The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry had a by wuyunyi

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									         College of Arts & Sciences

Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry



                2007 Self Study
        Ramón López de la Vega, Associate Professor
      Stanislaw F. Wnuk, Associate Professor and Chair

                      October 7, 2012
Program Review Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry                                   Page 2 of 27



                                         Table of Contents
 1.0   Executive Summary                                                              3

 2.0   Recommendations of the 2001 Program Review and Reponses                        4
       2.1    Recommendations issued by the Provost’s Office                          4
       2.2    Recommendations issued by the external reviewer                         6

 3.0   Program Description                                                            8
       3.1 Educational Programs                                                       8
            3.1.1 Undergraduate degree programs                                       8
            3.1.2 Graduate degree programs                                            9
            3.1.3 Number of majors                                                    9
            3.1.4 Support of core curriculum                                          9
            3.1.5 Student to faculty ratios                                           10
       3.2 Research Programs                                                          10
            3.2.1 Biomedical                                                          10
            3.2.2 Environmental                                                       10
            3.2.3 Environmental Health Sciences                                       11
            3.2.4 Forensic Science                                                    11

 4.0   Major Changes in Program                                                       11
             4.1   Discipline or field                                                11
             4.2   Student demand                                                     11
             4.3   Occupational demand                                                12
             4.4   Societal need                                                      12

 5.0   Strengths that support the achievement of program goals                        12

 6.0   Weaknesses that impede the achievement of program goals                        16

 7.0   Opportunities to explore in the achievement of program goals                   16

 8.0   Threats to overcome in the achievement of program goals                        17

 9.0   Budget                                                                         17

10.0   Major Findings and Recommendations                                             18

11.0   Student Learning Outcomes                                                      19

       Tables and Figures
       Table 1 - Goals Outlined in the Strategic Plan (2002-2010) for the
                                                                                      4
                Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry
       Table 2 - Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Publications and Funding    5
       Table 3 - Number of Chemistry and Biochemistry Faculty and Students, and FIU
                                                                                      6
                totals
       Table 4 - Number of Chemistry and Biochemistry Faculty and FTE                 10
       Figure 1 – Return on Investment Index for Chemistry and Biochemistry           18




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1.0 Executive Summary
It is an exciting time at the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at FIU. The program has achieved and
strives for continued excellence in its research and educational programs. It is one of the most successful de-
partments in the university in terms of research and funding. In the last three years the department has generat-
ed over 210 publications in peer reviewed journals and over 600 papers presented in state, local and national
meetings. Grant funding is at an all time high having generated an average of $4 million per year over the last
three years. The return on investment index (the ratio of extramural research support to the institutionally
provided budget for the department) reached 1.0 in 2006 and is currently 1.15; the department now generates
more in external funding than is the cost of running the program. Our educational programs are expanding and
evolving at both the graduate and undergraduate levels. The numbers of undergraduate and graduate student
majors have each more than doubled since 2002. The number of externally funded graduate students has also
more than doubled. In the 2005-2006 academic year the department generated more American Chemical Soci-
ety (ACS) certified BS majors than any other university in the State of Florida.
The department has identified multidisciplinary research initiatives in the areas of biomedical, environmental,
environmental health and forensic chemistries. The department is strongly committed to filling positions in the
biochemical area because of the fundamental role it plays in training of doctoral students, as well as students in
the emerging College of Medicine. It is our belief that strong programs in biochemistry and molecular biology,
leading to a deeper understanding of their principles, must be a precursor to the development of research based
medical school programs. The department is especially interested in identifying and hiring candidates with ex-
pertise in the interdisciplinary areas of protein structure determination and proteomics that complement our ex-
isting strengths. Current research strengths in the forensic science track include odor identification, microfluid-
ics, transportation security and explosives detection. To support both our growing forensic science and envi-
ronmental science tracks the department would like to hire a toxicologist. Expansion into the field of forensic
toxicology strengthens current programs and significantly enhances the potential for National Institutes of Health
(NIH) funding and collaborations with the medical school. This effort will bridge the environmental chemistry,
one of the traditional foci of the Chemistry PhD program, and the human health related fields associated with
environmental pollution.
Several state of the art facilities are now extant which provide much of the instrumentation necessary in the con-
tinued development of the department. These facilities specialize in mass spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic res-
onance, DNA fingerprinting, trace evidence analysis and trace metal analysis. Additionally, several centers
within the university such as the Southeast Environmental Research Center (SERC), the Advanced Research
Cooperation in Environmental Health (ARCH) and the International Forensic Research Institute (IFRI) provide
opportunities for interdisciplinary collaboration in research and education and help in attracting quality faculty
into our programs. Additionally these centers have been very active in facilitating funding opportunities for both
our younger and more established faculty members.
There are several factors, which if not addressed adequately, may inhibit or impede the expected progress of
the department in both research and education. These are the lack of adequate staff support, particularly for
the instrumentation facilities; the lack of large, state of the art classrooms necessary to accommodate our ever
expanding lower level enrollment and the lack of laboratory, classroom and general space to accommodate our
growing graduate student population. The department is poised to offer recitation sessions, run by our own
graduate students, in order to improve the manner in which lower level courses are delivered. This project will
require an increase in the number of available classrooms. We encourage the university to accelerate the con-
struction of the CP addition, possibly designing this building to accommodate more classrooms and teaching
laboratories and general space to accommodate the growing graduate populations.
Issues raised in this summary are addressed in the following sections. We believe the department is poised to
become one of the top tier departments in the nation. With the support of the university, it is our belief the de-
partment will achieve this goal within the next 10 years.
This document was prepared by Ramón López de la Vega, Associate Professor of Chemistry, and Stanislaw F.
Wnuk, Associate Professor of Chemistry and Department Chair.




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Program Review Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry                                            Page 4 of 27




    2.0 Recommendations of the 2001 Program Review and Reponses.
    2.1 In this section we list in italics specific priority recommendations made in the 2001 program review. First
    are listed and addressed the recommendations issued by the Provost’s Office. Then the recommendations
    made by the external reviewer, Professor R. Bruce Dunlap, are listed and addressed.
    “Develop a strategic plan that includes an implementation timeframe that addresses the aggressive
    research, enrollment and faculty recruitment objectives the department has identified. Special at-
    tention must be given to the development of a plan for graduate enrollment growth and doctoral de-
    gree production.”
         The Department’s Strategic Plan for 2002-2010 set as a goal significant progress toward becoming one
    of the top tier chemistry departments in the country. To move toward this goal, the Plan focused on faculty
    hires, external funding, the growth of the graduate program, and the needs of the undergraduate program
    (see Table 1.).
    Faculty Recruitment: A hiring target of one incremental faculty per year was established; it was recom-
    mended that four of the eight recommended hires be biochemists, as biomedical research is one of two are-
    as of explicit emphasis of our doctoral program. Since 2002, six incremental tenure-track faculty have been
    hired, three of them biochemists (Dr. Watson Lees in 2003, Dr. Xiaotang Wang in 2005, Dr. Jaroslava
    Miksovska in 2007). Additionally Dr. Mebel (physical chemist), Dr. Bruce McCord (analytical/forensic) and
    Dr. John Berry (marine science) were hired. Currently we are conducting a search for a tenure-track bioor-
    ganic chemist. An increase in start-up packages to an average of $300,000 was recommended to attract
    competitive applicants. The biochemistry hires since 2002 have received $170,000 (2003, bioorganic),
    $300,000 (2005), and $325,000 (2007) in start-up funds. Clearly the university has moved toward being
    competitive in this regard. Salaries for incoming faculty members have also increased. The average start-
    ing salary (9 months) increased from 54K/faculty to 60K/faculty for faculty starting at the Assistant Professor
    level. The economic situation in South Florida is such that at these salaries it is difficult to compete with oth-
    er regions of the country. The average starting home in South Florida (condominium) is $230,000. For a
    single family home the average price is almost $400,000. The salaries for beginning faculty may be
    stretched too far to allow them to reside in South Florida comfortably. Although this is a problem the com-
    munity as whole faces, it should be addressed in the hiring process in order to obtain the best candidates
    possible.
                     Table 1. Goals Outlined in the Strategic Plan (2002-2010) for the
                     Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry


                Milestone                         2001-2              2005-6             2009-10
                Number of faculty                 23                  27                 31
                Res.-active faculty               18                  22                 26
                Lab space (sq. ft.)               14,000              20,000             26,000
                Total funding                     $1,900,000          $2,760,000         $3,780,000
                Funding/faculty                   $100,000            $120,000           $140,000
                MS students                       20                  20                 20
                PhD students                      16                  36                 56
                Total students                    36                  56                 76
                TA’s                              24                  32                 40
                RA’s                              7                   15                 23




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Research: In recognition that a strong level of external funding is needed to support a graduate research pro-
gram, specific targets were made, with the 2009-10 target of $3,780,000 roughly double the 2001-2002 level.
That target has already been surpassed in 2005 and reached $4,465,117 in 2007. The number of peer reviewed
publications submitted by faculty has increased from an average of 35/academic year for 2001-2004 to an aver-
age of 65/academic year from 2004-2007, an 85% increase. Additionally, the number of papers presented at
meetings has also increased (see Table 2). It was recognized that research-active faculty must have lower
teaching loads if they are to be productive in research, and a target of two courses per year per research active
faculty was established. In 2002, the average load was four courses; by 2007 it has become three courses. To
allow this reduced teaching load without compromising the quality of undergraduate teaching, non-research-
active faculty have assumed heavier teaching loads, and the department has hired an additional instructor (Dr.
Uma Swami), whose job description has no research component.

     Table 2. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Publications and Funding
                               2001-2002          2002-2003          2003-3004    2004-2005    2005-2006         2006-2007
Faculty Members                23                 23                 25           26           27                29

Publications (peer rev.)       32                 31                 42           74           66                61
 Book Chapters                 NA                 10                 11           8            14                7
 Presentations                 111                150                211          217          196               188


Average Startup                $180K              no hires           $100K        $300K        $300K             $325K

Funding (total)                $2,476,800         $2,446,786         $3,152,632   $3,956,430   $4,045,879        $4,465,117
  Internal.                    $231,500           $85,587            $387,500     $125,700     $104,100          $81,560
  External                     $2,245,300         $2,361,199         $2,923,332   $3,830,730   $3,941,779        $4,383,557


Funded Grad. Students          31                 47                 46           54           53                65
  MS Chem                      13                 15                 16           19           14                11
  MS Forensic                  4                  10                 7            7            4                 5
  Ph.D.                        14                 22                 23           28           35                49
  E&G Funded TAs*              23                 34                 32           39           38                45
  C&G Funded RAs               8                  13                 14           15           15                20

Total Students, FIU              32,686            33,885             33,864      35,061       37,424            38,537
Total FTE Students,
                                 20,016            20,776             21,052      21,808       23,269            24,279
FIU
     *Including Presidential Fellowships and Dissertation Fellowships

     Graduate Enrollment Growth: To support growth of the program in terms of funding, research and new
     hires, the Department established a target increase in the total number of graduate students from 36 in 2001
     to 76 in 2009, and an increase in Ph.D. students in particular from 16 in 2001 to 56 in 2009. In 2007, these
     numbers are already 90 for total graduate students (including part-time students) and 58 for Ph.D. students.
     The Department proposed a steady increase in the fraction of funded students supported by RA’s to ap-
     proach but not quite reach 50% by 2009. The external program review in 2002 proposed more modest
     growth to 30% by 2009. Within the past year (fall 2006-fall 2007), the number of RA’s has been 27-32% of
     the total number of funded graduate students; small fluctuations occur when new students are put on RA
     and old students graduate. We are seeking to improve this number through continued increases in external
     funding.
     "Plan multidisciplinary research initiatives in areas such as biomedical, environmental, forensic and
     materials/nanoscience research."
     Multidisciplinary Research: FIU has an International Forensic Research Institute (IFRI), which grew out
     of and is anchored in the Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry. FIU houses the Southeast Environmen-
     tal Research Center (SERC), in which several of the Chemistry faculty members have joint appointments
     (one is director). Both of these organizations continue to be strengthened within the Department. Additional-
     ly, our Department serves as a foundation for the Advanced Research Cooperation in Environmental Health
     (ARCH) program between UM and FIU. Furthermore, a joint Ph.D. degree in Biochemistry is being pro-
     posed between the Departments of Chemistry & Biochemistry and the Department of Biological Sciences.
     This will strengthen the University in its Biochemistry Program which is important with the advent of the
     Medical School. It is our hope that in the near future we will develop the materials science emphasis further,
     particularly in the area of bio- and forensic materials.


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                             Table 3. Number of Chemistry and Biochemistry Faculty and Students, and FIU totals*
                                  2001-2002        2002-2003        2003-3004          2004-2005         2005-2006        2006-2007
Faculty Members                       22               22                24                26                 27             29

Undergrad. Majors (Total)             225             269               379              428               461                  489

Graduate Majors(Total)                 60              64               78                86               86                   89
   Masters (Chemistry)                 15              17               19                21               17                   18
   Masters (Forensic)                  21              22               26                24               20                   18
   Ph.D.                               24              25               33                41               49                   53

Total Majors (G and U)                265             333               457              514               547                  578

Degrees Awarded
  Total Undergraduate                  35              25               45                31               44                   33
  MS (Chem & Forensic)                  6               7               11                12               13                   12
  Ph.D.                                 1               1                3                 1                7                    7

Total Students, FIU                  32,686          33,885           33,864            35,061           37,424             38,537
Total FTE Students, FIU              20,016          20,776           21,052            21,808           23,269             24,279
     *Data from the Institutional Research Office.
    "Revise the Department’s tenure and promotion guidelines to match the stated goals for growth in
    external funding and refereed journal publications."
    Revision of Tenure and Promotion Guidelines: It has been made clear to all recent tenure and promo-
    tion candidates that the expectations for funding and publication have increased. As part of the faculty
    evaluation process impact factors of the journal and recognition of acquisitions of Federal Grants are taken
    into consideration. The Department formalized its official guidelines to match recently revised, more strin-
    gent University guidelines. The revised T&P guidelines are now part of the Departmental By-laws.
    2.2   The external program review by Dr. R. Bruce Dunlap in 2002 made 20 specific recommendations.
    They are given below in italics; the Department’s responses are in normal font.
    1. "Increase the number of tenure-track faculty by 8-10 by 2009." We are on track with the six incre-
    mental hires made so far and a search for two more that is currently under way in 2008.
    2. Continue to remain competitive in salaries for Assistant and Associate Professors. Salaries for
    the Chemistry & Biochemistry faculty at FIU have risen in both categories, keeping pace with national
    trends. Assistant Professor salaries for recent new hires were $51,000 in 2000, $53,000 in 2003, $60,000 in
    2006, and $61,500 in 2007. New Associate Professors were hired at $47,000 in 1997, $57,000 in 2003, and
    $70,000 in 2004 and 2005.
    3. "Develop a plan to raise the salaries for full professors to a competitive level." This is a universi-
    ty-level issue and has not yet been addressed.
    4. "Make strategic plans to develop retention packages." This remains an area to be addressed. We
    consider ourselves fortunate that we have been able to retain almost 100% of our faculty. This might be
    more difficult to achieve as the prestige of the department grows.
    5. "Make plans to offer competitive startup packages." We have done this as explained above; the
    average start-up package over the last four hires since 2004 has been $300,000.
    6. "Increase the square footage of research space for research-active faculty on the basis of their
    funding and productivity to 1000 sq. ft." The Departmental average research space per faculty is cur-
    rently 800 sq. ft. FIU is currently developing a university-wide policy to redistribute the available research
    space on the basis of external grant funding and numbers of Ph.D. students. The new Health and Life Sci-
    ences buildings have also addressed space needs. However, in the longer term, the building of new medical
    school buildings and an extension to the CP building (which houses Chemistry & Biochemistry), both on the
    development plan, will permit the expansion of research space.
    7. "Set goals to increase external funding per faculty member to at least $130,000 by 2005-6 and
    $170,000 by 2009-10." The level was $109,150 in 2001-2 and already has risen to $156,000 in 2007-8
    (averages are over all faculty; current average is $174,000 if the three instructors are omitted).
    8. "Increase standards for faculty performance with respect to tenure and promotion procedures."
    The tenure and promotion requirements have been raised university wide with regard to funding and publi-
    cation rate. Additionally, faculties have been encouraged to publish in journals with high impact factors.
    Thus our program is on target.
    9. "Develop a strategic plan to increase the Return on Investment Index to 1.0 by 2005." This index
    is defined as the ratio of extramural research support to the institutionally provided budget for the depart-



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Program Review Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry                                          Page 7 of 27



    ment. In 2002 this value was 0.77. By 2007 it has become 1.15, exceeding the 2005 target.
    10. "Increase the number of graduate students to at least 56 by 2005 and to 76 by 2009." This goal
    has nearly been met in 2007 (75 graduate students).
    11. "Increase the percentage of graduate students supported by RA’s to 27% by 2005 and to over
    30% by 2009." As discussed above, the percentage has been in the 27-32% range over the year ending in
    fall 2007, so the program is on target.
    12. "Increase the net annual income of graduate students." In 2005, M.S. students earned $15,000;
    currently they earn $15,450. In 2005, Ph.D. students earned $18,000; currently they earn $18,540-$19,207
    depending on their date of entry into the program. This is slightly below but close to the amount paid to doc-
    toral students by the University of Miami, $20,000. Graduate student stipend amounts are university, not
    department, policy, but the department has encouraged the University to become more competitive.
    13. "Develop a departmental plan that includes such items as a semiannual newsletter, a database
    of alumni and friends, and endowment funds." The department has established an endowment fund,
    the Zaida Morales-Howard Moore fund, for an annual undergraduate scholarship for Chemistry majors. The
    department has established an internship for undergraduates with Dow-Corning (one of our alumni is the
    CEO), and it is in the process of establishing an internship with Azopharma, a company in Miami.
    14. "Develop a comprehensive graduate student recruiting program." The department proposed a plan
    to increase the recruiting effort in 2004. We have obtained funding for faculty to make graduate student re-
    cruitment trips from the Department, the Dean of Arts & Sciences, and the University Graduate School. The
    department has strategically emphasized recruiting in Florida, in Puerto Rico and more generally Latin
    America, and in China because faculties have contacts and connections in those places. It is the depart-
    ment’s plan to maintain a relationship with these regions to develop a stream of students from them. Re-
    cruitment trips to all three regions have been made in the past several years and are planned for the future.
    While these regions have been emphasized, recruitment in other regions has been undertaken as well.
    15. "Develop a strategic plan to lower the teaching loads of research-active faculty members to one
    course per semester." We are well on the way to achieving this goal; as explained above, the teaching
    load has been reduced from two courses per semester in 2001-2 to 1.5 courses per semester in 2007-8.
    16. "Develop access to lecture halls of 250 or more seats for general chemistry courses." Large en-
    rollment classes are taught in a room that seats 212 students. Since fall 2007, the use of this room has
    been made more efficient, as FIU went from a weekly schedule of two 75-minute classes to three 50-minute
    classes. This has effectively increased large lecture hall availability for the high enrollment chemistry clas-
    ses. In the future, such teaching needs will be addressed with a new teaching building for the College of
    Arts & Sciences, which is on the development plan.
    17. "Make a strategic plan to increase support staff." Since 2002, we have hired an accountant to sup-
    port grants management; 50% of her salary is paid from external grant support (ARCH), and 50% is paid by
    University E&G monies. The department has also hired a second engineer to maintain and operate instru-
    mentation facilities. A future priority is hiring a Ph.D. scientist for managing our increasingly complex in-
    strumentation facilities and converting the departmental half-line accountant to a full time accountant, pri-
    marily for grants management. Additional secretarial help, specifically a secretary for the Chair should be a
    priority.
    18. "Prepare a strategic plan for 2003 and update it annually." We have been operating on the basis of
    the 2002-10 strategic plan, which together with the recommendations of the external reviewer has provided
    sufficient direction.
    19. "Develop a plan to establish a Departmental Industrial Advisory Board." This remains a future
    goal.
    20. "Prepare strategic plans to enhance research leading to the formation of multi-department, mul-
    ti-college centers of excellence in the areas of biomedical research, forensic science, environmental
    research, and materials/nanoscience research." FIU has an Advanced Research Cooperation in Envi-
    ronmental Health (ARCH) program, which is anchored in the Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry. FIU
    houses the International Forensic Research Institute (IFRI), which grew out of our department and South-
    east Environmental Research Center (SERC), in which several of the Chemistry faculty members have joint
    appointments (one is the director of the center). The proposal for a joint Ph.D. program in biochemistry
    clearly addresses the recommendation with respect to biomedical research.
    3.0 Program Description
    3.1 Educational Programs - The Chemistry & Biochemistry Department offers two baccalaureate degrees,
    a Bachelor of Science (BS) and a Bachelor of Arts (BA) in Chemistry and three graduate degrees, a Master
    of Science (MS) in Chemistry, a MS in Forensic Science and a Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in Chemistry in-



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    cluding PhD in Chemistry with a Forensic Science track. The undergraduate committee, under the leader-
    ship of the undergraduate program director, oversees the undergraduate curricula. This committee ensures
    that the program is up to date and that certification by the American Chemical Society (ACS) is maintained.
    The graduate committee, under the leadership of the graduate program director, oversees the graduate cur-
    ricula. The MS degree and Certificate Program in Forensic Science is administered by the Chemistry & Bi-
    ochemistry Department through the International Forensic Research Institute (IFRI) anchored in the De-
    partment. The Department follows the recommendations of the Committee on Professional Training of the
    ACS. The Chemistry undergraduate program has been accredited by the ACS for the past 20 years. It is
    reviewed yearly. Every five years a more extensive, more thorough review is undertaken. The last five-
    year review was undertaken in the year 2005.
    3.1.1 Undergraduate Degree Programs
    The Bachelor of Science (BS) degree is intended for students interested in pursing a career in chemistry
    or a related discipline. Students graduating with this degree may pursue more advanced degrees in chem-
    istry, or obtain employment in a chemical laboratory in industry, academia or a government setting. To-
    gether with a teaching certificate the student will be able to pursue a teaching career at the high school lev-
    el. The lower division requirement may be completed at FIU or at the community college setting. Students
    are expected to take one year of general chemistry, one year of physics, one year of calculus and one year
    of organic chemistry at the lower level. In the upper division additional chemistry courses must be taken in-
    cluding inorganic chemistry, calculus-based physical chemistry and biochemistry. Students are required to
    take a chemistry 4000 or 5000 level elective and at least one semester of independent research under the
    direct supervision of a faculty member. A Chemistry Honors program has been established. Students
    must be admitted to the BS in Chemistry program with a lower division GPA of at least 3.5 in science and
    math courses, and an overall GPA of at least 3.2. This degree has the additional requirement that the stu-
    dent must complete an Honors research project in collaboration with a faculty advisor. The results of this
    project must be written in the form of an Honors Thesis written in ACS style publication format and must be
    presented orally to an audience of peers and faculty members from all science department honors pro-
    grams. Thus far two students have completed the BS Honors program and both of them are pursuing the
    PhD degree, one at Penn State; the other one at FIU. In the 2005-2006 academic year the department had
    the highest number of ACS Certified BS majors in the State of Florida. (C&EN News, August 20, 2007)
    The Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree is designed for students preparing for careers in medicine, pharmacy,
    dentistry, environmental studies, veterinary medicine, patent law, forensic science, and secondary science
    education. The lower level requirements for the BA degree are similar to those of the BS degree. At the
    upper level the student can choose one of four “tracks”, or alternative areas of concentration, depending on
    their interests. Students may choose to follow the “Standard BA in Chemistry Concentration” or – in consul-
    tation with an advisor – choose a specific area of emphasis: the Biochemistry Concentration, the Environ-
    mental Chemistry Concentration, or the Forensic Science Concentration. The student is expected to com-
    plement this degree with other appropriate courses chosen in consultation with her/his advisor.
    The department through IFRI offers a Certificate in Criminalistics Chemistry program to accompany the
    Bachelors degree in Chemistry. In this program an internship in a local crime lab is required. The Certifi-
    cate in Forensic Science may accompany a BS in Chemistry or Biology.
    3.1.2 Graduate Degree Programs
    The Master of Science (MS) degree in chemistry is intended for students planning a career in chemistry
    which is not heavily research oriented. The MS degree requires a BS degree prior to admission into the
    program. It also requires a core program of courses in the traditional areas of chemistry accompanied by
    two other courses in different areas of specialization. The MS degree requires a Master’s Thesis presenting
    original research carried out under the direction of a Graduate Research Advisor. The MS degree in Chem-
    istry has been offered at FIU since 1987.
    The Masters of Science (MS) degree in Forensic Science is an interdisciplinary program intended for stu-
    dents pursuing careers in Forensic Science in local, state and national Forensic Science Laboratories. The
    degree requires a bachelor’s degree in biology or chemistry or related science. It consists of 32 credits in-
    cluding the completion of a Master’s Thesis or completion of an independent study report option. The MS
    degree in Forensic Science was approved by the Board of Regents in 1998. It is designed to address the
    need for advanced education in the emerging fields of forensic science.
    The Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) degree in chemistry is intended for students interested in pursuing a ca-
    reer in chemical research in a governmental, industrial or academic setting. The PhD degree requires a BS



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Program Review Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry                                         Page 9 of 27



    degree prior to admission into the program. It also requires a core program of courses in the traditional are-
    as of chemistry accompanied by three other courses in different areas of specialization. The PhD degree
    requires a set of cumulative examinations administered six times a year with announced or unannounced
    topics. Additionally it requires an original research proposal suitable for funding by the major funding agen-
    cies and an Oral Examination prior to Admission to Candidacy. The PhD degree requires a Doctoral Disser-
    tation presenting original research carried out under the direction of a Graduate Research Advisor. The
    PhD degree was first implemented in FIU in 1997.
    The Department also established a Forensic Track within the Ph.D. program in Chemistry in 2005. This
    has been a natural outgrowth of the Masters in Forensic Science. The FIU forensic science graduate curric-
    ulum is consistent with the chemistry and forensic science community philosophy that training of forensic
    scientists should emphasize the hard sciences.
    3.1.3 Number of Majors
    The numbers of majors at both the undergraduate and graduate levels have risen considerably. At the un-
    dergraduate level, the number of majors has increased by 117% (489 from 225, see Table 3). At the gradu-
    ate level the number of majors increased by 48%, mostly at the doctoral level (121%). Additionally, alt-
    hough the number of funded MS students did not vary significantly, the number of funded Ph.D. students in-
    creased from 14 to 49, an increase of over 350% (Table 2). Considering the general trends nationally, this
    achievement is truly remarkable and speaks very well of FIU, its efforts in student recruitment and the quali-
    ty of both the undergraduate and graduate programs at the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry.
    3.1.4 Support of Core Curriculum
    The Department offers the following courses in support of the core curriculum. The following five courses
    satisfy the natural sciences curriculum. The CHM courses fulfill the physical science requirements while
    CHS 3501 & CHS 3501L satisfy the life science requirements.
    CHM 1045/CHM 1045L – General Chemistry I and Laboratory Fundamental principles of general chem-
    istry: states of matter, atomic structure, stoichiometry, chemical bonding, acid-base reactions, and gas laws.
    This course is directed towards science, premedical and engineering students who expect to make exten-
    sive use of chemistry in their future careers. Premedical students are required to also take this course.
    Nine sections of lecture and 75 sections of laboratory are offered per academic year.
    CHM 1046/CHM 1046L – General Chemistry II and Laboratory Continuation of General Chemistry I
    (CHM 1045). Fundamental principles of chemistry: thermodynamics, solutions, kinetics, equilibrium and
    electrochemistry. This course is directed towards science, premedical and engineering students who expect
    to make extensive use of chemistry in their future careers. Premedical students are required to also take
    this course. Seven sections of lecture and 52 sections of laboratory are offered per academic year.
    CHM 1032/CHM 1032L – Chemistry and Society and Laboratory. This is a course for non-science ma-
    jors which introduces students to basic concepts in chemistry and applies those concepts to contemporary
    issues such as air/water pollution, energy and food production, drugs, nutrition, and toxic chemicals. Addi-
    tionally three sections per year are offered of CHM 1032 and corresponding laboratories online. Seven sec-
    tions of lecture and 65 sections of laboratory are offered throughout the academic year.
    CHM 1033/CHM 1033L – Survey of Chemistry and Laboratory. General and organic chemistry for non-
    science majors only. Atoms and molecules, states of matter, equilibrium, kinetics, acids and bases and in-
    troduction to organic chemistry. Laboratory must be taken concurrently. Does not fulfill requirements for
    chemistry, biology or pre-med majors. This course is taken by majors in nursing. Two sections of lecture
    and 18 sections of laboratory are offered per academic year.
    CHS 3501/CHS 3501L – Survey of Forensic Science. This has become a very popular course. An en-
    rollment of 200/semester is typical. A survey course introducing the principles and techniques of forensic
    science as they pertain to crime scene investigation and crime laboratory analysis. This course satisfies the
    life science requirement of the core curriculum. Two sections of lecture and 20 sections of laboratory are
    offered per academic year.
    In total the department offers 25 sections of lecture and 200 sections of laboratory per academic
    year in support of the university core curriculum.

    3.1.5 Student to Faculty Ratios.
    Ever since the last program review in 2001 the departmental FTE production has increased significantly.
    The total FTE production has increased an average of 15% per year over the last 5 years. The stu-
    dent/faculty ratio has also increased from 21.8 in 2001-2002 to 24.8 students/faculty in 2006-2007.



                                                          9
Program Review Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry                                                        Page 10 of 27


                                  Table 4. Number of Chemistry and Biochemistry Faculty and FTE*
                                         2001-2002    2002-2003      2003-3004    2004-2005        2005-2006     2006-2007
       Faculty Members                       22          22             24            26              27            29
       Undergraduate FTE(Total)             446.5       395.9          536.6        562.7            608           689.9
         Masters FTE                        21.7         17            25.5          25.3            23.5           26.2
         Ph.D. FTE                          11.8        11.7           17.9          23.8            23.5           23.2
         Total FTE                           480        424.6          580          611.8            655           718.3
       Student/Faculty ratio                21.8        19.3           24.2          23.8            24.3           24.8
       Total Students, FIU                 32,686      33,885         33,864        35,061          37,424        38,537
       Total FTE Students, FIU             20,016      20,776         21,052        21,808          23,269        24,279
       Data from the Institutional Research Office.

    3.2 Research Programs – There are varied and diverse research programs being carried out in the chem-
    istry and biochemistry department. In many cases via serendipity or for reasons of opportunity many of the-
    se research programs embraced problems in the environment, biomedicine, environmental science and fo-
    rensic science. The department has identified these four areas of specialization to further emphasize in the
    further development of the program.
    3.2.1 Biomedical – The department recognizes that Biochemistry and Biomedicinal Chemistry has to be a
    large part of a growing chemistry department. In recognition of this the department changed its name from
    the Department of Chemistry to the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry in 2003. Three of the most
    recently hired faculty members are biochemists. Additionally, grant funding in the biomedical area has in-
    creased tremendously. A recent estimate shows that in the last four years $2.3 million in research funds
    were acquired in whole or in part by faculty in the department carrying out research in Biomedical Chemis-
    try. The rapid development of this area in our department over a relatively short span of time has been truly
    remarkable. We consider ourselves fortunate to have attracted high quality faculty and students into the bi-
    omedical portion of our program. We are currently in the process of initiating a Ph.D. in biochemistry jointly
    with the Department of Biological Sciences.
    3.2.2 Environmental Chemistry – In the 2001 program review environmental chemistry was already a well
    developed area of emphasis. This area of research continues to grow within the Chemistry and Biochemis-
    try Department. In the past few years over $7 million dollars in funding has been attracted in whole or in
    part by faculty in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. Three of these faculty members are also
    members of The Southeast Environmental Research Center (SERC). This Center has been invaluable in
    providing the core instrumentation facilities needed by investigators in the area of Environmental Research.
    The Center’s director is a member of the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry.
    3.2.3 Environmental Health Sciences - Since 2001, the National Institute of Environmental Health Scienc-
    es has sponsored an ARCH (Advanced Research Cooperation in Environmental Health Sciences) Program
    in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at FIU. This is in interdisciplinary program which seeks to
    establish a core of researchers in the field of environmental health at a minority serving institution by part-
    nering with a research intensive university. FIU’s partner is the University of Miami. This program supports
    collaborative research and pilot projects between the two institutions. Since 2001, the ARCH program has
    supported a total of thirteen research and pilot projects including eight in the Department of Chemistry and
    Biochemistry, four in the Department of Biological Sciences and one in SERC. The program also supports
    two core facilities that serve as resources to ARCH investigators: Trace Metal Analysis and Toxic Algae Cul-
    ture. Since the inception of the program in 2001, over thirty-five peer reviewed papers have been published
    and ARCH scientists have used preliminary data gathered from research and pilot projects to acquire an
    additional $4M in research funding. Several ARCH programs have been established at minority serving in-
    stitutions nation-wide; however the ARCH program at FIU is to date, the only ARCH program that has suc-
    cessfully passed competitive renewal. The current funding cycle will extend the program until the fall of
    2011. The most important benefit obtained from the ARCH program is that it provides funding for young
    faculty members at FIU from Chemistry and Biological Sciences departments to be involved in Environmen-
    tal Health Related Projects.
    3.1.3 Forensic Sciences – The Criminalistics Program in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry
    has existed since the early 1980’s. It consisted of students carrying out an internship in a local crime la-
    boratory. In 1997 the program expanded with the creation of the International Forensic Research Institute
    (IFRI) which is anchored in the Chemistry and Biochemistry Department. Major milestones to date include
    establishing nationally recognized degree programs in Forensic Science at the undergraduate and graduate



                                                                10
Program Review Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry                                           Page 11 of 27



    levels, establishing nationally recognized research initiatives which generate significant extramural funding
    and offering a variety of onsite, offsite and online specialized workshops and services. Funding in this area
    has been very high with approximately $2 million dollars in funds acquired in the past few years. Additional-
    ly core Forensic Instrumentation facilities have been established in the University, among these are the DNA
    fingerprinting facility, the Trace Evidence Analysis Facility (TEAF) and Toxicology laboratory.
    4.0 Major Changes in Program
    In this section we address the major changes in the program since the last Program Review in 2001.
    4.1 – Changes in the Discipline – Education and Training - The Committee on Professional Training from
    the American Chemical Society is currently adopting new guidelines in chemical education. According to
    their most recent newsletter detailing progress in this endeavor:
         “….the curriculum required for a certified degree will consist of foundation course work in analytical, bio-
         chemistry, inorganic, organic, and physical chemistry to provide breadth; in-depth course work to pro-
         vide rigor, specialization, and integration; and laboratory experience, which can include undergraduate
         research. Chemistry programs will have increased opportunities for innovation by designing their own
         degree tracks or concentrations that meet the foundation, in-depth, and laboratory requirements…”
          “…The new guidelines also call for regular department self-evaluation for the purpose of continual im-
         provement...”
    The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry is poised to respond to these proposed changes in curricu-
    lum. Already the BA program and the Graduate programs, with different tracks offered, may be considered
    a model for the first recommendations of the committee. In a recent departmental retreat one of the stated
    goals was to focus on the development of tracks at the BS level. These tracks should include the already
    established forensics track, a track in environmental chemistry and Biochemistry major, particularly in light
    of the proposed Ph.D. program in Biochemistry. The department is well on its way to responding to the rec-
    ommendations of the ACS Committee on Professional Training.
    The recommendation for self evaluation is already being carried out. At the undergraduate level a capstone
    course has been established where academic learning compacts are being applied. These are discussed in
    the next section.
    A Chemistry Honors program has been established. In this program the student will earn the BS in Chem-
    istry degree with honors. Additionally four plus one MS programs in Chemistry and in Forensic Science are
    also offered. Students graduating from these accelerated programs will have achieved a Bachelor of Sci-
    ence degree in Chemistry simultaneously with a Masters Degree in the corresponding field. Up to 3 gradu-
    ate level courses (9 credits) may be used to satisfy both the Bachelor’s degree and the Master’s degree re-
    quirements. Students should be made aware of this program possibility in the sophomore year. If they real-
    ize the opportunity exists during the junior or senior years, it is too late to benefit from this program.
    In order to insure the smooth running of the day-to-day operation of department, particularly in light of the
    growth of the undergraduate program, the position of the Associate Chair was established in Spring 2007.
    4.2 Student Demand: Several changes in course offerings have been implemented in order to speed up
    student graduation rates without sacrificing the quality of the programs. A total of 3 sections of CHM 3120,
    Introduction to Analytical Chemistry and 12 sections of the laboratory are offered. Additionally there are
    now 3 sections of CHM 4130, Instrumental Analysis and 12 sections of the laboratory. Enrollments in these
    courses have doubled in the past few years. A new course has also been developed for those students in-
    terested learning Inorganic Chemistry without having to take Physical Chemistry I and II. This course is en-
    titled “Fundamentals of Inorganic Chemistry” (CHM 3610). It includes the basics of inorganic chemistry
    without requiring extensive knowledge of quantum mechanics. Course offerings have also increased in
    General Chemistry (one additional section per semester) and Organic Chemistry (Additional sections are of-
    fered in the Biscayne Bay Campus). These additional sections have been implemented in order to allow
    the students the opportunity to complete their degrees in a timely manner. Student demand for these
    courses continues to grow and many students are turned away. Larger classrooms are needed to be able
    to accommodate these enrollment demands.
    The CHM PAL program has also been instituted for undergraduates. In this program advanced students will
    help tutor less advanced students in General Chemistry. This is done strictly on a volunteer basis.
    4.3 Occupational Demand: There are several areas in chemistry for which there is a great occupational
    demand. The department has already responded to these occupational demands by adopting the areas of
    emphasis outlined in the previous section.




                                                          11
Program Review Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry                                            Page 12 of 27



      4.4 Societal Needs: National demand for minority employees at science and engineering companies is at a
      high, but few minorities are pursuing careers in science, according to the American Chemical Society. The
      percentage of minorities in scientific fields is significantly lower than their respective demographic represen-
      tations, according to the ACS. Hispanics, who make up 12.5 percent of the U.S. population, represent 2.6
      percent of the chemistry workforce. African Americans, at 12 percent of the population, make up less than 2
      percent of the chemical workforce, while Native Americans, who make up 1 percent of U.S. residents, com-
      prise less than 1 percent of those people employed in the field. Additionally, the percentage of women in
      science with doctoral degrees employed by Very High and High Research Active Universities is surprisingly
      low considering the number of degrees awarded. A 1998 national study by the Higher Education Research
      Institute at the University of California-Los Angeles reported that approximately one-third of African Ameri-
      can, Hispanic and Native American freshmen planned to pursue science and engineering majors. The rates
      of retention, however, were much lower for African American and Hispanic students. While 48 percent of
      white students received a bachelor's degree within 5 years, only 34 percent of African Americans and 32
      percent of Hispanics graduated in the same amount of time. It is a goal of the Department to improve the
      retention of these students. Efforts have lately concentrated in providing tutoring by the graduate students
      offerred for free to the undergraduate students. This year (2007) is the second year of the “CHM PAL” pro-
      gram where fellow undergraduates offer group tutoring to lower level students. The next goal is to establish
      required recitation sessions, offered by graduate students, to increase person to person contact that is nec-
      essary in any successful learning environment.

5.0     Strengths Supporting the Achievement of Program Goals.
    The greatest strength of the department lies in the quality of its faculty members and students. The faculty
    members in the department show diverse research interests and are very active in pursuing research pro-
    grams and innovations in education. The students in our department have demonstrated great capacity in
    performing research of high quality and innovative thinking. In the pages that follow is listed an assortment
    of publications that have recently appeared. Following are successful grant proposals authored by mem-
    bers of the department.
Representative Publications Authored by Faculty Members of the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry
 T. Trejos, J. R. Almirall, Effect of fractionation on the elemental analysis of glass using laser ablation induc-
  tively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). Anal. Chem. 2004, 76, 1236-1242.
 J. M. Perr, K. G. Furton, J. R. Almirall, Solid phase microextraction ion mobility spectrometer interface for
  explosive and taggant detection, J. Separat. Sci. 2005, 28, 177-183.
 J. J. Ley, A. Vigdorchik, L. Belayev, W. Zhao, R. Busto, L. Khoutorova, D. A. Becker, M.D. Ginsberg.
  Stilbazulenyl nitrone, a second-generation azulenyl nitrone antioxidant, confers enduring neuroprotection in
  experimental focal cerebral ischemia in the rat: neurobehavior, histopathology, and pharmacokinetics. J.
  Pharmacol. Exp Ther. 2005, 313, 1090-1100
 S. C. Mojumdar, D. A. Becker, G. A. DiLabio, J. J. Ley, L. R. Barclay, K. U. Ingold. Kinetic studies on
  stilbazulenyl-bis-nitrone (STAZN), a nonphenolic chain-breaking antioxidant in solution, micelles, and lipid
  membranes. J Org Chem. 2004, 69, 2929-36.
 Z. Chen, Y Cai, H. Solo-Gabriele, G. H. Snyder, J. L. Cisar, Interactions of Arsenic and the Dissolved Sub-
  stances Derived from Turf Soils. Environ. Sci. Technol. 2006, 40, 4659-4665.
 B. Khan, J. Jambeck, H. M. Solo-Gabriele, T. G. Townsend, Y. Cai, Release of Arsenic to the Environment
  from CCA-Treated Wood: Part II – Leaching and Speciation during Disposal. Environ. Sci. Technol. 2006, 40,
  988-993.
 W. Zhang, Y. Cai, Purification and characterization of thiols in an As hyperaccumulator under As exposure.
  Anal. Chem. 2003. 75, 7030-7035.
 E. Lewandowska, D. C. Chatfield, Regioselectivity of Michael Additions to 3-(Pyridin-3-yl or Pyrimidin-2-
  yl)propenoates and their N-Oxides. Experimental and Theoretical Studies. Eur. J. Org. Chem. 2005, 3297.
 A. M. Curran, S. I. Rabin, P. A. Prada, K. G. Furton, Comparison of the Volatile Organic Compounds Pre-
  sent in Human Odor Using SPME-GC/MS, J. Chem. Ecology, 2005, 31, 1607-1619.
 A. M. Curran, C. F. Ramirez, A. A. Schoon, K. G. Furton, The Frequency of Occurrence and Discriminatory
  Power of Compounds Found in Human Scent Across a Population Determined by SPME-GC/MS, J.
  Chromatogr. B, 2007, 846, 86-97.



                                                          12
Program Review Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry                                       Page 13 of 27



 R. T. Griffith, K. Jayachandran, W. Whitstine, K. G. Furton. Sensors, 2007, 7, 1415-1427.
 I. Zamora, I., P. Gardinali, F. Jochem, Assessing the Effects of Irgarol 1051 on Marine Phytoplankton Popu-
  lations in Key Largo Harbor, Florida”. Marine Pollution Bull. 2006, 52, 935-941
 S. P. Singh, P. R., Gardinali, "Trace Determination of 1-aminopropanone, a Marker for Waste Water Con-
  tamination by Liquid Chromatography and Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization-Mass Spectrometry
  (APCI-LC/MS). Water Res. 2006, 40, 588-594.
 N. Maie, C.-Y. Yang, T. Miyoshi, K. Parish, R. Jaffé. Chemical characteristics of dissolved organic matter in
  an oligotrophic subtropical wetland/estuarine ecosystem. Limnology & Oceanography, 2005, 50, 23-35.
 N. Maie, K. Parish, A. Watanabe, H. Knicker, R. Benner, T. Abe, K. Kaiser, R. Jaffé. Chemical characteristics
  of dissolved organic nitrogen in an oligotrophic subtropical coastal ecosystem. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta.
  2006, 70, 4491-4506.
 Y. Xu, B.R.T. Simoneit, R. Jaffé. Occurrence of long-chain mid-chain alkenols, diols, keto-ols and alkanols in
  a sediment core from a hypereuthophic, tropical, freshwater lake. Org. Geochem. 2007, 38, 870-883.
 R. J. Alvarado, J. M. Rosenberg, A. Andreu, J. C. Bryan, W.-Z. Chen, T. Ren, K. Kavallieratos "Structural
  insights into the coordination and extraction of Pb(II) by disulfonamide ligands derived from o-
  phenylenediamine.Inorg. Chem. 2005, 44, 7951-7959.
 K. Kavallieratos, J. M. Rosenberg, W. Chen, T. Ren, Fluorescent sensing and selective Pb(II) extraction by
  a dansylamide ion exchanger. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2005, 127, 6514-6515.
 P. Molnár, J. Deli, E. Ősz, G. Tóth, F. Zsila, C. Herrero, J. T. Landrum. Preparation and Spectroscopic
  Characterization of 3’-Oxolutein, Lett. Org. Chem. 2006, 3, 723-734.
 E. Chew, J. T. Landrum, Dose Ranging Study of Lutein Supplementation in Persons aged 60 years or older,
  Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis Sci. 2006, 47, 5227-33.
 F. Leng, L. Amado, R. McMacken. Coupling DNA Supercoiling to Transcription in Defined Protein Systems.
  J. Biol. Chem. 2005, 279, 47564-47571.
 T. Cui, S. Wei, K. Brew, F. Leng. Energetics of Binding the Mammalian High Mobility Group Protein HMGA2
  to poly(dA-dT)2 and poly(dA)poly(dT). J. Mol. Biol. 2005, 325, 629-645.
 J. D. Gough, E. J. Barrett, Y. Silva, W. J. Lees. ortho- and meta-Substituted Aromatic Thiols are Efficient
  Redox Buffers that Increase the Folding Rate of a Disulfide Containing Protein. J. Biotechnol. 2006, 125, 39-
  47.
 S. C. Bishop, M. Lerch, B. McCord, Detection of nitrated benzodiazepines by indirect laser induced fluores-
  cence detection on a microfluidic device. J. Chromatogr. A 2007, 1154, 481-484.
 O. L. Collin, C. Niegel, K. DeRhodes, B. McCord, G. Jackson, Fast GC of Explosive Compounds using a
  Pulsed Discharge Electron Capture Detector. J. Forensic Sciences, 2006, 51, 815–818.
 B. Hartzell, B. McCord, Effect of divalent metal ions on DNA studied by capillary electrophoresis. Electropho-
  resis, 2005, 26, 1046-1056.
 M. A. Mebel, V.V. Kislov. The C2H3 + O2 Reaction Revisited: Is Multireference Treatment of the Wave Func-
  tion Really Critical?, J. Phys. Chem. A, 2005, 109, 6993-6997.
 A. M. Mebel, V.V. Kislov, R.I. Kaiser. Potential energy surface and product branching ratios for the reaction
  of dicarbon, C2(X g ), with methylacetylene, CH3CCH(X A1): An ab initio/RRKM study. J. Phys. Chem. A,
                   1 +                                      1

  2006, 110, 2421-2433.
 C.S. Jamieson, M.A. Mebel, R.I. Kaiser. Understanding the kinetics and dynamics of radiation induced reac-
  tion pathways in carbon monoxide ice at 10 K. Astrophys. J., Suppl. Series, 2006, 206, 163-184.
 D. K. Kim, K. E. O’Shea, The Reaction of N-Methyl-1, 2, 4-triazoline-3, 5-dione with
  Tetracyclopropylethylene. Formation of an Unusual Meso-ionic Product and Its Rearrangement to the
  Diazetidine. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2004, 126, 700-701.
 W. Song, A. A De la Cruz, K. Rein, K. E. O’Shea, Ultrasonically Induced Degradation of Microcystin-LR and -
  RR: Identification of Products, Effect of pH, Formation and Destruction of Peroxides. Environ. Sci. Technol.
  2006, 40, 3941-3948.
 T. Xu, Y. Cai, K. E. O’Shea, Adsorption and Photocatalyzed Oxidation of Methylated Arsenic Species in TiO2
  Suspensions. Environ. Sci. Technol. 2007, 41, 5471-5477.



                                                          13
Program Review Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry                                     Page 14 of 27



 T. An, T.K.S. Kumar, M. Wang, L. Liu, J. O. Lay, R. Liyanage, J. Berry, M. Gantar, V. Marks, R. E. Gawley,
  K. S. Rein. Structures of Pahayokolides A and B, Two Cyclic Peptides from a Lyngbya sp. J. Natural Prod-
  ucts 2007, 70, 730-735.
 D. Simovic, M. Di, V. Marks, D. Chatfield, K. S. Rein, 1,3-Dipolar Cycloadditions of
  Trimethylsilyldiazomethane Revisited: Steric Demand of the Dipolarophile and the Influence on Product Dis-
  tribution. J. Org. Chem. 2007, 72, 650-653.
 J. Yu, Q. Guo, Q. You, L. Zhao, H. Gu, Y. Yang, H.W. Zhang, Z. Tan, X. Wang, "Gambogic acid induced
  G2/M phase cell cycle arrest via disturbing CDK7 mediated phosphorylation of CDC2/P34 in human gastric
  carcinoma BGC-823 cells," Carcinogenesis 2007, 28, 632-638.
 D. Andrei, S. F. Wnuk, S-Adenosylhomocysteine Analogues with the Carbon-5' and Sulfur Atoms Replaced
  by a Vinyl Unit. Org. Lett. 2006 8, 5093-5096.
 M. Rapp, T. A. Haubrich, J. Perrault, Z. B. Mackey, J. H. McKerrow, P. K. Chiang,S. F. Wnuk,
  "Antitrypanosomal Activity of 6'-Iodohomovinyl Derivatives of Adenosine and Related 6-N-
  Cyclopropyladenosine Analogues", J. Med. Chem. 2006, 49, 2096-2102.
 Z. Wang, S. F. Wnuk, Application of Vinyl Tris(trimethylsilyl)germanes in Pd-catalyzed Couplings", J. Org.
  Chem. 2005, 70, 3281-3284.

Main grants funded to the Chemistry and Biochemistry Department from 2002 to 2007
(2006-2008) J. Almirall “Forensic Significance of Elements Analysis” Department of Justice, $292,149/2 years
(2006-2008) K. G. Furton “Optimization of Sorbent Human Scents” United States Army, $397,771/2 years
(2005-2009) P. R. Gardinali “Contaminant Assessment & Risk Evaluation (CARE) for Everglades National
Park, Biscayne National Park and Big Cypress National Preserve ”. Department of Interior, National Park Ser-
vice, Biscayne National Park, $2.1M/4 years.
(2001-2004) P. R. Gardinali (co-PI) “Screening Level Risk Assessment to Determine Potential High Priority
Contaminants and Natural Resources at Risk in Biscayne and Everglades National Parks: Critical information
needs for CERP. Department of Interior, National Park Service, $736K/3 years
(2000-2006) and (2006-2012) R. Jaffe (co-PI), “The Florida Coastal Everglades (FCE) Long-term Ecological Re-
                               st                                             nd
search (LTER) Program”, NSF, 1 Award: 4.2 millions/6 years (2000-2006), 2 Award, 4.9 millions/6 years
(2006-2012)
(2004-2008) K. Kavallieratos (Subproject PI) "Design of novel toxic metals sensors via an ion-exchange extrac-
tion strategy" NIGMS/NIH (MBRS-SCORE), $470,965/4 years
(2004-2008) W. Lees, “Improving & Understanding the Folding of Disulfide Containing Proteins” NSF,
$348,699/5 years
(2004-2008) F. Leng, (Subproject PI) "Mechanisms of transcription-coupled DNA supercoiling”, NIGMS/NIH
(MBRS-SCORE), $936,604/4 years
(2004-2007) B. McCord, “Development of Microfluid”, Department of Justice, $488,854/3 years
(2006-2008) B. McCord, “An Investigation of the Effects” Department of Justice, $347,399/2 years
(2004-2007) and (2007-2010) A. Mebel, “Theoretical Studies of Chemical Reactions Related to the Formation of
                    st                           nd
Polyaromatic” DOE, 1 Award: $298,000/3 years, 2 Award: $285.030/3 years
(2006-2011) A. Mebel (co-PI). "Dynamics and Kinetics of the Formation and Growth of Unsaturated Hydrocar-
bons in Titan's atmosphere" NSF/CRC, 2.7 mln/5 years
(2001-2006) and (2006-2011) K. Rein, “Advanced Research in Cooperation in Environmental Health (ARCH
                  st                            nd
Program) NIEHS 1 Award: $2.9 millions/5 years, 2 Award: $3.7 millions/5 years
(2004-2009) X. Wang “Structural Basis for the Chloroperoxidase-Catalyzed Enantioselective Transformation
Structural Basis for the Chloroperoxidase" NSF (CAREER Award) $506,270/4 years



                                                          14
Program Review Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry                                        Page 15 of 27



(2006-2008) X. Wang (Subproject PI) "Structural and Functional Characterization of Prion Peptides and Their
Copper Complexes" NIGMS/NIH (MBRS-SCORE), $301.255/2 years
(2004-2008) S. Wnuk (Subproject PI) “Nucleoside-Based Enzyme Inhibitors. Novel Stannyl-, Silyl- and
Germyldesulfonylation Reactions.” NIGMS/NIH (MBRS-SCORE) $540,450/4 years
Major Instrumentation Grants
         Acquisition of a 600 MHz NMR Spectrometer, 2004, DOD, $400K, (Wnuk)
         Acquisition of a High Resolution ICP-MS, 2005, NSF, $498K (Almirall)
         Acquisition of a Differential Scanning Microcalorimeter and a Titration Microcalorimeter”, 2006, DOD,
          $175K (Lopez de la Vega)

As can be gleaned from the above, the research areas of the department are diverse. As discussed before, the
number of publications originating from the department has consistently grown. The level of grant funding has
increased to $4 million dollars/year in the last three years. All of these accomplishments are due to the quality
of the faculty and students that the program has been able to attract.

In 1997 the first doctoral students were admitted into the department. When a department initiates a program
such as this one wonders if the quality of the student that is generated will be competitive in the job market. We
are happy to say that several graduates now hold tenure earning faculty positions at the universities throughout
the United States [Ralph Mead - PhD 2003: University of North Carolina, Wilmington. Duk Kyung Kim – PhD
2003: Auburn University, Montgomery. Ballester Maria – 2005: Nova Southeastern University]

Our undergraduate program has always been successful in generating quality graduates and they continue to
do so. Our students are attending and/or graduated with PhD degree from such top programs as Berkeley,
Duke, Penn State, Columbia, Yale, etc. Rubin Gonzalez (BS, 1996) holds now an Assistant Professor position in
the Chemistry Department at Columbia University. Carlos Valdez (BS, 2000) was awarded a National Physical
Science Consortium graduate fellowship in 2001, earned his Ph.D. degree at Berkeley, and currently is a post-
doctoral fellow in the laboratory of Professor B. Sharpless, a Nobel Prize winner, at the Scripps Institute.

The instrumentation facilities available to the department have improved significantly since 2002. There now
are four core instrumentation facilities in the university which are closely affiliated to the Chemistry and Bio-
chemistry Department. The nuclear magnetic resonance facility now has two major instruments, a Bruker
AVANCE 400 MHz NMR with a quad probe and a Bruker AVANCE 600 mHz NMR with dedicated and multinu-
clear probes. The 400 mHz instrument was the only NMR in the department and was the workhorse for the de-
partment in the magnetic resonance area since 1998. In 2004, the faculty wrote a proposal to the Department
of Defense for a larger, 600 mHz, NMR Spectrometer. This instrument is used mainly for biological molecules.
Both the mass spectroscopy facility (AMSF) and NMR facilities are now in adjacent, fully renovated rooms in CP
178. The AMSF facility now has HP-4500 Plus: Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS), an
HP-6890/HP-5973 GC-MS, and a Finnigan Navigator LC-PDA-MS. The Trace Evidence Analysis Facility now
has Elan DRC+ quadrupole ICP-MS, a Thermo Element 2 magnetic sector high resolution ICP-MS, several au-
tomated liquid sample introduction systems, a CETAC 500+ 266 nm laser ablation system and a NewWave Re-
search 213 nm laser ablation system. The facility also contains a Philips XL30 Scanning Electron Microscope
with an EDAX detector, low and high vacuum capabilities and a gold sputtering coating system. The Trace
Metal Facility Core includes a new Clean Laboratory with quality grade suitable for trace metal analysis. This
Laboratory is split into two parts. A clean room (Class 1000) with approximately 200 sq ft will be used for clean
sample preparation. The clean room will be equipped with two clean hoods with HEPA filters, water purification
system, and lab furniture. The rest of the Lab (approximately 200 sq ft) is used for sample analysis. An ICP-MS
and a HPLC coupled to ICP-MS meets the needs for metal speciation. The department also has an undergrad-
uate instrumentation laboratory in CP 344 which includes uv-visible spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, a
fluorimeter and CD spectrometer.             Additionally calorimetric instrumentation includes the VP-ITC
MicroCalorimeter from MicroCal, Inc. and a VP –DSC calorimeter both from MircroCal Inc.

6.0       Weaknesses that impede the achievement of program goals:
Among the weaknesses in the makeup of the department which may impede the achievement of program goals
is the lack of technical and non technical staff to support the department, the lack of classroom, research and
general space needed to accommodate the growing graduate and undergraduate student population, and the



                                                          15
Program Review Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry                                            Page 16 of 27



high cost of living and lack of affordable housing in the South Florida area needed to accommodate prospective
graduate students.
The core facilities, particularly the nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectroscopy facilities are staffed by
technicians. A PhD scientist is needed in order to oversee the running of these facilities. Such a position exists
in most departments of our size and this level of advanced instrumentation. This is something that will in time
pay for itself since there should be fewer service calls to repair the instrumentation. Additionally, a PhD level
scientist in charge of these facilities will help in the design of experiments with the particular instrumentation
which is available.
A full time accountant is needed to manage expenses in the department. The department generates $4 mil-
lion/year in external funding. Most departments which generate this level of funding have a full time accountant
on staff to manage the grants. In our department the accountant is paid 50% by the department and 50% by the
ARCH program. As the grant revenues keep increasing, this situation will soon be intolerable.
An additional secretary is needed to support the current clerical staff. Currently the department has one office
manager, a secretary for the graduate program and one additional secretary partially assigned to IFRI. The de-
partment needs one additional secretary exclusively assigned to the Chair of the Department.
The incoming graduate students need space in the form of office space and research space. Currently graduate
students have to share desks in the research laboratories. There is no area for graduate student space within
the department. There is no room for the students to have their own meeting or at least share lunch time. Even
the research space is limited.
The cost of living in South Florida is very high. Most importantly there is a lack of affordable housing for gradu-
ate students. Current students have to share apartments in order to be able to afford living in South Florida. An
increase in the graduate stipend would help in alleviating this situation. Another possibility is to designate some
of the on campus housing as graduate student housing and make it affordable to the students, possibly as part
of the stipend offered.
There is very little classroom space available to the Chemistry and Biochemistry Department. We are limited as
to the number of sections that can be offered due to the lack of large classrooms. We are limited as to offering
recitation sessions due to the lack of available classroom space.
The economic situation in South Florida is such that it is difficult to attract new faculty hires at the current sala-
ries. The median family home is $230,000. This is for a condominium. The average unattached single family
residence is close to $400,000. At the salaries offered by the University it is difficult to move in and buy a new
comfortable house in the South Florida area. This will hinder the hiring of new faculty, not only in the Chemistry
and Biochemistry Department but University wide.
In order for the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry to expand and achieve its goals the issues listed
above should be addressed.

7.0     Opportunities to explore in the achievement of program goals.

The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry sees the establishment of a College of Medicine as an oppor-
tunity in developing the areas of biomedical aspects of chemistry, the environmental health sciences and foren-
sic science. The hiring of faculty members with joint appointments in chemistry and the College of Medicine
should be considered. In this way a bridge will exist between the two facilities and opportunities for funding
through the NIH roadmap programs (e.g., nanomedicine) will be increased.

The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry is continually seeking to improve the manner of delivery of its
undergraduate courses. The department needs to teach the undergraduate lectures in a larger state of the art
lecture hall. The current largest auditorium equipped to teach chemistry is CP 145. This is a shared room
where all of the large lectures are taught, not only by the Chemistry and Biochemistry Department, but by many
departments in the University. This room only accommodates 212 students. Every semester the course has to
turn away large number of students that would like to get into the undergraduate chemistry course but no seats
are available. The department has responded by increasing the sections of General Chemistry CHM1045 which
are offered. Additionally Chemistry and Society CHM 1032, a very popular course with non science majors, is
taught in a theater in the library, a less than ideal situation. A large auditorium with state of the art equipment is
needed in order to accommodate our growing number of students.




                                                          16
Program Review Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry                                             Page 17 of 27



There is a need to provide additional contact hours for undergraduate students. One possible model which is
being considered is the use of recitation sessions carried out by the doctoral students in the department. In this
way the undergraduate students do not have to depend on faculty members exclusively but will have a chance
to ask the help of graduate students. Additionally, small group recitation sessions will increase the camaraderie
among the undergraduate students. One reason this has not been implemented is the lack of suitable class-
room space needed for such an endeavor. Estimates are that two classrooms would be needed for two hours
every day to be able to accommodate the large number of students which will be required and benefit from tak-
ing the course.
We believe that the addition to the CP building should be placed as a higher priority in the University building
plan. Such an addition will alleviate the space concerns of the Chemistry and Biochemistry Department and al-
low us to forge ahead into the future.
The department wishes to pursue the establishment of a “Research Experience for Undergraduates” program at
FIU. This program is sponsored by the National Science Foundation and will introduce undergraduate students
from other institutions to the possibilities available for research at FIU. We believe this will be a very successful
program. It will provide a stipend for the students and housing for the summer. In order to carry this out the
housing during the summer problem must be worked out.
8.0 Threats to overcome in the achievement of program goals.
The most ominous threat in the achievement of program goals is the high cost of living and housing in South-
east Florida. The average cost of a home in Southeast Florida is more than $400,000. Even a small condo-
minium can cost as much as $230,000. Renting an apartment is also very expensive. This will impact graduae
student recruitment, faculty recruitment and retention.
Faculty at the full professor level are greatly underpaid in our department. As the name of FIU and the reputa-
tion of the department continues to grow, faculty from the department become more desirable to other universi-
ties nationwide. That coupled with the cost of housing and the cost of living in the South Florida area will en-
courage these very successful faculty to consider leaving the University for other more lucrative positions. We
must work to retain the quality faculty we have. The high cost of living will also affect our ability to attract quality
new faculty members into our department. It is difficult to be able to live comfortably and buy a house in south-
east Florida with the current salaries offered to incoming faculty. The high cost of living will also affect our ability
to attract quality graduate students. Rental apartments close to campus are available however the high cost
requires the student to share apartments at 3 or 4 students per apartment. This will make moving to South Flor-
ida a less desirable choice for graduate students and faculty alike.
9.0 Budget
The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry had a recurring operating budget of roughly $3.27 million per
year in last fiscal year (July 06-June 07). This includes faculty and staff salaries for both the main campus and
the BBC campus. In 2002 the department presented figures (see below) and predicted that the monies gener-
ated by external funds would match and subsequently surpass the operating budget in the year 2006. Even
though investment costs will vary considerably depending on the actual number of faculty lines, assistantships
and staff positions made available over the next 10 years, most, if not all of these initial costs could be offset by
increased FTE (and subsequent State FTE funding) and significantly increased extramural funding (and over-
head support back to the University). This latter point is the reason that the top Research Universities can afford
to have such large numbers of chemistry faculty (i.e. 40-50). The following graph showing the predicted behav-
ior and confirms that the department with $4.38 million in external grants has been on track with this prediction.
We expect to continue the trend and if the recommendations listed on this document are followed, the return on
investment index will continue to increase into the foreseeable future.




                                                          17
Program Review Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry                                                                   Page 18 of 27



                                                                   Investment vs. Returns
                             $20



                  Millions
                             $18


                             $16


                             $14


                             $12
         Amount




                                                                                                                                      Returns
                             $10
                                                                                                                                      Investment
                             $8


                             $6


                             $4


                             $2


                             $0
                                   02-03   03-04   04-05   05-06      06-07    07-08      08-09   09-10   10-11   11-12     12-13
                                                                                   Year




10.0    Major Findings and Recommendations

It is evident that the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry is performing remarkably well. The following
are specific recommendations which the department has delineated in order for the department become one of
the “top tier” departments in the nation.
1. The department recommends that at least ten additional faculty positions be added within the next ten years
to bring the department to a comparable number compared to benchmark universities and also to offset the cur-
rently very high FTE/faculty of the department compared to the Chemistry Departments nationwide. At least
half the faculty hires should be biomedical areas of chemistry in order to complement the biochemistry Ph.D.
program currently being initiated. Some of these should bridge the different areas of emphasis; for example, an
environmental toxicologist, and a forensic toxicologist would be strong additions to all four areas of emphasis in
the department. The faculty hires should not only be the Assistant Professor level but also more advanced re-
searchers should be courted in order to expand research and funding more rapidly. This will require greater
amounts in start up funds be provided. However, the younger faculty are needed to offset the inevitable retire-
ment process and avoid lapses in research productivity for the department as a whole.
2. The department recommends that at least 10 additional TA’s be provided within the next three years. This
addition would bring the total number of TA’s in the FIU Chemistry and Biochemistry Department to the average
for all doctoral granting programs in the nation. This will allow for the inclusion of recitation sessions as part of
the beginning undergraduate tuition. In addition, increases in faculty and subsequent funding will provide in-
creases in the number of RA’s and fellowships. This will continue the growth in full time supported graduate stu-
dents to over 100 which is more in line with a top tier Chemistry and Biochemistry Departments.
3. The department finds it crucial that a mechanism be found to facilitate available housing for graduate stu-
dents. Currently the cost of housing is amazingly high and students have to share apartments (sometimes 3 or
4 students/apartment) in order to survive. At this stage in the development of the Ph.D. program it is crucial that
we be able to draw from both the resident and nonresident applicant pools. Non resident students would find it
difficult to make ends meet. Additionally, it is in the department’s interest to develop an REU program on cam-
pus. One of the obstacles to its development is the unavailability of dormitories for the summer undergraduates
to occupy.
4. The department is attempting to pursue a “Research Experience for Undergraduates” program sponsored by
the National Science Foundation. This program will introduce undergraduate students from other institutions to
experience research at FIU. It will pay for a summer stipend and housing for the students. It is imperative that
dormitories by made available for the students in such a way that the cost of housing for the summer does not
eat up their whole stipend.
5. The department recommends that three additional staff positions be added within the next four years as fol-
lows:




                                                                              18
Program Review Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry                                         Page 19 of 27




    [1] One full time accountant position to the department with primary responsibilities to assist in the managing
    of C&G funds in the department.
    [2] Two additional lines to upgrade the current Engineer positions in FIU’s Advanced Mass Spectrometry
    Facility and FIU’s NMR facilities. These managers should be in addition to the engineers currently on staff
    and should be PhD scientists capable of operating and maintaining all of the instrumentations in the facilities
    at the highest "scientific level."
    [3] One additional secretarial position to provide support particularly to the Department Chair is needed.
6. The department proposes that the Chemistry and Physics building (CP) expansion, which is already in the
  Master Plan, be given a high priority for future buildings on campus as it will provide a much needed larger
  lecture hall for science and other instruction as well as provide for much needed expansion of teaching labora-
  tory facilities. We would propose a building with an expanded lecture hall able to seat 400 students. Such a
  building would allow for a 100% increase in FTE for our lower division lecture courses (i.e. CHM 1032, CHM
  1045, CHM 1046) by having a suitable larger multimedia lecture hall for science instruction and would also al-
  low many other departments to do the same. This building should also provide much needed additional class-
  room space to be used for graduate students run recitation sessions and general space for graduate students
  to use.

11.0     Student Learning Outcomes.
The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry has led the way for the University in establishing Academic
Learning Compacts. Ever since 2001 the department has been administering the Educational Testing Services
Exit Examination. This examination compares our graduates to other graduates nationwide. Only recently have
the rest of the departments followed suit and are now administering the exam.

The ETS examination is administered as part of a “capstone course” which is titled Chemistry Seminar (CHM
4930). As part of this course the student should: (The following objectives are for the BS degree, the other de-
grees are described in the upcoming pages in the form of their own academic learning compact.)

    a) Demonstrate proficiency in the theoretical and practical knowledge of physical, organic, inorganic, ana-
       lytical, and biochemistry.
    b) Satisfy admission requirements to graduate or professional schools.
    c) Be accurately advised and be able to assess when they expect to graduate
    d) Demonstrate the ability to critically read the chemical literature.
    e) Synthesize information from the literature and present it orally, in a seminar, to an audience of peers
       and faculty members.
    f)   Be able to use the scientific method to solve original chemical and biochemical problems
    g) Review appropriate literature. The resulting information would then be written as a research paper
    h) Demonstrate the ability to synthesize compounds, collect data using appropriate instrumentation, and
       analyze data using appropriate statistical methods.
    i)   Demonstrate the ability to prepare a written report on a chemical topic and orally present the pertinent
         information in a seminar to their peers and faculty.
Item (a) will be evaluated using the ETS exam administered during the capstone course. (b) was evaluated by
keeping track via an exit survey of our student graduates and determining their success entering graduate and
professional schools. (c) was evaluated by using our own graduation and time to graduate records in the de-
partment. The rest of the items were evaluated by using a rubric (shown at the end of this document) to evalu-
ate the students’ performance in seminar and written report describing the contents of the seminar.
Whether the student and faculty met the intended outcome or objective is evaluated and new guide-
lines are developed in order to address the issue. For example, since not enough students were
graduating on time, new sections of courses were instituted and new guidelines in student advisement
are currently being designed. If the students did not perform well in the exit exam, then course con-
tent is being examined by each of the corresponding subdisciplines.


                                                          19
Program Review Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry                                         Page 20 of 27




                                     Florida International University
                                                   Academic Learning Compact




 Name of the undergraduate degree program


                                                          Chemistry B.A.




 Mission Statement


 The B.A. in chemistry prepares students for careers in medicine, pharmacy, dentistry, environmental studies, veteri-
 nary medicine, patent law, forensic science, and in secondary school teaching.




 Student Learning Outcomes
 FIU Chemistry graduates should be able to do the following:

 Content/Discipline Knowledge
 1.Demonstrate proficiency in the theoretical and practical knowledge of physical, organic, inorganic, analytical, and
 biochemistry.
 2. Demonstrate the ability to critically read the chemical literature.
 3. Demonstrate the ability to grasp and outline the pertinent information needed to sumarize a chemistry topic.
 4. Synthesize information from the literature and present it orally, in a seminar, to an audience of peers and faculty
 members.

 Critical Thinking
 1. Apply the scientific method to solve original chemical problems.
 2. Demonstrate the ability to review appropriate literature.
 3. Demonstrate the ability to synthesize compounds, collect data using appropriate instrumentation, and analyze data
 using appropriate statistical methods.



 Oral and Written Communication
 1. Students will demonstrate the ability to prepare a written report on a chemical topic and orally present the pertinent
 information in a seminar to their peers and faculty.




                                                            20
Program Review Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry                                         Page 21 of 27




                                     Florida International University
                                                   Academic Learning Compact




 Name of the undergraduate degree program

                                                          Chemistry B.S.

 Mission Statement

 The B.S. in chemistry prepares students for graduate study or a professional career as a chemist in industry, in gov-
 ernment service, or in secondary school teaching.

 Student Learning Outcomes

 FIU Chemistry graduates should be able to do the following:

 Content/Discipline Knowledge
 1.Demonstrate proficiency in the theoretical and practical knowledge of physical, organic, inorganic, analytical, and
 biochemistry.
 2. Demonstrate the ability to critically read the chemical literature.
 3. Demonstrate the ability to grasp and outline the pertinent information needed to sumarize a chemistry topic.
 4. Synthesize information from the literature and present it orally, in a seminar, to an audience of peers and faculty
 members.

 Critical Thinking
 1. Apply the scientific method to solve original chemical problems.
 2. Demonstrate the ability to review appropriate literature.
 3. Demonstrate the ability to synthesize compounds, collect data using appropriate instrumentation, and analyze data
 using appropriate statistical methods.


 Oral and Written Communication
 1. Bachelor of Science students will write a report that is based on original research and will be judged by a faculty
 panel as suitable in style and content for publication in an appropriate ACS journal.
 2. Demonstrate the ability to prepare a seminar on a chemical topic and formally present the pertinent information in
 Senior Seminar (CHM 4930).




                                                            21
Program Review Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry                                                                                     Page 22 of 27
Department: Chemistry & Biochemistry                                               Chair: Stanislaw Wnuk                                         Year: 2006-07
PROGRAM NAME & CIP CODE: Chemistry 400501                                                                               LEVEL: BA
Expanded Statement of Institutional Purpose   Intended Outcome/objective        Assessment Criteria, Standards &        Outcome Assessment Results       Use of Results
                                                                                Procedures
Mission Statement:                            Demonstrate proficiency in        Students enrolled in senior semi-       36% of students taking the       The standard was not met.
                                              the theoretical and practical     nar CHM-4930 as well as other           ETS Chemistry test scored        Student performance was
The mission of the Department of              knowledge of physical, organ-     students in their senior year are       at or above the 50th per-        satisfactory and indicates im-
Chemistry at Florida International Uni-       ic, inorganic, analytical, and    required to take the Educational        centile. The mean scores         provement in most individual
versity is to provide the best education      biochemistry.                     Testing Service Field Exam in           were:                            subject areas. Faculty will
                                                                                                                                     th
possible for our students, contribute to                                        Chemistry. At least 50% of stu-         Physical 46 percentile           monitor the situation to see if
                                                                                                                                    th
tomorrow's knowledge through vigorous                                           dents will be expected to score in      Organic 85 percentile            this represents a short term
and productive research in fundamental                                          the 50th percentile.                    Inorganic 50th percentile        fluctuation in performance.
                                                                                                                                        th
and applied aspects of chemistry and to                                                                                 Analytical 55 percentile
                                                                                                                                 th
be of service to our discipline, universi-                                                                              Total 55 percentile
ty, community, state and beyond.
                                              Qualification of graduates will   40% of those graduates that apply       Based on the exit survey         The standard was met. The
                                              be sufficient to satisfy admis-   to graduate or professional             and personal communica-          results were reviewed by the
                                              sion requirements to graduate     schools will be accepted for ad-        tions 50% of students who        faculty. Efforts to successfully
                                              or professional schools.          mission.                                applied to graduate or           place students into graduate
                                                                                                                        professional schools were        and professional schools will
                                                                                Procedure: Graduating seniors will      accepted for admission.          continue.
                                                                                be surveyed in the Spring of their
                                                                                senior year to determine if they
                                                                                applied to professional school and
                                                                                whether they were accepted.

                                              Students will be accurately       75% of those applying for gradua-       59% (17 of 29) students          The standard was not met. The
                                              advised and be able to as-        tion will graduate.                     who applied for graduation       undergraduate advisor is estab-
                                              sess when they expect to                                                  for 1/2007 and 5/2007 had        lishing guidelines to better
                                              graduate                                                                  graduated by the end of          guide students through the
                                                                                                                        the summer.                      graduation process.
                                              Demonstrate the ability to        Faculty will use a scoring rubric in    100% of students scored in       The standard was met. The
                                              critically read the chemical      Senior Seminar (CHM 4930) to            the top two sections of the      process used was reviewed
                                              literature.                       assess student ability to read,         "Literature Review" portion      and found appropriate. The
                                                                                grasp, and synthesize information       of the rubric (4 - 73%; 3 -      criteria and standard will be
                                                                                from the chemical literature.           27%)                             maintained.


                                              Synthesize information from       Faculty will use a scoring rubric in    93% of students scored 25        The standard was met. The
                                              the literature and present it     Senior Seminar (CHM 4930) to            or above (out of 30) on the      process used was reviewed
                                              orally, in a seminar, to an       assess student ability to read,         rubric for the oral portion of   and found appropriate. The
                                              audience of peers and faculty     grasp, and synthesize information       seminar, with a mean             criteria and standard will be
                                              members.                          from the chemical literature.           score of 27.2/30.                maintained.

                                              Graduates will be able to use     Faculty will use a scoring rubric to    60% of the student re-           The standard was met. The
                                              the scientific method to solve    evaluate the critical thinking skills   search papers were judged        process used was reviewed
                                              original chemical and bio-        used in the presentation portion of     suitable in style and            and found appropriate. The
                                              chemical problems                 the Senior Seminar (CHM 4930).          presentation to those found      criteria and standard will be
                                                                                                                        in a comparable ACS              maintained, with more empha-
                                                                                50% of the research papers will be      journal.                         sis on improving student writing
                                                                                judged as comparable in style with                                       to meet ACS standards..
                                                                                an appropriate ACS journal.

                                              Review appropriate literature.    Faculty will use a scoring rubric to    80% of the students scored       The standard was met. The
                                              The resulting information         evaluate the critical thinking skills   in the top two sections for      process used was reviewed
                                              would then be written as          used in the presentation portion of     the "Literature" portion of      and found appropriate. The
                                              research paper                    the Senior Seminar (CHM 4930).          their research paper (4 -        criteria and standard will be
                                                                                                                        53%; 3 - 27%)                    maintained.

                                              Demonstrate the ability to         Faculty will use a scoring rubric to   93% of students scored in        The standard was met. The
                                              synthesize compounds, col-        evaluate the critical thinking skills   the top two sections of the      process used was reviewed
                                              lect data using appropriate       used in the presentation portion of     critical thinking portion of     and found appropriate. The
                                              instrumentation, and analyze      the Senior Seminar (CHM 4930).          the rubric for senior semi-      criteria and standard will be
                                              data using appropriate statis-                                            nar.                             maintained.
                                              tical methods.

                                              Students will demonstrate the     Faculty will use a scoring rubric to    100% of students scored in       The standard was met. The
                                              ability to prepare a written      evaluate the oral and written           the top two sections of the      process used was reviewed
                                              report on a chemical topic and    communications skills used in the       "Presentation" portion of        and found appropriate. The
                                              orally present the pertinent      presentation portion of the Senior      the rubric (4 - 53%; 3-          criteria and standard will be
                                              information in a seminar to       Seminar (CHM 4930).                     47%)                             maintained.
                                              their peers and faculty.




                                                                                           22
Program Review Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry                                                                                      Page 23 of 27
Department: Chemistry & Biochemistry                                                   Chair: Stanislaw Wnuk                                                  Year: 2006-07
PROGRAM NAME & CIP CODE: Chemistry 400501                                                                                             LEVEL: BS
Expanded Statement of Institutional Purpose   Intended Outcome/objective             Assessment Criteria, Standards &        Outcome Assessment           Use of Results
                                                                                     Procedures                              Results
Mission Statement:                            Graduates of our program will          Students enrolled in senior semi-       36% of students taking       The standard was not met.
                                              demonstrate proficiency in the         nar CHM-4930 as well as other           the ETS Chemistry test       Student performance was
The mission of the Department of              theoretical and practical              students in their senior year are       scored at or above the       satisfactory and indicates im-
                                                                                                                               th
Chemistry at Florida International Uni-       knowledge of physical, organic,        required to take the Educational        50 percentile. The           provement in most individual
versity is to provide the best education      inorganic, analytical, and bio-        Testing Service Field Exam in           mean scores were:            subject areas. Faculty will
                                                                                                                                          th
possible for our students, contribute to      chemistry.                             Chemistry. At least 50% of stu-         Physical 46 percentile       monitor the situation to see if
                                                                                                                                         th
tomorrow's knowledge through vigorous                                                dents will be expected to score in      Organic 85 percentile        this represents a short term
and productive research in fundamental                                               the 50th percentile.                    Inorganic 50th percentile    fluctuation in performance.
                                                                                                                                             th
and applied aspects of chemistry and to                                                                                      Analytical 55 percentile
                                                                                                                                     th
be of service to our discipline, universi-                                                                                   Total 55 percentile
ty, community, state and beyond.
                                              Qualification of graduates will be     70% of those graduates that apply       Based on the exit survey     The standard was met. The
                                              sufficient to satisfy admission        to graduate or professional schools     and personal communi-        results were reviewed by the
                                              requirements to graduate and           will be accepted for admission.         cations 80% of students      faculty. Efforts to successfully
                                              professional schools.                                                          who applied to graduate      place students into graduate
                                                                                     Procedure: Graduating seniors will      or professional schools      and professional schools will
                                                                                     be surveyed in the Spring of their      were accepted for ad-        continue.
                                                                                     senior year to determine if they        mission.
                                                                                     applied to graduate school and
                                                                                     whether they were accepted.

                                              Students will be accurately            75% of those applying for gradua-       75% (12 of 16) students      The standard was met. The
                                              advised and be able to assess          tion will graduate.                     who applied for gradua-      undergraduate advisor is estab-
                                              when they expect to graduate                                                   tion for 1/2007 and          lishing guidelines to better
                                                                                                                             5/2007 had graduated         guide students through the
                                                                                                                             by the end of the sum-       graduation process.
                                                                                                                             mer.
                                                                                     Faculty will use a scoring rubric in    100% of students scored      The standard was met. The
                                              Demonstrate the ability to criti-      Senior Seminar (CHM 4930) to            in the top two sections of   process used was reviewed
                                              cally read the chemical litera-        assess student ability to read          the "Literature Review"      and found appropriate. The
                                              ture.                                                                          portion of the rubric (4 -   criteria and standard will be
                                                                                                                             71%; 3 - 29%)                maintained.
                                              Demonstrate the ability to grasp       Faculty will use a scoring rubric in    100% of students scored      The standard was met. The
                                              and outline the pertinent infor-       Senior Seminar (CHM 4930) to            in the top two sections of   process used was reviewed
                                              mation needed to summarize a           assess student ability to read          the "Content" portion of     and found appropriate. The
                                              chemistry topic.                                                               the rubric (4 - 57%; 3 -     criteria and standard will be
                                                                                                                             43%)                         maintained.

                                                                                     Faculty will use a scoring rubric in    100% of students scored      The standard was met. The
                                              Synthesize information from the        Senior Seminar (CHM 4930) to            25 or above (out of 30)      process used was reviewed
                                              literature and present it orally, in   assess student ability to read          on the rubric for the oral   and found appropriate. The
                                              a seminar, to an audience of                                                   portion of seminar, with     criteria and standard will be
                                              peers and faculty members.                                                     a mean score of              maintained.
                                                                                                                             27.6/30.
                                              Graduates will be able to use          Faculty will use a scoring rubric to    86% of the student           The standard was met. The
                                              the scientific method to solve         evaluate the critical thinking skills   research papers were         process used was reviewed
                                              original chemical problems             used in the presentation portion of     judged suitable in style     and found appropriate. The
                                                                                     the Senior Seminar (CHM 4930).          and presentation to          criteria and standard will be
                                                                                     60% of the original papers will be      those found in a compa-      maintained.
                                                                                     judged as suitable in style and         rable ACS journal.
                                                                                     content for publication in an ap-
                                                                                     propriate ACS journal.

                                              Review appropriate literature,         Faculty will use a scoring rubric to    100% of the students         The standard was met. The
                                              collect data, and analyze results.     evaluate the critical thinking skills   scored in the top two        process used was reviewed
                                              The resulting information would        used in the presentation portion of     sections for the "Litera-    and found appropriate. The
                                              then be written in a manner            the Senior Seminar (CHM 4930).          ture" portion of their       criteria and standard will be
                                              suitable for publication                                                       research paper (4 -          maintained.
                                                                                                                             86%; 3 - 14%)
                                              Demonstrate the ability to syn-        Faculty will use a scoring rubric to    100% of students scored      The standard was met. The
                                              thesize compounds, collect data        evaluate the critical thinking skills   in the top two sections of   process used was reviewed
                                              using appropriate instrumenta-         used in the presentation portion of     the critical thinking        and found appropriate. The
                                              tion, and analyze data using           the Senior Seminar (CHM 4930).          portion of the rubric for    criteria and standard will be
                                              appropriate statistical methods.                                               senior seminar.              maintained.

                                              Bachelor of Science students           Faculty will use a scoring rubric to    100% of students scored      The standard was met. The
                                              will write a report that is based      evaluate the oral and written com-      in the top two sections of   process used was reviewed
                                              on original research and will be       munications skills used in the          the "Presentation" por-      and found appropriate. The
                                              judged by a faculty panel as           presentation portion of the Senior      tion of the rubric (4 -      criteria and standard will be
                                              suitable in style and content for      Seminar (CHM 4930).                     71%; 3- 29%)                 maintained.
                                              publication in an appropriate
                                              ACS journal.                           Faculty will use a scoring rubric to    100% of students scored      The standard was met. The
                                                                                     evaluate the oral and written com-      in the top two sections of   process used was reviewed
                                              Demonstrate the ability to pre-        munications skills used in the          the "Presentation" por-      and found appropriate. The
                                              pare a seminar on a chemical           presentation portion of the Senior      tion of the rubric (4 -      criteria and standard will be
                                              topic and formally present the         Seminar (CHM 4930).                     71%; 3 - 29%)                maintained.
                                              pertinent information in Senior
                                              Seminar (CHM 4930).




Department: Chemistry & Biochemistry      Chair: Stanislaw Wnuk                                                                                               Year: 2006-07
PROGRAM NAME & CIP CODE: Chemistry 400501                                                                                             LEVEL: MS

                                                                                             23
Program Review Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry                                                                Page 24 of 27
Expanded Statement of Institutional Intended Outcome/objective       Assessment Criteria, Standards & Procedures   Outcome Assessment     Use of Results
Purpose                                                                                                            Results
The mission of the Department of    Graduates of our program         80% of those graduates that apply to          100% of graduates      The standard was
Chemistry at Florida International  will have knowledge of           graduate or professional schools will be      applying to gradu-     met. The process
University is to provide the best   chemistry, which is suffi-       accepted for admission.                       ate or professional    was reviewed by
education possible for our stu-     cient to enable them ad-                                                       school were ac-        faculty and found to
dents, contribute to tomorrow's     mission to Ph.D. programs.                                                     cepted for admis-      be appropriate. The
knowledge through vigorous and                                                                                     sion.                  criteria and the
productive research in fundamen-                                                                                                          standard will be
tal and applied aspects of chemis-                                                                                                        maintained.
try and to be of service to our     Graduates seeking em-            75% of graduates seeking employment           80% of graduates       The standard was
discipline, university, community,  ployment in field will be        will be employed.                             seeking employ-        met. The process
state and beyond.                   competitive in the job mar-                                                    ment were em-          was reviewed by
                                    ket.                                                                           ployed.                faculty and found to
                                                                                                                                          be appropriate. The
                                                                                                                                          criteria and the
                                                                                                                                          standard will be
                                                                                                                                          maintained.
                                    Graduates of the program         It is expected that 80% of respondents        80% of graduates       The standard was
                                    will be satisfied with their     will express satisfaction with the educa-     indicated satisfac-    met. The process
                                    educational experience.          tional preparation.                           tion with their edu-   was reviewed by
                                                                                                                   cational prepara-      faculty and found to
                                                                                                                   tion.                  be appropriate. The
                                                                                                                                          criteria and the
                                                                                                                                          standard will be
                                                                                                                                          maintained.
                                    Graduates will be able to        80% percent of the students will be ex-       100% of students       The standard was
                                    critically read the chemical     pected to score 3 or 4 using the seminar      scored in the top      met. The process
                                    literature, grasp and outline    scoring rubric.                               two categories (3      was reviewed by
                                    the pertinent information,                                                     or 4) in the litera-   faculty and found to
                                    and be able to present it                                                      ture section of the    be appropriate. The
                                    orally to an audience of                                                       seminar scoring        criteria and the
                                    peers and faculty members.                                                     rubric.                standard will be
                                                                                                                                          maintained.
                                    Graduate will be able to use     Students will develop a research prob-        100% of students       The standard was
                                    the scientific method to solve   lem, analyze results, and write a thesis.     who submitted and      met. The process
                                    original chemical problems,      The contents of the thesis should repre-      defended their         was reviewed by
                                    review appropriate literature,   sent original research, which is appropri-    thesis did so suc-     faculty and found to
                                    collect data, analyze results    ate for publication in the chemical litera-   cessfully.             be appropriate. The
                                    and prepare written reports.     ture. The faculty mentor and the other                               criteria and the
                                                                     members of the student's graduate                                    standard will be
                                                                     committee will evaluate the content. The                             maintained.
                                                                     student must present these results in the
                                                                     form of an oral examination and receive
                                                                     a unanimous passing vote by their com-
                                                                     mittee.




                                                                             24
Program Review Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry                                                                       Page 25 of 27
Department: Chemistry & Biochemistry                        Chair: Stanislaw Wnuk                                                               Year: 2006-07

PROGRAM NAME & CIP CODE: Chemistry 400501                                                                                                  LEVEL: Ph.D.
Expanded Statement of Institutional   Intended Outcome/objective         Assessment Criteria, Standards & Proce-       Outcome Assessment          Use of Results
Purpose                                                                  dures                                         Results
The mission of the Department         Graduates of our program           Eighty percent (80%) of graduates will        100% of graduates           The standard was
of Chemistry at Florida Interna-      will have knowledge of chem-       be employed in field.                         were employed in the        met. The process
tional University is to provide       istry, which is sufficient to                                                    field of chemistry.         was reviewed by
the best education possible for       enable them to successfully                                                                                  faculty and found
our students, contribute to to-       obtain employment.                                                                                           to be appropriate.
morrow's knowledge through                                                                                                                         The criteria and the
vigorous and productive re-                                                                                                                        standard will be
search in fundamental and ap-                                                                                                                      maintained.
plied aspects of chemistry and        Graduates will express satis-      Graduates will be surveyed by a suita-        80% of graduates            The standard was
to be of service to our discipline,   faction with educational           ble questionnaire regarding the prepa-        indicated satisfaction      met. The process
university, community, state and      preparation offered by the         ration provided by FIU. It is expected        with their educational      was reviewed by
beyond.                               department                         that 80% of respondents will express          preparation.                faculty and found
                                                                         satisfaction with the educational prepa-                                  to be appropriate.
                                                                         ration.                                                                   The criteria and the
                                                                                                                                                   standard will be
                                                                                                                                                   maintained.
                                      Graduates will be able to          All students will review a scientific topic   100% of students            The standard was
                                      critically read the chemical       and present a seminar to peers and            scored in the top two       met. The process
                                      literature, grasp and outline      professors. Evaluation of the quality of      categories (3 or 4) in      was reviewed by
                                      the pertinent information, and     preparation, presentation and scientific      the literature portion of   faculty and found
                                      be able to present it orally to    quality will be evaluated by a faculty        the seminar rubric.         to be appropriate.
                                      an audience of peers and           panel. Eighty percent of the students                                     The criteria and the
                                      faculty members.                   will be expected to receive a score of 3                                  standard will be
                                                                         or 4 on the literature section of the                                     maintained.
                                                                         seminar rubric.
                                      Students will demonstrate          Students will demonstrate successful          100% of the students        The standard was
                                      mastery of chemistry, particu-     mastery of chemistry, particularly in         achieved a pass rate        met. The process
                                      larly in their area of speciali-   their area of specialization determined       of 40% or higher on         was reviewed by
                                      zation.                            by receiving a full passing score on at       the cumulative exams.       faculty and found
                                                                         least 40% of the cumulative exams                                         to be appropriate.
                                                                         taken in their first two years of study.                                  The criteria and the
                                                                                                                                                   standard will be
                                                                                                                                                   maintained.
                                      Graduates will be able to use      Students will develop a research prob-        100% of the students        The standard was
                                      the scientific method to solve     lem, analyze results, and write a dis-        successfully prepared       met. The process
                                      original chemical problems,        sertation. The contents of the disserta-      a written thesis and        was reviewed by
                                      review appropriate literature,     tion should represent original research,      successfully presented      faculty and found
                                      collect data, and analyze          which is appropriate for publication in       the results in an oral      to be appropriate.
                                      results. The resulting infor-      the chemical literature. The faculty          presentation, as indi-      The criteria and the
                                      mation would then be written       mentor and the other members of the           cated by the voting for     standard will be
                                      in a manner suitable for pub-      student's graduate committee will eval-       their doctoral commit-      maintained.
                                      lication                           uate the content. The student must            tees.
                                                                         present these results in the form of an
                                                                         oral examination and receive a unani-
                                                                         mous passing vote by their committee.




                                                                                  25
Program Review Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry                                                                      Page 26 of 27

Department: Chemistry & Biochemistry                                            Chair: Stanislaw Wnuk                                      Year: 2006-07
PROGRAM NAME & CIP CODE: Forensic Science 430106                                                                                        LEVEL MS
Expanded Statement of Institution-   Intended Outcome/objective         Assessment Criteria, Standards & Proce-   Outcome Assessment Re-       Use of Results
al Purpose                                                              dures                                     sults
The mission of the Forensic          Graduates of our program will      80% of graduates who apply for            Based on surveys of          The standard was
Science Masters Program at           have knowledge of forensic         graduate or professional schools will     students and our experi-     met. The process
Florida International University     science, which is sufficient to    be accepted.                              ence with admission to       was reviewed by
is to provide the best education     enable them to successfully                                                  the FIU PhD programs, ~      faculty and found to
possible for our students, con-      obtain employment in practic-      80% of graduates seeking employ-          80% of the MSFS stu-         be appropriate. The
tribute to tomorrow's                ing forensic science laborato-     ment will be employed.                    dents applying for further   criteria and the
knowledge through vigorous           ries and admission to Ph.D.                                                  graduate studies were        standard will be
and productive research in           programs.                                                                    accepted for admission.      maintained.
fundamental and applied as-
pects of forensic science and                                                                                     Based on student sur-
to be of service to our disci-                                                                                    veys, better than 80% of
pline, university, community,                                                                                     our graduates secure
state and beyond.                                                                                                 employment within 6
                                                                                                                  months of graduation with
                                                                                                                  the MSFS degree.


                                     Graduates of the program           Graduates will be surveyed by a           80% of the students sur-     The standard was
                                     will express satisfaction with     suitable questionnaire regarding the      veyed have expressed         met. The process
                                     their educational preparation      preparation provided by FIU. It is        satisfaction with their      was reviewed by
                                     in the Forensic Science            expected that 80% of respondents          preparation.                 faculty and found to
                                     program.                           will express satisfaction with the                                     be appropriate. The
                                                                        educational preparation.                                               criteria and the
                                                                                                                                               standard will be
                                                                                                                                               maintained.
                                     Graduates will be able to criti-   All students will review a scientific     80 % of students re-         The standard was
                                     cally read the chemical litera-    topic and present a seminar to peers      ceived a rating of 4 or 5    just met. The issue
                                     ture, grasp and outline the        and professors. Evaluation of the         in the section "overall      has been reviewed
                                     pertinent information, and be      quality of preparation, presentation      evaluation" of the semi-     by departmental
                                     able to present it orally to an    and scientific quality will be evaluat-   nar.                         faculty and greater
                                     audience of peers and faculty      ed by a faculty panel (see form uti-                                   emphasis is being
                                     members.                           lized). Eighty percent of the students                                 placed on preparing
                                                                        will be expected to receive a score                                    students for semi-
                                                                        "4" or "5" on a 5 point scale.                                         nar.

                                     Graduates will be able to use      Students will develop a research          100% percent of students     The standard was
                                     the scientific method to solve     problem, analyze results, and write a     passed the defense exam      met. The process
                                     original forensic science prob-    thesis. The contents of the thesis        of their thesis.             was reviewed by
                                     lems, review appropriate litera-   should represent original research,                                    faculty and found to
                                     ture, collect data, and analyze    which is appropriate for publication                                   be appropriate. The
                                     results. The resulting infor-      in the forensic science literature. The                                criteria and the
                                     mation would then be written in    faculty mentor and the other mem-                                      standard will be
                                     a manner suitable for publica-     bers of the student's graduate com-                                    maintained.
                                     tion                               mittee will evaluate the content. The
                                                                        student must present these results in
                                                                        the form of an oral examination and
                                                                        receive a unanimous passing vote
                                                                        by their committee.

                                     The program will maintain          The on site visit of the committees       The AAFS requires yearly     The standards of
                                     the national accreditation of      delegated by AAFS will evaluate the       reports from the graduate    accreditation were
                                     the American Academy of            quality of the teaching and research      program director indicat-    met and the AAFS
                                     Forensic Sciences (AAFS)           in forensic area.                         ing the program details      has awarded ac-
                                                                                                                  relating to meeting the      creditation for the
                                                                                                                  AAFS standards for ac-       year.
                                                                                                                  creditation. The MSFS
                                                                                                                  has met the standards of
                                                                                                                  the AAFS and maintained
                                                                                                                  accreditation status.




                                                                                  26
Program Review Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry                                                   Page 27 of 27

                                                Chemistry and Biochemistry Department Seminar Rubric
                                        4                                   3                                 2                               1             Points

                        The student is able to respond      Student responds well to ques-
                                                                                                 Student is hesitant and
Demonstrates Under-     to questions and shows ability      tions but is not really able to                                     Student is not able to
                                                                                                 not able to answer many
standing of Topic       to generalize the principles to     generalize the principles to other                                  answer questions
                                                                                                 of the questions.
                        other problems                      problems

                        Seminar presentation is inter-      Seminar presentation is interest-    Seminar presentation is
Delivery of Research                                                                                                            The seminar is poorly
                        esting, challenging, and under-     ing and understandable to the        not understandable to the
Topic                                                                                                                           presented
                        standable to the audience           audience yet lacks depth             audience yet is polished

                        An abundance of material is         The amount of material present-      The presentation lacks
                                                                                                                                Facts are presented with
                        presented that supports the         ed is limited but supports the       material or the thesis is
Content                                                                                                                         poor connection and no
                        thesis. The topic is current in     thesis. The topic is current in      not well defined. The
                                                                                                                                well defined thesis
                        chemistry.                          chemistry.                           topic is not current.

                        Literature review will be from      Appropriate scientific journals                                     An internet search of
                                                                                                 Scientific journals but very
Literature Review       appropriate scientific journals     but a shallow survey of the liter-                                  magazines – not scien-
                                                                                                 few articles
                        and will cover the topic in depth   ature                                                               tific journals

                        The student shows good un-          The student shows fair under-
                                                                                                 The student appears to         The student shows a lack
Demonstrates sound      derstanding of the chemical         standing of the chemical princi-
                                                                                                 have forgotten much of         of understanding of basic
chemical background     principles set by previous          ples set by previous course
                                                                                                 the previous coursework        chemical principles
                        course work                         work

                        Presentation method is appro-
                                                            The presentation is well done        The presentation is well       The presentation is poor-
                        priate to the subject. Graphics
Presentation                                                but contains graphics that don’t     planned but poorly pre-        ly planned and not well
                        used are appropriate and not
                                                            seem to fit                          sented                         presented
                        superfluous

                                                            The presentation is well articu-     Well articulated with good
                                                                                                                                Poor grammar and ar-
Speaking skills                                             lated, at appropriate volume,        grammar but does not
                                                                                                                                ticulation
                                                            and uses good grammar                project voice adequately


                                                                                                 Citation style is not ap-
Sources                                                     Citation style is appropriate                                       Sources are not cited
                                                                                                 propriate




                                                                                                                                Total Score




                                                                                            27

								
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