoked Salmon & Seafood                       Oak Park, IL 60302 USA
P.O. Box 2140                                             Contact: Steve Stellard
Kodiak, AK 99615 USA                                      P: 708–660–9345
Contact: Jamie Fagan                                      F: 708–660–9345
P: 907–486–6772                                           sstllrd@aol.com, www.bliscaviar.com
F: 907–486–5530
Jamie@smoked-fish.com, www.smoked-fish.com                Collins Caviar
                                                          925 W Jackson Blvd.
Woodbine Alaska Fish Company                              Chicago, IL 60607 USA
P.O. Box 39                                               P: 800–226–0342
Monroe, WA 98272 USA                                      cavco@collinscaviar.com, www.collinscaviar.com
Contact: Michael Lee
P: 360–805–5510                                           Fish Breeders of Idaho
F: 360–805–5460                                           P.O. Box 479
Woodbine@rickadee.net, www.woodbinealaska.com             Hagerman, ID 83332 USA
                                                          Contact: Leo Ray
                                                          P: 208–837–6114
                                                          F: 208–837–6254
                                                          fpi@fmt.org




                                                     The Fish and Shellfish Guide 97
Sunburst Trout Company                           Mountain Lake Fisheries
128 Raceway Pl.                                  P.O. Box 1067
Canton, NC 28716 USA                             Columbia Falls, MT 59912 USA
Contact: Sally Eason                             Contact: Ron Mohn
P: 800–673–3051                                  P: 406–892–2247
www.sunbursttrout.com                            F: 406–892–2077
                                                 mtlkfish@whitefishcaviar.com, www.whitefishcaviar.com

CAVIAR, WHITE STURGEON
(FARMED):                                        CLAMS:
                                                 Cultured clams are abundant and available. Check with
Burhop’s Seafood                                 your local distributor or contact a clam farmer below for
1515 Sheridan Rd.                                additional information.
Wilmette, IL 60091 USA
Contact: Jeff Burhop
P: 847–256–6400
F: 847–901–4017
www.burhops.com

Seattle Caviar Company                             CHERRYSTONE AQUA FARMS
2833 Eastlake Ave. E
Seattle, WA 98102 USA                              The largest processor of farmed hard clams (Mercenaria
Contact: Dale Sherrow                              mercenaria) on the East Coast.
P: 888–323–3005
F: 206–726–9603                                    Cherrystone Aqua Farms is located on Virginia’s Eastern
dale@caviar.com, www.caviar.com                    Shore in the lower Chesapeake Bay. Established in 1985,
                                                   Cherrystone is a pioneer in the technology of raising hard-
Stolt Sea Farms                                    shell clams in its state-of-the-art hatchery. Once the clams
9149 E Levee Rd.                                   reach the Little Neck size grade, Cherrystone collects and
Elverta, CA 95626 USA                              ships them live to markets around the U.S. Stored properly,
Contact: Kim North                                 they should have a shelf life of seven days.
P: 800–525–0333
F: 916–991–4334                                    P.O. Box 347
kbn@stoltseafarm.com, www.sterlingcaviar.com       Cheriton, VA 23316 USA
                                                   P: 757–331–1208
Tsar Nicoulai                                      F: 757–331–4366
60 Dorman Ave.                                     clams@infionline.net
San Francisco, CA 94124 USA
Contact: Daphne Engstrom
P: 800–952–2842                                  Aver y’s Bay Clams
F: 415–543–5172                                  741 E Great Creek Rd.
info@tsarnicoulai.com, www.tsarnicoulai.com      Galloway, NJ 08205 USA
                                                 Contact: Bill Avery
                                                 P: 609–345–7703
CAVIAR, WHITEFISH (WILD):                        F: 609–748–6630
                                                 wavery57@ix.netcom.com
Burhop’s Seafood
1515 Sheridan Rd.                                Burhop’s Seafood
Wilmette, IL 60091 USA                           1515 Sheridan Rd.
Contact: Jeff Burhop                             Wilmette, IL 60091 USA
P: 847–256–6400                                  Contact: Jeff Burhop
F: 847–901–4017                                  P: 847–256–6400
www.burhops.com                                  F: 847–901–4017
                                                 www.burhops.com




                           98 Sourcing Seafood
Cedar Key Aquaculture Farms, Inc.                          Marshall Point Sea Farm, LLC
11227 East Riverview Dr.                                   P.O. Box 285
Riverview, FL 33569 USA                                    Port Clyde, ME 04855 USA
P: 352–543–9131                                            Contact: Karl Eschholz
F: 352–543–9132                                            P: 207–372–8443
custserv@cedarkeyclams.com, www.cedarkeyclams.com          F: 207–372–0513
                                                           seafarm@gwi.net
Cherr ystone Aqua Farms
P.O. Box 347                                               Nautical Nuggets Clam Farms
Cheriton, VA 23316 USA                                     P.O. Box 134
Contact: Tim Parsons                                       Oceanville, NJ 08231 USA
P: 757–331–1208                                            P: 609–652–7725
F: 757–331–4366                                            mathisclamfarm@aol.com
clams@infionline.net
                                                           Noank Aquaculture Cooperative
EcoFish, Inc.                                              100 Main St.
78 Market St.                                              Noank, CT 06340 USA
Portsmouth, NH 03801 USA                                   Contact: Jim Markow
P: 603–430–0101 (877–214–FISH)                             P: 860–460–4558
F: 603–430–9929
www.ecofish.com                                            Phillips Seafood
                                                           Rt. 1, Box 1672
EcoFish offers a variety of seafood products.              Townsend, GA 31331 USA
For a complete list, see their profile on page 133.        Contact: Charlie Phillips
                                                           P: 912–832–4423
French’s Clam Co. Ltd.                                     pseafood@darientel.net
P.O. Box 28
Lund, BC V0N 2G0 Canada                                    Shellfish for You
Contact: Bob Paquin                                        227 Shore Rd.
P: 604–483–2063                                            Westerly, RI 02891 USA
F: 604–483–2022                                            Contact: Jeffrey Gardner
graceh@prcn.org                                            P: 401–322–7280
                                                           shellfish4U@ids.net
Gordon’s Shellfish LLC
P.O. Box 336                                               Taylor Shellfish Farms
Pocomoke, MD 21851 USA                                     130 SE Lynch Rd.
Contact: Stephen Gordon                                    Shelton, WA 98585 USA
P: 410–726–1202                                            Contact: Bill Taylor
F: 410–957–1303                                            P: 360–426–6178
sgordon@mafi.com                                           F: 360–427–0327
                                                           orders@Taylorshellfish.com, www.taylorshellfish.com
Imperial Eagle Clam Company Ltd.
6980 Seabrook Rd.                                          Wash-A-Shore Oyster Ranch
Saanichton, BC V8M 1M6 Canada                              P.O. Box 1079
P: 250–652–5166                                            South Wellfleet, MA 02663 USA
F: 250–652–2725                                            Contact: Capt. R. Andrew Cummings
rtryon@telus.net                                           P: 508–349–0819
                                                           andrew@outercapewaterman.com, www.outercapewater-
J&B AquaFood, Inc.                                         man.com
16 E Bayshore Blvd.
Jacksonville, NC 28540 USA
Contacts: Jim & Bonnie Swartzenberg
P: 910–347–7240
F: 910–347–7240
oyster@coastalnet.com




                                                      The Fish and Shellfish Guide 99
COD, PACIFIC:                                              Copper River Seafoods
Pacific cod is carried by most distributors. For smaller   4000 W 50th, Ste. 2
quantities or special requests, consider contacting an     Anchorage, AK 99502 USA
Alaskan producer directly.                                 Contact: Robyn McKenzie
                                                           P: 888–622–1197
AA1 Alaska Fish                                            F: 907–222–0823
P.O. Box 4004                                              rmckenzie@ctcak.net, www.copperriverseafood.com
Homer, AK 99603 USA
Contact: Bill Sullivan                                     EcoFish, Inc.
P: 907–235–2799                                            78 Market St.
F: 907–235–2799                                            Portsmouth, NH 03801 USA
kachemakbayseafoods@hotmail.com                            P: 603–430–0101 (877–214–FISH)
                                                           F: 603–430–9929
Alaska Glacier Seafoods, Inc.                              www.ecofish.com
P.O. Box 34363
Juneau, AK 99803 USA                                       EcoFish offers a variety of seafood products.
Contact: Mike Erickson                                     For a complete list, see their profile on page 133.
P: 907–790–3590
F: 907–790–4286                                            Fisherman’s Express LLC
alaskaglacier@gci.net                                      417 D St.
                                                           Anchorage, AK 99501 USA
Alaska Hook & Line Seafoods                                Contact: Cade Smith
P.O. Box 1172                                              P: 888–926–3474
Sitka, AK 99835 USA                                        F: 907–569–3476
Contact: Dan Stockel                                       cade@fishermansexpress.com,
P: 907–747–7115                                            www.fishermansexpress.com
F: 907–747–7113
hookak@ptialaska.net                                       Island Seafoods
                                                           317 Shelikof Ave.
Burhop’s Seafood                                           Kodiak, AK 99615 USA
1515 Sheridan Rd.                                          Contact: John Whiddon
Wilmette, IL 60091 USA                                     P: 907–486–8575
Contact: Jeff Burhop                                       F: 907–486–3007
P: 847–256–6400                                            IslandSeafoods@gci.net, www.islandseafoods.com
F: 847–901–4017
www.burhops.com                                            Snug Harbor Seafoods
                                                           P.O. Box 701
Buy N Pack Seafoods Inc.                                   Kenai, AK 98611 USA
P.O. Box 448                                               Contact: Brenda Stoops
Hoonah, AK 99829 USA                                       P: 907–283–6122
Contact: David Bowen                                       F: 907–283–6127
P: 907–945–3388                                            snug@alaska.net, www.snugharborseafood.com
F: 907–945–3697
buynpack@hoonah.net, www.buynpack.com                      Sunset Fisheries
                                                           P.O. Box 1395
Coal Point Seafood Company                                 Petersburg, AK 99833 USA
P.O. Box 674                                               Contact: Amanda Bossard
Homer, AK 99603 USA                                        P: 907–723–9888
Contact: Nancy Hillstrand                                  captainaritan@yahoo.com
P: 800–325–3877
F: 907–235–5330
fish@alaska.net, www.welovefish.com




                           100 Sourcing Seafood
Troller Point Fisheries                                            Bandon Pacific
1120 E Hoffman Rd. #23                                             P.O. Box 485
Anchorage, AK 99515 USA                                            Bandon, OR 97411 USA
Contact: Mark Hofman                                               Contact: Gradon Stinnett
P: 907–344–1866                                                    P: 541–347–4454
F: 907–344–1866                                                    F: 541–347–4313
troller@alaska.net, www.trollerpoint.com
                                                                   Bell Buoy Crab Co.
Vis Seafoods                                                       P.O. Box 680
2208 James St.                                                     Seaside, OR 97138 USA
Bellingham, WA 98225 USA                                           Contact: Jon Hartill
Contact: Adrian Hilde                                              P: 503–738–6354
P: 888–647–3474                                                    F: 503–738–8325
F: 360–671–6847                                                    bellbuoy@pacifier.com
fishhead@visseafoods.com, www.visseafoods.com
                                                                   Bornstein Seafoods
                                                                   1001 Hilton Ave.
CRAB, DUNGENESS:                                                   Bellingham, WA 98225 USA
East Coast buyers may be less familiar with this West              Contact: Colin Bornstein
Coast crab but it is gaining national popularity in all forms:     P: 360–734–7990
live, cooked whole, sections and meat. Contact these pri-          F: 360–734–5732
mary processors for details.                                       colin@bornstein.com, www.bornstein.com

                                                                   Burhop’s Seafood
                                                                   1515 Sheridan Rd.
                                                                   Wilmette, IL 60091 USA
                                                                   Contact: Jeff Burhop
                                                                   P: 847–256–6400
NELSON CRAB                                                        F: 847–901–4017
                                                                   www.burhops.com
A third-generation, family-owned business, Nelson
Crab is located in the village of Tokeland on the                  Caito Fisheries
Washington coast.                                                  P.O. Box 1370
                                                                   Fort Bragg, CA 95437 USA
Under the watchful eye of Kristi Nelson, Nelson Crab               Contact: Jim Caito
produces truly fresh Dungeness crabmeat (not picked                P: 707–964–6368
from previously frozen sections) and fresh and frozen              F: 707–964–6439
Dungeness whole cooks and sections. Nelson also                    caitofsh@mcn.org, www.caitofisheries.com
offers a variety of hand-packed gourmet canned seafood,
including all-natural, low-mercury albacore that is single-        EcoFish, Inc.
cooked in its own juices; cooked coldwater shrimp meat;            78 Market St.
boneless wild canned salmon; and shad roe. Nelson                  Portsmouth, NH 03801 USA
sells to distributors and sends seafood overnight to               P: 603–430–0101 (877–214–FISH)
restaurants and retailers.                                         F: 603–430–9929
                                                                   www.ecofish.com
P.O. Box 520
Tokeland, WA 98590 USA                                             EcoFish offers a variety of seafood products.
P: 800–262–0069                                                    For a complete list, see their profile on page 133.
F: 541–267–2921
seatreats@techline.com                                             Fishhawk Fisheries
                                                                   P.O. Box 715
                                                                   Astoria, OR 97103 USA
                                                                   Contact: Steve Fick
                                                                   P: 503–325–5252
                                                                   F: 503–325–8786
                                                                   fishhawk@ideal-web.com



                                                              The Fish and Shellfish Guide 101
Hallmark Fisheries                                 Trident Seafoods
P.O. Box 5390                                      5303 Shilshole Ave. NW
Charleston, OR 97420 USA                           Seattle, WA 98107 USA
Contact: Jack Emmons                               Contact: Joe Bundrant
P: 541–888–3253                                    P: 206–783–3474
F: 541–888–6814                                    F: 206–782–7246
hallmark.fisheries@verizon.net                     sales@tridentseafoods.com, www.tridentseafoods.com

Icicle Seafoods, Inc.
4019 21st Ave. W                                   CRAB, JONAH & ROCK:
Seattle, WA 98199 USA                              Learn more about these East Coast crustaceans by visiting
Contact: Rick Speed                                the web sites of suppliers listed below.
P: 206–282–0988
F: 206–282–7222                                    Burhop’s Seafood
ricks@icicleseafoods.com, www.icicleseafoods.com   1515 Sheridan Rd.
                                                   Wilmette, IL 60091 USA
Jessie’s Illwaco Fish Company                      Contact: Jeff Burhop
P.O. Box 800                                       P: 847–256–6400
Ilwaco, WA 98624 USA                               F: 847–901–4017
P: 360–642–3773                                    www.burhops.com
F: 360–642–3362
                                                   Clearwater Fine Foods
Monterey Fish Market                               757 Bedford Highway
Pier 33                                            Bedford, NS B4A 3Z7 Canada
San Francisco, CA USA                              Contact: Holly Reardon
Contact: Paul Johnson                              P: 902–443–0550
P: 415–956–1986                                    F: 902–443–8365
F: 415–956–5851                                    sales@clearwater.ca, www.clearwater.ca
www.montereyfish.com
                                                   Great Nor thern Products Ltd.
Nelson Crab, Inc.                                  P.O. Box 7622
P.O. Box 520                                       Warwick, RI 02887 USA
Tokeland, WA 98590 USA                             P: 401–821–2400
P: 800–262–0069                                    F: 401–821–2419
F: 541–267–2921                                    ecom@northernproducts.com, www.northernproducts.com
seatreats@techline.com
                                                   Nantucket Seafood
Pacific Seafood Group                              56 Old South Rd.
16797 SE 130th Ave.                                Nantucket, MA 02554 USA
Clackamas, OR 97015 USA                            P: 508–325–6345
Contact: Steve Spencer                             F: 508–325–6311
P: 503–905–4500; 800–388–1101
F: 503–905–4228                                    Por tland Shellfish
sspencer@pacseafood.com, www.pacseafood.com        110 Darmouth St.
                                                   South Portland, ME 04106 USA
Quinault Pride Seafood                             P: 207–799–9290
1111 NW 45th St., Ste. B                           F: 207–799–7179
Seattle, WA 98107 USA                              sales@pshellfish.com, www.portlandshellfish.com
Contact: Gayla Morrison
P: 206–706–7792                                    Stonington Sea Products
F: 206–789–0504                                    100 N Main St. (P.O. Box 100)
gayla@seafare.com, www.quinaultprideseafood.com    Stonington, ME 04681 USA
                                                   P: 888–402–2729
                                                   F: 207–367–2224
                                                   sales@stoningtonseafood.com, www.stoningtonseafood.com




                           102 Sourcing Seafood
Thomas Massey Ltd.                                                 Peter Pan Seafoods, Inc.
2 Hill Rd.                                                         2200 Sixth Ave., Ste. 1000
South Bristol, ME 04568 USA                                        Seattle, WA 98121 USA
P: 207–644–1400                                                    Contact: Steve Chartier
F: 207–644–8192                                                    P: 206–728–6000
tmasseyltd@yahoo.com                                               F: 206–284–7474
                                                                   stevec@ppsf.com, www.ppsf.com
William Atwood Lobster Company
P.O. Box 202                                                       Royal Aleutian Seafoods, Inc.
Spruce Head, ME 04859 USA                                          701 Dexter Ave. N #403
P: 207–596–6691                                                    Seattle, WA 98109 USA
F: 207–596–6958                                                    Contact: David Keene
support@atwoodlobster.com, www.atwoodlobster.com                   P: 206–283–6605
                                                                   F: 206–282–3572
                                                                   royal_aleutian_seafoods@msn.com
CRAB, KING (ALASKA):
The king crab season is short-lived, so contact the suppli-        Taku Fisheries
ers listed below to get your hands on this delicacy while          550 S Franklin St.
it’s in season.                                                    Juneau, AK 99801 USA
                                                                   Contact: Joe Isturis
Burhop’s Seafood                                                   P: 907–463–4617
1515 Sheridan Rd.                                                  F: 907–463–4644
Wilmette, IL 60091 USA                                             jisturis@takusmokeries.com, www.takusmokeries.com
Contact: Jeff Burhop
P: 847–256–6400                                                    Trident Seafoods Corporation
F: 847–901–4017                                                    5303 Shilshole Ave. NW
www.burhops.com                                                    Seattle, WA 98107 USA
                                                                   Contact: Joe Bundrant
Deep Sea Fisheries, Inc.                                           P: 206–783–3474
3900 Railway Ave.                                                  F: 206–782–7246
Everett, WA 98201 USA                                              sales@tridentseafoods.com, www.tridentseafoods.com
Contact: John Connors
P: 425–742–8609                                                    Unisea, Inc.
F: 425–742–8699                                                    15110 NE 90th St.
johnconnors@deepseafisheries.com,                                  Redmond, WA 98052 USA
www.deepseafisheries.com                                           Contact: Mike Cusack
                                                                   P: 425–861–5312
Icicle Seafoods, Inc.                                              F: 425–821–5841
4019 21st Ave. W                                                   mikec@fishking.com, www.unisea.com
Seattle, WA 98199 USA
Contact: Rick Speed
P: 206–282–0988                                                    CRAB, SNOW:
F: 206–282–7222                                                    Frozen snow crab is widely available from seafood and
ricks@icicleseafoods.com, www.icicleseafoods.com                   foodservice distributors throughout the U.S. The following
                                                                   companies are major snow crab producers:
Nor ton Sound Seafood Products
201 Belmont St.                                                    Burhop’s Seafood
Nome, AK 99762 USA                                                 1515 Sheridan Rd.
Contact: Tom Maguire                                               Wilmette, IL 60091 USA
P: 907–443–2304                                                    Contact: Jeff Burhop
F: 907–443–2457                                                    P: 847–256–6400
tom@nsedc.com, www.nsedc.com/nssp.html                             F: 847–901–4017
                                                                   www.burhops.com




                                                              The Fish and Shellfish Guide 103
Daley Brothers Ltd.                                Royal Aleutian Seafoods
P.O. Box 39                                        701 Dexter Ave. N #403
St. John’s, NL A1C 6C9 Canada                      Seattle, WA 98109 USA
P: 709–364–8844                                    Contact: David Keene
F: 709–364–7216                                    P: 206–283–6605
sales@daleybrothers.com, www.daleybrothers.com     F: 206–282–4572
                                                   royal_aleutian_seafoods@msn.com
Fisher y Products International
70 O’Leary Ave (P.O. Box 550)                      Sogelco International, Inc.
St. John’s, NL A1C 5L1 Canada                      715 Square Victoria, 4th Fl.
Contact: Chris Curran                              Montreal, QC H2Y 2H7 Canada
P: 709–570–0000                                    P: 514–849–2414
F: 709–570–0138                                    F: 514–849–0645
fpi@fpil.com, www.fpil.com                         info@sogelco.com, www.sogelco.com

Great Nor thern Products Ltd.                      Trident Seafoods
P.O. Box 7622                                      5303 Shilshole Ave. NW
Warwick, RI 02887 USA                              Seattle, WA 98107 USA
P: 401–821–2400                                    Contact: Joe Bundrant
F: 401–821–2419                                    P: 206–783–3474
gn@greatnorthernproducts.com,                      F: 206–782–7246
www.greatnorthernproducts.com                      sales@tridentseafoods.com, www.tridentseafoods.com

Icicle Seafoods, Inc.
4019–21st Ave. W                                   CRAB, STONE:
Seattle, WA 98199 USA                              Contact a Florida-based producer listed below for more
Contact: Rick Speed                                information regarding availability in your area.
P: 206–282–0988
F: 206–282–7222                                    Bama Sea Products, Inc.
ricks@icicleseafoods.com, www.icicleseafoods.com   756 28th St. S
                                                   St. Petersburg, FL 33712 USA
Keypor t Foods LLC                                 Contact: Mike Parks
5309 Shilshole Ave., NW, Ste. 210                  P: 727–327–3474
Seattle, WA 98107 USA                              F: 727–322–0580
Contact: Darryl Pedersen                           sales@bamasea.com, www.bamasea.com
P: 206–284–1947
F: 206–284–3055                                    Burhop’s Seafood
keyport@keyportfoods.com                           1515 Sheridan Rd.
                                                   Wilmette, IL 60091 USA
Peter Pan Seafoods                                 Contact: Jeff Burhop
2200 Sixth Ave., Ste. 1000                         P: 847–256–6400
Seattle, WA 98121 USA                              F: 847–901–4017
Contact: Steve Chartier                            www.burhops.com
P: 206–728–6000
F: 206–284–7474                                    Cox Seafood
stevec@ppsf.com, www.ppsf.com                      1003 Roosevelt Blvd.
                                                   Tarpon Springs, FL 34689 USA
Quinlan Brothers Ltd.                              P: 727–937–4471
P.O. Box 40                                        F: 727–942–5783
Bay De Verde, NL A0A 1E0 Canada
P: 709–587–2460
F: 709–587–2819




                          104 Sourcing Seafood
Islamorada Lobster & Stone Crab                                 Bonanza Crawfish Farms, Inc.
Enterprises, Inc.                                               1010 B Melancon St.
77300 Overseas Hwy.                                             Henderson, LA 70517 USA
Islamorada, FL 33036 USA                                        Contact: Gillray Patin
Contact: Bill Mincey                                            P: 337–228–2542
P: 305–664–9006                                                 F: 337–228–2542
F: 305–664–9019
www.billsstonecrab-lobsternextday.com                           Burhop’s Seafood
                                                                1515 Sheridan Rd.
Key Largo Fisheries                                             Wilmette, IL 60091 USA
P.O. Box 273                                                    Contact: Jeff Burhop
Key Largo, FL 33037 USA                                         P: 847–256–6400
P: 305–451–3782                                                 F: 847–901–4017
F: 305–451–3215                                                 www.burhops.com

Key West Seafoods                                               Cajun Crawfish
P.O. Box 6676                                                   5104 Fourth St.
Key West, FL 33041 USA                                          Marrero, LA 70072 USA
Contact: Gail Marshall                                          Contact: Elton Bernard
P: 305–292–4774                                                 P: 800–256–8135
F: 305–292–2420                                                 F: 504–341–7627
gofish@keywestseafood.com, www.keywestseafood.com
                                                                Fruge’s Cajun Crawfish Company
Keys Fisheries, Inc.                                            P.O. Box 393
3390 Gulfview Ave.                                              Branch, LA 70516 USA
Marathon, FL 33050 USA                                          Contact: Michael Fruge
Contact: Gary Graves                                            P: 888–254–8626
P: 305–743–6727                                                 F: 337–334–8477
F: 305–743–3562                                                 boudreaux@cajuncrawfish.com, www.cajuncrawfish.com
keysfish@marathonkey.com
                                                                Live Crawfish.com
                                                                22195 Talbot Dr.
CRAWFISH:                                                       Plaquemine, LA 70764 USA
Imported frozen crawfish meat is widely available from          Contact: Obie Watts
foodservice distributors. Most domestic crawfish suppli-        P: 866–522–3663
ers, which are listed below, are located in Louisiana:          F: 225–687–8200
                                                                infoquest@livecrawfish.com, www.livecrawfish.com
Acadiana Fisherman’s Cooperative
1020 Devillier St.
Breaux Bridge, LA 70517 USA                                     FLOUNDER, SUMMER (FLUKE):
Contact: Gabe LeBlanc                                           An East Coast staple, these processors either sell direct
P: 337–228–7503                                                 or provide the name of a local distributor.

Atchafalaya Crawfish                                            Burhop’s Seafood
1702 B Brande Anse Hwy.                                         1515 Sheridan Rd.
Breaux Bridge, LA 70517 USA                                     Wilmette, IL 60091 USA
Contact: Ron Noel                                               Contact: Jeff Burhop
P: 337–228–7515                                                 P: 847–256–6400
                                                                F: 847–901–4017
Bayou Land Seafood, LLC                                         www.burhops.com
1008 Vincent Berard Rd.
Breaux Bridge, LA 70517 USA
Contact: Adam Johnson
P: 800–737–6868
F: 337–667–6059
www.bayoulandseafood.com



                                                           The Fish and Shellfish Guide 105
Deep Sea Fish of Rhode Island, Inc.                            Airfresh Seafoods
P.O. Box 764                                                   P.O. Box 2523
Wakefield, RI 02880 USA                                        Gig Harbor, WA 98335 USA
P: 401–782–1330                                                Contact: Joe Stensgar
F: 401–782–4011                                                P: 253–851–5717
info@deepseafish.net, www.deepseafish.net                      F: 253–851–5758
                                                               sellfish@airfreshseafoods.com
National Fish and Seafood Inc.
11–15 Parker St.                                               Alaska Glacier Seafoods, Inc.
Gloucester, MA 01930 USA                                       P.O. Box 34363
Contact: Ann Malloch                                           Juneau, AK 99803 USA
P: 978–282–7880                                                Contact: Mike Erickson
F: 978–282–7883                                                P: 907–790–3590
amalloch@nationalfish.com, www.nationalfish.com                F: 907–790–4286
                                                               alaskaglacier@gci.net
Pamlico Packing Co.
P.O. Box 308                                                   Alaska Hook & Line Seafoods
Vandermere, NC 28587 USA                                       P.O. Box 1172
Contact: Doug Cross                                            Sitka, AK 99835 USA
P: 252–745–3688                                                Contact: Dan Stockel
F: 252–745–4637                                                P: 907–747–7115
don@bestseafood.com, www.bestseafood.com                       F: 907–747–7113
                                                               hookak@ptialaska.net
Poseidon Enterprises, Inc.
3516 Green Park Circle                                         AQE Fishermen’s Market
Charlotte, NC 28217 USA                                        473B Katlian St.
Contact: Mike Henninger                                        Sitka, AK 99835 USA
P: 704–944–1160                                                P: 877–392–5386
F: 704–423–9581                                                F: 907–747–6155
mikeh@poseidonseafood.com, www.poseidonseafood.com             aqe@gci.net, www.baranofbite.com

Wanchese Fish Company, Inc.                                    Bell’s Seafood
2000 Northgate Commerce Pkwy.                                  P.O. Box 1189
Suffolk, VA 23435 USA                                          Haines, AK 99827 USA
Contact: Sam Daniels                                           Contact: Clyde Bell
P: 757–673–4500                                                P: 907–766–2950
F: 757–673–4550
fishco@wanchese.com, www.wanchese.com                          Big Blue Fisheries
                                                               216 Smith St., Unit 13
                                                               Sitka, AK 99835 USA
HALIBUT, PACIFIC:                                              Contact: Calvin Boord (Chip)
Fresh and frozen halibut is widely available through most      P: 907–966–9999
seafood distributors. The processors and direct sales          F: 907–966–2583
fishermen listed below have indicated they sell to individu-   www.alaskasmokedfish.com
als or in small (100 pounds or less) quantities:
                                                               Burhop’s Seafood
10th & M Seafoods                                              1515 Sheridan Rd.
1020 M St.                                                     Wilmette, IL 60091 USA
Anchorage, AK 99501 USA                                        Contact: Jeff Burhop
Contact: Rob Winfree                                           P: 847–256–6400
P: 800–770–2722                                                F: 847–901–4017
F: 907–272–1685                                                www.burhops.com
TenMSea@Alaska.net, www.10thandmseafoods.com




                           106 Sourcing Seafood
Buy N Pack Seafoods Inc.                                   Horst’s Seafood, Inc.
P.O. Box 448                                               2315 Industrial Blvd.
Hoonah, AK 99829 USA                                       Juneau, AK 99801 USA
Contact: David Bowen                                       Contact: Horst Schramm
P: 907–945–3388                                            P: 907–790–4300
F: 907–945–3697                                            F: 907–790–5534
buynpack@hoonah.net, www.buynpack.com                      horsts@gci.net

Coal Point Seafood Company                                 Island Seafoods
P.O. Box 674                                               317 Shelikof Ave.
Homer, AK 99603 USA                                        Kodiak, AK 99615 USA
Contact: Nancy Hillstrand                                  Contact: John Whiddon
P: 800–325–3877                                            P: 907–486–8575
F: 907–235–5330                                            F: 907–486–3007
fish@alaska.net, www.welovefish.com                        IslandSeafoods@gci.net, www.islandseafoods.com

Coastal Cold Storage                                       J & R Fisheries
P.O. Box 307                                               P.O. Box 3302
Petersburg, AK 99833 USA                                   Seward, AK 99664 USA
Contact: Greg                                              Contact: Rhonda Anderson-Hubbard
P: 907–772–4177                                            P: 907–224–5584
F: 907–772–4176                                            F: 907–224–5572
coastal@alaska.com                                         kruzof@ak.net

Copper River Seafoods                                      Lofoten Fish Company
4000 W 50th, Ste. 2                                        P.O. Box 2028
Anchorage, AK 99502 USA                                    Petersburg, AK 99833 USA
Contact: Robyn McKenzie                                    P: 907–772–2680
P: 888–622–1197                                            F: 907–201–7287
F: 907–424–7435                                            cwallesz@hotmail.com
rmckenzie@ctcak.net, www.copperriverseafood.com
                                                           Monterey Fish Market
EcoFish, Inc.                                              Pier 33
78 Market St.                                              San Francisco, CA USA
Portsmouth, NH 03801 USA                                   Contact: Paul Johnson
P: 603–430–0101 (877–214–FISH)                             P: 415–956–1986
F: 603–430–9929                                            F: 415–956–5851
www.ecofish.com                                            www.montereyfish.com

EcoFish offers a variety of seafood products.              Nordic Fisheries, Inc.
For a complete list, see their profile on page 133.        P.O. Box 1345
                                                           Petersburg, AK 99833 USA
Fishing Vessel Alpha Dawn                                  Contact: Erika Gross
P.O. Box 257                                               P: 907–772–2263
Wrangell, AK 99929 USA                                     F: 907–772–2263
P: 907–874–3524                                            nordicfisheries@alaska.com
F: 907–874–3524
farnorth@aptalaska.net                                     Pacific Pleasures
                                                           P.O. Box 2
Fishing Vessel Patricia S                                  Yakutat, AK 99689 USA
P.O. Box 182                                               Contact: Scott Chadwick
Gustavus, AK 99826 USA                                     P: 907–784–3976
Contact: Eugene Farley                                     F: 907–784–3881
P: 907–697–2424                                            reeltime@ptialaska.net, www.yakutacharter.com
F: 907–697–2717
phdiesel@msn.com



                                                      The Fish and Shellfish Guide 107
Prime Select Seafoods                             Wrangell Seafoods Inc.
P.O. Box 846                                      641 Shakes St. (P.O. Box 908)
Cordova, AK 99574 USA                             Wrangell, AK 99929 USA
Contact: Jeff Bailey                              Contact: Serri Cummings
P: 907–424–7750                                   P: 907–874–3346
F: 907–424–7751                                   F: 907–874–3035
salmon@pssifish.com, www.pssifish.com             scummins@wrangellseafoods.com,
                                                  www.wrangellseafoods.com
Quinault Pride Seafood
1111 NW 45th St., Ste. B
Seattle, WA 98107 USA                             LOBSTER, AMERICAN:
Contact: Gayla Morrison                           Many lobster producers maintain “pounds” to hold live
P: 206–706–7792                                   lobster, therefore availability should not be a problem.
F: 206–789–0504
gayla@seafare.com, www.quinaultprideseafood.com   Allen’s Seafood
                                                  119 Lookout Point Rd.
Snug Harbor Seafoods                              Harpswell, ME 04079 USA
P.O. Box 701                                      Contact: Holly Chase Allen
Kenai, AK 98611 USA                               P: 207–833–2828
Contact: Brenda Stoops                            allenseafood@suscom-maine.net
P: 907–283–6122
F: 907–283–6127                                   Bay Haven Lobster, Inc.
snug@alaska.net, www.snugharborseafood.com        303 Chases Pond Rd.
This is an MSC-certified product.                 York, ME 03909 USA
                                                  Contact: Steve Small
Sunset Fisheries                                  P: 207–363–5265
P.O. Box 1395                                     loosegear@comcast.net
Petersburg, AK 99833 USA
Contact: Amanda Bossard                           Bayley’s Lobster Pound
P: 907–723–9888                                   P.O. Box 304
captainaritan@yahoo.com                           Scarborough, ME 04070 USA
                                                  Contact: Susan Bayley
Tonka Seafoods, Inc.                              P: 207–883–4571
P.O. Box 1420                                     F: 207–883–2528
Petersburg, AK 99833 USA                          bayleys@bayleys.com, www.bayleys.com
Contact: Shari Otness
P: 907–772–3662                                   BBS Lobster Company Inc.
F: 907–772–3663                                   141 Small’s Point Rd.
office@tonkaseafoods.com, www.tonkaseafoods.com   Machiasport, ME 04655 USA
                                                  Contact: Blair West
Triad Fisheries                                   P: 207–255–8888
P.O. Box 11702                                    F: 207–255–3987
Bainbridge Island, WA 98110 USA                   bbs_ealobster@hotmail.com
Contact: Bruce Gore
P: 206–842–1620                                   Beals Lobster Pier
F: 206–842–7757                                   P.O. Box 225
brucetfltd@aol.com                                Southwest Harbor, ME 04679 USA
                                                  Contact: Samuel Beal
Troller Point Fisheries                           P: 207–244–3202
1120 E Hoffman Rd. #23                            F: 207–244–9479
Anchorage, AK 99515 USA                           beals@acadia.net
Contact: Mark Hofman
P: 907–344–1866
F: 907–344–1866
troller@alaska.net, www.trollerpoint.com




                           108 Sourcing Seafood
Bob’s Seafood                                             Douty Bros. Inc.
901 Roosevelt Tr.                                         10 Portland Fish Pier
Windham, ME 04062 USA                                     Portland, ME 04101 USA
Contact: Tim Mathieu                                      Contact: Dick Douty
P: 207–893–2882                                           P: 207–773–2829
F: 207–893–2772                                           F: 207–774–3959
bobsseafood@earthlink.net, www.lobstersshipped.com        dbime1@aol.com, www.bestlobster.com

Burhop’s Seafood                                          Fishermen’s Heritage Lobster Co-op
1515 Sheridan Rd.                                         P.O. Box 359
Wilmette, IL 60091 USA                                    Friendship, ME 04547 USA
Contact: Jeff Burhop                                      Contact: Steven Thompson
P: 847–256–6400                                           P: 207–832–6378
F: 847–901–4017
www.burhops.com                                           Free Range Fish & Lobster
                                                          450 Commercial St.
Bushy Enterprises                                         Portland, ME 04101 USA
P.O. Box 489                                              Contact: Maggie Terry
Milbridge, ME 04658 USA                                   P: 207–774–8469
Contact: Randal Bushey                                    F: 207–774–8466
P: 207–546–2804                                           maggie@freerangefish.com, www.freerangefish.com
F: 207–546–7185
rnfbushey@acadia.net                                      Greenhead Lobster LLC
                                                          P.O. Box 670
Capt. Vince, Inc.                                         Stonington, ME 04681 USA
3–5 Park St.                                              Contact: Hugh Reynolds
Gloucester, MA 01930 USA                                  P: 207–367–0950
Contact: Anthony Ciarametaro                              F: 207–367–0922
P: 978–281–8860                                           greenhead@overnightseafood.com,
F: 978–283–6990                                           www.overnightseafood.com
captv@01930.com
                                                          Island Lobster, Ltd.
Castle Rock Lobster Company                               42 Rogers St.
437 Peabody Rd.                                           Gloucester, MA 01930 USA
Appleton, ME 04862 USA                                    Contact: Debra Sones
Contact: Mark Eller                                       P: 978–281–7771
P: 207–785–5555                                           F: 978–281–7772
F: 207–785–2315
athruzga@yahoo.com                                        Mainely Lobsters & Seafood
                                                          P.O. Box 214
Cook’s Lobster House                                      Owl’s Head, ME 04854 USA
P.O. Box 12                                               Contact: Jeff & Christina Woodman
Bailey Island, ME 04003 USA                               P: 207–594–6646
Contact: Joan Parent                                      F: 207–594–6646
P: 207–833–6641                                           cwoodman@mainelylobsters.com, www.mainelylobsters.com
F: 207–833–5851
cooks@cookslobster.com, www.cookslobster.com              McAleney’s New Meadows Lobster
                                                          60 Portland Pier
Cozy Harbor Seafood Inc.                                  Portland, ME 04101 USA
P.O. Box 389                                              Contact: Peter McAleney
Portland, ME 04102 USA                                    P: 207–775–1612
Contact: John Norton                                      F: 207–874–2456
P: 207–879–2665                                           lobsters@newmeadowslobster.com, www.newmeadowslob-
F: 207–879–2666                                           ster.com
jnorton@cozyharbor.com, www.cozyharbor.com




                                                     The Fish and Shellfish Guide 109
Mor tilliaro Lobster LLC                                Taylor Lobster Company
60 Commercial St.                                       32 Route 236
Gloucester, MA 01930 USA                                Kittery, ME 03904 USA
Contact: Vince Mortillaro                               Contact: Bret Taylor
P: 978–281–0959                                         P: 207–439–1350
F: 978–281–0579                                         F: 207–439–1392
                                                        btaylor@taylorlobster.com, www.taylorlobster.com
New Harbor Fishermen’s Co-op Inc.
P.O. Box 125                                            Trenton Bridge Lobster Pound Inc.
New Harbor, ME 04554 USA                                1237 Bar Harbor Rd.
Contact: Ken Tonneson                                   Trenton, ME 04605 USA
P: 207–677–2791                                         Contact: Josette Pettegrow
F: 207–677–3835                                         P: 207–667–2977
lobsta@lincoln.midcoast.com, www.newharborlobster.com   F: 207–667–3412
                                                        tblp@downeast.net, www.trentonbridgelobster.com
Pemaquid Fishermen’s Co-op
P.O. Box 152                                            True World Foods
New Harbor, ME 04554 USA                                111 E Main St.
Contact: Wayne Dighton                                  Gloucester, MA 01930 USA
P: 207–677–2801                                         Contact: Jimmy Watanable
F: 207–677–2818                                         P: 978–283–1324
pemco@tidewater.net, www.pemaquidlobsterco-op.com       F: 978–283–3058

Por t Lobster Co. Inc.                                  William Atwood Lobster Company
P.O. Box 729                                            P.O. Box 202
Kennebunkport, ME 04046 USA                             Spruce Head, ME 04859 USA
P: 207–967–2081                                         Contact: Bill McGonagle
F: 207–967–8419                                         P: 207–596–6691
portlob@gwi.net, www.portlobster.com                    F: 207–596–6958
                                                        www.atwoodlobster.com
Rockpor t Lobster Company
P.O. Box 1221                                           Young’s Lobster Pound
Gloucester, MA 01930 USA                                2 Fairview St.
Contact: Craig Babinski                                 Belfast, ME 04915 USA
P: 978–281–0225                                         Contact: Ray Young
F: 978–281–8578                                         P: 207–338–1160
                                                        F: 207–338–5652
Seaview Lobster Co.
P.O. Box 291
Kittery, ME 03904 USA                                   LOBSTER, SPINY (ROCK):
Contact: Tom Flanigan                                   Check with these suppliers for information on availability.
P: 207–439–1599
F: 207–439–1476                                         Burhop’s Seafood
seaviewlob@comcast.net, www.seaviewlobster.com          1515 Sheridan Rd.
                                                        Wilmette, IL 60091 USA
Sogelco International, Inc.                             Contact: Jeff Burhop
715 Square Victoria, 4th Fl.                            P: 847–256–6400
Montreal, Quebec H2Y 2H7 Canada                         F: 847–901–4017
P: 514–849–2414                                         www.burhops.com
F: 514–849–0645
info@sogelco.com, www.sogelco.com                       Catalina Offshore Products Inc.
                                                        5202 Lovelock St.
                                                        San Diego, CA 92110 USA
                                                        P: 619–297–9797
                                                        F: 619–297–9799
                                                        jeff@catalinaop.com, www.catalinaop.com



                         110 Sourcing Seafood
Di Carlo Seafood Company                                        Ariel Seafood, Inc.
842 N Pioneer Ave.                                              P.O. Box 5401
Wilmington, CA 90744 USA                                        Destin, FL 32540 USA
P: 310–830–3460                                                 Contact: David Krebs, Jr.
F: 310–830–1064                                                 P: 850–654–7779
pdicarlo@dicarloseafood.com, www.dicarloseafood.com             F: 850–654–0915
                                                                dakfish@hotmail.com, www.arielseafoods.com
Keys Fisheries, Inc.
3390 Gulfview Ave.                                              Atlantic Fish Corporation
Marathon, FL 33050 USA                                          P.O. Box 187
Contact: Gary Graves                                            Boca Raton, FL 33429 USA
P: 305–743–6727                                                 Contact: Tom Summer
F: 305–743–3562                                                 P: 561–395–7900
keyfish@marathonkey.com                                         F: 561–395–5500

Monterey Fish Market                                            Bama Sea Products, Inc.
Pier 33                                                         756 28th St. S
San Francisco, CA USA                                           St. Petersburg, FL 33712 USA
Contact: Paul Johnson                                           Contact: Mike Parks
P: 415–956–1986                                                 P: 727–327–3474
F: 415–956–5851                                                 F: 727–322–0580
www.montereyfish.com                                            sales@bamasea.com, www.bamasea.com

Moore’s Seafood Inc.                                            Buddy Gandy Seafood Inc.
640 Piropo Ct.                                                  P.O. Box 4677
Camarillo, CA 93010 USA                                         Panama City, FL 32401 USA
P: 805–384–9277                                                 Contact: Joellen Gandy
F: 805–383–9278                                                 P: 850–784–0663
                                                                F: 850–785–7587
Ocean Garden Products Inc.                                      gandysspd@aol.com
3585 Corporate Ct.
San Diego, CA 92123 USA                                         Burhop’s Seafood
P: 858–571–5002                                                 1515 Sheridan Rd.
F: 858–277–6228                                                 Wilmette, IL 60091 USA
www.oceangarden.com                                             Contact: Jeff Burhop
                                                                P: 847–256–6400
OFI Markesa International                                       F: 847–901–4017
5970 Alcoa Ave.                                                 www.burhops.com
Vernon, CA 90058 USA
P: 323–231–1600                                                 Deep Sea Fish of Rhode Island, Inc.
F: 323–231–0088                                                 P.O. Box 764
info@ofimarkesa.com, www.ofimarkesa.com                         Wakefield, RI 02880 USA
                                                                P: 401–782–1330
                                                                F: 401–782–4011
MACKEREL, ATLANTIC & SPANISH:                                   info@deepseafish.net, www.deepseafish.net
While we have not distinguished between suppliers of
Atlantic or Spanish mackerel, suppliers in Florida generally    Keys Fisheries, Inc.
supply Spanish, while others supply Atlantic.                   3390 Gulfview Ave.
                                                                Marathon, FL 33050 USA
All American Gulf Fish Company                                  Contact: Gary Graves
642 Anchors St. NW                                              P: 305–743–6727
Fort Walton Beach, FL 32548 USA                                 F: 305–743–3562
Contact: Yvonne Peters                                          keysfish@marathonkey.com
P: 850–243–1440
F: 850–243–5401




                                                           The Fish and Shellfish Guide 111
King’s Seafood Inc.                               Wanchese Fish Company, Inc.
P.O. Box 291607                                   2000 Northgate Commerce Pkwy.
Port Orange, FL 32127 USA                         Suffolk, VA 23435 USA
Contact: John Polston                             Contact: Sam Daniels
P: 386–756–7833                                   P: 757–673–4500
F: 386–760–6398                                   F: 757–673–4550
                                                  fishco@wanchese.com, www.wanchese.com
Lund’s Fisheries Inc.
997 Ocean Dr. (P.O. Box 830)                      Water Street Seafood Inc.
Cape May, NJ 08204 USA                            P.O. Box 121
P: 609–884–7600                                   Apalachicola, FL 32320 USA
F: 609–884–0664                                   Contact: Steven Rash
info@lundsfish.com, www.lundsfish.com             P: 800–831–4111
                                                  F: 850–653–9320
MB Seafood
650 Azalea Ave.
Merritt Island, FL 32952 USA                      MAHIMAHI (DOLPHINFISH):
Contact: Mike Schnurbusch                         Fresh mahimahi is available from domestic producers,
P: 321–459–1998                                   primarily in Hawaii and Florida, as well as importers.
F: 321–453–5647
                                                  Burhop’s Seafood
Ocean Choice                                      1515 Sheridan Rd.
42 Spring St., Ste 40                             Wilmette, IL 60091 USA
Newport, RI 02842 USA                             Contact: Jeff Burhop
Contact: Dave Kolator                             P: 847–256–6400
P: 401–847–0022                                   F: 847–901–4017
F: 401–847–5021                                   www.burhops.com
oceanchoice.ri@verizon.net, www.oceanchoice.com
                                                  EcoFish, Inc.
Point Judith Fishermen’s Co.                      78 Market St.
P.O. Box 730                                      Portsmouth, NH 03801 USA
Narragansett, RI 02882 USA                        P: 603–430–0101 (877–214–FISH)
P: 401–782–1500                                   F: 603–430–9929
F: 401–782–1599                                   www.ecofish.com

State Fish                                        EcoFish offers a variety of seafood products.
2194 Signal Pl.                                   For a complete list, see their profile on page 133.
San Pedro, CA 90731 USA
Contact: Klaus Brittinger                         Hawaii International Seafood, Inc.
P: 310–832–2633                                   P.O. Box 30486
F: 310–831–2402                                   Honolulu, HI 96820 USA
klaus@statefish.com, www.statefish.com            P: 808–839–5010
                                                  F: 808–833–0712
Standard Fish Company                             info@cryofresh.com, www.cryofresh.com
P.O. Box 1427
San Pedro, CA 90733 USA                           Hilo Fish Company, Inc.
P: 310–241–0016                                   55 Holomua St.
F: 310–241–0054                                   Hilo, HI 96720 USA
nino@seakingbrand.com, www.seakingbrand.com       Contact: Charlie Umamoto
                                                  P: 808–961–0877
Steve Connolly Seafood                            F: 808–935–1603
34 Newmarket Sq.                                  charlie@hilofish.com, www.hilofish.com
Boston, MA 02118 USA
P: 617–427–7700
F: 617–427–7697




                          112 Sourcing Seafood
Kalamar Seafood Inc.                                            EcoFish, Inc.
2490 W 78th St.                                                 78 Market St.
Hialeah, FL 33016 USA                                           Portsmouth, NH 03801 USA
Contact: Eric Pettersen                                         P: 603–430–0101 (877–214–FISH)
P: 305–822–5586                                                 F: 603–430–9929
F: 305–557–4418                                                 www.ecofish.com
rvazquez@kalamarseafood.com, www.kalamarseafood.com
                                                                EcoFish offers a variety of seafood products.
Lombardi’s Seafood Inc.                                         For a complete list, see their profile on page 133.
7491 Brokerage Dr.
Orlando, FL 32809 USA                                           The Great Eastern Mussel Farms, Inc.
P: 407–859–1015                                                 P.O. Box 141 Long Cove Rd.
F: 407–240–2562                                                 Tenants Harbor, ME 04860 USA
quality@lombardis.com, www.lombardis.com                        P: 888–229–1436
                                                                gem@midcoast.com, www.eatmussels.com

MUSSELS (FARMED):                                               Produces live rope-cultured and bottom-cultured blue mussels
Learn more about the many types of cultured mussels by
contacting these producers or visiting their web sites.         Monterey Fish Market
                                                                Pier 33
American Mussel Har vesters, Inc.                               San Francisco, CA USA
165 Tidal Dr.                                                   Contact: Paul Johnson
North Kingstown, RI 02852 USA                                   P: 415–956–1986
Contact: Jane Bugbee                                            F: 415–956–5851
P: 401–294–8999                                                 www.montereyfish.com
F: 401–294–0449
amussel@americanmussel.com, www.americanmussel.com              New Zealand Seafoods
                                                                4321 Boyle Ave.
Produces live rope-cultured and bottom-cultured blue mussels    Vernon, CA 90058 USA
                                                                Contact: Vicki Tanaka
Bantr y Bay Seafoods Ltd.                                       P: 323–584–2400
Gortalassa                                                      F: 323–584–2431
Bantry, County Cork, Ireland                                    vicki@nzseafoods.com, www.nzseafoods.com
Contact: Dennis Minihane
P: 011–353 27 50977                                             Produces and exports live and frozen half shell greenshell
F: 011–353 27 50943                                             mussels
info@bantrybayseafoods.com, www.bantrybayseafoods.com
                                                                PEI Mussel King
Produces and exports rope-grown, value-added blue mussel        P.O. Box 39
products                                                        Morell, PEI COA 1S0 Canada
                                                                P: 902–961–3300
Burhop’s Seafood                                                F: 902–961–3366
1515 Sheridan Rd.                                               info@peimusselking.com, www.peimusselking.com
Wilmette, IL 60091 USA
Contact: Jeff Burhop                                            Produces and exports live rope-grown blue mussels
P: 847–256–6400
F: 847–901–4017                                                 Penn Cove Shellfish, LLC
www.burhops.com                                                 P.O. Box 148
                                                                Coupeville, WA 98239 USA
                                                                Contact: Ian Jefferds
                                                                P: 360–678–4803
                                                                shellfish@penncoveshellfish.com,
                                                                www.penncoveshellfish.com

                                                                Produces live rope-grown blue and Mediterranean mussels




                                                           The Fish and Shellfish Guide 113
Prince Edward Aqua Farms Inc.                                     Aeros
R.R. #2                                                           10272 N Bayview Rd.
Kensington, PEI C0B 1M0 Canada                                    Southold, NY 11971 USA
P: 902–886–2220                                                   Contact: Karen Rivara
F: 902–866–2335                                                   P: 631–765–1808
sales@peaqua.com,www.peaqua.com                                   keeno@juno.com

Produces and exports live rope-grown blue mussels                 AK Johnston Oysters
                                                                  5271 Chrisman Rd.
Sealord Nor th America                                            Denman Island, BC V0R 1T0 Canada
P.O. Box 1126                                                     Contact: Graeme Johnston
Highland Park, IL 60035 USA                                       P: 250–335–2689
Contact: Jason Plato                                              egjohns@mars.ark.com
P: 847–433–1150
F: 847–433–4247                                                   Aver y’s Bay Clams
jdp@us.sealord.co.nz, www.sealord.co.nz                           741 E Great Creek Rd.
                                                                  Galloway, NJ 08205 USA
Produces and exports rope-grown New Zealand greenshell            Contact: Bill Avery
mussels on the half shell                                         P: 609–345–7703
                                                                  F: 609–748–6630
Taylor Shellfish Farms, Inc.                                      wavery57@ix.netcom.com
130 SE Lynch Rd.
Shelton, WA 98584 USA                                             B&B Oysters
P: 360–426–6178                                                   Site 33, C–6
tomb@taylorshellfish.com, www.taylorshellfish.com                 Fanny Bay, BC V0R 1W0 Canada
                                                                  Contact: Glenn Bullen
Produces live rope-grown Mediterranean mussels                    P: 250–335–1330

                                                                  Brady’s Oysters
OYSTERS:                                                          3714 Oyster Pl.
Suppliers below offer oysters from a variety of regions.          Aberdeen, WA 98520 USA
                                                                  Contact: Mark Ballo
                                                                  P: 360–268–0077
                                                                  F: 360–268–9828
                                                                  sales@bradysoysters.com, www.bradysoysters.com

                                                                  Brenner Oyster Co.
TAYLOR SHELLFISH FARMS                                            402 S 333rd St., Ste. 102
                                                                  Federal Way, WA 98003 USA
The Taylor family has combined over a century of experience       Contact: Bruce Brenner
with modern technology to create state-of-the-art shellfish       P: 253–929–1562 (cell: 360–239–4943)
farms in Puget Sound and on the Washington coast.                 F: 253–929–1564
                                                                  jjclam@aol.com, www.jjbrenner.com
Taylor is the largest producer of farmed shellfish in the U.S.;
its products include oysters (Pacific, Kumamoto, European         Burhop’s Seafood
flat, and Olympia), Manila clams, Mediterranean mussels,          1515 Sheridan Rd.
and geoducks. The company guarantees the quality of its           Wilmette, IL 60091 USA
shellfish with confidence and pride by working to ensure that     Contact: Jeff Burhop
the waters of its growout sites remain clean and clear.           P: 847–256–6400
                                                                  F: 847–901–4017
130 SE Lynch Rd.                                                  www.burhops.com
Shelton, WA 98585 USA
P: 360–426–6178
F: 360–427–0327
orders@Taylorshellfish.com, www.taylorshellfish.com




                             114 Sourcing Seafood
C and C Oyster Co. Ltd.                                    EcoFish, Inc.
485 Seventh St.                                            78 Market St.
Nanaimo, BC V9R 1E6 Canada                                 Portsmouth, NH 03801 USA
Contact: Ms. Diane Curnow                                  P: 603–430–0101 (877–214–FISH)
P: 250–335–1369                                            F: 603–430–9929
                                                           www.ecofish.com
Chessie Seafood
P.O. Box 412                                               EcoFish offers a variety of seafood products.
Wicomico, VA 23184 USA                                     For a complete list, see their profile on page 133.
Contact: Tommy Leggett
P: 804–642–2240                                            Ekone Oyster Co.
F: 804–642–6639                                            29 Holtz Rd.
                                                           South Bend, WA 98586 USA
Circle “C” Oyster Ranchers                                 Contact: Nick Jambor
49944 Airedele Rd.                                         P: 360–875–5494
Ridge, MD 20680 USA                                        F: 360–875–6058
Contact: Rick Pelz                                         ekoneoyster@hotmail.com, www.ekoneoyster.com
P: 301–872–5126
F: 215–243–8324                                            Everjay Shellfish Co.
rich@oysterranching.com, www.oysterranching.com            110 Western Ave. S
                                                           South Wellfleet, MA 02663 USA
Clausen Oysters                                            Contact: Jake Bruinooge
66234 N Bay Rd.                                            P: 508–349–6080
North Bend, OR 97459 USA                                   jacobe@cape.com
Contact: Lilli Clausen
P: 541–756–3600                                            Fisher’s Island Oyster Farm
F: 541–756–3200                                            P.O. Box 402
questions@silverpointoysters.com,                          Fisher’s Island, NY 06390 USA
www.silverpointoysters.com                                 Contact: Steve & Sarah Malinowski
                                                           P: 631–788–7899
Coast Seafoods Company                                     fioysters@worldnet.att.net
14711 NE 29th Pl., Ste. 111
Bellevue, WA 98007 USA                                     Gordon’s Shellfish LLC
Contact: Bill McDonough                                    P.O. Box 336
P: 425–702–8800                                            Pocomoke, MD 21851 USA
F: 425–702–0400                                            Contact: Stephen Gordon
www.coastseafoods.com                                      P: 410–726–1202
                                                           F: 410–957–1303
Desolation Sound Oysters Ltd.                              sgordon@mafi.com
Site 138, C–33, RR #1
Bowser, BC V0R 1G0 Canada                                  Great Little Oyster Company Ltd.
Contact: Keith Reid                                        3470 Tweedsmuir Ave.
P: 250–757–9304                                            Powell River, BC V8A 1C3 Canada
F: 250–757–9305                                            Contact: Eric Boucher
shellfish@shawcable.com                                    P: 604–485–9814
                                                           F: 604–485–9814
Duxbur y Bay Shellfish Co.                                 bcboucher@prcn.org
175 King Phillips Path
Duxbury, MA 02332 USA                                      Hama Hama Co.
Contact: George Shamma                                     301 N Webb Rd.
P: 781–834–1990                                            Lilliwaup, WA 98555 USA
F: 781–834–6161                                            Contact: Hank Bloomfield
duxburyoysters@adelphia.net, www.duxburyoysters.com        P: 360–877–6938
                                                           F: 360–877–6942
                                                           hhannie@hctc.com




                                                      The Fish and Shellfish Guide 115
High Flutin’ Oyster Co., Ltd.                          Outer Coast Oysters
RR #2 Malaspina Rd.                                    P.O. Box 436
Powell River, BC V8A 4Z3 Canada                        Tahsis, BC V0P 1X0 Canada
Contact: Jeffrey Shuster                               Contact: Ben Devault
P: 604–483–7945                                        P: 250–761–4248
momshu@aisl.bc.ca                                      F: 250–338–7290
                                                       devaults@island.net
Hog Island Oyster Co.
P.O. Box 829                                           Oyster Island Seafoods Ltd.
Marshall, CA 94940 USA                                 1625 Meadowood Way
Contact: John Finger                                   Qualicum Beach, BC V9K 2S3 Canada
P: 415–663–9218                                        Contact: Tim Peligren
F: 415–663–9246                                        P: 250–752–2429
hogislnd@svn.net, www.hogislandoyster.com              F: 250–752–2482
                                                       timp@nanaimo.ark.com
J&B AquaFood, Inc.
16 E Bayshore Blvd.                                    Pemaquid Oyster Company, Inc.
Jacksonville, NC 28540 USA                             1957 Friendship Rd. (P.O. Box 302)
Contact: Jim & Bonnie Swartzenberg                     Waldoboro, ME 04572 USA
P: 910–347–7240                                        Contact: Christopher V. Davis
F: 910–347–7240                                        P: 207–832–6067
oyster@coastalnet.com                                  F: call before faxing
                                                       cdavis@midcoast.com
Katama Bay Oyster Co.
Edgartown, MA 02539 USA                                Penn Cove Shellfish LLC
Contact: Roy Scheffer                                  P.O. Box 148
P: 508–680–6293                                        Coupeville, WA 98239 USA
                                                       Contact: Ian Jefferds
Little Skookum Shellfish Growers                       P: 360–678–4803
P.O. Box 1157                                          F: 360–678–0266
Shelton, WA 98584 USA                                  shellfish@penncoveshellfish.com,
Contact: Carl Barringer                                www.penncoveshellfish.com
P: 360–426–9759
F: 360–426–5272                                        Rappahannock River Oysters, LLC
littleskookum@direcway.com, www.skookumshellfish.com   P.O. Box 1050
                                                       Dunnsville, VA 22454 USA
Marshall Point Sea Farm, LLC                           Contact: Travis & Ryan Croxton
P.O. Box 285                                           P: 804–986–2854
Port Clyde, ME 04855 USA                               travis@rroysters.com, www.rroysters.com
Contact: Karl Eschholz
P: 207–372–8443                                        Ravens Oysters Ltd.
F: 207–372–0513                                        P.O. Box 229
seafarm@gwi.net                                        Whaletown, BC V0P 1Z0 Canada
                                                       Contact: Merle Boley
Noank Aquaculture Cooperative                          P: 250–935–0053
100 Main St.                                           F: 235–935–0116
Noank, CT 06340 USA
Contact: Jim Markow                                    Rose’s Oyster Bar
P: 860–460–4558                                        70 Rose Lane
                                                       Wellfleet, MA 02667 USA
                                                       Contact: James A. Rose
                                                       P: 508–246–4042
                                                       jamesrose1@comcast.net




                         116 Sourcing Seafood
Seapowet Shellfish LLC                                          Vanguard Bay Oyster Company Ltd.
146 Raleigh Ave.                                                301–1985 Bellevue Ave.
Pawtucket, RI 02680 USA                                         West Vancouver, BC V7V 1B6 Canada
Contact: Chris Clarendon                                        Contact: Dave Saxby
P: 401–727–4569                                                 P: 604–219–6113
chris.clarendon@verizon.net                                     F: 604–926–2620
                                                                djsaxby@istar.ca
Will sell through Aquidneck Oyster in 2005
                                                                Wampanoag Aquinnah Shellfish Hatcher y
Seattle Shellfish LLC                                           20 Black Brook Rd.
1408 State Ave NE, Ste. 6                                       Aquinnah, MA 02535 USA
Olympia, WA 98506 USA                                           Contact: Rob Garrison
Contact: Jim Gibbons                                            P: 508–645–9420
P: 360–236–0462                                                 F: 508–645–9421
F: 360–236–0471                                                 tomahawkoysters@adelphia.net
JLGibbons@seattleshellfish.com, www.seattleshellfish.com
                                                                Wash-A-Shore Oyster Ranch
Shellfish for You                                               P.O. Box 1079
227 Shore Rd.                                                   South Wellfleet, MA 02663 USA
Westerly, RI 02891 USA                                          Contact: Capt. R. Andrew Cummings
Contact: Jeffrey Gardner                                        P: 508–349–0819
P: 401–322–7280                                                 andrew@outercapewaterman.com, www.outercapewater-
shellfish4U@ids.net                                             man.com

Slack Sea Farm                                                  We’ Shuk Oysters (Ehattesaht First
P.O. Box 1238                                                   Nation)
Orleans, MA 02653 USA                                           P.O. Box 59
Contact: David Slack                                            Zeballos, BC V0P 2A0 Canada
P: 508–255–8094                                                 P: 250–761–4155
dslack@gls.net                                                  F: 250–761–4156
                                                                ehatis@zeballos.net
Strait Oysters Ltd.
12 N Delta Ave.                                                 Wellfleet Sea Farms, Inc.
Burnaby, BC V5B 1E6 Canada                                      #1963 Rte. 6
Contact: Frank Cox                                              South Wellfleet, MA 02663 USA
P: 604–329–7870                                                 Contact: Wentzle Ruml IV
F: 604–299–4130                                                 P: 508–349–9107
FTCresources@shaw.ca                                            F: call before faxing
                                                                wruml@comcast.net
Taylor Shellfish Farms
130 SE Lynch Rd.                                                Westcott Bay Sea Farms
Shelton, WA 98585 USA                                           904 Westcott Dr.
Contact: Bill Taylor                                            Friday Harbor, WA 98250 USA
P: 360–426–6178                                                 Contact: Craig Bleeker
F: 360–427–0327                                                 P: 360–378–2489
orders@Taylorshellfish.com, www.taylorshellfish.com             F: 360–378–6388
                                                                sandy@westcottbay.com, www.westcottbay.com
Tenass Pass Shellfish
P.O. Box 20704
Juneau, AK 99802 USA                                            POLLOCK (ALASKA):
Contact: Rodger Painter                                         Pollock is widely available; contact your local supplier.
P: 907–463–3600
F: 907–463–3600
rodgerpainter@hotmail.com




                                                           The Fish and Shellfish Guide 117
SABLEFISH (BLACK COD):                                    Coastwide Fishing Ltd.
While much of the sablefish supply goes to Japan, these   12411 Vulcan Way
suppliers can help identify local availability.           Richmond, BC, V6V 1J7 Canada
                                                          Contact: Dick Yamazaki
CANADIAN SUPPLIERS                                        P: 604–272–1106
                                                          F: 604–272–0992
Aero Trading Co. Ltd.                                     cwf@telus.net
8592 Fraser St.
Vancouver, BC B5X 3Y3 Canada                              F.A.S. Seafood Producers Ltd.
Contact: Mr. Moonie                                       27 Erie St.
P: 604–327–6331                                           Victoria, BC V8V 1P8 Canada
aero@intergate.ca                                         Contact: Bob Fraumeni
                                                          P: 250–383–7764
Albion Fisheries, Ltd.                                    seafood@telus.net
1077 Great Northern Way
Vancouver, BC Z5T 1E1 Canada                              Leader Fishing Ltd.
Contact: Colin McMillan                                   7008 Venture St.
P: 604–875–9411                                           Delta, BC V4G 1H4 Canada
F: 604–875–0644                                           Contact: Erling Olsen
www.albion.bc.ca                                          P: 604–940–6818
                                                          erling@leaderfishing.com
Andersen Foods Intl. Ltd.
10972 Shelley Pl.                                         Lions Gate Fisheries Ltd.
Delta, BC V4E 1G5 Canada                                  4179 River Rd. W
Contact: Steven Andersen                                  Delta, BC V4K 1R9 Canada
P: 604–591–7223                                           Contact: Jack Waterfield
F: 604–591–5971                                           P: 604–946–1361
Sandersen@dccnet.com                                      F: 604–946–0944
                                                          jack@lionsgatefisheries.com, www.lionsgatefisheries.com
Canada Seafood Inc., Intl.
8731 Citadel Cresent                                      Pacific Seafood Intl. Ltd.
Richmond, BC V7C 4T3 Canada                               10210 Bowerbank Rd.
Contact: George W.Y. Mok                                  Sidney, BC V8L 3X4 Canada
P: 604–272–1823                                           P: 250–656–0901
F: 604–272–1897                                           F: 250–656–7615
georgewymok@yahoo.com                                     pacficseafoods@shaw.ca, www.pacificseafoods.com

Clear Bay Fisheries, Inc.                                 River Seafoods Inc.
Unit 16–12200 Vulcan Way                                  7008 Venture St.
Richmond, BC V6V 1J8Canada                                Delta, BC V4G 1H4 Canada
Contact: Julian Ng                                        Contact: Jock Bray
P: 604–276–2515                                           P: 604–940–2173
F: 604–276–2213                                           F: 604–940–2174
Clearbay-seafood@shaw.ca                                  jock@riverseafoods.bc.ca, www.riverseafoods.bc.ca

Coast Island Seafoods                                     Saurian Seafoods Inc.
6000 Island Hwy. West                                     1625 Lincoln Ave.
Qualicum Bay, BC Z9K 2E1 Canada                           Port Coquitlam, BC V3B 2J5 Canada
Contact: Dave Gray                                        Contact: Jack Morris
P: 250–757–8533                                           P: 604–942–0415
F: 250–757–8447                                           F: 604–464–6936




                          118 Sourcing Seafood
Worldwide Seafoods Ltd.
2115 Commissioner St.
Vancouver, BC V5L 1A6 Canada
Contact: Jim Heras
P: 604–738–5545
johnny_wws@telus.net, www.wws1997.com                      QUINAULT PRIDE SEAFOOD

U.S. SUPPLIERS                                             Wholly owned by the Quinault Indian Nation, Quinault
                                                           Pride Seafood has processed seafood for almost 50
Alaska Fresh Seafoods, Inc.                                years in the town of Taholah on the pristine Olympic
105 Marine Way                                             Peninsula of Washington’s northwest coast.
Kodiak, AK 99615 USA
Contact: David Woodruff                                    All of Quinault Pride’s seafood products are wild and all
P: 907–486–5749                                            natural. The company offers fresh steelhead, sockeye,
F: 907–486–6417                                            king, and silver salmon and sturgeon, which is landed and
akfresh@gci.net                                            shipped out to Seattle the same day it is caught. Quinault
                                                           Pride is also the only commercial source of Pacific razor
Alaska Glacier Seafoods, Inc.                              clams on the west coast. Quinault Pride also offers large
P.O. Box 34363                                             quantities of fresh and frozen Dungeness crab and sable-
Juneau, AK 99803 USA                                       fish (black cod).
Contact: Mike Erickson
P: 907–790–3590                                            1111 NW 45th St., Ste. B
F: 907–790–4286                                            Seattle, WA 98107 USA
alaskaglacier@gci.net                                      P: 206–706–7792
                                                           F: 206–789–0504
Alaska Hook & Line Seafoods                                gayla@seafare.com, www.quinaultprideseafood.com
P.O. Box 1172
Sitka, AK 99835 USA
Contact: Dan Stockel                                     Bornstein Seafoods
P: 907–747–7115                                          1001 Hilton Ave.
F: 907–747–7113                                          Bellingham, WA 98225 USA
hookak@ptialaska.net                                     Contact: Colin Bornstein
                                                         P: 360–734–7990
Arrowac Fisheries, Inc.                                  F: 360–734–5732
4039 21st Ave. W, Ste. 200                               colin@bornstein.com, www.bornstein.com
Seattle, WA 98199 USA
Contact: Frank Mercker                                   Burhop’s Seafood
P: 206–282–5655                                          1515 Sheridan Rd.
F: 206–282–9329                                          Wilmette, IL 60091 USA
fmercker@arrowac-merco.com, www.arrowac-merco.com        Contact: Jeff Burhop
                                                         P: 847–256–6400
Bering Select Seafoods Co.                               F: 847–901–4017
641 W Ewing St.                                          www.burhops.com
Seattle, WA 98119 USA
Contact: Lance Magnuson                                  Caito Fisheries
P: 206–284–3474                                          P.O. Box 1370
F: 206–283–1442                                          Fort Bragg, CA 95437 USA
                                                         Contact: Jim Caito
Big Blue Fisheries                                       P: 707–964–6368
216 Smith St., Unit 13                                   F: 707–964–6439
Sitka, AK 99835 USA                                      caitofsh@mcn.org, www.caitofisheries.com
Contact: Calvin Boord (Chip)
P: 907–966–9999
F: 907–966–2583
www.alaskasmokedfish.com




                                                    The Fish and Shellfish Guide 119
Deep Sea Fisheries, Inc.                              J & R Fisheries
3900 Railway Ave.                                     P.O. Box 3302
Everett, WA 98201 USA                                 Seward, AK 99664 USA
Contact: John Connors                                 Contact: Rhonda Anderson-Hubbard
P: 425–742–8609                                       P: 907–224–5584
F: 425–742–8699                                       F: 907–224–5572
johnconnors@deepseafisheries.com, www.deepseafish-    kruzof@ak.net
eries.com
                                                      Nautilus Seafoods, Inc.
EcoFish, Inc.                                         4215 21st Ave. W, Ste. 210
78 Market St.                                         Seattle, WA 98199 USA
Portsmouth, NH 03801 USA                              Contact: Stephen G. Slater
P: 603–430–0101 (877–214–FISH)                        P: 206–285–6150
F: 603–430–9929                                       F: 206–284–5984
www.ecofish.com                                       s.slater@nautilusseafoods.com

EcoFish offers a variety of seafood products.         Nelson Crab, Inc.
For a complete list, see their profile on page 133.   P.O. Box 520
                                                      Tokeland, WA 98590 USA
Fishhawk Fisheries                                    P: 800–262–0069
P.O. Box 715                                          F: 541–267–2921
Astoria, OR 97103 USA                                 seatreats@techline.com
Contact: Steve Fick
P: 503–325–5252                                       Nordic Fisheries, Inc.
F: 503–325–8786                                       P.O. Box 1345
fishhawk@ideal-web.com                                Petersburg, AK 99833 USA
                                                      Contact: Erika Gross
Hallmark Fisheries                                    P: 907–772–2263
P.O. Box 5390                                         F: 907–772–2263
Charleston, OR 97420 USA                              nordicfisheries@alaska.com
Contact: Jack Emmons
P: 541–888–3253                                       NorQuest Seafoods Inc.
F: 541–888–6814                                       5245 Shilshole Ave. NW
hallmark.fisheries@verizon.net                        Seattle, WA 98107 USA
                                                      Contact: Vic Taggart
Horst’s Seafood, Inc.                                 P: 206–282–4104
2315 Industrial Blvd.                                 F: 206–282–4109
Juneau, AK 99801 USA                                  vtaggart@norquest.com, www.norquest.com
Contact: Horst Schramm
P: 907–790–4300                                       Nor th Pacific Seafoods, Inc.
F: 907–790–5534                                       P.O. Box 31179
horsts@gci.net                                        Seattle, WA 98103 USA
                                                      Contact: Jeff Otness
Icicle Seafoods, Inc.                                 P: 206–726–9900
4019 21st Ave. W                                      F: 206–726–1667
Seattle, WA 98199 USA                                 jeff@northpacproc.com
Contact: Rick Speed
P: 206–282–0988                                       Ocean Beauty Seafoods, Inc.
F: 206–282–7222                                       1100 W Ewing St.
ricks@icicleseafoods.com, www.icicleseafoods.com      Seattle, WA 98119 USA
                                                      Contact: Jim Yonker
                                                      P: 206–285–6800
                                                      F: 206–281–5897
                                                      jim.yonker@oceanbeauty.com, www.oceanbeauty.com




                            120 Sourcing Seafood
Pacific Seafood Group                                  Tonka Seafoods, Inc.
16797 SE 130th Ave.                                    P.O. Box 1420
Clackamas, OR 97015 USA                                Petersburg, AK 99833 USA
Contact: Steve Spencer                                 Contact: Shari Otness
P: 503–905–4500; 800–388–1101                          P: 907–772–3662
F: 503–905–4228                                        F: 907–772–3663
sspencer@pacseafood.com, www.pacseafood.com            office@tonkaseafoods.com, www.tonkaseafoods.com

Pelican Seafoods                                       Triad Fisheries
P.O. Box 110                                           P.O. Box 11702
Pelican, AK 99832 USA                                  Bainbridge Island, WA 98110 USA
P: 907–735–2204                                        Contact: Bruce Gore
F: 907–735–2281                                        P: 206–842–1620
pelicans@starband.net, www.pelicanseafoods.com         F: 206–842–7757
                                                       brucetfltd@aol.com
Peter Pan Seafoods, Inc.
2200 Sixth Ave., Ste. 1000                             Trident Seafoods Corporation
Seattle, WA 98121 USA                                  5303 Shilshole Ave. NW
Contact: Steve Chartier                                Seattle, WA 98107 USA
P: 206–728–6000                                        Contact: Joe Bundrant
F: 206–284–7474                                        P: 206–783–3474
stevec@ppsf.com, www.ppsf.com                          F: 206–782–7246
                                                       sales@tridentseafoods.com, www.tridentseafoods.com
Quinault Pride Seafood
1111 NW 45th St., Ste. B                               Troller Point Fisheries
Seattle, WA 98107 USA                                  1120 E Hoffman Rd., #23
Contact: Gayla Morrison                                Anchorage, AK 99515 USA
P: 206–706–7792                                        Contact: Mark Hofman
F: 206–789–0504                                        P: 907–344–1866
gayla@seafare.com, www.quinaultprideseafood.com        F: 907–344–1866
                                                       troller@alaska.net, www.trollerpoint.com
Seafood Producers Cooperative
2875 Roeder Ave., Ste. 2                               True World Foods, Alaska
Bellingham, WA 98225 USA                               P.O. Box 2997
Contact: Jeff Reynolds                                 Kodiak, AK 99615 USA
P: 360–733–0120                                        P: 907–486–4768
F: 360–733–0513                                        F: 907–486–4885
jreynolds@spcsales.com, www.spcsales.com               jean@trueworldfoods.com, www.trueworldfoods.com

Snug Harbor Seafoods                                   UniSea Inc.
P.O. Box 701                                           15110 NE 90 St.
Kenai, AK 98611 USA                                    Redmond, WA 98052 USA
Contact: Brenda Stoops                                 Contact: Mike Cusack
P: 907–283–6122                                        P: 425–861–5312
F: 907–283–6127                                        F: 425–821–5841
snug@alaska.net, www.snugharborseafood.com             mikec@fishking.com, www.unisea.com

Sunset Fisheries                                       Western Alaska Fisheries, Inc.
P.O. Box 1395                                          1111 3rd Ave., Ste. 2200
Petersburg, AK 99833 USA                               Seattle, WA 98101 USA
Contact: Amanda Bossard                                Contact: Takashi Kuroki
P: 907–723–9888                                        P: 206–382–0640
captainaritan@yahoo.com                                F: 206–625–0089
                                                       kuroki@westakfish.com




                                                  The Fish and Shellfish Guide 121
Westward Seafoods, Inc.                                        Bornstein Seafoods
1111 Third Ave., Ste. 2250                                     1001 Hilton Ave.
Seattle, WA 98101 USA                                          Bellingham, WA 98225 USA
Contact: R. Oshimi                                             Contact: Colin Bornstein
P: 206–682–5949                                                P: 360–734–7990
F: 206–682–1825                                                F: 360–734–5732
www.westwardseafoods.com                                       colin@bornstein.com, www.bornstein.com

Wrangell Seafoods Inc.                                         Burhop’s Seafood
P.O. Box 908                                                   1515 Sheridan Rd.
Wrangell, AK 99929 USA                                         Wilmette, IL 60091 USA
Contact: Serri Cummings                                        Contact: Jeff Burhop
P: 907–874–3346                                                P: 847–256–6400
F: 907–874–3035                                                F: 847–901–4017
scummins@wrangellseafoods.com,                                 www.burhops.com
www.wrangellseafoods.com
                                                               Caito Fisheries
                                                               P.O. Box 1370
SALMON, PACIFIC (WILD):                                        Fort Bragg, CA 95437 USA
Most major seafood distributors offer wild salmon. To          Contact: Jim Caito
order directly from a primary producer, or to identify local   P: 707–964–6368
distributors, contact the Alaska, British Columbia, or         F: 707–964–6439
California salmon promotion organizations listed in the        caitofsh@mcn.org, www.caitofisheries.com
seafood guide. Listed below are companies that use the
MSC logo, certifying that their salmon comes from a sus-       Cape Cleare Fisher y
tainable fishery.                                              370 Middlepoint Rd.
                                                               Port Townsend, WA 98368 USA
                                                               Contact: Robert Williams
TRIAD FISHERIES                                                P: 360–385–7486
                                                               rick@capecleare.com, www.capecleare.com
For more than 20 years, Bruce Gore has been catching
and marketing the finest frozen-at-sea wild troll salmon       Coastal Villages Seafood, LLC
to dedicated clients in the U.S., Europe, and Japan.           711 H St.
                                                               Anchorage, AK 99501 USA
As demand for Bruce’s salmon has grown, he has added           Contact: Robert Williams
salmon trollers to his fleet. But not just any boat can pro-   P: 907–278–5151
duce Bruce Gore brand salmon; its captain has to commit        F: 907–278–5150
to Bruce’s rigorous quality-control program. All Bruce Gore    Robert_w@coastalvillages.org, www.coastalvillages.org
salmon is completely bled, handled with the utmost care,
and frozen at ultra-cold temperatures. In addition to wild     Cook Inlet Salmon Brand, Inc.
salmon, Bruce sells Alaska spot prawns, halibut, and           43335 Kalifornsky Beach Rd., Ste. 16
sablefish (black cod).                                         Soldotna, AK 99669 USA
                                                               Contact: Sylvia Beaudoin
P.O. Box 11702                                                 P: 907–714–2332
Bainbridge Island, WA 98110 USA                                F: 907–262–6762
P: 206–842–1620                                                sbeaudoin@borough.kenai.ak.us
F: 206–842–7757
brucetfltd@aol.com                                             Cor tes Island Wild Har vest
                                                               P.O. Box 94
                                                               Mansons Landing, BC V0P1K0 CANADA
                                                               P: 250–935–6939
                                                               F: 907–262–6762
                                                               pescador@oberon.ark.com,
                                                               http://oberon.ark.com/~pescador




                            122 Sourcing Seafood
EcoFish, Inc.
78 Market St.
Portsmouth, NH 03801 USA
P: 603–430–0101 (877–214–FISH)
F: 603–430–9929
www.ecofish.com                                              GULKANA SEAFOOD DIRECT

EcoFish offers a variety of seafood products.                Bill Weber is a Cordova, Alaska, fisherman who markets
For a complete list, see their profile on page 133.          his catch directly to markets in the Lower 48.

Favco, Inc.                                                  All fish sold by Gulkana is processed onboard Bill’s boat,
1205 W 29th Ave.                                             the F/V Gulkana. Each fish is bled and layer-iced on board.
Anchorage, AK 99503 USA                                      Two hours after each opening, Bill is back in Cordova
Contact: Greg Favretto                                       boxing up fresh sockeye, king, and silver salmon from the
P: 907–278–1525                                              Copper and Bering rivers and air freighting it to buyers
F: 907–276–6626                                              throughout the U.S. who understand—and appreciate—
greg@favco.net, www.favco.com                                truly fresh salmon that is handled with the utmost care
                                                             from the minute it comes out of the water.
Fishhawk Fisheries
P.O. Box 715                                                 P.O. Box 1230
Astoria, OR, 97103, USA                                      Mile 6 1/4, Copper River Hwy.
Contact: Steve Fick                                          Cordova, AK 99574–1230 USA
P: 503–325–5252                                              P: 907–424–5106
F: 503–325–8786                                              sales@GulkanaSeafoodsDirect.com ,
fishhawk@ideal-web.com                                       www.GulkanaSeafoodsDirect.com

Gulkana Seafoods Direct
P.O. Box 1230                                              Interocean Seafood Co.
Mile 6 1/4, Copper River Hwy.                              3918 15th Pl. West
Cordova, AK 99574–1230 USA                                 Seattle, WA 98119 USA
Contact: Jack Emmons                                       Contact: Derryl Evans
P: 907–424–5106                                            P: 206–352–8686
sales@GulkanaSeafoodsDirect.com,                           F: 206–352–8671
www.GulkanaSeafoodsDirect.com
                                                           Intersea Fisheries West
Hallmark Fisheries                                         550 S Michigan St.
P.O. Box 5390                                              Seattle, WA 98108 USA
Charleston, OR 97420 USA                                   Contact: Brian Glidden
Contact: Jack Emmons                                       P: 206–285–5630
P: 541–888–3253                                            F: 206–283–7627
F: 541–888–6814                                            brian@interseafisheries.com, www.interseafisheries.com
hallmark.fisheries@verizon.net
                                                           Kodiak Salmon Packers
Icy Strait Seafoods, Inc.                                  P.O. Box 469
2825 Roeder Ave.                                           Donald, OR 97020 USA
Bellingham, WA 98225 USA                                   Contact: Brian Gannon
Contact: Hank Baumgart                                     P: 503–678–1310
P: 360–734–8175                                            F: 503–678–1311
F: 360–734–2203                                            brian@kspi.net, www.kspi.net
icystrait@att.net




                                                      The Fish and Shellfish Guide 123
Leader Creek Fisheries LLC                        Pelican Seafoods
P.O. Box 449                                      P.O. Box 110
Naknek, AK 99633 USA                              Pelican, AK 99832 USA
Contact: Julie Cysco                              P: 907–735–2204
P: 907–246–8846                                   F: 907–735–2281
F: 907–246–8847                                   pelicans@starband.net, www.pelicanseafoods.com
leader@bristolbay.com
                                                  Peter Pan Seafoods, Inc.
Monterey Fish Market                              2200 Sixth Ave., Ste. 1000
Pier 33                                           Seattle, WA 98121 USA
San Francisco, CA USA                             Contact: Steve Chartier
Contact: Paul Johnson                             P: 206–728–6000
P: 415–956–1986                                   F: 206–284–7474
F: 415–956–5851                                   stevec@ppsf.com, www.ppsf.com
www.montereyfish.com
                                                  Quinault Pride Seafood
Nautilus Foods                                    1111 NW 45th St., Ste. B
P.O. Box 727                                      Seattle, WA 98107 USA
Valdez, AK 99686 USA                              Contact: Gayla Morrison
Contact: Tom Waterer                              P: 206–706–7792
P: 907–835–4227                                   F: 206–789–0504
F: 907–835–4268                                   gayla@seafare.com, www.quinaultprideseafood.com
tom@nautilusfoods.com
                                                  SeaBear
Nor th Pacific Processors                         605 30th St.
2300 Eastlake Ave. E                              Anacortes, WA 98221 USA
Seattle, WA 98107 USA                             Contact: Cathy Hayward-Hughes
Contact: Jeff Otness                              P: 360–293–4661
P: 206–726–9900                                   F: 360–293–4097
F: 206–726–1667                                   cathyhh@seabear.com, www.seabear.com
jeff@northpacproc.com
                                                  Seafood Producers Cooperative
Nor thern Products                                2875 Roeder Ave., Ste. 2
1932 1st Ave.                                     Bellingham, WA 98225 USA
Seattle, WA 98101 USA                             Contact: Jeff Reynolds
Contact: Bill Dignon                              P: 360–733–0120
P: 206–448–6677                                   F: 360–733–0513
F: 206–448–9664                                   jreynolds@spcsales.com, www.spcsales.com

Ocean Beauty Seafoods, Inc.                       Select Fish
1100 W Ewing St.                                  5980 1st Ave. S
Seattle, WA 98119 USA                             Seattle, WA 98108 USA
Contact: Jim Yonker                               Contact: Scott Barton
P: 206–285–6800                                   P: 206–767–2642
F: 206–281–5897                                   scott.barton@wholefoods.com
jim.yonker@oceanbeauty.com, www.oceanbeauty.com
                                                  Snug Harbor Seafoods
Pacific Seafood Group                             P.O. Box 701
16797 SE 130th Ave.                               Kenai, AK 98611 USA
Clackamas, OR 97015 USA                           Contact: Brenda Stoops
Contact: Steve Spencer                            P: 907–283–6122
P: 503–905–4500; 800–388–1101                     F: 907–283–6127
F: 503–905–4228                                   snug@alaska.net, www.snugharborseafood.com
sspencer@pacseafood.com, www.pacseafood.com




                        124 Sourcing Seafood
Taku Fisheries                                              YKI Fisheries, Inc.
550 S Franklin St                                           P.O. Box 389
Juneau, AK 99801 USA                                        Yakutat, AK 99689 USA
Contact: Joe Isturis                                        Contact: Moses Waweru
P: 907–463–4617                                             P: 907–784–3671
F: 907–463–4644                                             F: 907–784–3670
jisturis@takusmokeries.com, www.takusmokeries.com           mryki@yahoo.com

Trapper’s Creek Smoking
5650 B St.                                                  SARDINES:
Anchorage, AK 99518 USA                                     Check with these producers for ideas on how to incorporate
Contact: Andrea Meche                                       this abundant and sustainable resource into your menu.
P: 907–561–8088
F: 907–561–8389                                             Acadian Fishermen’s Co-op Assoc.
info@trapperscreek.com, www.trapperscreek.com               P.O. Box 115, RR3, Abram’s Village
                                                            Wellington, PEI C0B 2E0 Canada
Triad Fisheries Ltd.                                        Contact: Jeff Malloy
Box 11702, Bainbridge Island                                P: 902–854–2675
Seattle, WA 98110 USA                                       F: 902–854–2140
Contact: Bruce Gore                                         acadian.coop@pei.sympatico.ca
P: 206–842–1620
F: 206–842–7757                                             Burhop’s Seafood
brucetfltd@aol.com                                          1515 Sheridan Rd.
                                                            Wilmette, IL 60091 USA
Trident Seafoods Corporation                                Contact: Jeff Burhop
5303 Shilshole Ave. NW                                      P: 847–256–6400
Seattle, WA 98107 USA                                       F: 847–901–4017
Contact: Larry Dutton                                       www.burhops.com
P: 206–783–3818
F: 206–782–7246                                             F.W. Br yce, Inc.
LarryDutton@Tridentsfds.com, www.tridentseafoods.com        8 Pond Rd.
                                                            Gloucester, MA 01930 USA
Wildcatch                                                   P: 978–283–7080
1050 Larrabee Ave., Ste. 104–325                            F: 978–283–7647
Bellingham, WA 98225 USA                                    fwbryce@fwbryce.com, www.fwbryce.com
Contact: John Saarhein
P: 360–715–0101                                             Bornstein Seafoods
jonsaarheim@aol.com                                         P.O. Box 58
                                                            Astoria, OR 97103 USA
Wrangell Seafoods Inc.                                      Contact: Doug Heater
P.O. Box 908                                                P: 503–325–6164
Wrangell, AK 99929 USA                                      F: 503–325–0403
Contact: Serri Cummings                                     doug@bornstein.com, www.bornstein.com
P: 907–874–3346
F: 907–874–3035                                             Cape Island Seafood
scummins@wrangellseafoods.com,                              P.O. Box 276
www.wrangellseafoods.com                                    Kittery, ME 03904 USA
                                                            P: 207–439–8508
Yardarm Knot Fisheries, LLC                                 F: 207–439–6609
3600 15 Ave. W, Ste. 300
Seatlle, WA 98119 USA
Contact: Hank Streich
P: 206–216–0220
F: 206–216–0988
hank@yardarm.net




                                                       The Fish and Shellfish Guide 125
Connor’s Bros., Ltd.                              SCALLOPS, BAY & SEA:
669 Main St.                                      Scallops are widely available; contact your local supplier.
Blacks Harbor, NB E5H 1K1 Canada
Contact: David Giddens
P: 506–456–3391                                   SHRIMP, NORTHERN PINK:
F: 506–456–1557                                   A good value and widely available. Check with your local
www.connors.ca                                    distributor or contact these producers.

Fogo Island Co-Operative Society Ltd.             Aero Trading
P.O. Box 70                                       P.O. Box 1102
Seldom, Fogo Island, NF A0G 3Z0 Canada            Port Edward, BC V0V 1G0 Canada
P: 709–627–3452                                   Contact: Brad Mirau
F: 709–627–3495                                   P: 250–628–3227
kenbudden@nf.a.bn.com                             F: 250–628–9311
                                                  aero@citytel.net
H. Glenwood Evans & Son
P.O. Box 468, Jersey Rd.                          Bay Ocean Seafood
Crisfield, MD 21817 USA                           P.O. Box 348
P: 410–968–1717                                   Garibaldi, OR 97118 USA
F: 410–968–3541                                   Contact: Jeff Princehouse
                                                  P: 503–322–3316
Jessie’s Ilwaco Fish Company                      F: 503–322–0049
P.O. Box 800                                      customerservice@bayoceanseafood.com
Ilwaco, WA 98624 USA                              www.bayoceanseafood.com
Contact: Terry Gramson
P: 360–642–3773                                   Bornstein Seafoods
F: 36–642–3362                                    P.O. Box 58
                                                  Astoria, OR 97103 USA
Monterey Fish Market                              Contact: Doug Heater
Pier 33                                           P: 503–325–6164
San Francisco, CA USA                             F: 503–325–0403
Contact: Paul Johnson                             doug@bornstein.com, www.bornstein.com
P: 415–956–1986
F: 415–956–5851                                   Clearwater Fine Foods
www.montereyfish.com                              757 Bedford Hwy.
                                                  Bedford, NS B4A 3Z7 Canada
Ocean Choice                                      P: 902–443–0550
42 Spring St., Ste. 40                            F: 902–443–8459
Newport, RI 02842 USA                             www.clearwater.ca
Contact: Dave Kolator
P: 401–847–0022                                   Coal Point Seafood Company
F: 401–847–5021                                   P.O. Box 674
oceanchoice.ri@verizon.net, www.oceanchoice.com   Homer, AK 99603 USA
                                                  Contact: Nancy Hillstrand
Pacific Seafood Group                             P: 800–325–3877
16797 130th Ave.                                  F: 907–235–5330
Clackamas, OR 97015 USA                           fish@alaska.net, www.welovefish.com
Contact: Dan Obradovich
P: 503–905–4500                                   Coastal Cold Storage
F: 503–905–2495                                   P.O. Box 307
www.pacseafood.com                                Petersburg, AK 99833 USA
                                                  Contact: Greg
                                                  P: 907–772–4177
                                                  F: 907–772–4176
                                                  coastal@alaska.com




                         126 Sourcing Seafood
Cozy Harbor Seafood, Inc.                                  Jessie’s Ilwaco Fish Company
P.O. Box 389 (35 Union Wharf)                              P.O. Box 800
Portland, ME 04112 USA                                     Ilwaco, WA 98624 USA
P: 1–800–225–2586                                          Contact: Terry Gramson
F: 207–879–2666                                            P: 360–642–3773
jnorton@cozyharbor.com, www.cozyharbor.com                 F: 36–642–3362

EcoFish, Inc.                                              Labrador Fishermen’s Union
78 Market St.                                              Shrimp Co. Ltd.
Portsmouth, NH 03801 USA                                   46 Waterfront Rd.
P: 603–430–0101 (877–214–FISH)                             Lanse au Loup, Labrador A0K 3L0 Canada
F: 603–430–9929                                            Contact: Gilbert Linstead
www.ecofish.com                                            P: 709–927–5816
                                                           F: 709–927–5555
EcoFish offers a variety of seafood products.              gm@lfuscl.com, www.lfuscl.com
For a complete list, see their profile on page 133.
                                                           Nelson Crab, Inc.
Fisher y Products International                            P.O. Box 520
18 Electronics Ave.                                        Tokeland, WA 98590 USA
Danvers, MA 01923 USA                                      P: 800–262–0069
Contact: Keith Decker                                      F: 541–267–2921
P: 978–750–5335                                            seatreats@techline.com
F: 978–777–7458
fpi@fpil.com, www.fisheryproducts.com                      Pacific Seafood Group
                                                           16797 130th Ave.
Fishhawk Fisheries                                         Clackamas, OR 97015 USA
P.O. Box 715                                               P: 503–905–4500
Astoria, OR 97103 USA                                      F: 503–905–2495
Contact: Steve Fick                                        www.pacseafood.com
P: 503–325–5252
F: 503–325–8786                                            Por tland Shellfish
fishhawk@ideal-web.com                                     110 Darmouth St.
                                                           South Portland, ME 04106 USA
Fogo Island Co-Operative Society Ltd.                      P: 207–799–9290
P.O. Box 70                                                F: 207–799–7179
Seldom, Fogo Island, NF A0G 3Z0 Canada                     sales@pshellfish.com, www.portlandshellfish.com
P: 709–627–3452
F: 709–627–3495                                            Thomas Massey Ltd.
kenbudden@nf.a.bn.com                                      2 Hill Rd.
                                                           South Bristol, ME 04568 USA
Great Nor thern Products                                   P: 207–644–1400
P.O. Box 7622                                              F: 207–644–8192
Warwick, RI 02887 USA                                      tmasseyltd@yahoo.com
P: 410–821–2400
F: 401–821–2419                                            Ucluelet Seafood Processors Ltd.
gn@northernproducts.com, www.northernproducts.com          P.O. Box 1089
                                                           Ucluelet, BC V0R 3A0 Canada
Hallmark Fisheries                                         P: 250–726–7768
P.O. Box 5390                                              F: 250–726–3434
Charleston, OR 97420 USA                                   usp@alberni.net
Contact: Jack Emmons
P: 541–888–3253
F: 541–888–6814




                                                      The Fish and Shellfish Guide 127
SHRIMP, (SPOT PRAWNS)                                    EcoFish, Inc.
TRAP CAUGHT:                                             78 Market St.
Because of limited supply, buyers should talk to these   Portsmouth, NH 03801 USA
suppliers to learn more about price and availability.    P: 603–430–0101 (877–214–FISH)
                                                         F: 603–430–9929
Alaska Glacier Seafoods, Inc.                            www.ecofish.com
P.O. Box 34363
Juneau, AK 99803 USA                                     EcoFish offers a variety of seafood products.
Contact: Mike Erickson                                   For a complete list, see their profile on page 133.
P: 907–790–3590
F: 907–790–4286                                          Hi-To Fisheries Ltd.
alaskaglacier@gci.net                                    1575 Vernon Dr.
                                                         Vancouver, BC V6A 3P8 Canada
Alaska Hook & Line Seafoods                              Contact: Lawrence Chan
P.O. Box 1172                                            P: 604–253–5111
Sitka, AK 99835 USA                                      F: 604–251–6526
Contact: Dan Stockel                                     hitofish@istar.ca
P: 907–747–7115
F: 907–747–7113                                          Icy Straits Seafood
hookak@ptialaska.net                                     2825 Roeder Ave.
                                                         Bellingham, WA 98225 USA
Bell’s Seafood                                           Contact: Mark Wallace
P.O. Box 1189                                            P: 360–734–8175
Haines, AK 99827 USA                                     F: 360–734–2203
Contact: Clyde Bell                                      icystrait@att.net
P: 907–766–2950
                                                         Lions Gate Fisheries Ltd.
Burhop’s Seafood                                         4179 River Rd. W
1515 Sheridan Rd.                                        Delta, BC V4K 1R9 Canada
Wilmette, IL 60091 USA                                   Contact: Jack Waterfield
Contact: Jeff Burhop                                     P: 604–946–1361
P: 847–256–6400                                          F: 604–946–0944
F: 847–901–4017                                          jack@lionsgatefisheries.com, www.lionsgatefisheries.com
www.burhops.com
                                                         Monterey Fish Market
Coal Point Seafood Company                               Pier 33
P.O. Box 674                                             San Francisco, CA USA
Homer, AK 99603 USA                                      Contact: Paul Johnson
Contact: Nancy Hillstrand                                P: 415–956–1986
P: 800–325–3877                                          F: 415–956–5851
F: 907–235–5330                                          www.montereyfish.com
fish@alaska.net, www.welovefish.com
                                                         Pinnacle Seafoods Ltd.
Coastal Cold Storage                                     2199 Commissioner St.
P.O. Box 307                                             Vancouver, BC V5L 1A4 Canada
Petersburg, AK 99833 USA                                 Contact: Guy Dean
Contact: Greg                                            P: 604–255–7991
P: 907–772–4177                                          F: 604–255–7118
F: 907–772–4176                                          info@pinnacleseafoods.com, www.pinnacleseafoods.com
coastal@alaska.com
                                                         Quest Fishing Ltd.
                                                         RR #1, Site 14C
                                                         Madeira Park, BC V0N 2H0 Canada
                                                         P: 604–883–9831
                                                         F: 604–883–9832
                                                         prawns@spotshrimp.com, www.spotshrimp.com



                          128 Sourcing Seafood
Sunset Fisheries
P.O. Box 1395
Petersburg, AK 99833 USA
Contact: Amanda Bossard
P: 907–723–9888
captainaritan@yahoo.com                                            OCEAN BOY FARMS

                                                                   In July 2004, this Florida shrimp company became the
SHRIMP, U.S. (FARMED):                                             second farm in the U.S. to produce certified organic
Not all farmed shrimp are created equal. Contact these             shrimp, according to fine organic livestock guidelines
ocean-friendly shrimp producers to learn more about their          of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
operations and distribution in your area.
                                                                   Ocean Boy, located in the south central part of the state,
Arizona Mariculture Associates LLC                                 grows white shrimp (Penaeus vannamei) in artesian well
HC1 Box 46A, 50621 Agua Caliente Rd.                               water that it is recirculated through water-treatment ponds
Dateland, AZ 85333 USA                                             and reused in the shrimp-growing ponds, an environmental-
Contact: Josh Wilkenfeld                                           ly friendly aquaculture practice. Ocean Boy offers fresh
P: 928–502–0454                                                    shrimp from July through December and quick-frozen
F: 928–782–0685                                                    shrimp all year. In addition to shell-on product, Ocean Boy
joshwilkenfeld@mindspring.com                                      offers value-added cooked and peeled organic shrimp.

BayBoy Farms                                                       2954 Airglades Blvd.
P.O. Box 248                                                       Clewiston, FL 33440 USA
Hayneville, AL 36040 USA                                           P: 863–983–9941
Contact: Lee Jackson, Jr.                                          F: 863–983–9943
P: 205–242–6548, 334–563–7563                                      www.floridasweetshrimp.com
gcdcinc@aol.com, www.bayboyfarms.com

Bubba Sue Shrimp                                                 EcoFish, Inc.
Duntreath Farm                                                   78 Market St.
4954 Paris Pike                                                  Portsmouth, NH 03801 USA
Lexington, Kentucky 40511 USA                                    P: 603–430–0101 (877–214–FISH)
Contact: Susan Harkin                                            F: 603–430–9929
P: 859–299–2254                                                  www.ecofish.com
bubbasue@qx.net
                                                                 EcoFish offers a variety of seafood products.
Burhop’s Seafood                                                 For a complete list, see their profile on page 133.
1515 Sheridan Rd.
Wilmette, IL 60091 USA                                           Greene Prairie Aquafarm
Contact: Jeff Burhop                                             P.O. Box 10152
P: 847–256–6400                                                  Boligee, AL 35443 USA
F: 847–901–4017                                                  David Teichert-Coddington
www.burhops.com                                                  P: 205–372–2844
                                                                 www.greeneprairieaquafarm.com
Deser t Sweet Shrimp Farm
P.O. Box A1                                                      Indian River Aquaculture
Gila Bend, AZ 85337 USA                                          5505 12th St.
P: 623–393–0136                                                  Vero Beach, FL 32966 USA
F: 623–393–0158                                                  P: 800–955–2387
shrimp@desertsweetshrimp.com,                                    F: 772–567–1274
www.desertsweetshrimp.com




                                                            The Fish and Shellfish Guide 129
OceanBoy Farms, Inc.                                      Caito Fisheries
2954 Airglades Blvd.                                      P.O. Box 1370
Clewiston, FL 33440 USA                                   Fort Bragg, CA 95437 USA
Contact: Stutz Armstrong                                  Contact: Jim Caito
P: 863–983–9941                                           P: 707–964–6368
F: 863–983–9943                                           F: 707–964–6439
www.floridasweetshrimp.com                                caitofsh@mcn.org, www.caitofisheries.com

Old Ocean Shrimp Company                                  Offers Dover sole (fillet and whole) and Rex sole (fillet,
517 N 8th St.                                             whole, and dressed)
Midlothian, TX 76065 USA
P: 972–723–0295                                           Global Seafoods Nor th America LLC
Information@oldoceanshrimpco.com, www.oldoceanshrimp-     11100 NE 8th St., #310
co.com                                                    Bellevue, WA 98004 USA
                                                          Contact: Nikolay Osokin
Penbur Farms                                              P: 425–451–3705
3415 Clovis Ave.                                          F: 425–451–1067
Clovis, CA 94612 USA                                      osikin@globalseafoods.com, www.globalseafoods.com
P: 559–292–1354
F: 559–292–1454                                           Ocean Beauty Seafoods Inc.
jimpenfield@penbur.com, www.penbur.com                    P.O. Box C–70739
                                                          Seattle, WA 98127 USA
Permian Sea Shrimp Company                                Contact: Jim Yonker
P.O. Box 448                                              P: 206–285–6800
Imperial, TX 79743 USA                                    F: 206–281–5897
Contact: Bart Reid                                        randy.cade@oceanbeauty.com, www.oceanbeauty.com
P: 432–536–2216
patsy@west-tex.net, www.permianseashrimp.com              Pacific Seafood Group
                                                          16797 SE 130th Ave.
                                                          Clackamas, OR 97015 USA
SOLE, PACIFIC:                                            Contact: Steve Spencer
Check with these suppliers for information on this West   P: 503–905–4500; 800–388–1101
Coast alternative to more limited East Coast flatfish.    F: 503–905–4228
                                                          sspencer@pacseafood.com, www.pacseafood.com
Bornstein Seafoods Inc.
P.O. Box 188                                              Peter Pan Seafoods, Inc.
Bellingham, WA 98227 USA                                  2200 Sixth Ave.
Contact: Colin Bornstein                                  Seattle, WA 98121 USA
P: 360–734–7990                                           Contact: Steve Chartier
F: 360–734–5732                                           P: 206–728–6000
colin@bornstein.com, www.bornstein.com                    F: 206–284–7474
                                                          stevec@ppsf.com, www.ppsf.com
Burhop’s Seafood
1515 Sheridan Rd.                                         Trident Seafood Corporation
Wilmette, IL 60091 USA                                    5303 Shilshole Ave.
Contact: Jeff Burhop                                      Seattle, WA 98107 USA
P: 847–256–6400                                           Contact: Joe Bundrant
F: 847–901–4017                                           P: 206–783–3474
www.burhops.com                                           F: 206–782–7246
                                                          sales@tridentseafoods.com, www.tridentseafoods.com




                          130 Sourcing Seafood
Western Alaska Fisheries, Inc.                                     Blue Heron Aqua Farms
1111 3rd Ave., Ste. 2200                                           14545 J Military Trail #167
Seattle, WA 98101 USA                                              Delray Beach, FL 33484 USA
Contact: Takashi Kuroki                                            Contact: Sal Cherch
P: 206–382–0640                                                    P: 561–638–5974
F: 206–625–0089                                                    F: 561–638–5724
kuroki@westakfish.com                                              foodfish@aldephia.net

                                                                   Kent SeaTech Corporation
STRIPED BASS, WILD & HYBRID                                        11125 Flintkote Ave., Ste. J
Wild striped bass is available from many East Coast sup-           San Diego, CA 92121 USA
pliers as well as primary processors in the mid-Atlantic.          P: 858–452–5765
Depending on the size of the operation, hybrid striped             F: 858–452–0075
bass farmers may have their own sales organization or              www.kentseatech.com
sell through brokers. Contact the producer for sales,
availability, and information on farming practices.                Monterey Fish Market
                                                                   Pier 33
                                                                   San Francisco, CA USA
                                                                   Contact: Paul Johnson
                                                                   P: 415–956–1986
                                                                   F: 415–956–5851
                                                                   www.montereyfish.com
KENT SEA TECH CORPORATION
                                                                   Nature’s Catch
A pioneer in the technology of closed-system fish                  1090 Willis Rd.
farming and sustainable aquaculture, Kent Sea Tech is              Clarksdale, MS 38614 USA
the largest grower of hybrid striped bass in the world.            Contact: Max Ripert
                                                                   P: 800–964–FISH
Its farms in the California desert near Palm Springs use           F: 662–627–1486
geothermal water to raise fish in raceways and tanks. A            info@naturescatch.com, www.naturescatch.com
unique, cold bank system technology allows Kent Sea Tech
to provide two-pound fish year-round. Kent Sea Tech mar-           Silver Streak Bass Co.
kets live and sashimi-quality fresh whole California Farmed        P.O. Box 99
Striped Bass to customers in the U.S., Asia, and Europe.           Danevang, TX 77432 USA
                                                                   Contact: Jim Ekstrom
11125 Flintkote Ave., Ste. J                                       P: 979–543–8989
San Diego, CA 92121 USA                                            F: 979–543–8840
P: 858–452–5765                                                    eksent@wcnet.net
F: 858–452–0075
www.kentseatech.com                                                Susquehanna Aquacultures Inc.
                                                                   P.O. Box 306
                                                                   York Haven, PA 17370 USA
Anguilla Fish Farm                                                 Contact: Brent W. Blauch
P.O. Box 817                                                       P: 717–266–4577
Hastings, FL 32145 USA                                             F: 717–266–0611
Contact: Dugan Whiteside                                           bassman@itech.net
P: 904–692–1050
F: 904–692–1050                                                    VanGuard Fish Farm, Inc.
                                                                   851 Wilmar Rd.
Austin Bros. Fisheries                                             Vanceboro, NC 28586 USA
P.O. Box 844                                                       Contact: Ronald Groover
Aurora, NC 27806 USA                                               P: 252–244–3155
Contact: Scott Austin                                              F: 252–244–3981
P: 252–322–6590                                                    ronaldatvanguard@aol.com
F: 252–322–7271




                                                              The Fish and Shellfish Guide 131
STURGEON, WHITE (FARMED):                                       SeaChick, Inc.
Buyers will need to contact these suppliers directly to iden-   P.O. Box 2024
tify purchase options.                                          Escatawpa, MS 39552 USA
                                                                P: 800–343–7313
Burhop’s Seafood                                                F: 228–475–1503
1515 Sheridan Rd.                                               SeaChick@worldnet.att.net, www.seachick.com
Wilmette, IL 60091 USA
Contact: Jeff Burhop                                            Southern Farm Tilapia LLC
P: 847–256–6400                                                 P.O. Box 908
F: 847–901–4017                                                 Bailey, NC 27807 USA
www.burhops.com                                                 P: 252–235–9963
                                                                F: 252–235–9824
The Fisher y                                                    rcehunt@aol.com
11583 Valensin Rd.
Galt, CA 95632 USA                                              IMPORTERS:
Contact: Ken Beers
P: 916–687–7475                                                 Enaca International, LLC
F: 916–687–8823                                                 11800 NW 100 Rd., Ste. 4
                                                                Medley, FL 33178 USA
Stolt Sea Farm                                                  P: 305–599–8877
9149 East Levee Rd.                                             F: 305–599–2255
Elverta, CA 95626 USA                                           sales@enacausa.com, www.enaca.net
Contact: Peter Struffeneger
P: 800–525–0333                                                 Mountain Stream
F: 916–991–4334                                                 6800 NW 36th Ave.
info@stoltseafarm.com, www.stoltseafarm.com                     Miami, FL 33147 USA
                                                                P: 305–691–7997
                                                                F: 305–696–6561
TILAPIA, U.S. (FARMED):                                         sales@mountainstreamtilapia.com, www.mountainstreamti-
Below are domestic growers and importers of fresh tilapia.      lapia.com

DOMESTIC GROWERS:                                               Rain Forest Aquaculture
                                                                1000 Sawgrass Corporate Pkwy., Ste. 110
Aquafresh Farms of Mississippi                                  Sunrise, FL 33323 USA
6908 Andover St.                                                P: 954–835–0988
Moss Point, MS 39563 USA                                        F: 954–337–0804
P: 228–475–1822                                                 sales@tilapia.com, www.tilapia.com
F: 228–457–6308
onedollarforyou@aol.com                                         Regal Springs
                                                                P.O. Box 20608
Fish Breeders of Idaho                                          Bradenton, FL 34204 USA
P.O. Box 479                                                    P: 941–747–9161
Hagerman, ID 83332 USA                                          F: 941–747–9476
P: 208–837–6114                                                 tilapiafillet@aol.com, www.regalsprings.com
F: 208–837–6254
fpi@fmt.org                                                     Tropical Aquaculture Products
                                                                P.O. Box 6311
Pacific Aqua Fish Farms, Inc.                                   Rutland, VT 05702 USA
10468 Hot Mineral Spa Rd.                                       P: 802–747–6311
Niland, CA 92257 USA                                            F: 802–747–6353
P: 760–354–1533                                                 info@eattilapia.com, www.eattilapia.com
F: 760–354–1068




                           132 Sourcing Seafood
TROUT, RAINBOW (FARMED):
Fresh and frozen trout is readily available from most
seafood and foodservice distributors. However, buyers may
want to seek out locally grown trout for more regional
emphasis. The trout growers listed below sell either
through distributors or directly.                                    ECOFISH, INC.

Burhop’s Seafood                                                     EcoFish has carved out an important niche within the
1515 Sheridan Rd.                                                    U.S. seafood market as a wholesaler of seafoods exclu-
Wilmette, IL 60091 USA                                               sively from environmentally sustainable fisheries.
Contact: Jeff Burhop
P: 847–256–6400                                                      EcoFish has a strong commitment to promoting ecological-
F: 847–901–4017                                                      ly responsible seafood consumption. In carrying out their
www.burhops.com                                                      mission, EcoFish’s independent Seafood Advisory Board
                                                                     researches and recommends well managed fisheries to
Clear Springs Foods, Inc.                                            EcoFish, ensuring the products they offer are from sustain-
P.O. Box 712                                                         able fisheries. In addition, EcoFish donates a percentage
Buhl, ID 83316 USA                                                   of its sales to communities and organizations around the
P: 208–543–4316                                                      world that promote sustainable fishing practices.
F: 800–635–8211
csf@clearsprings.com, www.clearsprings.com                           EcoFish offers a large variety of ocean-friendly seafoods
                                                                     including: catfish (farmed), clams (farmed), Pacific cod
The largest trout producer in the U.S., with nationwide distri-      (line/pot caught), Dungeness crab, Alaskan halibut
bution of fresh, frozen and value-added trout products. Call         (longline), mahimahi (troll/handline), mussels (farmed),
the names of local suppliers.                                        oysters, Alaskan sablefish (longline), Alaskan salmon
                                                                     (all species), scallops (farmed), shrimp (farmed/organic,
EcoFish, Inc.                                                        northern pink, spot prawns), rainbow trout (farmed), ahi
78 Market St.                                                        tuna (troll/handline), and albacore tuna (troll/handline).
Portsmouth, NH 03801 USA
P: 603–430–0101 (877–214–FISH)                                       78 Market St.
F: 603–430–9929                                                      Portsmouth, NH 03801 USA
www.ecofish.com                                                      P: 603–430–0101 (877–214–FISH)
                                                                     F: 603–430–9929
EcoFish offers a variety of seafood products.                        www.ecofish.com
For a complete list, see their profile on page 133.

Harrietta Hills Trout Farm                                         Star Prairie Trout Farm
1681 S 7 1/2 Rd.                                                   400 Hill Ave.
Harrietta, MI 49638 USA                                            Star Prairie, WI 54026 USA
P: 231–389–2514                                                    P: 715–248–3633
dan@harriettahills.com                                             F: 715–248–7933
                                                                   sptrout@pressenter.com, www.starprairietrout.com
Idaho Trout Company
P.O. Box 72                                                        Established in 1856.
Buhl, ID 83316 USA
P: 866–878–7688                                                    Sunburst Trout Company
F: 208–543–8476                                                    128 Raceway Pl.
rainbowtrout@idahotrout.com, www.idahotrout.com                    Canton, NC 28716 USA
                                                                   P: 828.648.3010
                                                                   F: 828.648.9279
                                                                   info@sunbursttrout.com, www.sunbursttrout.com

                                                                   Offers a wide variety of trout products from fish grown with-
                                                                   out animal-based feeds. Also sells rainbow trout caviar.




                                                              The Fish and Shellfish Guide 133
TUNA, AHI (YELLOWFIN & BIGEYE):                              Hawaii International Seafood, Inc.
Because of issues regarding seine and longline fishing,      P.O. Box 30486
concerned buyers should contact suppliers to identify pole   Honolulu, HI 96820 USA
and troll-caught ahi.                                        P: 808–839–5010
                                                             F: 808–833–0712
Barnacle Seafood Co.                                         info@cryofresh.com, www.cryofresh.com
5301 NW 35th Ave.
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309 USA                                Hilo Fish Company, Inc.
P: 954–486–8000                                              55 Holomua St.
                                                             Hilo, HI 96720 USA
Burhop’s Seafood                                             Contact: Charlie Umamoto
1515 Sheridan Rd.                                            P: 808–961–0877
Wilmette, IL 60091 USA                                       F: 808–935–1603
Contact: Jeff Burhop                                         charlie@hilofish.com, www.hilofish.com
P: 847–256–6400
F: 847–901–4017                                              McFresh, Inc.
www.burhops.com                                              2740 W 81st St.
                                                             Miami, FL 33016 USA
EcoFish, Inc.                                                P: 305–822–2442
78 Market St.                                                F: 305–822–1448
Portsmouth, NH 03801 USA                                     sam@mcfresh.com, www.mcfresh.com
P: 603–430–0101 (877–214–FISH)
F: 603–430–9929                                              New Zealand Seafoods
www.ecofish.com                                              4321 Boyle Ave.
                                                             Vernon, CA 90058 USA
EcoFish offers a variety of seafood products.                Contact: Vicki Tanaka
For a complete list, see their profile on page 133.          P: 323–584–2400
                                                             F: 323–584–2431
Fresh Island Fish, Inc.                                      vicki@nzseafoods.com, www.nzseafoods.com
312 Alamaha St., Unit G
Kahuluhi, HI 96732 USA
Contact: Bruce Johnson                                       TUNA, ALBACORE:
P: 808–871–1111                                              While frozen albacore is widely available from seafood and
F: 808–871–6511                                              foodservice distributors, fresh or frozen troll-caught fish
mail@freshislandfish.com, www.freshislandfish.com            may a little harder to find. During the fishing season, many
                                                             West Coast fishermen sell their catch directly from major
Garden Valley & Isle Seafood                                 fishing ports in Washington, Oregon, and California.
225 N Nimitz Hwy. #3
Honolulu, HI 96817 USA                                       Burhop’s Seafood
P: 808–524–4847                                              1515 Sheridan Rd.
F: 808–528–5590                                              Wilmette, IL 60091 USA
info@gvisfd.com, www.gvisfd.com                              Contact: Jeff Burhop
                                                             P: 847–256–6400
H&N Foods International                                      F: 847–901–4017
125 Bayshore Blvd.                                           www.burhops.com
San Francisco, CA 94124 USA
Contact: Peter Hall                                          Car valho Fisheries Inc.
P: 415–821–6637                                              1585 Heartwood Dr., Ste. D
F: 415–821–7159                                              McKinleyville, CA 95519 USA
peter_hall@hnfoods.com, www.hnfoods.com                      Contact: Bill Carvalho
                                                             P: 800–301–3270
                                                             F: 707–839–3260
                                                             admin@carvalhofisheries.com, www.carvalhofisheries.com




                            134 Sourcing Seafood
EcoFish, Inc.                                              Nelson Crab, Inc.
78 Market St.                                              P.O. Box 520
Portsmouth, NH 03801 USA                                   Tokeland, WA 98590 USA
P: 603–430–0101 (877–214–FISH)                             P: 800–262–0069
F: 603–430–9929                                            F: 541–267–2921
www.ecofish.com                                            seatreats@techline.com

EcoFish offers a variety of seafood products.              New Zealand Seafoods
For a complete list, see their profile on page 133.        4321 Boyle Ave.
                                                           Vernon, CA 90058 USA
Fresh Island Fish, Inc.                                    Contact: Vicki Tanaka
312 Alamaha St., Unit G                                    P: 323–584–2400
Kahuluhi, HI 96732 USA                                     F: 323–584–2431
Contact: Bruce Johnson                                     vicki@nzseafoods.com, www.nzseafoods.com
P: 808–871–1111
F: 808–871–6511                                            Pacific Seafood Group
mail@freshislandfish.com, www.freshislandfish.com          16797 SE 130th Ave.
                                                           Clackamas, OR 97015 USA
H&N Foods International                                    Contact: Steve Spencer
125 Bayshore Blvd.                                         P: 503–905–4500; 800–388–1101
San Francisco, CA 94124 USA                                F: 503–905–4228
Contact: Peter Hall                                        sspencer@pacseafood.com, www.pacseafood.com
P: 415–821–6637
F: 415–821–7159                                            Quinault Pride Seafood
peter_hall@hnfoods.com, www.hnfoods.com                    1111 NW 45th St., Ste. B
                                                           Seattle, WA 98107 USA
Hilo Fish Company, Inc.                                    Contact: Gayla Morrison
55 Holomua St.                                             P: 206–706–7792
Hilo, HI 96720 USA                                         F: 206–789–0504
Contact: Charlie Umamoto                                   gayla@seafare.com, www.quinaultprideseafood.com
P: 808–961–0877
F: 808–935–1603
charlie@hilofish.com, www.hilofish.com

Jessie’s Illwaco Fish Company
P.O. Box 800
Ilwaco, WA 98624 USA
P: 360–642–3773
F: 360–642–3362




                                                      The Fish and Shellfish Guide 135
Supplier Index

Alphabetical Listing




COMPANY                                   CITY                STATE    COUNTRY   OCEAN-FRIENDLY FISH
                                                                                 AND SHELLFISH

10th & M Seafoods                         Anchorage           AK       U.S.      Caviar, Salmon (wild Pacific); Halibut,
                                                                                 Pacific
AA1 Alaska Fish                           Homer               AK       U.S.      Cod, Pacific
The Abalone Farm                          Cayucos             CA       U.S.      Abalone, red (farmed)
Acadian Fishermen’s Co-op Association     Wellington          PEI      Canada    Sardines
Acadiana Fisherman’s Cooperative          Breaux Bridge       LA       U.S.      Crawfish
Aero Trading                              Port Edward         BC       Canada    Shrimp, Northern Pink
Aero Trading Co. Ltd.                     Vancouver           BC       Canada    Sablefish
Aeros                                     Southold            NY       U.S.      Oysters
Agassiz Aqua Farms                        Oakville            ON       Canada    Arctic char
Airfresh Seafoods                         Gig Harbor          WA       U.S.      Caviar, Salmon (wild Pacific); Halibut,
                                                                                 Pacific
AK Johnston Oysters                       Denman Island       BC       Canada    Oysters
Alaska Fresh Seafoods, Inc.               Kodiak              AK       U.S.      Sablefish
Alaska Glacier Seafoods, Inc.             Juneau              AK       U.S.      Cod, Pacific; Halibut, Pacific; Sablefish;
                                          Shrimp                                 (Spot Prawns), Trap-caught
Alaska Hook & Line Seafoods               Sitka               AK       U.S.      Caviar, Salmon (wild Pacific); Cod,
                                                                                 Pacific; Halibut, Pacific; Sablefish;
                                                                                 Shrimp (Spot Prawns), Trap-caught
Alaska Seafood Company                    Juneau              AK       U.S.      Caviar, Salmon (wild Pacific)
Alaskan Marine Resources                  Cordova             AK       U.S.      Caviar, Salmon (wild Pacific)
Albion Fisheries, Ltd.                    Vancouver,          BC       Canada    Sablefish
All American Gulf Fish Company            Fort Walton Beach   FL       U.S.      Mackerel, Atlantic or Spanish
Allen’s Seafood                           Harpswell           ME       U.S.      Lobster, American
American Mussel Harvesters, Inc.          North Kingstown     RI       U.S.      Mussels
America’s Catch                           Itta Bena           MS       U.S.      Catfish, U.S. (farmed)
Andersen Foods Intl. Ltd.                 Delta               BC       Canada    Sablefish
Anguilla Fish Farm                        Hastings            FL       U.S.      Striped Bass, Hybrid
AQE Fishermen’s Market                    Sitka               AK       U.S.      Caviar, Salmon (wild Pacific); Halibut,
                                                                                 Pacific
Aquafarms                                 Holdenville         OK       U.S.      Catfish, U.S. (farmed)
Aquafresh Farms of Mississippi            Moss Point          MS       U.S.      Tilapia
Ariel Seafood, Inc.                       Destin              FL       U.S.      Mackerel, Atlantic or Spanish
Arizona Mariculture Associates LLC        Dateland            AZ       U.S.      Shrimp, U.S. (farmed)
Arpeggio’s                                Cordova             AK       U.S.      Caviar, Salmon (wild Pacific)
Arrowac Fisheries, Inc.                   Seattle             WA       U.S.      Sablefish
Atchafalaya Crawfish                      Breaux Bridge       LA       U.S.      Crawfish
Atlantic Fish Corporation                 Boca Raton          FL       U.S.      Mackerel, Atlantic or Spanish
Austin Bros. Fisheries                    Aurora              NC       U.S.      Striped Bass, Hybrid
Avery’s Bay Clams                         Galloway            NJ       U.S.      Clams; Oysters
B&B Oysters                               Fanny Bay           BC       Canada    Oysters
Bama Sea Products, Inc.                   St. Petersburg      FL       U.S.      Crab, Stone; Mackerel, Atlantic
                                                                                 or Spanish
Bandon Pacific                            Bandon              OR       U.S.      Crab, Dungeness
Bantry Bay Seafoods Ltd.                  Bantry              County   Ireland   Mussels
                                                              Cork
Barnacle Seafood Co.                      Fort Lauderdale     FL       U.S.      Tuna, Ahi (Yellowfin/Bigeye)




                                136 Sourcing Seafood
COMPANY                             CITY                  STATE      COUNTRY    OCEAN-FRIENDLY FISH
                                                                                AND SHELLFISH


Bay Haven Lobster, Inc.             York                  ME         U.S.       Lobster, American
Bay Ocean Seafood                   Garibaldi             OR         U.S.       Shrimp, Northern Pink
BayBoy Farms                        Hayneville            AL         U.S.       Shrimp, U.S. (farmed)
Bayley’s Lobster Pound              Scarborough           ME         U.S.       Lobster, American
Bayou Land Seafood, LLC             Breaux Bridge         LA         U.S.       Crawfish
BBS Lobster Company Inc.            Machiasport           ME         U.S.       Lobster, American
Beals Lobster Pier                  Southwest Harbor      ME         U.S.       Lobster, American
Bell Buoy Crab Co.                  Seaside               OR         U.S.       Crab, Dungeness
Bell’s Seafood                      Haines                AK         U.S.       Halibut, Pacific; Shrimp (Spot Prawns),
                                                                                Trap Caught
Bering Select Seafoods Co.          Seattle               WA         U.S.       Sablefish
Big Blue Fisheries                  Sitka                 AK         U.S.       Halibut, Pacific; Sablefish
Big Island Abalone                  Seattle               WA         U.S.       Abalone (farmed)
Blis Caviar                         Oak Park              IL         U.S.       Caviar, Trout (farmed)
Blue Heron Aqua Farms               Delray Beach          FL         U.S.       Striped Bass, Hybrid
Bob’s Seafood                       Windham               ME         U.S.       Lobster, American
Bonanza Crawfish Farms, Inc.        Henderson             LA         U.S.       Crawfish
Bornstein Seafoods                  Bellingham            WA         U.S.       Crab, Dungeness; Sablefish; Salmon,
                                                                                Pacific (wild); Sole, Pacific
Bornstein Seafoods                  Astoria               OR         U.S.       Sardines; Shrimp, Northern Pink
Brady’s Oysters                     Aberdeen              WA         U.S.       Oysters
Brenner Oyster Co.                  Federal Way           WA         U.S.       Oysters
Buddy Gandy Seafood Inc.            Panama City           FL         U.S.       Mackerel, Atlantic or Spanish
Burhop’s Seafood                    Wilmette              IL         U.S.       Artic Char; Catfish, U.S. (farmed);
                                                                                Caviars, U.S.; Clams; Cod, Pacific;
                                                                                Crab, Dungeness, Jonah/Rock, King
                                                                                Snow and Stone; Crawfish; Flounder;
                                                                                Halibut, Pacific; Lobster, American and
                                                                                Spiny/Rock; Mackarel; Mahimahi;
                                                                                Mussels, (farmed); Oysters; Salmon,
                                                                                Pacific (wild); Sardines; Shrimp, U.S.
                                                                                (farmed); Shrimp (Spot Prawns), Trap-
                                                                                caught; Sole (Pacific); Trout, Rainbow;
                                                                                Tuna, Albacore and Ahi;
                                                                                White Sturgeon, U.S. (farmed)
Buy N Pack Seafoods Inc.            Hoonah                AK         U.S.       Cod, Pacific; Halibut, Pacific
C and C Oyster Co. Ltd.             Nanaimo               BC         Canada     Oysters
Caito Fisheries                     Fort Bragg            CA         U.S.       Crab, Dungeness; Sablefish; Salmon,
                                                                                Pacific (wild); Sole, Pacific
Cajun Crawfish                      Marrero               LA         U.S.       Crawfish
Canada Seafood Inc., Intl.          Richmond              BC         Canada     Sablefish
Cape Cleare Fishery                 Port Townsend         WA         U.S.       Salmon, Pacific (wild)
Canadian Fishing Company            Vancouver             BC         Canada     Caviar, Salmon (wild Pacific)
Cape Island Seafood                 Kittery               ME         U.S.       Sardines
Capt. Vince, Inc.                   Gloucester            MA         U.S.       Lobster, American
Carolina Classics                   Ayden                 NC         U.S.       Catfish, U.S. (farmed)
Carvalho Fisheries Inc.             McKinleyville         CA         U.S.       Tuna, Albacore
Castle Rock Lobster Company         Appleton              ME         U.S.       Lobster, American
Catalina Offshore Products Inc.     San Diego             CA         U.S.       Lobster, Rock and Spiny
Cedar Key Aquaculture Farms, Inc.   Riverview             FL         U.S.       Clams
Cherrystone Aqua Farms              Cheriton              VA         U.S.       Clams
Chessie Seafood                     Wicomico              VA         U.S.       Oysters
Circle “C” Oyster Ranchers          Ridge                 MD         U.S.       Oysters
Clausen Oysters                     North Bend            OR         U.S.       Oysters
Clear Bay Fisheries, Inc.           Richmond              BC         Canada     Sablefish
Clear Springs Foods, Inc.           Buhl                  ID         U.S.       Trout, Rainbow (farmed)
Clearwater Fine Foods               Bedford               NS         Canada     Crab, Jonah (Rock); Shrimp,
                                                                                Northern Pink




                                                       The Fish and Shellfish Guide 137
COMPANY                                   CITY                  STATE   COUNTRY   OCEAN-FRIENDLY FISH
                                                                                  AND SHELLFISH


Coal Point Seafood Company                Homer                 AK      U.S.      Caviar, Salmon (wild Pacific); Cod,
                                                                                  Pacific; Halibut, Pacific; Shrimp,
                                                                                  Northern Pink; Shrimp (Spot Prawns),
                                                                                  Trap Caught
Coast Island Seafoods                     Qualicum Bay          BC      Canada    Sablefish
Coast Seafoods Company                    Bellevue              WA      U.S.      Oysters
Coastal Cold Storage                      Petersburg            AK      U.S.      Halibut, Pacific; Shrimp, Northern
                                                                                  Pink; Shrimp (Spot Prawns), Trap Caught
Coastal Villages Seafood, LLC             Anchorage             AK      U.S.      Salmon, Pacific (wild)
Coastwide Fishing Ltd.                    Richmond              BC      Canada    Sablefish
Collins Caviar                            Chicago               IL      U.S.      Caviar: Paddlefish (farmed), Salmon
                                                                                  (wild Pacific) and Trout (farmed)
ConFish Inc./Country Select Catfish       Isola                 MS      U.S.      Catfish, U.S. (farmed)
Connor’s Bros., Ltd.                      Blacks Harbor         NB      Canada    Sardines
Cook Inlet Salmon Brand, Inc.             Soldotna              AK      U.S.      Salmon, Pacific (wild)
Cook’s Lobster House                      Bailey Island         ME      U.S.      Lobster, American
Copper River Seafoods                     Anchorage             AK      U.S.      Cod, Pacific; Halibut, Pacific
Cortes Island Wild Harvest                Mansons Landing       BC      Canada    Salmon, Pacific (wild)
Cossack Caviar                            LaConnor              WA      U.S.      Caviar, Salmon (wild Pacific)
Cox Seafood                               Tarpon Springs        FL      U.S.      Crab, Stone
Cozy Harbor Seafood Inc.                  Portland              ME      U.S.      Lobster, American; Shrimp,
                                                                                  Northern Pink
Daley Brothers Ltd.                       St. John’s            NL      Canada    Crab, Snow
Deep Creek Custom Packing Inc.            Ninilchik             AK      U.S.      Caviar, Salmon (wild Pacific)
Deep Sea Fish of Rhode Island, Inc.       Wakefield             RI      U.S.      Flounder, Summer (Fluke); Mackerel,
                                                                                  Atlantic or Spanish
Deep Sea Fisheries, Inc.                  Everett               WA      U.S.      Crab, King; Sablefish
Delta Pride Catfish                       Indianola             MS      U.S.      Catfish, U.S. (farmed)
Desert Sweet Shrimp Farm                  Gila Bend             AZ      U.S.      Shrimp, U.S. (farmed)
Desolation Sound Oysters Ltd.             Bowser                 BC     Canada    Oysters
Di Carlo Seafood Company                  Wilmington            CA      U.S.      Lobster, Rock and Spiny
Douty Bros. Inc.                          Portland              ME      U.S.      Lobster, American
Duxbury Bay Shellfish Co.                 Duxbury               MA      U.S.      Oysters
EcoFish, Inc.                             Portsmouth            NH      U.S.      Catfish, U.S. (farmed); Cod, Pacific;
                                                                                  Clams; Crab, Dungeness; Halibut, Pacific;
                                                                                  Mahimahi; Mussels; Oysters; Sablefish;
                                                                                  Salmon, Pacific (wild); Scallops; Shrimp;
                                                                                  Trout, Rainbow (farmed); Tuna, Ahi
                                                                                  (Yellowfin/Bigeye); Tuna, Albacore
Ekone Oyster Co.                          South Bend            WA      U.S.      Oysters
Enaca International, LLC                  Medley                FL      U.S.      Tilapia
Everjay Shellfish Co.                     S. Wellfleet          MA      U.S.      Oysters
F.A.S. Seafood Producers Ltd.             Victoria              BC      Canada    Sablefish
F.W. Bryce, Inc                           Gloucester            MA      U.S.      Sardines
Favco, Inc.                               Anchorage             AK      U.S.      Salmon, Pacific (wild)
Fish Breeders of Idaho                    Hagerman              ID      U.S.      Catfish, U.S. (farmed); Caviar, Trout
                                                                                  (farmed); Tilapia
Fisherman’s Express LLC                   Anchorage             AK      U.S.      Cod, Pacific
Fishermen’s Heritage Lobster Co-op        Friendship            ME      U.S.      Lobster, American
The Fishery                               Galt                  CA      U.S.      Sturgeon, White (farmed)
Fisher’s Island Oyster Farm               Fisher’s Island       NY      U.S.      Oysters
Fishery Products International            St. John’s            NL      Canada    Crab, Snow; Shrimp, Northern Pink
Fishhawk Fisheries                        Astoria               OR      U.S.      Crab, Dungeness; Sablefish; Salmon,
                                                                                  Pacific (wild); Shrimp, Northern Pink
Fishing Vessel Alpha Dawn                 Wrangell              AK      U.S.      Halibut, Pacific
Fishing Vessel Patricia S                 Gustavus              AK      U.S.      Halibut, Pacific
Fogo Island Co-Operative Society Ltd.     Seldom, Fogo Island   NF      Canada    Sardines; Shrimp, Northern Pink
Free Range Fish & Lobster                 Portland              ME      U.S.      Lobster, American
French’s Clam Co. Ltd.                    Lund                  BC      Canada    Clams




                                138 Sourcing Seafood
COMPANY                                      CITY                STATE      COUNTRY    OCEAN-FRIENDLY FISH
                                                                                       AND SHELLFISH


Fresh Island Fish, Inc.                      Kahuluhi            HI         U.S.       Tuna, Ahi (Yellowfin/Bigeye); Tuna,
                                                                                       Albacore
Fruge’s Cajun Crawfish Company               Branch              LA         U.S.       Crawfish
Garden Valley & Isle Seafood                 Honolulu            HI         U.S.       Tuna, Ahi (Yellowfin/Bigeye)
Global Seafoods North America LLC            Bellevue            WA         U.S.       Sole, Pacific
Gordon’s Shellfish LLC.                      Pocomoke            MD         U.S.       Clams; Oysters
The Great Eastern Mussel Farms, Inc.         Tenants Harbor      ME         U.S.       Mussels
Great Little Oyster Company Ltd.             Powell River        BC         Canada     Oysters
Great Northern Products Ltd.                 Warwick             RI         U.S.       Crab, Jonah (Rock) and Snow; Shrimp,
                                                                                       Northern Pink
Greene Prairie Aquafarm                      Boligee             AL         U.S.       Shrimp, U.S. (farmed)
Greenhead Lobster LLC                        Stonington          ME         U.S.       Lobster, American
Gulkana Seafood Direct                       Cordova             AK         U.S.       Salmon, Pacific (wild)
H&N Foods International                      San Francisco       CA         U.S.       Tuna, Ahi (Yellowfin/Bigeye); Tuna,
                                                                                       Albacore
H. Glenwood Evans & Son                      Crisfield           MD         U.S.       Sardines
Hallmark Fisheries                           Charleston          OR         U.S.       Crab, Dungeness; Sablefish; Salmon,
                                                                                       Pacific (wild); Shrimp, Northern Pink
Hama Hama Co.                                Lilliwaup           WA         U.S.       Oysters
Haring’s Pride                               Wisner              LA         U.S.       Catfish, U.S. (farmed)
Harrietta Hills Trout Farm                   Harrietta           MI         U.S.       Trout
Hawaii International Seafood, Inc.           Honolulu            HI         U.S.       Mahimahi; Tuna, Ahi (Yellowfin/Bigeye)
Heartland Catfish                            Itta Bena           MS         U.S.       Catfish, U.S. (farmed)
High Flutin’ Oyster Co., Ltd.                Powell River        BC         Canada     Oysters
Hilo Fish Company, Inc.                      Hilo                HI         U.S.       Mahimahi; Tuna, Ahi (Yellowfin/Bigeye);
                                                                                       Tuna, Albacore
Hi-To Fisheries Ltd.                         Vancouver           BC         Canada     Shrimp (Spot Prawns), Trap-caught
Hog Island Oyster Co.                        Marshall            CA         U.S.       Oysters
Horst’s Seafood, Inc.                        Juneau              AK         U.S.       Halibut, Pacific; Sablefish
Icelandic USA Inc.                           Norwalk             CT         U.S.       Arctic char
Icicle Seafoods, Inc                         Seattle             WA         U.S.       Crab, Dungeness; Crab, King; Crab,
                                                                                       Snow; Sablefish
Icy Strait Seafoods, Inc.                    Bellingham          WA         U.S.       Salmon, Pacific (wild); Shrimp
                                                                                       (Spot Prawns), Trap-caught
Idaho Trout Company                          Buhl                ID         U.S.       Trout
Imperial Eagle Clam Company Ltd              Saanichton          BC         Canada     Clams
Indian River Aquaculture                     Vero Beach          FL         U.S.       Shrimp, U.S. (farmed)
Interior Alaska Fish Processors              Fairbanks           AK         U.S.       Caviar, Salmon (wild Pacific)
Interocean Seafood Co.                       Seattle             WA         U.S.       Salmon, Pacific (wild)
Intersea Fisheries West                      Seattle             WA         U.S.       Salmon, Pacific (wild)
Islamorada Lobster & Stone Crab              Islamorada          FL         U.S.       Crab, Stone
  Enterprises, Inc.
Island Lobster, Ltd.                         Gloucester          MA         U.S.       Lobster, American
Island Seafoods                              Kodiak              AK         U.S.       Cod, Pacific; Halibut, Pacific
J&R Fisheries                                Seward              AK         U.S.       Halibut, Pacific; Sablefish
J&B AquaFood, Inc.                           Jacksonville        NC         U.S.       Clams; Oysters
Jessie’s Illwaco Fish Company                Ilwaco              WA         U.S.       Crab, Dungeness; Sardines; Shrimp,
                                                                                       Northern Pink, Tuna, Albacore;
Kalamar Seafood Inc.                         Hialeah             FL         U.S.       Mahimahi
Katama Bay Oyster Co.                        Edgartown           MA         U.S.       Oysters
Kent SeaTech Corporation                     San Diego           CA         U.S.       Striped Bass, Hybrid
Key Largo Fisheries                          Key Largo           FL         U.S.       Crab, Stone
Key West Seafoods                            Key West            FL         U.S.       Crab, Stone
Keyport Foods LLC                            Seattle             WA         U.S.       Crab, Snow
Keys Fisheries, Inc.                         Marathon            FL         U.S.       Crab, Stone; Lobster, Rock and Spiny;
                                                                                       Mackerel, Atlantic or Spanish
King’s Seafood Inc.                          Port Orange         FL         U.S.       Mackerel, Atlantic or Spanish
Kodiak Salmon Packers                        Donald              OR         U.S.       Salmon, Pacific (wild)
Labrador Fishermen’s Union Shrimp Co. Ltd.   Lanse au Loup       NL         Canada     Shrimp, Northern Pink




                                                              The Fish and Shellfish Guide 139
COMPANY                                    CITY             STATE   COUNTRY   OCEAN-FRIENDLY FISH
                                                                              AND SHELLFISH


Leader Creek Fisheries LLC                 Naknek           AK      U.S.      Salmon, Pacific (wild)
Leader Fishing Ltd.                        Delta            BC      Canada    Sablefish
Lions Gate Fisheries Ltd.                  Delta            BC      Canada    Sablefish; Shrimp (Spot Prawns),
                                                                              Trap-caught
Little Skookum Shellfish Growers           Shelton          WA      U.S.      Oysters
Live Crawfish.com                          Plaquemine       LA      U.S.      Crawfish
Lofoten Fish Company                       Petersburg       AK      U.S.      Halibut, Pacific
Lombardi’s Seafood Inc.                    Orlando          FL      U.S.      Mahimahi
Lund’s Fisheries Inc.                      Cape May         NJ      U.S.      Mackerel, Atlantic or Spanish
Mainly Lobsters & Seafood                  Owl’s Head       ME      U.S.      Lobster, American
Marshall Point Sea Farm, LLC.              Port Clyde       ME      U.S.      Clams; Oysters
MB Seafood                                 Merritt Island   FL      U.S.      Mackerel, Atlantic or Spanish
Mc Fresh, Inc.                             Miami            FL      U.S.      Tuna, Ahi (Yellowfin/Bigeye)
McAleney’s New Meadows Lobster             Portland         ME      U.S.      Lobster, American
Monterey Abalone Company                   Monterey         CA      U.S.      Abalone (farmed)
Monterey Fish Market                       San Francisco    CA      U.S.      Crab, Dungeness; Halibut;
                                                                              Lobster, Spiny; MahiMahi; Salmon
                                                                              Pacific (wild); Sardines; Scallops;
                                                                              Shrimp (spot Prawns); Sole, Pacific;
                                                                              Striped bass
Moore’s Seafood Inc.                       Camarillo        CA      U.S.      Lobster, Rock and Spiny
Mortilliaro Lobster LLC                    Gloucester       MA      U.S.      Lobster, American
Mountain Stream                            Miami            FL      U.S.      Tilapia
Nantucket Seafood                          Nantucket        MA      U.S.      Crab, Jonah (Rock)
National Fish and Seafood Inc.             Gloucester       MA      U.S.      Flounder, Summer (Fluke)
Nature’s Catch                             Clarksdale       MS      U.S.      Striped Bass, Hybrid
Nautical Nuggets Clam Farms                Oceanville       NJ      U.S.      Clams
Nautilus Foods                             Valdez           AK      U.S.      Salmon, Pacific (wild)
Nautilus Seafoods, Inc.                    Seattle          WA      U.S.      Sablefish
Nelson Crab, Inc.                          Tokeland         WA      U.S.      Crab, Dungeness; Sablefish; Shrimp,
                                                                              Northern Pink; Tuna, Albacore
New Harbor Fishermen’s Co-op Inc.          New Harbor       ME      U.S.      Lobster, American
New Zealand Seafoods                       Vernon           CA      U.S.      Mussels; Tuna, Ahi (Yellowfin/Bigeye);
                                                                              Tuna, Albacore
Noank Aquaculture Cooperative              Noank             CT     U.S.      Clams; Oysters
Nordic Fisheries, Inc.                     Petersburg       AK      U.S.      Halibut, Pacific; Sablefish
NorQuest Seafoods Inc.                     Seattle          WA      U.S.      Sablefish
North Pacific Processors                   Seattle          WA      U.S.      Salmon, Pacific (wild)
North Pacific Seafoods, Inc.               Seattle          WA      U.S.      Sablefish
Northern Keta Caviar Co.                   Juneau           AK      U.S.      Caviar, Salmon (wild Pacific)
Northern Products                          Seattle          WA      U.S.      Salmon, Pacific (wild)
Norton Sound Seafood Products              Nome             AK      U.S.      Crab, King
Ocean Beauty Seafoods Inc.                 Seattle          WA      U.S.      Sablefish; Salmon, Pacific (wild); Sole,
                                                                              Pacific
Ocean Choice                               Newport          RI      U.S.      Mackerel, Atlantic or Spanish; Sardines
Ocean Garden Products Inc.                 San Diego        CA      U.S.      Lobster, Rock and Spiny
OceanBoy Farms, Inc.                       Clewiston        FL      U.S.      Shrimp, U.S. (farmed)
OFI Markesa International                  Vernon           CA      U.S.      Lobster, Rock and Spiny
Osage Catfisheries, Inc.                   Osage Beach      MO      U.S.      Caviar, Paddlefish (farmed)
Outer Coast Oysters                        Tahsis           BC      Canada    Oysters
Oyster Island Seafoods Ltd.                Qualicum Beach   BC      Canada    Oysters
Pacific Aqua Fish Farms, Inc.              Niland           CA      U.S.      Tilapia
Pacific Pleasures                          Yakutat          AK      U.S.      Halibut, Pacific
Pacific Seafood Group                      Clackamas        OR      U.S.      Crab, Dungeness; Sablefish; Salmon,
                                                                              Pacific (wild); Sardines; Shrimp,
                                                                              Northern Pink; Sole, Pacific; Tuna,
                                                                              Albacore
Pacific Seafood Intl. Ltd.                 Sidney           BC      Canada    Sablefish
Pamlico Packing Co.                        Vandermere       NC      U.S.      Flounder, Summer (Fluke)




                                 140 Sourcing Seafood
COMPANY                           CITY                STATE      COUNTRY    OCEAN-FRIENDLY FISH
                                                                            AND SHELLFISH


PEI Mussel King                   Morell              PEI        Canada     Mussels
Pelican Seafoods                  Pelican             AK         U.S.       Sablefish; Salmon, Pacific (wild)
Pemaquid Fishermen’s Co-op        New Harbor          ME         U.S.       Lobster, American
Pemaquid Oyster Company, Inc.     Waldoboro           ME         U.S.       Oysters
Penn Cove Shellfish LLC           Coupeville          WA         U.S.       Mussels; Oysters
Peter Pan Seafoods, Inc.          Seattle             WA         U.S.       Crab, King and Snow; Sablefish;
                                                                            Salmon, Pacific (wild); Sole, Pacific
Phillips Seafood                  Townsend            GA         U.S.       Clams
Pinnacle Seafoods Ltd.            Vancouver           BC         Canada     Shrimp (Spot Prawns), Trap-caught
Point Judith Fishermen’s Co.      Narragansett        RI         U.S.       Mackerel, Atlantic or Spanish
Port Lobster Co. Inc.             Kennebunkport       ME         U.S.       Lobster, American
Portland Shellfish                South Portland      ME         U.S.       Crab, Jonah (Rock); Shrimp,
                                                                            Northern Pink
Poseidon Enterprises, Inc.        Charlotte           NC         U.S.       Flounder, Summer (Fluke)
Prairie Lands Seafood             Pinckneyville       IL         U.S.       Catfish, U.S. (farmed)
Pride of the Pond                 Tunica              MS         U.S.       Catfish, U.S. (farmed)
Pride of the South                Brooksville         MS         U.S.       Catfish, U.S. (farmed)
Prime Line Catfish                Scooba              MS         U.S.       Catfish, U.S. (farmed)
Prime Select Seafoods             Cordova             AK         U.S.       Halibut, Pacific
Prince Edward Aqua Farms Inc.     Kensington          PEI        Canada     Mussels
Quest Fishing Ltd.                Madeira Park        BC         Canada     Shrimp (Spot Prawns), Trap-caught
Quinault Pride Seafood            Seattle             WA         U.S.       Crab, Dungeness; Halibut, Pacific;
                                                                            Sablefish; Salmon, Pacific (wild); Tuna,
                                                                            Albacore
Quinlan Brothers Ltd.             Bay De Verde        NL         Canada     Crab, Snow
Rain Forest Aquaculture           Sunrise             FL         U.S.       Tilapia
Rappahannock River Oysters, LLC   Dunnsville          VA         U.S.       Oysters
Ravens Oysters Ltd.               Whaletown           BC         Canada     Oysters
Regal Springs                     Bradenton           FL         U.S.       Tilapia
River Seafoods Inc.               Delta               BC         Canada     Sablefish
Rockport Lobster Company          Gloucester          MA         U.S.       Lobster, American
Rose’s Oyster Bar                 Wellfleet           MA         U.S.       Oysters
Royal Aleutian Seafoods, Inc.     Seattle             WA         U.S.       Crab, King and Snow
Saurian Seafoods Inc.             Port Coquitlam      BC         Canada     Sablefish
SeaBear                           Anacortes           WA         U.S.       Salmon, Pacific (wild)
SeaChick, Inc.                    Escatawpa           MS         U.S.       Tilapia
Seafood Producers Cooperative     Bellingham          WA         U.S.       Sablefish: Salmon, Pacific (wild)
Sealord North America             Highland Park       IL         U.S.       Mussels
Seapowet Shellfish LLC            Pawtucket           RI         U.S.       Oysters
Seattle Caviar Company            Seattle             WA                    Caviar, White Sturgeon (farmed)
Seattle Shellfish LLC             Olympia             WA         U.S.       Oysters
Seaview Lobster Co.               Kittery             ME         U.S.       Lobster, American
Select Fish                       Seattle             WA         U.S.       Salmon, Pacific (wild)
Shellfish for You                 Westerly            R.I.       U.S.       Clams; Oysters
Silver Streak Bass Co.            Danevang            TX         U.S.       Striped Bass, Hybrid
Simmons Farm Raised Catfish       Yazoo City          MS         U.S.       Catfish, U.S. (farmed)
Slack Sea Farm                    Orleans             MA         U.S.       Oysters
Snug Harbor Seafoods              Kenai               AK         U.S.       Caviar, Salmon (wild Pacific); Cod,
                                                                            Pacific; Halibut, Pacific; Sablefish;
                                                                            Salmon, Pacific (wild)
Sogelco International, Inc.       Montreal            QC         Canada     Crab, Snow; Lobster, American
Southern Farm Tilapia LLC         Bailey              NC         U.S.       Tilapia
Southern Pride Catfish            Greensboro          AL         U.S.       Catfish, U.S. (farmed)
SouthFresh Catfish Processors     Oxford              MS         U.S.       Catfish, U.S. (farmed)
Standard Fish Company             San Pedro           CA         U.S.       Mackerel, Atlantic or Spanish
Star Prairie Trout Farm           Star Prairie        WI         U.S.       Trout
State Fish                        San Pedro           CA         U.S.       Mackerel, Atlantic or Spanish
Steve Connolly Seafood            Boston              MA         U.S.       Mackerel, Atlantic or Spanish
Stolt Sea Farms                   Sacramento          CA         U.S.       Caviar, White Sturgeon (farmed)




                                                   The Fish and Shellfish Guide 141
COMPANY                                      CITY                STATE   COUNTRY   OCEAN-FRIENDLY FISH
                                                                                   AND SHELLFISH


Stonington Sea Products                      Stonington          ME      U.S.      Crab, Jonah (Rock)
Strait Oysters Ltd.                          Burnaby             BC      Canada    Oysters
Sunburst Trout Company                       Canton              NC      U.S.      Caviar, Trout (farmed); Trout, Rainbow
                                                                                   (farmed)
Sunset Fisheries                             Petersburg          AK      U.S.      Cod, Pacific; Halibut, Pacific; Sablefish;
                                                                                   Shrimp (Spot Prawns), Trap-caught
Susquehanna Aquacultures Inc.                York Haven          PA      U.S.      Striped Bass, Hybrid
Taku Fisheries                               Juneau              AK      U.S.      Crab, King; Salmon, Pacific (wild)
Taylor Lobster Company                       Kittery             ME      U.S.      Lobster, American
Taylor Shellfish Farms                       Shelton             WA      U.S.      Clams; Oysters; Mussels
Tenass Pass Shellfish                        Juneau              AK      U.S.      Oysters
Thomas Massey Ltd.                           South Bristol       ME      U.S.      Crab, Jonah (Rock); Shrimp,
                                                                                   Northern Pink
Tonka Seafoods, Inc.                         Petersburg          AK      U.S.      Halibut, Pacific; Sablefish
Trapper’s Creek Smoking                      Anchorage           AK      U.S.      Salmon, Pacific (wild)
Trenton Bridge Lobster Pound Inc.            Trenton             ME      U.S.      Lobster, American
Triad Fisheries                              Bainbridge Island   WA      U.S.      Halibut, Pacific; Sablefish; Salmon,
                                                                                   Pacific (wild)
Trident Seafoods Corporation                 Seattle             WA      U.S.      Crab, Dungeness; Crab, King; Crab,
                                                                                   Snow;; Sablefish; Salmon, Pacific (wild);
                                                                                   Sole, Pacific
Troller Point Fisheries                      Anchorage           AK      U.S.      Cod, Pacific; Halibut, Pacific; Sablefish
Tropical Aquaculture Products                Rutland             VT      U.S.      Tilapia
True World Foods                             Gloucester          MA      U.S.      Lobster, American
True World Foods, Alaska                     Kodiak              AK      U.S.      Sablefish
Tsar Nicoulai                                San Francisco       CA                Caviar, White Sturgeon (farmed)
Ucluelet Seafood Processors Ltd.             Ucluelet            BC      Canada    Shrimp, Northern Pink
Unisea, inc.                                 Redmond             WA      U.S.      Crab, King; Sablefish
Vanguard Bay Oyster Company Ltd.             West Vancouver      BC      Canada    Oysters
VanGuard Fish Farm, Inc.                     Vanceboro           NC      U.S.      Striped Bass, Hybrid
Vis Seafoods                                 Bellingham          WA      U.S.      Cod, Pacific
Wampanoag Aquinnah Shellfish Hatchery        Aquinnah            MA      U.S.      Oysters
Wanchese Fish Company, Inc.                  Suffolk             VA      U.S.      Flounder, Summer (Fluke); Mackerel,
                                                                                   Atlantic or Spanish
Wash-A-Shore Oyster Ranch                    South Wellfleet     MA      U.S.      Clams; Oysters
Water Street Seafood Inc.                    Apalachicola        FL      U.S.      Mackerel, Atlantic or Spanish
We’ Shuk Oysters (Ehattesaht First Nation)   Zeballos            BC      Canada    Oysters
Wellfleet Sea Farms, Inc.                    South Wellfleet     MA      U.S.      Oysters
West Virginia Aqua LLC                       Logan               WV      U.S.      Arctic char
Westcott Bay Sea Farms                       Friday Harbor       WA      U.S.      Oysters
Western Alaska Fisheries, Inc.               Seattle             WA      U.S.      Sablefish; Sole, Pacific
Westward Seafoods, Inc.                      Seattle             WA      U.S.      Sablefish
Wild Alaska Smoked Salmon & Seafood          Kodiak              AK      U.S.      Caviar, Salmon (wild Pacific)
Wildcatch                                    Bellingham          WA      U.S.      Salmon, Pacific (wild)
William Atwood Lobster Company               Spruce Head         ME      U.S.      Crab, Jonah (Rock); Lobster, American
Woodbine Alaska Fish Company                 Monroe              WA      U.S.      Caviar, Salmon (wild Pacific)
Worldwide Seafoods Ltd                       Vancouver           BC      Canada    Sablefish
Wrangell Seafoods Inc.                       Wrangell            AK      U.S.      Halibut, Pacific; Sablefish; Salmon,
                                                                                   Pacific (wild)
Yardarm Knot Fisheries, LLC                  Seatlle             WA      U.S.      Salmon, Pacific (wild)
YKI Fisheries, Inc.                          Yakutat             AK      U.S.      Salmon, Pacific (wild)
Young’s Lobster Pound                        Belfast             ME      U.S.      Lobster, American




                               142 Sourcing Seafood
Notes
Notes
                                     y family has been farming trout in North Carolina for three generations and we
                                M    care about every step in our process. We see this guide to sourcing seafood as a
                                thoughtful and timely resource for all of industry that will help like-minded, concerned
                                retailers and chefs choose seafood products that match their high standards for quality,
                                taste and environmental friendliness. Thank you, Seafood Choices Alliance!
                                      Sally Eason, Owner
                                      Sunburst Trout Company (Canton, NC)



                                    s a distributor of ocean-friendly seafood products, EcoFish knows it’s challenging for
                                A   chefs and retailers to research and source sustainable seafood. Sourcing Seafood is a
                                fantastic resource, providing a great service by pointing out those fishermen and suppliers
                                working hard to ensure their products are high quality and sustainable.
                                      Henry Lovejoy, President
                                      EcoFish, Inc. (Portsmouth, NH)



                                    his guide couldn’t come at a more critical time for the ocean. Sourcing Seafood is a
                                T   useful tool for people, such as myself, who are trying to make responsible seafood
                                decisions whenever possible. It makes purchasing seafood—and feeling good about it—
                                a whole lot easier.
                                      Rick Moonen, Executive Chef/Partner
                                      Restaurant RM (New York, NY)




1731 Connecticut Avenue, NW
         Suite 450
   Washington, DC 20009
  www.seafoodchoices.com



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