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					                         Self-Study Report – Part I

                     Associate Degree in
         Electrical Engineering Technology (2EET)

                  The Pennsylvania State University



                                 York Campus




                                      June 2006

PREPARED FOR:
Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET)
Technology Accreditation Commission (TAC)
111 Market Place, Suite 1050
Baltimore, MD 21202-4012
Phone: 410-347-7700
www.abet.org




                                            1
                                                           Part 1: Self-Study Report
                                        Common Information: 2EET & 2MET & 4EMET


                                                                        Contents

A. Background Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
   1. Program Titles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
   2. Program Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
   3. Actions to Correct Previous Findings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
       a. Common Institutional Factors Affecting the Engineering Technology Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
       b. Program Evaluation-2EET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
B. Accreditation Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
   1. Program Educational Objectives – 2EET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10
   2. Program Outcomes – 2EET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11
     3. Assessment and Evaluation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
          a. CQI Activities – 2EET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
     4. Program Characteristics – 2EET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
     5. Faculty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
     6. Facilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
     7. Institutional and External Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
     8. Program Criteria – 2EET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Appendix 0, Cross-Reference: Self-Study to Form TC4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A 0-1
[Appendices numbered 1-5 have been deleted from this document. Some were considered unnecessary; others contained
course outlines which have been consolidated for the entire Penn State system. When the CD is used to review any ET
program, the main navigation screen will include a navigation bar on the left that lists all programs. Selecting a program
will produce a list of course outlines for further selection.]

Appendix 7, Curricula Vitae for Full-time Faculty. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A7-1
Appendix 8, Curricula Vitae for Part-time and Adjunct Faculty. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A8-1
                                      Part 1: Self-Study Report
                         Common Information: 2EET & 2MET & 4EMET


A. Background Information
A.1. Program Title
   At the Penn State – York Campus there are three Engineering Technology programs:

             Electrical Engineering Technology                    (A.S. EET) (2EET)
             Mechanical Engineering Technology                    (A.S. MET) (2MET)
             Electro-Mechanical Engineering Technology            (B.S. EMET) (4EMET)
                (Note: Both two-year programs feed into the four-year EMET program. There is no
      co-op or internship requirement, and no remote/alternative delivery of courses.)

   This particular self-study report mentions all three programs because there is extremely tight
   integration among them; no one program has exclusive claim to any classroom, lab, faculty
   member or support person. Much of the technical material is required in both the 2EET and
   2MET programs, or in the 4EMET program and one of the 2-year programs. The 4EMET
   program requires for admission an associate degree in either EET or MET. All full-time faculty
   teach or have taught courses taken by students in all three programs. A single, very active
   Industrial Advisory Committee (whose members tend to be multi-disciplinary) is concerned with
   all three. The CQI process is the same for all three programs; it is indistinguishable at the
   campus level, and tightly integrated at the university level.

A.2. Program Modes
   All three programs operate in a “twilight mode”: technical courses typically are offered just
   once a year, and alternate in scheduling between afternoon and evening. This allows part-time
   students on either day or evening shifts to schedule courses around their work schedules.

A.3. Actions to Correct Previous Findings
   A.3.a. Common Institutional Factors Affecting the Engineering Technology Unit

      i. Institutional Concern: “It is recommended that all student technical work be corrected
           for spelling and grammar so as to increase the students’ proficiency in this area”

          Response – We considered seriously the possibility of having reports for the "writing
          intensive" courses (any with a "W" suffix) proofread by a technical writer for
          spelling, grammar and punctuation. For a number of reasons (logistical, economic &
          pedagogical) we decided instead to ask all faculty (including adjuncts) to pay more
          attention to these details.
          By coincidence, Harley Hartman currently is teaching "W" courses for all three ET
          programs; therefore he is being particularly intentional about grading writing.
          Ann Fetterman, a specialist with our Learning Center, met with the engineering
          faculty several times to talk about how to grade writing. She also developed a sheet
          of proofreading marks and examples, to simplify grading for the faculty and to clarify
          for students what those marks mean.

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                                 Part 1: Self-Study Report
                   Common Information: 2EET & 2MET & 4EMET


   The Learning Center also scheduled and advertised regular voluntary sessions for
   writing-skill development, but hardly any students took advantage of those. Some of
   us are now incorporating a writing exercise into one of the first classes, and insisting
   that the worst writers go to the Learning Center for help.

ii. Other Comment on Institutional Factors: Literature does not identify ABET properly,
    "The institution is requested to give attention to this requirement and utilize this
    wording in an easily identifiable location such as the college catalog.”

   Response - The web-site and program brochures have been modified to identify
   ABET properly. Ref:

              2EET:    http://www.cede.psu.edu/studentguide/associate/2eet.htm

              2MET:    http://www.cede.psu.edu/studentguide/associate/2met.htm
 The 4EMET program has been in place since 2001 at the York Campus, and even longer at the
 Altoona, Berks and New Kensington campuses, where it is already accredited. For economic
 reasons, paper brochures for our 4EMET program will not be reprinted until after the
 accreditation process; however, updated information is available at the following web site:

              4EMET:    http://www.cede.psu.edu/studentguide/baccalaureate/emet.htm
                                   Part 1: Self-Study Report


                           Program-Specific Information: 2EET



A.3.b. Program Evaluation-Electrical Engineering Technology

   i. Program Concern: “The enrollment has declined from 55 in 1995 to 25 at present.”

      Response – Enrollment was much higher before major industries such as
      Caterpillar and AMP shut down. In the past five years enrollment has bounced
      around between 21 and 27. EET acts to a significant extent as a feeder to the
      upper division Electro-Mechanical Engineering Technology Program.

   ii. Program Concern: “Additional student-focused curricular activities, such as the
        formation of a student chapter of the IEEE, may be helpful in generating interest
        and excitement by students and potential students”

      Response – Students have been encouraged to join the campus chapter of IEEE. One
      student in the EMET program presented a project at the annual IEEE Region 2
      Student Activities Conference in 2004. Five students from our Engineering and
      Engineering Technology Programs attended the 2005 Conference and eleven students
      attended the 2006 Conference. Four of those students participated in the Ethics
      Competition, and all eleven actively participated in at least one of the competitions.

   iii. Institutional Concern: “It is recommended that all student technical work be
        corrected for spelling and grammar so as to increase the students’ proficiency in
        this area”

      Response – See corresponding institutional concern A.3.a.i. Faculty have had
      some training for grading writing, and are attempting to become more consistent
      in doing it.

   iv. Other Comments on Program: “Laboratory equipment and maintenance are
       currently adequate for the present program enrollment. Aging equipment and
       marginal maintenance combined with increasing enrollment may negatively
       impact the program in the future by distracting the faculty from their teaching
       responsibilities. This situation should be periodically assessed to maintain student
       access to equipment without undue burden on the faculty.”

      Response – An equipment survey was conducted in Spring 2004 for students,
      faculty, and the IAC members to determine what additional equipment was
      needed and what equipment was in need of repair. Several thousand dollars per
      year has been spent on equipment; for example, four digital oscilloscopes were
      purchased for the EET lab at a price of $950 each. A Pennsylvania Department of
      Education program provides grants for one-third of the cost of engineering
      equipment. We have secured a donation of $14,000 for our two-thirds, and have

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                                     Part 1: Self-Study Report


                              Program-Specific Information: 2EET


          received the remaining third as grant. About $20,000 of equipment has been
          identified to improve our labs, and will be purchased in 2006. More than half of
          this total directly impacts the EET program.


Note: The 4EMET program did not exist at this campus at the time of the last TAC evaluation.
It was started in 2001. Three other campuses already had the program, and now are accredited.
                                            Part 1: Self-Study Report
                              Common Information: 2EET & 2MET & 4EMET


B. Accreditation Summary
    Current criteria of the Accreditation Board of Engineering and Technology (ABET) require
    that, to be accredited, engineering technology programs must adopt clearly defined and
    measurable “objectives” and “outcomes.” The meaning of these two terms are clearly and
    explicitly defined by ABET. “Objectives” represent those accomplishments that can
    reasonably be expected of program graduates in the first few years after graduation.
    “Outcomes” represent the skills, knowledge and capabilities that graduates should possess at
    the time of graduation so that they are properly prepared to achieve the “objectives” of the
    program.
    The 2EET, 2MET and 4EMET programs at Penn State are offered at several campuses
    within the Penn State system, York Campus being one of them. However, each of the
    programs offered at all of these campuses is administered and academically controlled by the
    School of Engineering Design, Technology, and Professional Programs (SEDTAPP), which
    is a department within Penn State’s College of Engineering (COE). As such, the program
    curricula, as well as their objectives and outcomes, should be common to all offerings of the
    programs. Further, to ensure appropriate breadth, relevance, and technical currency,
    objectives and outcomes for the programs have been established, and will be maintained,
    through a process that involves faculty and program constituents from all campuses where
    the programs are offered. The details of that process are described in section B3 –
    Assessment and Evaluation of this document. The current objectives and outcomes
    established for these programs through that collective process are described later in this
    section.
University mission
To be valid, program objectives must be derived from the larger vision and mission of
the University and the College that offers the program. In the case of the ET
programs, this linkage is easily drawn. As stated in the latest University strategic
plan, Penn State “is a multi-campus, public land-grant university that improves the
lives of people…through, integrated, high-quality programs in teaching, research and
service.”1 In the arena of academic programs, the University pursues this vision via a
strategy that calls for “review[ing] academic programs [for] quality, centrality, and
demand [and] identify[ing] programs for enhancement, expansion, redefinition,
merger, or elimination to achieve world-class excellence.”2
College mission
Within the University, the College of Engineering (COE) is the primary agent
responsible for pursuing this academic strategy for engineering technology programs.
That responsibility is reflected in the College’s most recent strategic plan, where it is
stated that the College’s mission is to ‘develop and deliver an undergraduate
curriculum based on active, problem-based and professionally oriented teaching and

1
  “Progress Amidst Challenge – The Pennsylvania State University Strategic Plan – 2003-04 through
2005-06,” page 4.
2
  Ibid, page 6.

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                                                Part 1: Self-Study Report
                                  Common Information: 2EET & 2MET & 4EMET


learning’3 and to do so in a way that gives Penn State engineering technology
programs their ‘own identity and decision making capability,’ ‘strengthen[s]
baccalaureate pathways for viable programs,’ and ‘markets Penn State engineering
technology programs nationwide.’4
SEDTAPP mission
In the SEDTAPP’s view, the University’s and College’s focus on ‘problem-based,
professionally oriented’ academics is consistent with the demands that future
engineering technology graduates will face. That is, job challenges for future
graduates will be driven more by two trends – rapid changes in technology
(automation, digitization, miniaturization, embedded computerization, etc.) and
market globalization – than by any other factors. In that context, it will not be so
much the facts and information that graduates acquire while in school that matter, but
will instead be their ability to apply new facts and information to the
conceptualization, evaluation and solution to new problems, to be able to convey
those solutions in clear fashion to others, and to do so in the context of local and
international demands and constraints. Further, their professional success and
advancement will hinge on their ability to respond to new problems in this way.

      In this section (B) some subsections are common to all three programs and some
      are clearly distinguishable by program. The following list shows that distinction:
      Program-Specific                                 Common to all programs

B.1. Program Educational Objectives

B.2. Program Outcomes

                                                       B.3. Assessment and Evaluation

B.4. Program Characteristics

                                                       B.5. Faculty

                                                       B.6. Facilities

                                                       B.7. Institutional and External
Support

B.8. Program Criteria




3
    Penn State University College of Engineering Strategic Plan, 2005/6 – 2008/9, page 11
4
    Ibid., page 13
                               Part 1: Self-Study Report
                   Common Information: 2EET & 2MET & 4EMET


The three ET programs are closely integrated. Associate Degree students are made
aware of our Baccalaureate Electro-Mechanical Engineering technology program and
are encouraged to consider this as an additional opportunity once they complete either 2-
year degree. In addition, students considering the 4-year degree are encouraged to take
optional courses in the Associate Degree program (such as an advanced calculus course)
that can be applied to the 4EMET program.
                                        Part 1: Self-Study Report


                                Program-Specific Information: 2EET


B.1. Program Educational Objectives - 2EET Program
   The objectives of the Penn State EET program reflect the belief that successful graduates of tomorrow
   will be faced with job challenges that are driven by the rapidly changing face of the technical work
   community. Modernization, digitization, and automation across the spectrum of human endeavor mean
   that almost any technical system today will include elements from almost all aspects of electrical
   technology. Analog sensors measure the state of the surroundings.       Signal conditioners manage and
   digitize that information, and computers or embedded processors use the digitized information to
   determine desired actions and information. Computed results drive both digital and analog devices to
   move things, display things, alter things, communicate, or otherwise produce desired effects.
   EET graduates immersed in this environment will be obligated to understand, assemble, install, operate,
   troubleshoot, and many times help in the design of all aspects of these new technologies and products.
   To do so, they will need a solid theoretical foundation across the spectrum of electrical, electronic,
   digital and computer topics. However, beyond the theories, they will need to understand, and quantify,
   the practical capabilities and limitations of technologies built on these theories. Otherwise, without this
   practical underpinning, their ability to operate, install, troubleshoot, and maintain modern systems will
   be severely limited.
   However, theoretical and practical understanding is no longer enough. The ever increasing influence of
   global competition and the global economy means that all fields, technical and non-technical, involve
   more interaction and cooperation among individuals from varying cultures and backgrounds than ever
   before. In this environment, strong interpersonal skills, effective communication, and sound social,
   environmental, and ethical awareness are essential.
   Finally, the rapid pace of technological change in recent years has made it clear that the technical details
   that students learn in school today will be obsolete long before their careers end; possibly even before
   the ink is truly dry on their diplomas. The only defense against technical obsolescence is a commitment
   to continual education, either self-directed or in an organized format. Technical specialists must accept
   this commitment or they will fail.


   B.1.a. Objectives
   With this philosophical framework as a backdrop, the objectives adopted for Penn State’s EET program
   are –
   “To produce graduates who, during the first few years of professional practice, will:
   1. Demonstrate broad knowledge of electrical/electronics engineering technology practices to support
      design, application, installation, manufacturing, operation, and maintenance as required by their
      employer,
   2. Apply basic mathematical and scientific principles for technical problem solving in areas that may
      include circuit analysis and analog and digital electronics, microprocessors and electrical
      machines,
   3. Utilize computers and software in a technical environment,
   4. Demonstrate competence in written and oral communication,

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                               Program-Specific Information: 2EET


   5. Work effectively as an individual and as a member of a multidisciplinary team,
   6. Show awareness of social concerns and professional responsibilities in the workplace, and
   7. Continue their professional training and adapt to changes in the workplace through additional
      formal or informal education.”

B.2. Program Outcomes
   The program objectives outlined above are the achievements that are expected of EET graduates once
   they leave Penn State and embark on their careers. Program outcomes, on the other hand, are those
   skills and capabilities that are the foundation on which those achievements can be built. Stated
   differently, outcomes are the talents, skills, and capabilities that should be imparted to students so
   that, when they leave Penn State, they are well-equipped to succeed at their chosen careers.
   B.2.a. Outcomes
   The Penn State EET program has identified eleven outcomes that are believed to provide that
   foundation. Those outcomes require that “Graduates be able to:
       1. Apply basic knowledge in electronics, electrical circuit analysis, electrical machines,
           microprocessors, and programmable logic controllers,
       2. Conduct experiments, and then analyze and interpret results,
       3. Apply basic mathematical, scientific, and engineering concepts to technical problem solving,
       4. Demonstrate a working knowledge of drafting and computer usage, including the use of one or
           more computer software packages for technical problem solving,
       5. Communicate effectively orally, visually, and in writing,
       6. Work effectively in teams,
       7. Understand professional, ethical and social responsibilities,
       8. Have a respect for diversity and a knowledge of contemporary professional, societal and
           global issues,
       9. Recognize the need for lifelong learning and be prepared to continue their education through
           formal or informal study,
       10. Apply creativity through the use of project-based work to design circuits, systems or
           processes, and
       11. Have a commitment to quality, timeliness, and continuous improvement.”


   B.2.b. Outcomes vs. Criterion 2

The preceding discussion describes the views of Penn State faculty, administration, and industry
advisors regarding appropriate and effective objectives and outcomes for the EET program.
However, TAC of ABET also has expectations regarding program outcomes. Those expectations
                                           Part 1: Self-Study Report


                                   Program-Specific Information: 2EET


are defined in Criterion 2 of the General Accreditation Criteria and are typically referred to as the
“a – k” requirements. In the most recent Criteria5, these requirements are stated as follows –
    “An engineering technology program must demonstrate that graduates have:
     a. an appropriate mastery of the knowledge, techniques, skills and modern tools of their
        disciplines,
     b. an ability to apply current knowledge and adapt to emerging applications of
        mathematics, science, engineering and technology,
     c. an ability to conduct, analyze and interpret experiments and apply experimental
        results to improve processes,
     d. an ability to apply creativity in the design of systems, components or processes
        appropriate to program objectives,
     e. an ability to function effectively on teams,
     f. an ability to identify, analyze and solve technical problems,
     g. an ability to communicate effectively,
     h. a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in, lifelong learning,
     i. an ability to understand professional, ethical and social responsibilities,
     j. a respect for diversity and a knowledge of contemporary professional, societal and
        global issues, and
     k. a commitment to quality, timeliness and continuous improvement.”
In addition to the General Criteria, which apply to all accredited engineering technology
programs, the ABET stipulates program-specific performance expectations for specific
programs. The program-specific criteria for Electrical/Electronic(s) Engineering Technology
Programs6 stipulate that –
    “Graduates … must demonstrate knowledge and hands-on competence … in:
     a. the application of circuit analysis and design, computer programming, associated
        software, analog and digital electronics, and microcomputers to the building, testing,
        operation, and maintenance of electrical/electronic systems, and
     b. the application of physics or chemistry to electrical/electronic(s) circuits in a rigorous
        mathematical environment at or above the level of algebra and trigonometry.”
Both the general and the program-specific criteria were considered in the development of and are
encompassed by the EET program outcomes. Table B.2-1 below shows the correspondence
between EET program outcomes and the ABET’s general and program-specific criteria.



       Table B.2-1 – Correspondence Between Program Outcomes and ABET Criteria
                                                                 ABET General Criteria               Pgm.


5
  “Criteria for Accrediting Engineering Technology Programs,” Effective for Evaluations During the 2006-2007
Evaluation Cycle, October 29, 2005, pg 5.
6
  Ibid., pg. 19
                                                          Part 1: Self-Study Report


                                              Program-Specific Information: 2EET


                                                                                                                                          Crit.
                    Program Outcomes                                    a     b     c    d   e       f        g       h       i   j   k   a   b
                        (Students should: )
   Apply basic knowledge in electronics, electrical circuit
 1 analysis, electrical machines, microprocessors, and                 X      X                                                           X
   programmable logic controllers.
 2 Conduct experiments, and then analyze and interpret results.                     X                                                     X
   Apply basic mathematical, scientific, and engineering concepts
 3                                                                            X          X           X                                    X   X
   to technical problem solving.
   Demonstrate a working knowledge of drafting and computer
 4 usage, including the use of one or more computer software           X                                                                  X
   packages for technical problem solving.
 5 Communicate effectively orally, visually, and in writing.                                                 X
 6 Work effectively in teams.                                                                X
 7 Understand professional, ethical and social responsibilities.                                                          X
   Have a respect for diversity and a knowledge of contemporary
 8                                                                                                                                X
   professional, societal and global issues
   Recognize the need for lifelong learning and be prepared to
 9                                                                                                                    X
   continue their education through formal or informal study.
   Apply creativity through the use of project-based work to
10                                                                                       X                                                X
   design circuits, systems or processes.
   Have a commitment to quality, timeliness, and continuous
11                                                                                                                                    X
   improvement.




    B.2.c. Outcomes vs. Objectives

If program outcomes are to provide the proper foundation for achieving program objectives, it is
essential that there be a direct correlation between the outcomes and the expected objectives.
Table B.2-2 below illustrates this correspondence in general terms. Numbers of program
objectives are those used in paragraph B.1.b above.




   Table B.2-2 – Correspondence Between Program Objectives and Program Outcomes

                                                                                                             Program Objectives

                    Program Outcomes (i.e., students should:)                                    1       2        3       4       5   6   7
         Apply basic knowledge in electronics, electrical circuit analysis, electrical
     1                                                                                           X       X
         machines, microprocessors, and programmable logic controllers.
                                                         Part 1: Self-Study Report


                                              Program-Specific Information: 2EET


    2     Conduct experiments, and then analyze and interpret results.                                                                     X                                      X
          Apply basic mathematical, scientific, and engineering concepts to technical
    3                                                                                                                                      X             X                        X
          problem solving.
          Demonstrate a working knowledge of drafting and computer usage, including the
    4                                                                                                                                      X             X                        X
          use of one or more computer software packages for technical problem solving.
    5     Communicate effectively orally, visually, and in writing.                                                                                                               X                X
    6     Work effectively in teams.                                                                                                                                                                                X
    7     Understand professional, ethical and social responsibilities.                                                                                                                                                            X               X
          Have a respect for diversity and a knowledge of contemporary professional,
    8                                                                                                                                                                                                               X              X
          societal and global issues
          Recognize the need for lifelong learning and be prepared to continue their
    9                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              X
          education through formal or informal study.
          Apply creativity through the use of project-based work to design circuits, systems
    10                                                                                                                                     X                                                                        X
          or processes.
    11    Have a commitment to quality, timeliness, and continuous improvement.                                                                                                   X                                 X              X



B.2.d. Outcomes vs. Courses


In general, EET program outcomes are achieved through work in the various courses that make
up the EET curriculum. However, to ensure that result, it is necessary to take the final step of
identifying and ensuring the relationship among the expected outcomes and the courses that are
responsible for achieving those outcomes. That relationship, as currently constituted in the EET
curriculum, is illustrated in Table B.2-3. The table indicates those courses that are designed to
be the primary venues for achieving the various outcomes defined above. However, it is
important to note that most, if not all, outcomes are achieved through the influence of many
courses and activities. Table B.2-3 indicates only those courses where emphasis is placed
specifically on the development of the indicated outcomes. Specific details of the curriculum
and the courses making up the curriculum are covered in a later section of this report.




         Table B.2-3 – Relationships Between Program Outcomes and Program Courses
                                                                                                                                                     Courses
                                                                                               EET 109 LAB




                                                                                                                                                      EET 118 LAB
                                                                                                                                                                    EET 120 LAB
                                                                                                                                                                                  EET 205 LAB




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   EET 221 LAB
                                                                                                                                                                                                                    EET 213W




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 Gen. Educ.
                                                                                                             EGT 101
                                                                                                                       EGT 102
                                                                                     EET 101




                                                                                                                                 EET 114
                                                                                                                                           EET 117




                                                                                                                                                                                                EET 210
                                                                                                                                                                                                          EET 211


                                                                                                                                                                                                                               EET 216
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         EET 220
                                                                   ET 002
                                                                            ET 005




                   Program Outcomes
                      (Students should: )
                                                         Part 1: Self-Study Report


                                              Program-Specific Information: 2EET


   Apply basic knowledge in electronics, electrical circuit
 1 analysis, electrical machines, microprocessors, and                     X               X   X               X   X   X   X   X
   programmable logic controllers.
 2 Conduct experiments, and then analyze and interpret results.                X                   X   X   X                       X
   Apply basic mathematical, scientific, and engineering
 3                                                                 X   X   X               X                   X       X   X
   concepts to technical problem solving.
   Demonstrate a working knowledge of drafting and computer
 4 usage, including the use of one or more computer software           X           X   X                           X           X
   packages for technical problem solving.
 5 Communicate effectively orally, visually, and in writing.       X               X   X               X   X           X       X X
 6 Work effectively in teams.                                          x       X                   X                   X       X
 7 Understand professional, ethical and social responsibilities.   x   x                                               X               X
   Have a respect for diversity and a knowledge of
 8                                                                     X                                               X               X
   contemporary professional, societal and global issues
   Recognize the need for lifelong learning and be prepared to
 9                                                                     x                                                               X
   continue their education through formal or informal study.
   Apply creativity through the use of project-based work to
10                                                                                                     X   X       X           X X
   design circuits, systems or processes.
   Have a commitment to quality, timeliness, and continuous
11                                                                                                                     X       X
   improvement.




       All course outlines are found on the CD, and can be reached via the main navigation
    window.


    B.2.e. Display Material Organization


To facilitate the accreditation team’s review of the success of the EET program in achieving its
defined outcomes, Table B.2-3 has been used as an organizing framework for two distinct sets of
display materials. Though the two sets contain overlapping information, they are organized
differently.


One set is organized according to the eleven program outcomes. That is, there are eleven
folders, one for each outcome listed in Table B.2.3. Each of these ‘Outcome’ folders contains
samples of student work, relevant to that outcome, from the corresponding courses indicated in
Table B.2.3. Since it is generally true that no outcome is achieved through the efforts of a single
course, a reviewer can, by examining these folders, determine the breadth of development of
each outcome across the entire program curriculum.


The second display set follows the more traditional approach of organizing display materials into
‘Course’ folders. Each of these folders will contain reference to outcomes and CQI activities
related to that course.
                                       Part 1: Self-Study Report
                           Common Information: 2EET & 2MET & 4EMET


B.3. Assessment and Evaluation


Engineering Technology is coordinated across the Penn State system. Assessment and evaluation for all
ET programs take place at the University (System) level, at the Campus level, and at the Instructor level.
Every teacher should strive for improvement in teaching; at Penn State, personal observation and
response is supplemented by several different tools, procedures and committees. The two figures at the
end of Section B.3 show how these entities interact.


Every faculty member has a degree of academic freedom in determining how a course is taught;
however, each ET course has a System-wide Course Chair responsible for a standard course outline, and
each ET program has a System-wide Curriculum Committee responsible for defining program content,
including associated outcomes and objectives. Curriculum Committees meet only every month or two,
so immediate concerns and questions are handled by a Campus Program Coordinator or a System-wide
Program Coordinator.


The second of the two figures in this section has a box listing key Assessment Tools. All are used as
part of the feedback process for Continuous Quality Improvement. Course grades and SRTEs (Student
Rating of Teaching Effectiveness) apply directly to one course taught by one instructor. The feedback
loop for those mainly involves just the instructor, but the DAA reviews the SRTEs to assure that faculty
are being effective. Surveys of current and recent graduates, employers, and our Industrial Advisory
Committee are particularly valuable for responses to open-ended questions of the nature of "how can we
do better." These provide feedback on how well we are accomplishing our declared objectives, as well
as how those objectives should be changed.


The M.E.E.T. database was created specifically to assess how well we are accomplishing our declared
course outcomes. This is an on-line system that gathers student and faculty input from all campuses
regarding how well each specified outcome was met in each class. It also digests the data and provides
graphical summaries. The data are valuable for individual faculty, program coordinators and curriculum
committees.


Between here and the figures at the end of this section are paragraphs amplifying on the organizational
structure mentioned above. There are more layers and side branches than the above simplified overview
would indicate.
          _____________________________________________________________

   SEDTAPP is an acronym for the School of Engineering Design, Technology and Professional
   Programs. SEDTAPP is a Department in the College of Engineering (the academic authority for the
   programs), and a Division in the Commonwealth College (the deliverer of the programs).
   SEDTAPP is responsible for carrying out the engineering technology mission as established by the

                                                   16
                                   Part 1: Self-Study Report
                       Common Information: 2EET & 2MET & 4EMET


strategic plans of those two colleges. From the perspective of curriculum and programs, that mission
for technology is to ‘develop and deliver an undergraduate curriculum based on active, problem-
based and professionally oriented teaching and learning’ and to do so in a way that gives Penn State
engineering technology programs their ‘own identity and decision making capability,’ ‘strengthen[s]
baccalaureate pathways for viable programs,’ and ‘markets Penn State engineering technology
programs nationwide.’
The SEDTAPP strives to achieve this mission via a three-pronged strategy that emphasizes ongoing
assessment of and planning for the future vision of technology; systematic control, monitoring and
evolutionary growth of existing program curricula; and coordinated resource allocation and
professional development of faculty. The general responsibilities for carrying out these three
strategies are embedded in three broad-based activities headed, respectively, by the Engineering
Technology Council, the Engineering Technology Advisory Board, and the administrations of the
SEDTAPP and the individual campuses where technology programs are offered. Further, ongoing
monitoring, assessment, improvement, and strategic growth of all the engineering technology is an
inherent feature of these activities. The fold-out diagram several pages ahead summarizes the
organization and interaction among these activities. Detailed descriptions of the activities and
responsibilities of each area follow.


The Engineering Technology Council (ETC):
In addition to the COE’s engineering technology programs delivered by the CwC, there are
engineering technology programs offered, and in some cases academically controlled, by four other
academic colleges within the Penn State system (The Capital College, the Altoona College, the
Behrend College and the Berks-Lehigh Valley College). Student movement among these programs
is common, and in fact, is encouraged by the University to optimize the availability of programs to
all Pennsylvania residents. As a result, it is essential that programs at all locations and colleges
remain as compatible as possible to avoid creating artificial barriers for students needing this
flexibility. Further, it is essential that all the technology programs at the University share a
coordinated strategy of program and curriculum development to minimize unwanted duplication,
optimize resource usage, avoid internal competition for students, and create an integrated system of
opportunities for future technology students. The ETC is the main vehicle for ensuring the inter-
campus coordination necessary to bring these results about.
The ETC consists of the administrative leaders (department heads, division head, etc.) at each of the
six colleges involved in offering engineering technology programs. The Council typically meets
four times a year.
The ETC is supported in its role by two other groups, the Engineering Technology Vision Team
(ETVT) and a state-wide Industrial Advisory Council (IAC). The ETVT was formed in early 2004
to examine the state of technology programs at Penn State and, based on that examination, to
develop a strategic vision of how the programs should evolve. Subsequently, the ETC decided that
such strategic brainstorming was a natural complement to its duties, particularly if it included the
development of practical recommendations for achieving future visions. Thus, the ETVT was
charged with that responsibility as an ongoing support to the ETC.
                                    Part 1: Self-Study Report
                       Common Information: 2EET & 2MET & 4EMET


Engineering Technology Vision Team – The ETVT consist of selected senior and junior faculty
members, key administrators, and active curriculum and course coordinators from all parts of the
Penn State technology system. It typically meets two to three times each year to assess the state of
affairs in technology, the progress on development initiatives, and to modify and update future plans
for the SEDTAPP technology programs. One of its key responsibilities in this role is the
identification of funding sources for development activities and the preparation of funding and grant
proposals to support those activities.
State-wide Industrial Advisory Council – The state-wide IAC was established in 2005 to bring
together representatives from key industrial constituents around Pennsylvania primarily to establish
a more integrated understanding of the needs and expectations of employers of technology graduates
and how those expectations should be factored into Penn State’s spectrum of technology offerings.
The state-wide IAC was also created to provide a greater visibility within both the University and the
industrial community of the importance of technology programs to Penn State. Members of the
state-wide IAC are generally self-identified, active volunteers from the various local IACs that
support the many campus technology programs. The council typically meets twice a year with the
ETC, and their main role is to provide the ETC with input about where industry is headed and how
those directions should impact on the future directions for technology programs at the University.

The Engineering Technology Advisory Board (ETAB):
Where the ETC, with the support of the ETVT and the state IAC, is charged with charting the long-
range future directions of Penn State technology, the Engineering Technology Advisory Board is
charged with facilitating the consistent delivery of SEDTAPP’s existing technology programs
throughout the system, and with managing the orderly evolution of those curricula to meet changing
demands. It does this by coordinating curriculum development activities, establishing desired
program outcomes, correlating course activities with desired program outcomes, establishing and
disseminating curriculum and course standards, responding to constituents’ suggestions for
curriculum improvement, and managing evolutionary changes in curricula. Like the ETVT, the
ETAB consist of selected senior and junior faculty members, key administrators, and active
curriculum and course coordinators from all parts of the Penn State technology system, and in fact,
there is typically significant overlap between the two groups. Meetings of the groups are also
typically coordinated to permit exchange of ideas and information between the two activities. The
ETAB accomplishes its objectives primarily by developing strategic direction for its three main
support groups: the system-wide program coordinators, the program curriculum committees, and the
course chairs. Each of those groups is described below.
System-wide Program Coordinators – though there are eight distinct ET programs in the SEDTAPP
system (EET, MET, BET, TelET, NanoET, AET, BEST, and EMET), commonalties in their
curricula permit them to be grouped into three major programmatic areas: Electrical-based ET (EET,
TelET, BET, & NanoET), Mechanical-based ET (MET, AET, & BEST), and Electro-Mechanical ET
(EMET). The SEDTAPP has assigned a System-wide Program Coordinator for each of these
programmatic areas. System-wide coordinators’ job is to be the liaison among program coordinators
at all the campuses where their respective programs are offered. The liaison function relates
primarily to keeping campus program leaders abreast of curriculum developments, coordinating
development activities that involve those leaders, identifying opportunities for resource sharing
                                    Part 1: Self-Study Report
                       Common Information: 2EET & 2MET & 4EMET


and/or exchange among programs, and identifying common needs and interests, and opportunities
for shared effort, among faculty at different locations.
Program Curriculum Committees – as with the system-wide coordinators, there are three SEDTAPP
Curriculum Committees, one for EET-related programs, one for MET-related programs, and one for
the EMET programs. Curriculum committees are responsible for establishing, controlling,
monitoring, disseminating, and directing the orderly evolution of the SEDTAPP engineering
technology program curricula. The committees meet twice during the year at the spring and fall
SEDTAPP faculty meetings and at other times during the year as situations dictate. Committees
consist of faculty representatives from all of the colleges within Penn State that deliver engineering
technology programs. Committee functions, membership, and operating rules are governed by
Bylaws generated by Committee members but approved by all faculty. Each committee
accomplishes its charge mainly through the following activities:
   Establishing and disseminating the TC2K ‘objectives’ expected of the program, and periodically
    reviewing and updating those objectives based on assessment information.
   Establishing and disseminating the TC2K ‘outcomes’ expected of the program, and periodically
    reviewing and updating those outcomes to ensure they support the current program objectives.
   Establishing those courses and activities in the program curriculum that are to be the primary
    means by which program outcomes are to be achieved.
   Recruiting and managing course chairpersons to develop and maintain standard course outlines
    for all technical courses in the curriculum.
   Reviewing, approving, and disseminating standard course outlines to faculty.
   Receiving, reviewing, responding to, and acting on faculty recommendations for curriculum
    change and improvement.
   Managing the curricular change process though the colleges and the University faculty senate for
    official curriculum changes.
   Monitoring program-related assessment information from various assessment systems
    (employer, graduate, and student exit surveys; advisory body inputs; M.E.E.T data system; etc.)
    and taking appropriate curricular action to respond to that information.
   Maintaining records documenting curricular change activities.


Course Chairpersons – chairpersons in charge of SEDTAPP’s standard course outlines hold a key
place in the SEDTAPP curricular quality control structure. As noted above, curriculum committees
establish the expected ‘objectives’ and ‘outcomes’ for programs, and then identify those courses in
the curriculum are the key producers of the expected outcomes. The committees rely on a set of
approved, standard course outlines to ensure that the defined outcomes are consistently achieved
everywhere a program is offered. They do this by expecting every faculty member teaching in the
SEDTAPP engineering technology programs to use the standard outlines as the basis for their own
in-course syllabi. Course outlines follow a standard format. They also explicitly identify the
program outcomes supported by the course, expand those program outcomes into specific course
                                    Part 1: Self-Study Report
                       Common Information: 2EET & 2MET & 4EMET


outcomes, suggest example activities and practices that can be used to achieve course outcomes, and
suggest possible ways to assess and document students’ success in achieving each outcome.
Course chairs are the agents responsible for developing, maintaining, and revising the course
outlines. Chairs are selected from among the faculty who have significant experience teaching each
course. They are responsible to first develop, and then provide annual updates of, the outlines to the
curriculum committees for review and approval. Approved outlines are then distributed to all
faculty.
In the process of developing and maintaining outlines, course chairs receive input from several
sources. As noted above, curriculum committees identify the program outcomes to be supported by
courses, and they act as the review and approval body for changes to outlines. However, the primary
inputs leading to improvement of outlines come from faculty. Each semester, the SEDTAPP surveys
the performance of every technology course at every location with reference to the established
program ‘outcomes.’ One element of that process offers faculty the opportunity to comment on the
effectiveness of existing course outlines and course outcomes, and to offer suggestions for
improvement. Those suggestions and comments are made available directly to the course chairs.
When receiving such comments, course chairs are expected to evaluate the comments, if necessary,
discuss the comments with the appropriate faculty, and develop a suitable response. Suitable
responses may be anything from a discussion and resolution of the comments with the interested
faculty to the identification of necessary revisions to the outline. Course chairs are responsible for
managing and documenting these activities and reporting the outcomes to curriculum committees on
an annual basis. The following flow chart is included to clarify the nature of these interactions.

Administrative Support Structure for Engineering Technology:
The framework on which all of the above activities hang is the administrative infrastructure of the
Penn State colleges that offer technology programs. The head of the SEDTAPP provides overall
coordination of this function, primarily by interacting with the local campus Directors of Academic
Affairs (DAAs) to keep them apprised of external demands and obligations on the technology
programs (mostly related to accreditation), future directions and opportunities being pursued by
SEDTAPP leadership, and funding and grant opportunities that may help support local programs.
The SEDTAPP head also establishes workload guidelines for technology faculty, provides input to
faculty performance evaluations, consults in and provides guidance for faculty hiring, and advocates,
with the campus administration, in faculty promotion and tenure decisions. Finally, the SEDTAPP
provides some funds to the campuses to support professional development activities for faculty.
Campus DAAs are the local counterparts to the SEDTAPP head. They are the academic leaders at
the campuses, and as such, are most directly responsible for faculty supervision and development.
They are responsible for managing work assignments, providing necessary clerical and staff support,
assessing and rewarding performance, planning for and supporting professional development,
ensuring adequate resources and facilities for programs, hiring faculty, and advocating for faculty in
promotion and tenure processes.
A Campus Program Coordinator is the main administrative interface between the DAA and the
technology program and its faculty. The coordinator’s core role typically includes establishing
program class schedules, assigning standing faculty to classes, arranging for adjunct faculty when
                                    Part 1: Self-Study Report
                       Common Information: 2EET & 2MET & 4EMET


needed, advising students, and interacting with the System-wide Program Coordinator (described
earlier). Coordinators also monitor and anticipate equipment and resource needs of the technology
programs and keep campus administration aware of those needs. They also are expected to take the
lead in identifying sources and possible funding to meet those needs. Much of this activity takes
place via interactions with the local industrial advisory committees, which are typically orchestrated
by the campus coordinator. Finally, coordinators are typically leaders in campus recruitment and
marketing efforts, and for identifying and organizing student internships, tours, and recruitment
functions.
Finally, the faculty represent the foundation for all the functions discussed above. In the context of
ensuring quality of the technology programs, they have four key roles. First and foremost, they are
obligated to teach the various courses in the program with particular emphasis given to
accomplishing the course outcomes stipulated in the standard course outlines. Second, they are
responsible for continually assessing the accomplishments in their courses against their expected
outcomes, mainly by participating in the various assessment activities and surveys conducted by the
SEDTAPP via the ETAB. They are also expected to routinely assess both their courses and the
program with respect to developing trends and changing technology, and to recommend to course
chairs and curriculum committees, course and curriculum adjustments to adapt to these changes.
Finally, faculty are expected to be actively involved with local industrial contacts, via the local
advisory committee and elsewhere, to identify sources of resources, funding, and adjunct faculty
candidates, and to create opportunities for tours, internship, student employment, and faculty
development and consultancy.
                                            Part 1: Self-Study Report
                          Common Information: 2EET & 2MET & 4EMET




                                                                                                            To:
                                                                                                            Engr Faculty Council
                                          Curriculum Committee                                              Univ. Faculty Senate

                    Establishes Program Objectives & Outcomes
                    Identifies Foundation Courses to Support Outcomes
                    Disseminates Objective, Outcome, & Course Information to Faculty
                    Assigns Course Chairs
                    Reviews & Approves Standard Course Outlines                                         Formal Proposals for Course &
                    Disseminates Approved Outlines to Faculty                                           Curriculum Change Approval
                    Assesses Need for & Initiates Curricular Improvement/Change
                    Reviews & Responds to Faculty Suggestions re. Curriculum Changes
                    Manages University Approval of Curriculum Change



                                 Program Outcomes vs. Courses
                                                                                            Recommendations for Course
                                                                                            and Curriculum Change


Response/Resolution to Course                                    Annual Outline Updates
& Curriculum Suggestions



                                               Course Chairs

              Develops & Maintains Standard Course Outline
              Reviews & Responds to Faculty Comments/Suggestions re. Course Outlines
              Updates Course Outlines Annually in Response to Faculty Assessment & Comments




                                Course Change Suggestions



                                                            Response/Resolution to Course
                                                            Change Suggestions




                                                    Faculty

                    Incorporate Standard Course Outcomes into Class Syllabi
                    Assess Class Performance vs. Course Outcomes Each Semester
                    Provide Comments/Suggestions to Course Chairs re. Standard Outlines




                                                            22
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                                                                                                       Common Information: 2EET & 2MET & 4EMET



Strategic Guidance for ET Programs

                                                                                              Commonwealth College                       College of Engineering                                             SEDTAPP
                                                                                                                                                                                          Quality Assurance Organization and Functions
                          Capital College                   Behrend College
                                                                                                                         Vision & mission
                                                                                                                         Resources & support
                                  System coordination among all
  Berks-LHV College                  University ET programs


                                           Engineering                                                          School of Engineering Design,
    Altoona College                     Technology Council                                                       Technology & Professional
                                                                                                                   Programs (SEDTAPP)                                  Curricular Control & Enhancement


    Commonwealth
       College
                                          Strategic planning guidance
                                                                                                          Administrative                                                                   Engineering Technology
                      Engineering Technology                   State-Wide Industrial                      Support for ET                                                                       Advisory Board                Products:
                           Vision Team                        Advisory Board for ET                                                                                                                                           Pgm goals & objectives
                                                                                                                                    Resources & support                                                                      Curriculum/course mods
                                                                                                                                    Professional development                                                                 Course chair assignments
                                                                                                                                                                                                                              Standard course outlines


                                                                                                                   Campus Administration
Assessment & Feedback                                                                                                                                                    System-wide Program               Program Curriculum
                                                                                                                                                                             Coordinators                      Committees
                                                           Funds & equipment
                                                           Advisory support                    Resources & support                                                          Pgm/curric coord
                                                                                                Professional development                                                     Equipment sharing

                                                                                                                                                 Professional development                                                  Course feedback from faculty
                                                                                                                                                 Administrative support                                                    Course coordination
                                                                                           Pgm reviews
     Graduates & Employers                                                                 Resources
                                                              Local Industrial             Adjuncts
                                                                                                                Campus Program
                                                            Advisory Committees                                  Coordinators

                                                                                                                                                                                                                    Course Chairs
                                                                                                                                                                         Faculty curriculum feedback:
                                                                                   Course support                                                                        Course improvements
                                                                                   Internships          Scheduling                                                      Curriculum upgrades                              Std. course outlines
                                                                                   Consulting           Admin support                                                   New pgm & course proposals                       Feedback on course content,
                                                                                   Tours                                                                                                                                    effectiveness, upgrades

                       ASSESSMENT TOOLS:                                                                                       Faculty
                         Graduate surveys
                         Employer surveys
                         M.E.E.T. database
                         IAC surveys
                         SRTEs
                         Course grades
                         Exit surveys                                                                                              23
                         ?
                                           Part 1: Self-Study Report


                                   Program-Specific Information: 2EET


B.3.a. Examples of CQI – 2EET Program

System Reports:

The Penn State Engineering Technology Assessment Team has been working with faculty and
administration to develop a system that will aid in the direct measurement of Program Educational
Objectives (PEOs), Program Outcomes (POs), and Course-Level Outcomes (COs). Several
instruments have been designed and tested:

              Online Exit Surveys (Program Outcomes)
              Online Industrial Surveys (Program Educational Objectives)
              Online Alumni Surveys (Program Outcomes and Program Educational Objectives)
              The online M.E.E.T. (“Measurement and Evaluation Engineering Technology”)
               system which contains 3 instruments.
               1. Instructor Perception of Student Performance (With Evidence)
               2. Instructor Perception of Course Effectiveness (With Comments)
               3. Student Perception of Ability and Course Effectiveness (With
                  Comments)

Exit Survey and Interviews:

        In addition to the Industrial Advisory Committee at Penn State York conducting exit surveys
with graduating students, an on-line exit survey was administered to students graduating in
Engineering Technology. The first section collected data regarding the background and basic
information of the student while the second section collected data about the Program Outcomes. A
summary of the results and action taken is included in the display material. For example, 12.5% of
the students surveyed in EET felt that Program Outcomes 7, “understand professional, ethical and
social responsibilities” was not being met. Material was added to ET2 and ET5 to address this
concern.
        As an example the feedback from the Penn State York IAC exit interviews, lab experiments
using Field Programmable Logic Arrays (FPLA) was asked to be included in one of the courses in
the EET program. For Spring 2006 term, FPLA has been included using equipment from Xilinx
Corporation. Additional examples and action taken will be included in the display material.

Industry Survey:

An on-line survey was sent to Employers that hired Penn State Graduates to obtain their comments
and recommendations on Penn State Graduates and on our technology programs. This was done for
the campuses that offer these programs and the results and a summary will be included in the display
material. In addition, a hard copy survey was presented to the York Industrial Advisory Committee
and those results will be included. The actions taken as a result of these surveys will be discussed.
For example, one of the companies asked for EET students to have the ability to read wiring
diagrams; as a result, a wiring diagram assignment will be included.



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                                            Part 1: Self-Study Report


                                    Program-Specific Information: 2EET




Alumni Survey: No specific changes resulted.


M.E.E.T. System Wide Report:

The M.E.E.T. (Measurement and Evaluation Engineering Technology) System Wide Report and
data analysis is included in the display material. A system wide report is included in the display
material that is broken down campus by campus. The three areas included in this report are:
           1. Instructor Perception of Student Performance (With Evidence)
           2. Instructor Perception of Course Effectiveness (With Comments)
           3. Student Perception of Ability and Course Effectiveness (With
                Comments)

As an example of the analysis for York EET, the data indicated that for Program Outcome 7,
“Understand professional, ethical and social responsibilities”, the results did not meet the acceptable
standards. Material was added to ET 5 to accomplish this outcome.
The M.E.E.T. data for each Penn State York course will be included with the display material along
with the assessment and course modifications.

Curriculum Committee:

It was recognized that Outcome #8 was not being addressed properly. The EET Curriculum Meeting
on 9/15/ 2005 sought a solution. After consideration of multiple alternatives, the EET curriculum
committee voted unanimously to add program outcome #8 to ET 005 and EET 213W in the
mapping.

Outcome #8, “Have a respect for diversity and knowledge of contemporary, professional, societal,
and global issues”, was added to the ET 005 course outline eventually, as these specific outcomes:

    Outcome 8:
     Introduction of students to professional codes of ethics that practitioners of engineering &
      technology are expected to abide by.
     Students complete some problem/homework assignment focused on controversial
      technology.
                                                       Part 1: Self-Study Report


                                            Program-Specific Information: 2EET


B.4. Program Characteristics – 2EET
    B.4.a. Curriculum vs. Criteria 4 and 8
    Table 1 lists all courses in the program, and identifies them by content area.


    Criterion 8 specifies two application-oriented outcomes for a 2EET program. In Section
    B.2.b. it was shown how those two outcomes mapped to our 2EET program objectives, and
    in Section B.2.d. it was shown how the program objectives mapped to specific courses.
                                                              Table 1. Curriculum
    Table B.4-1 lists the required courses in the Electrical Engineering Technology associate degree
    program. The year and semester in which students typically take these courses are indicated in the first
    column; however, some alteration of schedules may occur in individual cases depending on specific
    student needs. Sequencing of technical courses is dictated by course prerequisites, which are stipulated
    in the University Bulletin. Footnotes in the table highlight correlations between various curriculum
    elements and specific TC2K accreditation criteria.


                                    Table B.4-1 – EET Program Curriculum
                                                                                         Category (Credit Hours)




                                                                                                                                             (Lecture/Lab Credits)
                                                                                                    Physical & Natural




                                                                                                                                             Technical Content
                                                                                                                         Social Sciences &
                                                                   Communications




                                                                                    Mathematics




                                                                                                                         Humanities
                                 Course
                                                                                                    Sciences




                       (Department, Number, Title)
 Year and        (C) – indicates foundation or core course
 Semester        (S) – indicates technical specialty course
                                                Electrical & Electronics Courses1
 Yr 1, Sm 1   EET 101 – Electrical Circuits I (C)                                                                                               3/0
 Yr 1, Sm 1   EET 109 – Electrical Circuits I Lab (C)                                                                                           0/1
 Yr 1, Sm 2   EET 114 – Electrical Circuits II (C)                                                                                              4/0
 Yr 1, Sm 2   EET 117 – Digital Electronics (S)                                                                                                 3/0
 Yr 1, Sm 2   EET 118 – Electrical Circuits II Lab (C)                                                                                          0/1
 Yr 1, Sm 2   EET 120 – Digital Electronics Lab (S)                                                                                             0/1
 Yr 2, Sm 1   EET 205 – Semiconductor Lab (S)                                                                                                   0/1
 Yr 2, Sm 1   EET 210 – Fund. of Semiconductors (S)                                                                                             2/0
 Yr 2, Sm 1   EET 211 – Microprocessors (S)                                                                                                     3/0
 Yr 2, Sm 1   EET 213W – Fund.of Elecrical Machines2 (S)          (4/1)3                                                                        4/1
 Yr 2, Sm 2   EET 216 – Linear Electronic Circuits (S)                                                                                          3/0
 Yr 2, Sm 2   EET 220 – Programmable Logic Controls (S)                                                                                         1/1
 Yr 2, Sm 2   EET 221 – Linear Electronics Lab (S)                                                                                              0/1
                                                                                                  Total credits (lecture/lab) =                23/7
                                                 Supporting Technical Courses1
 Yr 1, Sm 1   EGT 101 – Technical Drawing Fund. (C)                                                                                              0/1
 Yr 1, Sm 1   EGT 102 – Intro. to Computer-Aided Drftg (C)                                                                                       0/1
 Yr 1, Sm 1   ET 002 – ET Orientation (C)                                                                                                        0/1
 Yr 1, Sm 2   ET 005 – Engr. Methods in ET (C)                                                                                                   0/1


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                                                  Program-Specific Information: 2EET


                                                                                                           Total credits (lecture/lab) =    0/4
                                                              Mathematics Courses4
    Yr 1, Sm 1     Math 081 – Tech Math I                                                       3
    Yr 1, Sm 2     Math 082 – Tech Math II                                                      3
    Yr 2, Sm 3     Math 083 – Tech Math III                                                     4
                                                                       Total credits =         10
                                                           Physical Sciences Courses5
    Yr 1, Sm 2     Phys 150 – Tech Physics I                                                                   3
    Yr 2, Sm 1     Phys 151 – Tech Physics II                                                                  3
                                                                                         Total credits =       6
                                                            Communications Courses
    Yr 1, Sm 1     Engl 015 – Rhetoric & Composition2                        3
    Yr 2, Sm 2     CAS 100 – Effective Speech2                               3
                                                   Total credits =           6
                     Technical Elective Course Selections (representative courses listed in Table B.4-1A)
                   Each student is required to take 1 – 4 credits of
    Yr 2, Sm 2
                   technical elective courses.
                                                                                  Total Credits (a minimum of 1 credit is required) =      1–4
General Education Courses (one course in each discipline required; representative courses listed in Table B.4-1B)6
    Yr 1, Sm 1     Social Sciences, Humanities or Arts7                                                                        3
    Yr 2, Sm 2     Social Sciences, Humanities or Arts7                                                                        3
    Yr 2, Sm 2     Social Sciences, Humanities or Arts7                                                                        3
                                                                                                       Total Credits =         9
                    Totals Required for the Degree (by Category) =           63                10              6               9            35
                                                 Percent of Total =          93                15              9              14            53
                                                                                              Total Credits Required in the Program =       668




                                                               Table B.4-1 – Notes
1     The breadth and depth of the technical sciences and supporting technical courses are designed to satisfy the Technical Content requirement of
      Criterion 4 of the GENERAL CRITERIA, which specifies minimum credit requirements and general content.
2     These courses have specific and significant relevance to the Communications requirements specified by Criterion 4 of the GENERAL
      CRITERIA. The college composition and public speaking courses are required by the University of all associate degree graduates. Further, the
      “W” designated course requires extensive and focused development of written and oral communication skills within the specific context of
      the program discipline. The requirement for a discipline-specific “W” course in all degree programs is also a University-wide requirement.
3     These totals and percentages do not include the contribution of the “W-designated” technical course to the communications training of
      students. If that contribution is included, the communications credit total would be 11, and the percentage would be 17%
4     The technical math sequence includes topics in college algebra, trigonometry, and concepts of technical calculus, including limits, derivatives
      & differentiation, integration & integration techniques, and basic differential equations. This range of coverage exceeds the minimum
      Mathematics requirements of Criterion 4 of the GENERAL CRITERIA.
5     The two-course physics sequence required by the EET program covers topics in mechanics, heat, wave motion, sound, electricity, light, and
      basics of modern physics. Coverage is from the perspective of the basic sciences, which provides students with a broader theoretical
      foundation for their studies in the technical sciences. Both courses include experimental lab activities. This content and focus is consistent
      with the Physical and Natural Sciences requirement of Criterion 4 of the GENERAL CRITERIA.
6     All associate degree graduates at Penn State University must complete a minimum of nine credits in the Social Sciences, Humanities, and
      Arts. One course in each area is generally required. Additionally, at least one of these courses must be either intercultural in nature or
      international in focus to satisfy University-wide requirements for breadth and diversity in programs’ societal and global perspectives. These
      requirements are consistent with the Social Sciences and Humanities requirement of Criterion 4 of the GENERAL CRITERIA.
7     Examples of Social Sciences, Humanities, and Arts courses typically available at the campus are listed in Table B.4-1B, which follows.
8     Total program credits exceed the minimum of 64 specified by Criterion 4 of the GENERAL CRITERIA.
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Table B.4-1A -- Technical Elective Course Selections
 (Courses below automatically satisfy technical elective requirements of EET. Other courses may be approved by the SEDTAPP Dept. Head)




                                                                                                                                                       Technical Content
                                                                                                                                   Social Sciences &
                                                                     Communications




                                                                                                                Natural Sciences
                                                                                                  Mathematics




                                                                                                                                   Humanities
                                                                                                                Physical &
 Year and
 Semester                         Course
 Yr 2, Sm 2    Chem 011 – Intro Chemistry                                                                            3
 Yr 2, Sm 2    Chem 012 – Chemical Principles                                                                        3
 Yr 2, Sm 2    CET 261 – Fluid Flow                                                                                                                     3
 Yr 2, Sm 2    CmpSc 101 – Basic Computer Prgmg                                                                                                         3
 Yr 2, Sm 2    CmpSc 201 – Computer Prgmg for Engr                                                                                                      3
 Yr 2, Sm 2    EET 297 – Independent Studies                                                                                                           1–9
 Yr 2, Sm 2    IET 101 – Mfg Matls, Processes & Lab                                                                                                     3
 Yr 2, Sm 2    IET 105 – Economics of Industry                                                                                                          2
 Yr 2, Sm 2    MchT 111 – Statics                                                                                                                       3
 Yr 2, Sm 2    Math 140 – Calc w/ Analytic Geom I                                                  4
 Yr 2, Sm 2    Math 141 – Calc w/ Analytic Geom II                                                 4
 Yr 2, Sm 2    BiSc 003 – Environmental Science                                                                 3
                                                                                      Total Credits (A minimum of 1 credit is required) =              1–4
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Table B.4-1B – General Education Courses
EET students are required to complete three credits each of Social Sciences, Humanities, and Arts studies for a total of nine General Education
credits. At least one of these courses must be an “International and Intercultural Competency” (GI) designated course. Typical courses available
to satisfy these requirements are listed below. GI designated course are shown in Italics. Not all courses are available at all campuses.

Subject                              Course                    Description
                                                                     Arts
Art                                  Art 20                    Introduction to Drawing
Art History                          ArtH 100                  Introduction to Art
                                     ArtH 111                  Ancient to Medieval Art
                                     ArtH 112                  Renaissance to Modern Art
Integrative Arts                     InArt 1                   The Arts
Music                                Music 005                 An Introduction to Western Music
                                     Music 007                 Evolution of Jazz
                                     Music 008                 Rudiments of Music
                                     Music 009                 Introduction to World Musics
Theatre Arts                         Thea 100                  The Art of the Theatre
                                     Thea 102                  Fundamentals of Acting

                                                                  Humanities
Comparative Literature               CmLit 10                  The Forms of World Literature
English                              Engl 104                  The Bible as Literature
                                     Engl 139                  Black American Literature
                                     Engl 182                  Literature and Empire
                                     Engl 194                  Women Writers
History                              Hist 1                    The Western Heritage I
                                     Hist 2                    The Western Heritage II
                                     Hist 20                   American Civilization to 1877
                                     Hist 21                   American Civilization since 1877
                                     Hist 175                  The History of Modern East Asia
                                     Hist 191                  Early African History
                                     Hist 192                  Modern African History
Philosophy                           Phil 10                   Critical Thinking
                                     Phil 106                  Introduction to Business Ethics
                                     Phil 221                  Philosophy of Science
                                     Rl St 001                 Introduction to World Religions

                                                        Social & Behavioral Sciences
Anthropology                         Anth 045                 Cultural Anthropology
Economics                            Econ 002                 Introductory Microeconomic Analysis
                                     Econ 004                 Introductory Macroeconomic Analysis
Geography                            Geog 020                 Human Geography: An Introduction
History                              Hist 12                  History of Pennsylvania
                                     Hist 120                 Europe since 1848
International Studies                IntSt 100                Introduction to International Studies
Political Science                    Pl Sc 001                Intro to American National Government
                                     Pl Sc 003                Introduction to Comparative Politics
                                     Pl Sc 014                International Relations
Psychology                           Psy 002                  Psychology
                                     Psy 213                  Intro to Developmental Psychology
                                     Psy 221                  Introduction to Cognitive Psychology
                                     Psy 243                  Psychology of Personal Well-Being
Sociology                            Soc 001                  Introductory Sociology
Women’s Studies                      WmnSt 001                Introduction to Women’s Studies
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B.4.b – Minimum Credits and Credit Distributions re. ABET Criterion 4:
Footnotes in Table B.4-1 indicate the correlations between various elements of the EET
curriculum and minimum credit hours and credit distributions specified in ABET Criterion 4.
Details of these relationships are described below.

Total Credits
  The EET program consists of 66 total credits, which exceeds the 64 credit minimum
   requirement of Criterion 4.
Communications
  While communications skills are imparted in a variety of places in the EET curriculum, the
   specific elements that address students’ communications skills directly are English 15
   (Rhetoric & Composition), Communications Arts and Sciences 100 (Effective Speech) and
   EET 213W (Fundamentals of Electric Machines). The first two of these courses provide
   traditional college-level-instruction in the art of effective writing and effective public
   speaking respectively. The EET 213W course is the University-approved “writing intensive”
   course in the EET program.
  The University requires all students to complete at least three credits of writing-intensive
   course work within their major. Further, "W" courses must include writing assignments that
   relate clearly to the course objectives and serve as effective instruments for learning the
   subject matter of the course. Typically, assignments are designed to help students investigate
   the course subject matter, gain experience in interpreting data, shape writing and/or speaking
   for a particular audience, or practice the type of writing and/or speaking associated with a
   given profession or discipline. “W” courses also provide opportunities for students to receive
   written feedback from the instructor and to apply that feedback to future efforts. “W”
   courses often include tutorial assistance, instructor conferences, use of writing or learning
   centers, and classroom discussions of writing and/or speaking assignments. From a grading
   perspective, it is typically expected that 15% of the grade in a “W” course will be determined
   from the communications-related activities.
  While the English composition, speech communications, and “W” courses provide special
   emphasis to the development of EET students’ communications skills, it is also possible to
   point out specific examples of written, oral and graphical communications exercises in other
   parts of the technical curriculum.
  Technical Writing Exercises – Essentially all lab courses within in the EET curriculum
   require students to prepare usually two formal written reports out of the weekly written lab
   exercises. Basic, structured lab reports are required in all three of the freshman lab courses
   (EET 109, 118 & 120), and the sophomore electronic labs (EET 205 & 221) elevate the level
   of this type of formal lab reporting. Finally, the EET 213W course requires students to
   prepare a substantial, library & internet based research paper, and the EET 220 course
   requires students to prepare a substantial group project report, in a journal paper format,
   documenting PLC-based controls projects done in that course. Specific examples of
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    technology course-based writing exercises can be found in the display materials for the EET
    109, 118, 120, 205, 221, 211, 220, and EET 213W..
   Oral Presentation Exercises – The speech communications class is the obvious place where
    students’ oral presentation skills are developed. However, oral presentations are a standard
    element of the EET 213W course where students are required to present summaries of their
    research reports to classmates using standard presentation tools. Oral presentations are also a
    standard component of the ET 005 introductory engineering technology course; students are
    taught the fundamentals of team work that includes such methods as brainstorming. Other
    project based courses include EET 211, EET 120 and EET 220.

  Graphical Presentation Exercises – Graphical presentation of visual and numerical
   information is a critical skill in technology professions. The EET curriculum imparts this
   skill in several courses. Visual presentations using CAD are the specific focus of the EGT
   102 course. Students are required to demonstrate a full range of skills covering multi-view,
   sectional and isometric drawings; dimensioning, layout, and complex assemblies. As noted
   above, creation of graphical representations of numerical data is required in many labs, but
   the ET 005 and EET 213W courses give particular emphasis to this topic. ET 005 covers the
   use of various mathematical and simulation software (Excel, MathCAD, LabVIEW, PSpice,
   etc.), and part of that coverage specifically addresses creation of engineering-quality graphs
   of calculated and measured data. Graphing skills learned in ET 005 are honed in EET 213W
   where a variety of lab and project exercises require students to collect, analyze, and
   synthesize laboratory measurements or theoretical calculations into meaningful engineering-
   quality graphs of machine performance characteristics. Finally, the EET 216 lab includes a
   number of lab projects that require students to analyze various circuits and generate
   professional-quality representations of the projects.
  Library Research & Use of Technical Literature –Also, the research report required in the
   EET 213W course is a formal research report requiring review and proper referencing of
   information sources, which are generally retrieved both through the library and the Internet.
  Teamwork Skills – Essentially all lab courses in the EET curriculum are team-based
   exercises involving teams of 2 or 3 students conducting lab exercises.
Mathematics
  The EET technical math sequence includes topics in college algebra, trigonometry, and
   concepts of technical calculus, including limits, derivatives & differentiation, integration &
   integration techniques, and basic differential equations. This range of coverage exceeds the
   minimum requirements of Criterion 4 for an associate degree program.

Physical and Natural Sciences
  The two-course physics sequence required by the EET program covers topics in mechanics,
   heat, wave motion, sound, electricity, light, and basics of modern physics. Coverage is from
   the perspective of the basic sciences, which provides students with a broader theoretical
   foundation for their studies in the electrical and electronic technical sciences. Both courses
   include experimental lab activities. This content and focus is consistent with the physical
   and natural sciences requirement of Criterion 4 for an associate degree program.
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Social Sciences and Humanities
  All associate degree graduates at Penn State must complete a minimum of nine credits in the
   study of the social sciences, humanities, and arts. One course in each area is generally
   required. Additionally, at least one of these courses must be either intercultural in nature or
   must be international in focus to satisfy University-wide requirements for breadth and
   diversity in programs’ societal and global perspectives. These requirements are consistent
   with the social sciences and humanities requirement of Criterion 4 for an associate degree
   program.
Technical Content
  The technical content of the EET curriculum consists of the combination of ET-, EGT-, and
   EET- designated courses (see Table B.4-1 above). The combination of these courses
   represents 35 of the total 66 credits in the program. Thus, technical content represents 53%
   of the total curriculum, which is between the minimum of 33% and the maximum of 67%
   required by the General Criteria.
  The ET-, EGT- and 100-level EET-designated courses constitute the core or foundation of
   the program. The ET courses provide students with foundation training in computer tools
   that are essential to success in the program. The EGT courses provide a similar purpose with
   respect to engineering drawing and computer-aided drafting skills. The freshman-level EET
   courses teach students the fundamental concepts, theories and analysis techniques for dealing
   with DC, AC and digital circuits; tools that are essential to success in the technical specialty
   courses of the sophomore year.
  The 200-level EET-designated courses represent the technical specialty courses in the EET
   program. Building on the core courses, these courses teach students fundamentals of the
   operation and analysis of analog electronic devices and circuits, microprocessors and
   microcontrollers, programmable logic controls, and high-power AC and DC electrical
   machines.
  Laboratory activities support essentially all core and specialty topics. All laboratories
   require students to use standard laboratory measurement equipment (analog and digital
   voltage and current meters, function generators, frequency counters, power supplies,
   oscilloscopes, tachometers, power meters, etc.) to excite and monitor the performance of
   electrical and electronic devices and electrical machines. In most cases, the data determined
   through these measurements are analyzed and synthesized into formal laboratory reports.
  Design practices and the use of design tools in the EET curriculum are concentrated in four
   topical areas: digital electronics, analog electronics, programmable logic controls, and
   electric machines. Courses in each of the areas require students to complete open-ended
   design analyses, in many cases supported by lab demonstrations, to arrive at workable device
   and circuit designs. These projects include such activities as designing PLC controls for
   various control systems; investigating the effects of standard modeling parameters on
   performance characteristics of induction motors; designing, building and verifying digital
   combinational logic circuits and counter/timer circuits; designing, building and verifying
   operation of standard amplifier circuits; etc. In all cases, students are expected to use
   standard design and computational tools such as PSpice, Excel, MathCAD, Xilinx, etc. as
   well as standard design methods taught in class to accomplish these design efforts.
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Integrating Experiences are a part of several courses in the EET program. These activities
require students to apply various technical and non-technical skills to solve problems or
complete assigned tasks. Examples include:
          A three- to four-week, team-based project in the semiconductor lab (EET 216) in
    which students are asked to design an operational amplifier circuit to measure temperature
    and present the value in both Celsius and Fahrenheit scales, and write up the results in a
    formal report. The project requires out-of-class investigations and research, open-ended
    conceptualization, and workload sharing to arrive at a combined team report.
          The electrical machines course (EET 213W) includes a research report on an
    individual responsible for fundamental developments in the electrical industry. The research
    report involves library and Internet research, and presentation of a formal report in both
    written and oral formats. A less formal research report is also completed by each student,
    examining nameplate information and machine specifications.
          Approximately the final third of the programmable logic controls course (EET 220)
    consists of a series of exercises in which students conceptualize, design, and develop sub-
    modules of various control systems. In the process, students are exposed to and practice
    concepts of job segmentation, specification and control interface requirements, and design
    integration.

   In combination, these activities solidify students’ abilities to apply a range of skills and
    perspectives to problem solving tasks and team-based projects.

Co-operative Education
  The EET program has no co-operative education or internship provisions.

B.4.c – Quality Assurance of Core Courses:
   Section B.3.a. describes the general quality control process and administrative features
    implemented by SEDTAPP to monitor, maintain, and improve the courses that make up the
    EET program

B.4.d – Course Descriptions:
Standard course outlines can be viewed at the Engineering Technology Student Guide website
(http://cede.psu.edu/studentguide/associate/2eet.htm). Detailed outlines/syllabi for the technical
core and specialty courses listed in Table B.4.1 will be part of the display during the visit. Both
a hardcopy of the course outlines and a CD version of the course outlines are also provided.

    Each program has a capstone course that requires actual design, formal reports and
    presentations.
       For 2EET it is EET 220, the PLC course.
       For 2MET it is MET 210W, the product design course.
       For 4EMET it is EMET 440, the electromechanical design project course.
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                                         Program-Specific Information: 2EET


Detailed outlines/syllabi for the technical core and specialty courses listed in Table B.4.1, as
conducted at the Penn State York campus, are included in the display material along with a CQI
report for each course.

B.4.e – Demonstration of Adequate Attention to Key Curriculum Components:
   The following table shows the breakdown, by credit count, to the distinct curricular elements
    of the EET program:


                        Table B.4-2 – Credit Allocations to Key Curricular Topics
          Curricular Area                              Total Credits                           Percent of Program
            Technical   Core1                                 17                                          26
         Technical Specialties2                               18                                          27
             Mathematics                                      10                                          15
          Physical Sciences                                   6                                           9
           Communications3                                  6 (11)                                      9 (17)
           Soc. Sc/Hum/Arts                                   9                                           14
                Totals                                        66                                         100
Notes:
    1 – Technical core courses are ET-2, -5, EGT-101, -102, EET-101, -109, -114, & -118.
    2 – Technical specialty course are EET-205, -210, -211, -213W, -216, -220, -221, & -220
    3 – Numbers in () include credits for EET 213W in the ‘ Communications’   category. Numbers not in () reflect only the Engl-
         15 (college composition) and CAS-100 (effective speaking) courses.

As the table shows, more than half of the program is dedicated to technology subjects. Further,
more than three quarters of the program is dedicated to technology subjects supported by critical
math and science topics. The remaining ~25% of the program is

committed to essential communications skills and exposure to core topics in the humanities and
social sciences. This distribution of studies is typical of similar programs at other schools.


B.4.f – Co-operative Education Provisions:
The EET program has no co-operative education or internship provisions.

B.4.g – Additional Review Materials:
Most review materials demonstrating the above described characteristics are included in the
‘Outcomes’ and ‘Course’ files described previously in section B.2.e. Information not contained
in those files generally will be found in appendices to this report or online at SEDTAPP-
maintained websites. Where appropriate, the text herein indicates the relevant appendix or
identifies the Internet address to the relevant website. (Note – if viewing an electronic version of
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                               Program-Specific Information: 2EET


this report from an Internet-connected computer, links to online sources are active, and the
information may be accessed directly by ‘clicking’ on the link while holding down the ‘Ctrl’
key).
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                         Common Information: 2EET & 2MET & 4EMET


B.5. Faculty

   B.5.a. Faculty Analysis
      Table B.5-1 below summarizes faculty information. Detailed curricula vitae are found in
      Appendix 7 for full-time faculty, and Appendix 8 for part-time and adjunct faculty.
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                                                                      Table B.5-1. Faculty Analysis
     The level of activity should reflect an average over the current year (year prior to visit) plus the two previous years. Provide
     updated information at the time of the visit.
                                                                                                                              Level of Activity (high, med, low, none)*
                                                                                    Years of Experience          Professional                     in:



                               FT or PT
                                               Degrees Earned                   Year          Years     Years at Registration
                                               Degree, Year, &              Govt./Industry Teaching      This     (Indicate    Professional Professional Work in
     Name            Rank                        Institution                  Eng/ET         Eng/ET Institution     State)    Development        Society      Industry
                                          M.S. Electrical Engr. 1989
                                          Fairleigh Dickinson Univ.                17
                     Assoc.
 Michael Marcus               FT          B.S. Electrical Engr. 1972           Biomedical                                           Med.           Med.         Low
                      Prof.                                                                                        EIT for P.E.
                                          Penn State University              Instrumentation     14        6
                                                                                                                       PA.
                                          A.S. Electronics Tech. 68
                                          AE, State
                                          Penn2EET 2003 Penn State                 25+
                                                                                                                   P.E., Penn &
Harley H. Hartman   Instructor FT           BS, EMET 2004 Penn              Industrial Control   18       12                        None           Low         High
                                                                                                                    Maryland
                                                     State                      Systems

                                          BS    61   PSU;    MS       62           28
                     Asst..
Charles A. Gaston             FT          Stanford; PhD 65 Purdue                (IBM)           11.5     11.5       PE (MD)        Med.           High         Low
                      Prof.
                                          (all Engineering Science)        +1.5 (6 summers)

                                          MS, Applied Mathematics,
                                                                                   13
                                          1996 Johns Hopkins
 Donald E. Coho     Instructor FT                                             metalworking        8        8         EIT (PA)       None           None        Med.
                                          BS, 4MET 1983 Penn State
                                                                             manufacturing
                                          AE, 2MET 1981 Penn State
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                                                         Common Information: 2EET & 2MET & 4EMET

                                        BS,      Civil    Eng,.,   1976
                                        Virginia Military Institute
                                        ME, Mechanical Eng., 1978
                                        Univ. of Virginia                         18
  Marshall F. Coyle   Assoc. Prof FT                                                           10     9.5      PE (VA)         Med.   None   Med.
                                        Ph.D.,      Mechanical        &     manufacturing
                                        Aerospace Eng., 1995
                                        Univ. of Virginia


                                              MES 1985 Loyola                     18
                                         University Maryland; MS              Industrial
  Douglas P. Barnes   Instructor   PT                                                           1      1                       Med.   None   High
                                         PSU 1978; BS PSU 1975             automation and
                                                                           manufacturing
                                                                              industries

                                        AS 1969                                   35
                      Instructor   PT               Electronics                                 1      1                       Med.   Low    High
 David Marteny                                                              York Hospital
                                                  Institute

                                              BS, Physics, 1979,                                               PE (PA)
                                                                                  15
                                              Millersville Univ.                                            Certified Fire &
                      Instructor   PT                                      Safety, controls,   12      2                       Med.   High   High
   Roy Hoffer                           MS, Electrical Eng., 1981,                                            Explosion
                                                                             electronics
                                           Univ. of Pennsylvania                                              Investigator
                                           Masters Equivalency,                                                 Master
                                                   generalist                                                Examiner in
                      Instructor   PT                                           10+?           12+    12+                      Med.   Med.   Low
Margaret E. Runkle                         (see complete resume)                                               Drafting,
                                                                                                                NOCTI
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B.5.b. Faculty Background & Competence vs. Curriculum

All full-time engineering faculty members have extensive industrial experience (ranging from more than
13 to nearly 30 years). Furthermore, all have multi-disciplinary knowledge and experience, and strive to
broaden their knowledge. Detailed resumes are found in Appendices 7 & 8.

    Donald Coho teaches mostly courses in drawing, CAD, statistics, engineering economics,
        manufacturing materials and processes, and quality.
    His BS degree is in Mechanical Design Engineering Technology, and his MS topics included
        statistics and quality. Positions of responsibility in industry have provided experience in
        manufacturing and economics. He has been known to work in industry for the summer just to
        learn more about current practices.

    Marshall Coyle teaches mostly courses in statics, dynamics, strength, thermodynamics and fluids.
    His degrees are in Civil and, Mechanical Engineering. His industrial experience includes extensive
        high-temperature stress analysis, and he continues to do significant consulting in this area.

    Charles Gaston teaches courses ranging from the freshman engineering design course (an option for
        ET students) to the capstone design course for 4EMET. Other recent courses have included
        automated control and the labs for AC circuits and manufacturing processes (robotics and NC
        machining).
    Both his degrees in Engineering Science and his widely varied IBM experience have provided
        understanding of most fields of engineering, especially interdisciplinary applications. He has
        been known to tour manufacturing facilities while on vacation, just to learn more about
        different fields of manufacturing.

    Harley Hartman teaches mostly courses in motors & generators, PLCs, and digital systems, but also
        a course in product design.
    He is mostly self-taught, and became a Registered Professional Engineer before obtaining any
        college degree. Job experience, full-time consulting experience and curiosity have given him
        knowledge of electrical/electronic systems beyond what is in our textbooks. Recent degrees in
        2EET and 4EMET completed his knowledge of all the courses in those programs. He has been
        known, in the midst of an unbelievably busy schedule, to spend time on an unrelated technical
        problem just for the joy of solving it.

    Michael Marcus teaches mostly courses in digital and analog electronics, including instrumentation
        and biomedical applications.
    His degrees are in Electrical Engineering, and most of his work experience is related to biomedical
        instrumentation. His research areas have included biomedical applications and pedagogy. In
        order to make a professional video of the "Project Teams" activities he uses in some of his
        classes, he sought out and combined funds from at least four different small grants. The result
        earned him a University-level award for active and collaborative learning.
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   B.5.c. Faculty Count vs. Demands
   In spite of the fact that there are only five full-time engineering faculty, expectations are being met
       for yearly course offerings, student interaction, advising, professional/industrial contacts, etc.
       (Adjuncts cover some classes, but they are highly qualified – currently or recently working in the
       area that they teach.) Required courses are offered each year, even if enrollment is low.
       Relatively small classes enhance student-faculty interactions. Faculty are dedicated enough to
       accept overloads when necessary and to meet with students for advising and counseling outside
       regular office hours whenever necessary. Engineering Technology faculty are usually out in
       force for campus open house activities, and (as shown in Appendix 7) also accept a fair share of
       other campus service.


   B.5.d. Faculty Experience and Currency
   As mentioned above, every faculty member has no less than 13 years industrial experience; the
      average is about 20 years. All maintain currency by some combination of study, consulting and
      professional meetings. See Appendices 7 & 8 for individual details. Penn State policy is to
      schedule one day each week without classes so that engineers can consult or do research more
      easily.


   B.5.e. Faculty Development
   The campus provides travel funds up to about $1300 per faculty member per year. Within that limit,
      no more than half the expense of a conference will be covered if the engineer is not presenting a
      paper. Additional development funds can be obtained, in many circumstances, through a variety
      of grant programs administered at the campus level, and sometimes through University Park
      funding. See Appendices 7 & 8 for individual development activities.


   B.5.f. Faculty Control of Program Objectives
Program objectives and outcomes for the EET program, and the expected relationships among these and
the program curriculum, are established by EET Curriculum Committee, which involves representation
from all the colleges that offer the EET program. These documents are maintained on-line at an open-
access Internet site available to all faculty. The process for establishing and updating these documents
involves Committee representatives notifying their constituent faculty of proposed changes, which are
posted online, and asking for comment and reactions. All feedback received is provided to the
Committee for consideration before modifications are adopted as final. As a result, all faculty have the
opportunity to be involved in the creation of and modifications to the program.
Faculty are also included in the annual distribution of standard course outlines, which are first
distributed in draft form for comment. Further, the on-line course assessment system (M.E.E.T. see
section B.3.a.) gives all faculty the opportunity every semester to provide feedback to Course Chairs
regarding appropriateness of, problems with, or suggestions for improvement of standard course
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outlines. These comments are reviewed by Course Chairs, who are charged with responding to and
resolving all such comments with both the faculty and the Curriculum Committee.
Finally, all full-time faculty also are involved in monthly meetings of our Industrial Advisory
Committee. These meetings provide the faculty the opportunity to discuss industry practices related to
the topics they teach.


   B.5.g Faculty Workload Summary
                               Table B.5-2. Faculty Workload Summary


                                                     Range                     Average
             Credit Hours                6 – 13                          10
             Contact Hours Per Week      11 – 20                         15
             Laboratory Size             1 – 18                          12
             Class Size                  1 – 30                          9
             Advisees                    15 - 30                         23

 Indicate the number of credit and contact hours per week that is considered a normal full teaching load,
 and explain how a full-time load is determined.
               Credit Hours 9             Contact Hours 12

 B.5.h. Individual Teaching Schedules

 Complete teaching schedules for each faculty member are listed in these tables:

                        Tables B.5-3.
 Faculty Member:         Marshall Coyle
 Semester     Courses         Number       Credits     Hours of        Hours of        Total
              Taught          Sections                 Lecture        Laboratory      Contact
                                                                                       Hours
 Spring 05    MchT 111           1           3            3               0               3
 Spring 05    EMET 405           1           4            4               0               4
 Spring 05    EMch 12            1           3            3               0               3
 Spring 05    EMch 13            1           3            3               0               3
 Spring 05    ME 30              1           3            3               0               3
                                                              Total Contacts             13
 Fall 05      Mch T 213          1           3            3               0               3
 Fall 05      Mch T 214          1           1            0               2               2
 Fall 05      MET 206            1           3            3               0               3
 Fall 05      EMET 322           1           4            4               0               4
 Fall 05      E Mch 11           1           3            3               0               3
                                       Part 1: Self-Study Report
                           Common Information: 2EET & 2MET & 4EMET


                                                               Total Contacts           15


Faculty Member:        Don Coho
Semester     Courses        Number        Credits       Hours of        Hours of       Total
             Taught         Sections                    Lecture        Laboratory     Contact
                                                                                       Hours
Spring 05    EET 109           1            1              0               2             2
Spring 05    EGT 114           1            2              0               4             4
Spring 05    EGT 201           1            2              0               4             4
Spring 05    EMET 311          1            3              3               0             3
Spring 05    EMET 350          1            3              3               0             3
Spring 05    IET 215           1            2              2               0             2
                                                               Total Contacts           18
Fall 05      EET 101           1            3              3               0             3
Fall 05      EGT 101           1            1              0               2             2
Fall 05      EGT 102           1            1              0               2             2
Fall 05      IET 101           1            3              2               2             4
Fall 05      IET 105           1            2              2               0             2
                                                               Total Contacts           13




Faculty Member:        Chuck Gaston
   Semester      Courses       Number       Credits        Hours of      Hours of     Total
                 Taught        Sections                    Lecture       Laboratory   Contact
                                                                                      Hours
   Spring 05     EET 118           1                1          0                2             2
   Spring 05     ED&G 100          1                3          1                5             6
   Spring 05     ED&G 100H         1                3         1.5               5            6.5
   Spring 05     EMET 440          1                3          2                4            1.5
   Spring 05     IET 216           1                2          0                4             4
   Spring 05     PSU 8             1                1          1                0             1
   Spring 05     NMT 210W          1                3          2                2             4
                                                           Total Contacts                    18
   Fall 05       ED&G 100          2                3          1                5             6
   Fall 05       EMET 410          1                4          3                2             5
   Fall 05       PSU 8             1                1          1                0             1
                                                           Total Contacts                    11


Faculty Member:        Harley Hartman
Semester     Courses        Number        Credits       Hours of        Hours of       Total
                                     Part 1: Self-Study Report
                        Common Information: 2EET & 2MET & 4EMET


            Taught        Sections                 Lecture        Laboratory   Contact
                                                                                Hours
Spring 05   MET 210W         1           3            3               0           3
Spring 05   EET 117          1           3            3               0           3
Spring 05   EET 216          1           3            3               0           3
Spring 05   EET 221          1           1            0               2           2
                                                          Total Contacts         11
Fall 05     EET 205          1           1            0               2           3
Fall 05     EET 210          1           2            2               0           2
Fall 05     EET 211          1           3            3               0           3
Fall 05     EET 213W         1           5            5               0           5
Fall 05
                                                          Total Contacts         13




Faculty Member:       Michael Marcus
Semester    Courses       Number       Credits     Hours of        Hours of     Total
            Taught        Sections                 Lecture        Laboratory   Contact
                                                                                Hours
Spring 05   EE 210           1           4            3            2 (adj.)      3
Spring 05   EET 114          1           4            4               0          4
Spring 05   EET 296          1           1            1               0          1
Spring 05   EMET 310         1           3            3               0          3
Spring 05   EMET 397         1           3            3               0          3
Spring 05     and 497        1           3            3               0
Spring 05   ET 5             1           1            0               2           2
                                                          Total Contacts         14
Fall 05     CSE 271          1           3            3               0           3
Fall 05     CSE 275          1           1            0               2           2
Fall 05     EMET 330         1           3            2               2           4
Fall 05     ET 2             2           1            0               2           4
                                                          Total Contacts         13
                                         Part 1: Self-Study Report
                           Common Information: 2EET & 2MET & 4EMET




 Faculty Member:       Margaret Runkle
 Semester    Courses          Number       Credits      Hours of        Hours of           Total
             Taught           Sections                  Lecture        Laboratory         Contact
                                                                                           Hours
 Spring 05 EGT 101               1           1             0             2                   2
 Spring 05 EGT 102               1           1             0             2                   2
                                                             Total Contacts                  4
 Fall 05     EGT 102             1           1             0             2                   2
                                                             Total Contacts                  2




B.6. Facilities
   B.6.a. Overview
       Describe classrooms, laboratory facilities, equipment, and infrastructure. Note any changes since
       the previous accreditation cycle (if applicable).
   Physical facilities for the engineering technology programs at the York Campus are housed in the Main
   Classroom Building (MCB). This building includes administrative offices, faculty offices, 18
   classrooms, a large lecture room, and various chemistry, physics, biology, computer and engineering
   technology (ET) labs. The library and most computer labs are in other buildings.

   B.6.a.(1). Classrooms

   Three classrooms located on the lower level of the building near the ET labs are normally used for most
   ET classes. These, like most of the classrooms in the building, will handle 25-30 students. Sometimes
   classes are scheduled in other parts of the building, including labs that are large enough to include seats
   arranged for lectures. Most classrooms have permanently-installed computers and projection systems.

   B.6.a.(2). Laboratories

   The EE Lab measures 31’ x 37’ and has 6 student workstations with built-in 230V 3-phase and 120V DC
   power in addition to conventional AC. It has an adjacent 10' x 31' store room on one side and four
   offices on the other. With a small blackboard, two tables and some chairs, it can serve as a classroom for
   groups up to about eight. Beyond that, people must scatter around the lab benches, and equipment
   shelves on the benches block visibility. There are no windows.

   The Material Test Lab measures 24' x 20' and has a long bench cabinet along the window wall. A small
   blackboard, plus tables and chairs in the center of the room, allow this to be used as a classroom for at
   least a dozen students.

   The Manufacturing Lab measures 17' x 35', but is so full that the only chairs are at the two computers in
   the room.
                                      Part 1: Self-Study Report
                         Common Information: 2EET & 2MET & 4EMET



The CAD Lab (located one floor up and at the opposite end of the building) is 29' x 44' and is split between a
computer lab in the back of the room and drafting tables in the front of the room. Students can go back and
forth between the two sections during class. This lab is used mostly by ET students and students in our
baccalaureate degree engineering program, but also serves as an open computer lab for this building.


B.6.a.(3). Laboratory equipment

In the EE Lab each bench is supplied with an oscilloscope, digital voltmeter, function generator, two
power supplies, and a frequency counter. Additional work area is provided by 6 bench-height rolling
tables. Equipment available in the lab or in the store room also includes Hampden AC and DC machine
trainers and dynamometers, extra oscilloscopes and function generators, Simpson and Triplett VOMs,
programmable logic system, 2 older model Techtronics digital storage scopes and 4 newer models, 9
Allen Bradley Micrologic 1000 PLC’s, LabVIEW acquisition circuit board, 10 EZ-Micro Motorola
M68HC11 microprocessor trainers, and other necessary parts and equipment. The EET lab contains 16
PCs. They are connected to the campus network to run all circuit design and other appropriate EET-
related software. This software supports LabVIEW, the M68HC11 microprocessor, and the PLC’s; in
addition, PSpice and C++, and MathCad also are used.

The Materials Test Lab contains a universal testing machine (with clamshell furnace for high-
temperature tests), data collection system and strain gage system. It also contains a wax foundry used to
produce wax rods for the manufacturing system across the hall.

The Manufacturing Lab has manually operated tools in the back (drill press, chop saw, grinder and many
hand tools) plus bench space and storage space. The front of the room has a Flexible Manufacturing
System comprising a CNC mill and lathe, a robot, a closed-loop conveyor system and other supporting
equipment. One computer is used to program the robot; another is used to convert commented lathe and
mill programs into the condensed form used by the CNC machines.

The CAD Lab contains 25 computer systems. All are connected to the campus network, so they can be used
for e-mail, web searches and the like, as well as for CAD. A Lexmark Optra N 245 Postscript laser printer
handles both normal printing and plotting capability. A Dell overhead LCD projector is used regularly for
instruction. Software available in the lab includes Windows XP Professional, Microsoft Office Professional
(Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Access, and Publisher), visual Studio.Net (Visual C++, Visual J++, visual Basic
and Visual Foxpro), Ansys, Frontpage 2003, Macromedia MX Suite, Solidworks, TurboCAD, Netscape
Communicator 7, Internet Explorer 6.0, Eudora Pro 6.12, Spice, LabVIEW, and others. Solidworks is used
for most CAD modeling.


B.6.a.(4). Infrastructure

Computer facilities are exceptionally good across the campus. With the exception of some old
computers retained in the Manufacturing Lab to run important software not compatible with the latest
version of Windows, computers all are tied to the campus network and are upgraded every three or four
years. In addition to the EE Lab and CAD Lab, there are four computer labs in the Information Sciences
and Technology Center (ISTC). At least one of those is open to students during most times of the day and
evening.
                                    Part 1: Self-Study Report
                        Common Information: 2EET & 2MET & 4EMET




B.6.a.(5). Changes since previous accreditation cycle


New equipment used by ET students:


3 programmable logic controllers analog          $2,100
20 programmable logic device trainers            $1,080
4 Digital oscilloscopes plus accessories         $4,626
3 Function Generators                            $ 515
3 Digital Multimeters                            $ 820
LabVIEW Equipment
    2 Signal Simulators                          $ 585
    3 DAQ Signal Accessories                     $ 850
    1 16 Bit A/D chassis system                  $ 6,531
    4 Data Acquisition Cards                     $1,785
    3 GPIB Cards                                 $1,500


2   Solder Stations                              $ 254
2   Digital Tachometers                          $ 520
1   Torque measuring device                      $ 525
1   Hampden Control trainer                      $4,954
1   Hampden Servo System                         $2,481
7   I.C. Breadboards                             $ 308
    Lab experiment components                    $1,050
    Lab – general supplies                       $ 520
    Repairs to CNC lathe                         $2,400
                                           Total $32,879


Components for EMET 330 Projects: approximately $900 - $1200 per year
                                      Part 1: Self-Study Report
                          Common Information: 2EET & 2MET & 4EMET


   Our PA Dept. of Ed. grant request was approved, so we expect to have about $20,000 in additional
      equipment available by the time of the TAC of ABET visit.
   B.6.b. Adequacy of Facilities


          The EE Lab facilities are used by all the electrically-based lab courses in all three ET
          programs and the 4-year regular engineering programs. At present, the facilities are adequate
          to accommodate all enrollment demands without scheduling conflicts among the programs
          since most courses are rotated between day and evening on alternate years.
          The Mechanical Labs are used by far fewer courses, so they encounter no significant
          scheduling problems.
          Additional lab space (on the same level as some outside door) would be nice, since then we
          would be able to accept offers of large equipment that occasionally are made to us.


          In recent years, funding for equipment purchases and repairs in most of the labs has become
          more available because of tuition surcharges imposed on the baccalaureate EMET students
          who also use the labs. Most equipment repairs are contracted out to local electronics and
          equipment vendors.
          The selection of some equipment was recently determined with the help of student surveys
          and a survey of the Industrial Advisory Committee taken after a tour of the lab.


          Both the Materials Test Lab and the EE Lab have bookcases with reference books, and
          faculty members often leave journals they no longer need out for students to read.
          A new library facility has been completed recently. In addition to the reference texts in the
          library, the campus subscribes to on-line references in science and engineering. Students
          typically conduct the majority of their research using the internet to access the Thomas
          register, periodicals, manufactures catalogs, society publications, etc.




B.7. Institutional and External Support
B.7.a. General Description

B.7.a.(1) Equipment
         Over the last several years, monies to acquire equipment have been obtained thru gifts from
           foundations and benefactors. The Director of University Relations is the person who is the
           campus’s representative to patrons and benefactors who may wish to gift monies to the
           Associate Degree Mechanical Engineering Technology program. The monies for the
           upgrading of computers and software used in the Associate Degree Mechanical Engineering
           Technology program are budgeted annually. Monies to maintain equipment are on an as-
                                       Part 1: Self-Study Report
                          Common Information: 2EET & 2MET & 4EMET


          needed basis and applied for through the Director of Academic Affairs’ office. When a piece
          of equipment is non-operational a decision is made to repair, scrap or replace. If the
          equipment is repairable, then it is sent out for repair. Monies for reasonable repairs have
          always been available. If it is determined that the piece of equipment is beyond repair and
          should be replaced then see the statement above regarding acquisition of equipment. If a
          piece of equipment is non-operational and is no longer needed in the program, then it is sent
          to salvage. Operation of equipment is always under the direction of the instructor of the
          course.
EMET students pay a tuition surcharge each semester, the income from which is earmarked exclusively
for use by the EMET and supporting programs. Typical uses include funding senior projects, upgrading
software, maintaining and upgrading laboratory equipment, and purchasing expendable lab supplies.
Because of the intimate interrelationships among the ET programs, 4EMET expenditures targeted at
improvements in the lab facilities also support the 2EET or 2MET program.


   B.7.a.(2) Support Personnel
              The campus provides financial aid services, advising, tutoring, and career placement
              services. The campus Learning Center is particularly good. Students on work study help
              with lab setups, which relieves faculty somewhat, but do not have the skills for any
              sophisticated maintenance. Faculty maintain what they can; otherwise, repairs are sent
              out. The Engineering Technology faculty prepare their own exams, reports, etc.
       B.7.a.(3) Acquiring New Faculty
              Faculty positions are publicly advertised. Significant industrial experience is a
              requirement. A search committee is delegated with the responsibility of screening all
              candidates for the advertised position. Finalists are asked to present a sample lesson, and
              anyone may attend. Faculty hold some professional affiliation. Money is appropriated
              annually to help keep faculty current in their field of expertise and also for professional
              development.


       B.7.a.(4). Selection and Supervision of Students.
              The campus has an open enrollment policy. Students are administered tests at the time of
              acceptance into the university to determine their placement in English, Math and
              Chemistry. If the scores are below a threshold then the students are placed in remedial
              courses that do not accumulate credit toward their degree.
       Transfer applications are evaluated formally by the Undergraduate Admissions Office.
       Coursework completed at an accredited college or university may be evaluated for
       transfer credit if passed with a grade equivalent of “C” or better. Unofficial evaluations
       are available from individual faculty and/or the central SETCE office upon student inquiry.
   Often many applicable engineering technology courses are placed in a general credit category by the
   Admissions staff. This occurs when previously taken courses are not identical to Penn State courses.
   In these instances, students can provide catalog descriptions and/or course outlines and petition the
                                    Part 1: Self-Study Report
                        Common Information: 2EET & 2MET & 4EMET


SEDTAPP Head for acceptance of these courses for Penn State equivalents. These are normally
approved if they have the recommendation of the local campus faculty. Students and campuses are
provided with the appropriate approval documentation for the student’s campus file.


           Checksheets list all courses required for any of the Engineering Technology degrees and
           an advisor is assigned to each Engineering Technology student. Students can meet with
           advisors at scheduled advising sessions, or at any time in the semester during scheduled
           office hours or by appointment.
   Students may at any time do a "degree audit" on line to verify what courses have been
   taken and what courses still are needed to finish the degree. Verifying that candidates
   have met degree requirements for graduation is a combined effort between the
   Registrar, academic advisers at Penn State York, and the appropriate departments and
   colleges at University Park. University Park distributes a list of potential graduates to
   the campus. Local academic advisers then ensure that degree requirements have been
   met using check sheets, degree audit reports and current transcripts. When it is
   determined both locally and at the University departmental level that a student has met
   all of the degree requirements, the University Park department will enter approval for
   graduation into the student database.

           The campus has an excellent Learning Center for those who need tutoring or help with
           study skills.
           More than half our ET students are non-traditional, and most already have jobs. In these
           disciplines, in the York area, usually there are more companies seeking employees than
           there are students looking for jobs. The campus has a Director of Career Services who is
           the main interface for companies seeking employees, but some opportunities come first to
           the attention of the faculty. In either case students are informed by personal contact, e-
           mail or postings on a bulletin board


B.7.b. Complete Table 4, Support Expenditures For The Program. Report fiscal year expenditures
for support functions of the engineering technology program being evaluated. The information is to
be supplied for each of the three most recent fiscal years. The current fiscal year is the year during
which you will be preparing this self-study. Provide your preliminary estimate of annual
expenditures if your current fiscal year is not over. Provide an updated table at the time of the visit.




                    Table B.7-1 – Support Expenditures for ET Programs
                                             Part 1: Self-Study Report
                               Common Information: 2EET & 2MET & 4EMET


                                                                                                      Budgeted for the
   Expenditure Category        Two years ago                 Last Year           Current Year         Year of the Visit
                            1       NA                          NA                   NA                     NA
Operations, excluding staff
       2
Travel                        $2,043.24                       $711.66             $3,245.08               $6,500.00
Equipment: 3
 (a) Institutional Funds4        $5,785.39                   $9,037.08             $4,099.00            $5,828 (est.)
 (b) Grants and Gifts 5                                                           $19,939.66
Temporary (non-teaching)             0                            0                    0                       0
Assistance

                         Totals:        $7,828.63            $9,748.74            $27,283.74               $12,328
Notes:      1.   There are no operating expenses exclusive to the ET programs.
            2.   Institutionally sponsored, excluding special program grants. Includes both intra-University and conference
                 travel.
            3.   Major laboratory equipment.
            4.   These funds are generated by the Campus Engineering Surcharge Fund paid by student fees.
            5.   Private funds of $13,293.11 were matched against $6,646.55 in engineering equipment funds from the state
                 of Pennsylvania.




    B.7.c. Describe the makeup and activities of the program’s industrial advisory committee. Provide
    evidence that the committee is supported and active, and that input from industry is being used to
    shape the program.
         The Industrial Advisory Committee is comprised of individuals representing a cross section from
         local industries. Table B.7-2 lists current members. Meetings are held almost every month
         during the academic year. Minutes from the meetings will be available on campus, but some
         highlights are summarized here:
                                                  IAC

        The Penn State - York Industrial Advisory Committee (IAC) currently includes 13 industrial
members with about an equal division between members with Electrical Engineering Degrees and
Mechanical Engineering Degrees. (See Table B.7-2.) Because of the strong manufacturing influence in
the York area with a significant number of jobs being both electrical and mechanical in nature, it was
decided to continue to have one combined IAC representing the Associate Degrees in Electrical and
Mechanical Engineering Technology, as well as the Baccalaureate Electromechanical Engineering
Technology Program. A single IAC also makes sense from the campus viewpoint because of the
thoroughly integrated nature of the three programs. It was anticipated that, on the rare occasion when it
was necessary to focus on specific programs, the IAC could break out into smaller groups; however,
virtually all IAC members consider themselves multidisciplinary, and have been interested in all aspects
of the programs.
        The IAC meets almost every month throughout the academic year, with an average of about
seven meetings per year. (IAC member participation in open houses and other events is not included
here.) Following are highlights of some of the activities of the IAC since the last ABET visit in 2000.
                                       Part 1: Self-Study Report
                          Common Information: 2EET & 2MET & 4EMET


        Much of the initial activity of the IAC after the re-accreditation of the EET and MET program in
2000 centered on the Baccalaureate Electromechanical Engineering Technology Program. The Meeting
Minutes from May 24, 2000 mention a survey of industry (Polk-Lepson Survey) to determine the need
for a York Electromechanical Engineering Degree. In addition, a survey was conducted of current EET
and MET students and graduates of both programs over the past several years to see if there was interest
in the program. Both surveys indicated a need for the degree and a proposal was made to begin the
EMET program in Fall 2001. The IAC was given a description of the courses that were offered in the
EMET program at three other campuses in the Penn State System.
         In the meeting of November 27, 2000, a discussion took place to review the ABET findings and
to talk about ways to address some of the recommendations made by ABET. In addition, a trip by IAC
representatives and York Faculty was planned up to University Park Campus to meet with various
administrators to talk about additional funding for Engineering Technology Programs at the York
Campus and to tour the Engineering Labs at University Park.
        Much of the discussion at various IAC meetings focused on recruitment strategies. IAC
members participated in York Open House activities by talking to perspective students about their
experiences in industry and the types of jobs available in the area with their degrees. In addition, the
IAC has helped by providing displays of products and equipment at various open house activities.
Members were also included in visits to the High Schools. For one of the open house activities, Lego
MindStorm equipment needed to be purchased and the IAC support was included in a grant proposal. A
presentation for local companies on the programs at Penn State York was prepared by one of the IAC
members and is included in the April 17, 2002 minutes. Other activities included a visit to the
“Advanced Skills Center” of York to see some other job opportunities that may be available to our
students. The IAC also advised Continuing Education on the curriculum for a certificate in
Manufacturing Engineering Technology. The IAC has toured the equipment in the EET and MET labs
(there is no exclusive EMET lab) and completed a questionnaire to make suggestions about additional
equipment that should be considered to help better prepare students for industry. At various meetings,
the IAC has been involved in discussions and presentations about the steps Penn State has been taking to
prepare for the ABET visit. They have looked at and commented on the “outcomes” for each program
and the procedure for evaluating each course and the “Continuous quality improvement” process. They
have been given the syllabus for each course and IAC members selected specific courses to comment
on. The IAC participated in evaluating projects for EMET 330, “Measurement Theory and
Instrumentation” and made recommendations for improving the projects in future courses. The IAC has
conducted exit interviews for graduating students and reported back the results to faculty members for
CQI.
        The most recent undertaking by the IAC has been to review the course content and objectives for
each of the courses in our three programs. The EET program was reviewed in February, the MET
program in March, and the EMET program in April. Before each meeting, syllabi were sent out for
review and, ultimately, written comments. Some of those comments and recommendations also were
discussed at the meetings. The IAC also was presented with a proposed list of lab equipment totaling
$19,930. Two thirds of the funds already had been secured from a local donor, and the remaining third
subsequently has come from a Pennsylvania State Department of Education Grant.



Table B.7-2 – IAC Members
                                                    Part 1: Self-Study Report
                                 Common Information: 2EET & 2MET & 4EMET




Last Name       First
                Name             Email Address                 Employer                               Address                         Tel.
Bahn           Michael    mbahn@tekgard.com                 Tekgard, Inc.        1760 Toronita             York, PA 17402        717-854-0005

Christ         Sharon     sem1@psu.edu                      Penn State York                                                      717-771-4045

Coho           Donald     dec147@psu.edu                    Penn State York                                                      717-771-4086
                                                                                                           New Providence, PA
Cooper         Edward     Mustang_67@epix.net                                    410 Schoolhouse Road      17560                 717-786-2888
                                                            RR Donnelley &
Costa          Peter      ENGCoste@aol.com                  Sons Company         216 Greenfield Road       Lancaster, PA 17601   717-293-2414

Coyle          Marshall   mfc5@psu.edu                      Penn State York                                                      717-771-4113
                                                                                 Suite 208
Daubert        Calvin     caldaubert@aol.com                UAI Group, L.P.      227 Granite Run Drive     Lancaster, PA 17604   717-431-3260
Fullerton      William                                      Retired              3396 Harrowgate Road      York, PA 17402        717-757-7001
Gales          Charles    cgales@weldonsolutions.com        Weldon Solutions     1800 West King Street     York, PA 17404        717-846-4000

Gaston         Charles    cag9@psu.edu                      Penn State York                                                      717-771-4155
Hartman        Harley     hhh2@psu.edu                      Penn State York                                                      717-771-4097
                                                                                                                                 717-665-2421
Heitzenrater   David      dgh@fennerdrives.com              Fenner Drives        311 W. Stiegel St.        Manheim, PA 17545     x 323
                                                            Genl Dynamics
                                                            Ordnance       &
Kugler         Jon        jtkugler@rdl.gd-ots.com           Tactical Systems     PO Box 127                Red Lion, PA 17356    717-246-8232
Landis         Bea        bkl1@psu.edu                      Penn State York                                                      717-771-4192
McCormick      Joseph     jpm32@psu.edu                     Penn State York                                                      717-771-4051
                                                            LiveWire             3495 Industrial Drive
McCracken      David      dmccracken@livewirekiosk.com      International, Inc   P.O. Box 20069            York, PA 17402        717-505-3909

Marcus         Michael    mxm81@psu.edu                     Penn State York                                                      717-771-4089
                                                            Pease
Pease          Howard     hfpease2@aol.com                  Associates           1689 Randow Road          York, PA 17403        717-845-6017
Rodney         Joel       jmr45@psu.edu                     Penn State York                                                      717-771-4120
                                                            York
Smith          Stephen    stephen.smith@york.com            International        631 S. Richland Avenue    York, PA 17402        717-771-7132
Sonnenberg     William    billsonnenberg@hotmail.com        Caterpillar Inc.     600 Memory Lane           York, PA 17402        717-751-5716
                          randy.l.stegemerten@honeywell
Stegemerten    Randy      .com                              Honeywell            P.O. Box 934              York, PA 17405        717-771-8144
                                       Part 1: Self-Study Report


                                Program-Specific Information: 2EET


8. Program Criteria – 2EET
    a. Demonstrate that the discipline-specific components of the program meet the requirements of all
       applicable program criteria.


The relationships between EET program and course outcomes and ABET Program Criteria for
Electrical/Electronic(s) Engineering Technology programs were outlined briefly in section B.2 of this
report. Table B.8.1 below repeats that information in expanded detail to show explicitly those courses in
the curriculum that are designed to satisfy the specific program criteria stipulated in the ABET program
criteria.
As shown in Table B.2.1 and B.2.3, ABET’s EET program criteria A and B are addressed by Penn
State’s EET program through five educational outcomes. Those are:
   Outcome 1 – application of basic knowledge in electronics, electrical circuit analysis, electrical
    machines, microprocessors, and PLC, which is primarily addressed by courses EET 101, 114, 117,
    210, 211, 213W, and 220.
   Outcome 2 – conduct of experiments, and then analysis and integration of results, which is
    accomplished primarily in lab courses EET 109, 118, 120, 205, and 221.
   Outcome 3 – application of mathematical, scientific, and engineering concepts to technical problem
    solving, which is primarily accomplished in courses ET 002 and 005, EET 101, 114, 210, 213W, and
    216.
   Outcome 4 – demonstrate a working knowledge of drafting and computer usage, including the use of
    one or more computer software packages for technical problem solving, which is primarily
    addressed in ET 005, EGT 101 and 102, EET 211 and 220.
   Outcome 10 – application of creativity through the use of project-based work to design circuits,
    systems, and processes, which is primarily centered in courses EET 120, 205, 211, 220, and 221.
Table B.8.1 correlates the courses listed above to the requirements established by the EET program
criteria established by ABET.
                                                           Part 1: Self-Study Report


                                 Program-Specific Information: 2EET


           Table B.8.1 – Mapping EET Program Courses to ABET Program Criteria

                                                                                        ABET EET Program Criteria

                                                                                                                                                                                       B
                                                                                          A                                                                 Application of the
                            Application of the following to the design, building, testing,                                                                following to electrical
                            operation, and maintenance of electrical/electronic circuits                                                                 and/or electronic circuits




                                                                                                                                                                                           Application of Mathematics
                                                             Programming & Associated
                             Circuit Analysis, Design, &




                                                                                                                                                              Application of Physics
                                                                                                                                     Microprocessors &
                                                                                          Analog Electronics



                                                                                                               Digital Electronics




                                                                                                                                     Microcomputers
                                                             Software
                             Testing




           Courses
Phys 150                                                                                                                                                      X
Phys 151                                                                                                                                                      X
EGT 101                                                            X
EGT 102                                                            X
ET 002                                                             X                                                                                                                       X
ET 005                                                             X                                                                                                                       X
EET 101                            X                                                                                                                          X                            X
EET 109                            X                               X
EET 114                            X                                                                                                                          X                            X
EET 117                            X                                                                           X
EET 118                            X                               X
EET 120                            X                               X                                           X
EET 205                            X                               X                      X
EET 210                            X                                                      X                                                                                                X
EET 216                            X                                                      X                                                                   X                            X
EET 221                            X                               X                      X
EET 211                            X                               X                                                                     X
EET 213W                           X                                                                                                                          X                            X
EET 220                            X                               X                      X                                              X
                                            Part 1: Self-Study Report
                                        Appendix 0 – Cross-Reference


       Appendix 0 – Cross-Reference: Self-Study to TAC of ABET Assessment Form TC4


The Self-Study format given to campuses by TAC of ABET asks for information in a structure much
different from the format given to evaluators in Assessment Form TC4. This Appendix provides a
cross-reference to help resolve those incompatibilities.


QUESTIONS RELATED TO PROGRAM TITLE, DEGREE OFFERINGS AND OPTIONS
               See section A.1. and A.2.


CRITERION #1 – QUESTIONS RELATED TO PROGRAM OBJECTIVES
               Program Objectives: Official program objectives for the ET programs are published and
        maintained on the SEDTAPP ET programs website at
                           <<http://www.cede.psu.edu/tc2k/contents/programs.htm>>
        Current program objectives for are listed in section B.1.b of this report.
              Consistency of Institution and Program Missions: Consistency of ET program objectives with the
        missions of Penn State, the College of Engineering, and the SEDTAPP is described in section B.1.a.
               Maintenance of Program Objectives: The respective ET Curriculum Committees are responsible
        for maintaining and updating ET program objectives. The review, assessment, and updating processes
        are described in section B.3.
                Reflection of Constituents’ Needs in Program Objectives: ET program objectives are based on
        inputs from all program constituents (i.e., faculty, students, administrators, and industry representatives).
        The process for involving these groups in the establishment of objectives is discussed in section B.3.
               Adequacy of Educational Program to Support Stated Objectives: Sections B.4, B.5, and B.6
        describe the curriculum, faculty, and facilities, respectively, that ensure that graduates of the ET program
        can achieve the stated program objectives.


CRITERION #2 – QUESTIONS RELATED TO PROGRAM OUTCOMES
               Program Outcomes: Official program outcomes for the ET programs are published and
        maintained on the SEDTAPP ET programs website at
                           <<http://www.cede.psu.edu/tc2k/contents/programs.htm>>
        Current program outcomes are listed in section B.2.a.
                 Adequacy of Program Outcomes to Encompass TAC of ABET Criteria 2a – 2k: The defined
        program outcomes are not an identical match to the 2a – 2k criteria; however, they` do encompass the
        full intent of the 2a – 2k criteria. This relationship is discussed in section B.2.b and shown explicitly in
        table B.2.1.
                Ability of Program Outcomes to Achieve Specific Elements of Criteria 2a – 2k: Table B.2.1 shows
        the correlation between program outcomes and criteria 2a – 2k. Table B.2.3 shows the relationships
        between program outcomes and specific curriculum elements in the program. In combination, these
        tables indicate how the program addresses individual 2a – 2k criteria.
              Verification of Achievement of Outcomes Prior to Graduation: Verification of achievement of
        outcomes is based on the assumption that successful completion of all required courses indicates
        successful achievement of required course outcomes, which in turn assures achievement of required

                                                       A0 - 1
                                          Part 1: Self-Study Report
                                      Appendix 0 – Cross-Reference


       program outcomes as indicated in section B.2 of this report. Verification that all graduates have
       successfully completed all required courses in the program curriculum is done by both the program
       coordinator and the University Registrar. The verification process is described in section B.9 of Volume II
       of this report.


CRITERION #3 – QUESTIONS RELATED TO PROGRAM ASSESSMENT AND EVALUATION
              Formal Assessment Process in Place and Functioning: A full description of the CQI processes
       used to ensure continuing assessment and improvement of the program is provided in section B.3 of this
       report.
               Written Continuous Improvement Plan in Place: Since fall of 2003, the SEDTAPP has been
       issuing an “ETCE TC2K Resource Manual” to all faculty teaching engineering technology in the Penn
       State system. This manual provides reference materials, assessment guidance, timetables for action,
       contact points, and task assignments so that all program coordinators and ET faculty are aware of what is
       expected of them and what resources are at their disposal to conduct the ETCE’s CQI program. It also
       identifies the key tools (MEET survey system, archived MEET survey data, standard course outlines, etc.)
       that are available to assist them as they carry out that process. Copies of these manuals will be available
       for review by the ABET review team. Further, the contents of the Resource Guide, updates to it, and
       reports on ongoing CQI activities are a keystone component of the two annual meetings of all SEDTAPP
       ET faculty. The discussion in section B.3 of this report is a synopsis of the various elements of the
       processes and activities that are covered by the Resource Manual.
               Multiple Assessment Measures are Used: There are several system-wide and local assessment
       tools used to monitor program success. These are described in detail in section B.3; however, in
       summary the important ones are –
         –   System-level Activities: MEET survey system used each semester by both faculty and students to
             evaluate every ET course offered that semester; exit surveys conducted each semester of all
             graduating ET students; annual alumni surveys of former graduates; annual industrial surveys of
             representative industry contacts; issuance and annual updates to standard course outlines for all
             ET courses; annual review, evaluation, and update of program educational objectives and
             outcomes by relevant curriculum committees; annual review by curriculum committee of all system
             program MEET data to identify system-level quality concerns.
         –   Local-level Activities: individual course improvements implemented by all ET faculty as
             appropriate; student review and teaching evaluations (SRTE surveys) conducted each semester
             for each ET course taught; local exit survey of ET graduates conducted by the Industrial Advisory
             Committee; periodic meetings of all ET faculty to brainstorm key directions and improvments to be
             undertaken at campus.
             Assessment Data Evaluated and Used to Improve Program: See section B.3.b. of this report for
       some examples.


CRITERION #4 – QUESTIONS RELATED TO PROGRAM CHARACTERISTICS
              Content of Curriculum Develops Graduates' Ability to Solve Problems: Program educational
       outcome #1 is the primary means of ensuring this result. See table B.2-3 for a list of courses primarily
       responsible for this outcome. Refer to the standard course outlines for these courses (separate
       document assembled by the SEDTAPP) for a description of the fundamental content of these courses.
       Specific syllabi used at the York Campus will be available as part of the display materials.
               Orientation is Consistent with Program Objectives, Faculty Qualifications, etc.: See section B.2
       for correspondence of program objectives and planned program outcomes. See section B.5 for faculty



                                                     A0 - 2
                                          Part 1: Self-Study Report
                                      Appendix 0 – Cross-Reference


       qualifications and workloads. See section B.4 for information on program content. See section B.1 for a
       discussion of the compatibility between program objectives and college and University objectives.
               Total Credits and Credit Distribution: Section B.4.b discusses the program credit distribution in
       reference to the minimum requirements of ABET’s accreditation criteria.


CRITERION #5 – QUESTIONS RELATED TO PROGRAM FACULTY
       See Section B.5. and the individual vitae in Appendices 7 & 8.
              Faculty Workloads and Qualifications: In Section B.5, see especially Tables 2 & 3, and
                       sections B.5.b & h.
              Faculty Characteristics: See Section B.5.b.
         –   Balance of Backgrounds: See Section B.5.b. and individual vitae.
         –   Individual Faculty Competence: See Section B.5.b. and individual vitae.
         –   Breadth and Depth of Faculty: There is a great deal of interdisciplinary competence among the
             faculty. See Table 2 and individual vitae.
         –   Support for Extracurricular Activities: ET faculty regularly support Open House events, and some
             serve as judges for the County Science Fair held on campus each spring. Because the York
             Campus has no dorms, and because most ET students are non-traditional and/or part-time,
             attempts to have engineering-related extra-curricular events generally fizzle. One ET faculty
             member has recruited a dozen or so IEEE student members, and most attended a Section Student
             Conference in Philadelphia with another faculty member, but regular meetings seem futile.
         –   Faculty Professional Development: See section B.5.e for a discussion of professional
             development support, and see individual vitae to see how individuals have taken advantage of it.
         –   Size of Faculty: See the table in Section B.5.h for individual teaching loads.
         –   Faculty Responsibility and Authority to Define, Revise, Implement, and Achieve Program Change:
             Section B.5.f provides a brief overview; however, see section B.3.a, and particularly the discussion
             of course chair and standard outline updates, for a discussion of faculty involvement in key quality
             improvement functions.


CRITERION #6 – QUESTIONS RELATED TO PROGRAM FACILITIES
       See Sections B.6 and B.7 for information on facilities and support.
              Financial Support for the Program: See S and section B.7.b.
              Classrooms, Laboratories, Computing Facilities, etc.: Section B.6 provides a comprehensive
       discussion of all the physical plant and computing facilities available to the ET programs.
              Support Staff: Support staff available to the ET program are described in Section B.7.a.(2).
              Information Resources: Section B.6.a.(4) summarizes the informational resources available to
       the ET programs. A more detailed description of technical references and library resources is provided in
       volume II of this report.

CRITERION #7 – QUESTIONS RELATED TO INSTITUTIONAL AND EXTERNAL SUPPORT
              Faculty Recruiting, Retention, and Development: See section B.7.a.(3).
              Student Recruiting, Selection and Advising: See section B.7a.(4).


                                                     A0 - 3
                                          Part 1: Self-Study Report
                                       Appendix 0 – Cross-Reference


             Leadership and Interpretation to the Public: This is provided by the "front office", including our
       Chancellor and publicity officer.
              Support Staff: Support staff available to the ET programs are described in Section B.7.a.(2).
              Job Placement Services: Career placement services are provided to ET students by a full-time
       placement counselor working out of the Advising Center. A more detailed description of campus career
       services is provided in volume II of this report.
              Industrial Advisory Committee: See section B.7.c. for a description of the makeup of the
       program’s industrial advisory committee. Minutes from monthly meetings will be available among the
       display materials.
   


CRITERION #8 – QUESTIONS RELATED TO ABET PROGRAM-SPECIFIC CRITERIA – see section B.8 for a discussion of the
relationship between program objectives and outcomes and specific ABET program criteria.




                                                     A0 - 4
                                     Self-Study Report Part 1
                         Appendix 7, Curricula Vitae for Full-time Faculty


This Appendix contains the following Curricula Vitae:

       Faculty Name                                                   Page No.

       Coho, Donald E.                                                A7 - 2

       Coyle, Dr. Marshall F.                                         A7 - 5

       Gaston, Dr. Charles A.                                         A7 - 9

       Hartman, Harley H.                                             A7 - 12

       Marcus, Michael                                                A7 - 14




                                                A7 – 1
                                       Self-Study Report Part 1
                           Appendix 7, Curricula Vitae for Full-time Faculty
1. Name:               Donald E. Coho

2. Department: School of Engineering Design, Technology, and Professional Programs (SEDTAPP)
   Programs:          Associate Degree in Electrical Engineering Technology (2EET)
                      Associate Degree in Mechanical Engineering Technology (2MET)
                      Bachelors Degree in Electro-Mechanical Engineering Technology (4EMET)

3. Date Hired:         August 1996

4. Years of Service:   9

5. Rank:         Assistant Professor (previous rank) and Instructor of Engineering (present rank,
                 obtained January 27, 1999)

6. Education:

1996             MS, Applied Mathematics with Honors, The Johns Hopkins University
                    Statistics, Design of Experiments, Total Quality Management, and Optimization

1983             BS, Mechanical Design Engineering Technology, The Pennsylvania State University
                     Evan Pugh Scholar (Penn State’s highest academic honor) as an undergraduate

7. Other teaching experience:

2003-2004        RiderCoach, Motorcycle Safety Program
                     Basic RiderCourse teaches mental and physical skills to new riders

8. Full-time Industrial Experience:

1995-97          Project Engineer, New Standard Corporation, Hellam, PA
                     Originated ISO 9001 procedures as a consultant during PSU employment.
                     Responsible for new product development and manufacturing startup.
                     Selected for the Steering Committee for Statistical Process Control implementation.

1989-95          Senior Manufacturing Engineer, SKF Bearing Industries, Hanover, PA
                    Responsible for the specification, negotiation of price and performance, functional
                      testing, installation, operator training and startup for new capital equipment.
                    Analyzed processes and implemented improvements to quality, production
                      rates, setup times, and material movement and storage methods
                    Selected for U.S.A. Quality Council and a Communication Task Force.

1988-89          Supervisor of Tool Services, York International Corporation, York, PA
                    Supervised craftsmen and managed all tooling-related support services.
                    Planned and executed an automated welding cell as Manufacturing Engineer.

1985-88          Lead Project Engineer, Precision Components Corporation, York, PA
                    Directed and controlled the complete technical planning and first-time fabrication
                      of a Naval Nuclear (DOD) aircraft carrier refueling system (MIL-I-45208).
                    Led a Quality Circle to continuously improve manufacturing systems.

1983-85          Mechanical Engineer, Bechtel Power Corporation, Gaithersburg, MD
                    Analyzed and redesigned operating nuclear power plant systems

9. Part-time Industrial Experience (summers, during college):

1980-82          Student Intern, Bechtel Power Corporation, Gaithersburg, MD


                                                    A7 – 2
                                        Self-Study Report Part 1
                            Appendix 7, Curricula Vitae for Full-time Faculty
Donald E. Coho
Page 2 of 3

10. Consulting work in the past five years:

2004               Design Consultant, Genie Electronics Corporation
                      Design refinement for frozen pattypacking machinery

2001-2004          Design Consultant, Carrier Transport Air Conditioning
                      Design and detail documentation for bus cooling systems using SolidWorks®

1997-99            Manager of Process Development and Improvement, B.I.C. Mfg. Co., Inc.
                      4KW CO2 Laser Cutting Start-up Business
                      Responsible for Manufacturing Process and Business System Development

1996-97            Quality Systems Consultant, New Standard Corporation
                      Originated ISO 9001 procedures.

11. Professional Registration and Certification:         EIT, PA

12. Principal Publications in the past five years: N/A

13. Scientific and Professional Societies: N/A

14. Honors and Awards: N/A

15. Professional Development Activities in the past five years:

1. Consulting activities
2. Continuous self re-training in numerous CAD software packages: SolidWorks, Pro/ENGINEER,
    AutoCAD, TurboCAD, DynaCADD, Vdraft

16. Other duties performed for regular base salary during academic year (with average hours per
week):

1.   Local Faculty Senate, general and committee meetings, 1.0 hour per week
2.   Open Houses, lab coverage and planning for those, 1.0 hour per week
3.   Advising and Office Hours, 5.0 hours per week
4.   Administrative support, 1.0 hour per week

17. Other duties performed for extra compensation during academic year, with average hours per
week: N/A

18. Recent summer or other assignments not shown above: N/A

19. Additional Pertinent Information:

1. I am an engineering and education professional with fifteen years of manufacturing experience and a
     strong background in Just-in-Time, Statistical Quality Control and Total Quality Management. A
     results-oriented individual who relates well to people and enjoys the challenge of accomplishing
     difficult tasks in a team environment.
2. Research interests include the Learning Factory, Quality and Productivity in manufacturing, and
     application of Solids Modeling in Engineering Design.




                                                     A7 – 3
                                       Self-Study Report Part 1
                           Appendix 7, Curricula Vitae for Full-time Faculty
Donald E. Coho
Page 3 of 3

20. Institutional and Professional Service in the past five years:

1. Secretary, Faculty Senate-Served two terms as meeting minute recorder
2. Course Chair, course number EG T 201, Advanced C.A.D-Responsible for Penn State's system-wide
    standards for this course




                                                   A7 – 4
                                        Self-Study Report Part 1
                            Appendix 7, Curricula Vitae for Full-time Faculty
1. Name:                 Marshall F. Coyle

2. Department: School of Engineering Design, Technology, and Professional Programs (SEDTAPP)
   Programs:          Associate Degree in Electrical Engineering Technology (2EET)
                      Associate Degree in Mechanical Engineering Technology (2MET)
                      Bachelors Degree in Electro-Mechanical Engineering Technology (4EMET)

3. Date Hired:           August 1995

4. Years of Service at Penn State:       10

5. Rank:                 Associate Professor of Engineering (May 2002)

6. Education:
1976          B.S., Civil Engineering, Virginia Military Institute
1978          M.E., Mechanical Engineering, University of Virginia
1995          Ph.D., Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Virginia

7. Other Teaching Experience:
1992          Lecturer, University of Virginia
1995          Assistant Professor, Shawnee State University

8. Full-time Industrial Experience:

                 Reynolds Metals Co., Richmond, VA, 1980-1990
1987-1990        Project Director
                     Directed special research projects and performed finite element analysis.
                     Supervised and trained one to three technicians depending on assignment
1984-1987        Test Engineer
                     Planned and conducted tests as assigned pertaining to mechanical systems and
                     machine designs, reported completed test results
1980-1984        Development Engineer
                     Developed and engineered work in solar engineering, coatings, system design and
                     installation, evaluated performance, and prepared reports and technical supporting
                     literature
1980             Industrial Engineer, Concrete Pipe and Products Co., Richmond, VA
                     Designed machines for production
1978-1980        Project Officer, United States Army Corps of Engineers, Sacramento, CA
                     Prepared estimates and negotiated contract modifications (civil, mechanical and
                     electrical) for military construction projects

9. Part-time Industrial Experience (summers, during college):

1968-1975        Drafter, Modern Engineering Service Co., Berkley, MI
                     Drafter, performed detailing, and designing of gauges, fixtures, and special machines
                     for the automotive industry

10. Consulting Work in the past five years:

1996-present     Consulting Engineer, Wire Mesh Products, Inc., York, PA
                    Directed special research projects, checked engineering calculations and design,
                    assisted on various engineering designs and performed finite element analysis on
                    furnace belts.
1998-2000        Consulting Engineer, Gichner Shelter Systems, Inc., Dallastown, PA
                    Provided engineering assistance in designing a QUAD COM shelter for military
                    application. Performed thermal, thermal stress, and dynamic analysis on AN/TPS-75
                    Shelter.
                                                      A7 – 5
                                       Self-Study Report Part 1
                           Appendix 7, Curricula Vitae for Full-time Faculty
Marshall F. Coyle
Page 2 of 4

10. Consulting Work in the past five years, continued:

2003            Consulting Engineer, New Standard Corporation, Hallam, PA
                   Performed structural and modal analysis of washer machine base being designed for
                   Bosch, Inc.
2002-2005       Consulting Engineer, Trans/Air Manufacturing Corporation, Dallastown, PA
                   Performed finite element analysis of A/C compressor brackets. Made
                   recommendations as to alterations of brackets to lower stress levels. Also consulted
                   Trans/Air engineering staff on use of COSMOS finite element software to analyze
                   A/C brackets.
2001-2004       Consulting Engineer, E.W. Bowman, Incorporated, Uniontown, PA
                   Performed stress analysis of AVCO Lehr Belt
                   Provide advice on furnace belts for glass, ceramic, and TV production
2001            Consulting Engineer, Armstrong World Industries, Incorporated, Lancaster, PA
                   Performed finite element analysis of shaft-roll gudgeon assembly.
                   Made recommendations as to alterations to gudgeon to prevent future failures.
2002            Consulting Engineer, Harper International Corporation, Lancaster, New York
                   Provided engineering assistance for designing wire mesh furnace belt and driving
                   system for a special processing furnace to produce graphite fibers.
2001            Consulting Engineer, Oak Works, Shewsbury, PA, Inc.
                   Provided structural analysis assistance on Scissor-Table Design.
2001            Consulting Engineer, York Steel Rule Dies, York, PA
                   Provided structural analysis assistance on a building structure.
2001            Consulting Engineer, ALCOA Mill Products, Lancaster, PA
                   Advising on the causes of “crow foot” and “crepe-paper effect” that they were
                   encountering in their sheet products.
                   Provided structural analysis assistance on a drive shaft
2000            Consulting Engineer, Marine Tech Wire and Cable, Inc, York, PA
                   Advising on testing of wire.

11. Professional Registration and Certification:        Professional Engineer in VA

12. Principal Publications in the past five years, ARTICLES PUBLISHED IN REFERRED
JOURNALS:

1. Coyle, M.F., Keel, C.G., Teaching Finite Elements to Second Year Engineering Students, The 21st
Century Engineer, Online Archival Journal for Engineering and Engineering Technology, Vol. 1, No. 1,
Fall 2000
2. Coyle, M. F., Keel, C.G., The Sensitivity of Flattened Wire Mesh Furnace Belts to Spiral Twist, Powder
Metals Science & Technology Briefs Journal for Metal Powder Industrial Federation, Vol. 3, No. 2: 13-17,
April 2001
3. Coyle, M.F., Keel, C.G., A Combined Stress Experiment using a Hacksaw, The 21st Century Engineer,
Online Archival Journal for Engineering and Engineering Technology , Vol. 1, No. 2, Spring 2001

12. Principal Publications in the past five years, REFEREED PROCEEDINGS:

1. Coyle, M. F., Riva, R. D., A Research Program to Analyze Wire Mesh Furnace Belts. Presented at the
ASEE Industry and Education Collaboration Conference Proceedings, Orlando, Florida, Jan. 31 – Feb. 4,
2000, pp. 36-45 (2000)
2. Coyle, M. F., Riva, R. D., A Research Program to Analyze Wire Mesh Furnace Conveyor Belts, ASEE
Mid-Atlantic Spring 2000 conference. Conference Proceedings Farmingdale, New York, April 14 - 15,
2000, pp. 135-147
3. Coyle, M. F., Riva, R.D., Finite Element Analyses of Wire Mesh Furnace Belts, 2000 International
Conference on Powder Metallurgy and Particulate Materials Conference Proceedings, New York City,
New York, May 30-June 3, 2000, Part 1 Design & Modeling CD-ROM
                                                     A7 – 6
                                       Self-Study Report Part 1
                           Appendix 7, Curricula Vitae for Full-time Faculty
Marshall Coyle
Page 3 of 4

12. Principal Publications in the past five years, REFEREED PROCEEDINGS, continued:

4. Coyle, M.F., Keel, C.G., A Combined Stress Experiment using a Hacksaw, ASEE 2001 Annual
Conference and Exposition, Albuquerque, NM, June 24-27 2001, CD-ROM
5. Coyle, M.F., Keel, C.G., Teaching Finite Elements to Second Year Engineering Students, ASEE 2001
Annual Conference and Exposition, Albuquerque, NM, June 24-27, CD-ROM

12. Principal Publications in the past five years, PROCEEDINGS: N/A

12. Principal Publications in the past five years, BOOKS OR PARTS OF BOOKS: N/A

12. Principal Publications in the past five years, ARTICLE PUBLISHED IN NON-REFEREED
JOURNALS:

Coyle, M. F., Riva, R. D., Finite Element Analysis of Wire Shape Used to Improve Service Life of Mesh-
Type Furnace Belts, Industrial Heating the International Journal of Thermal Technology, 67:10:55-59
(October 2000).

13. Scientific and Professional Societies: NA

14. Honors and Awards:

1. Michigan Industrial Education Awards, sponsored by Michigan Industrial Education Society and The
Detroit News – 1st in regional competition and 4th in state Engineering graphics comparison (1972)
2. Graduated with Distinction from Virginia Military Institute (1976)
3. ASTM award in materials testing at Virginia Military Institute (1976)
4. Inducted into Sigma Gamma Tau, Aerospace Engineering National Honor Society (1992)

15. Professional Development Activities in the past five years:

1. Engineering Science Workshop to discuss EMch 11, 12, and 13 courses Spring and Fall 2004

16. Other Duties Performed for Regular Base Salary during academic year (with average hours
per week):

1. Chair of the York Campus Senate 2003
2. Mechanical Engineering Program Coordinator, 2004-Present
3. Unit Head for the Natural Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Unit, 2004
4. Member, York Campus Strategic Planning Committee, 2003-2004
5. Member, York Campus Advisory Board, 2003-2004
6. Member, Industrial Advisory Committee, Fall 1995-Present
7. Member, York Campus Budget Committee, 2004
8. Member, Director of Academic Affairs Council, 2004
9. Member, Teaching, Learning Technology Advisory Committee, 2004-Present
10. Faculty Advisor to ASEE Tau Alpha Pi National Honors Society, Spring 1997- Present
11. Co-Chair PSU-York athletic program evaluation sub-committee of the Student Affairs
         Committee, Fall 1998- 2000
12. Grade Adjudication committee, Fall 1999 to 2001
13. Ombudsperson , Fall 1999 to 2001

17. Other Duties Performed for Extra Compensation: N/A

18. Recent Summer Assignments: N/A


                                                     A7 – 7
                                       Self-Study Report Part 1
                           Appendix 7, Curricula Vitae for Full-time Faculty
Marshall Coyle
Page 4 of 4

19. Additional Pertinent Information: N/A

20. Institutional and Professional Service in the past five years:

1. Engineering Judge at the York County Science and Engineer Fair, Spring 1998 and 2002
2. Assisted high school and one middle school student on Science Fair projects, 1999-2004




                                                    A7 – 8
                                          Self-Study Report Part 1
                              Appendix 7, Curricula Vitae for Full-time Faculty
1. Name:                 Charles A. Gaston

2. Department: School of Engineering Design, Technology, and Professional Programs (SEDTAPP)
   Programs:          Associate Degree in Electrical Engineering Technology (2EET)
                      Associate Degree in Mechanical Engineering Technology (2MET)
1.                    Bachelors Degree in Electro-Mechanical Engineering Technology (4EMET)

3. Date Hired:           August 1993

4. Years of Service:     13

5. Rank:                 Assistant Professor (obtained 1993)

6. Education:

1961             B.S., Engineering Science, Penn State (With Highest Distinction)
1962             M.S., Engineering Science, Stanford
1965             PhD., Engineering Science, Purdue (Thesis area: Rocket trajectory optimization)

7. Other Teaching Experience:

1984-1985        Work-time classes at IBM -- Disciplined Creativity
1992             Training in use of Software Control System that I wrote
1982             Evening (paid) classes at IBM -- BASIC programming
1982-1983        Adult education classes -- BASIC programming
1985             Substitute teacher -- Jr.Hi Social Studies, H.S. Math

8. Full-time Industrial Experience:

1973-1993        Advisory Engineer, IBM, East Fishkill, NY, Advisory Engineer
1965-1973        Advisory Engineer, IBM, Washington, DC area,

9. Part-time Industrial Experience (summers, during college):

1964             Bellcomm, Washington, DC, Lunar landing trajectories
1963             General Precision Aerospace, NJ, Rendezvous trajectories.
1962             Hughes Aircraft, CA, Tri-state logic
1961             RCA, PA, Photomultiplier tube tester design
1960             IBM, NY, Core driver circuit design
1959             RCA, NJ, Discrete logic design

10. Consulting Work in the past five years:

2005             Solved a ground-isolation problem deemed "impossible" by many, to simplify ground
                     resistance testing process.
2001             Showed small R&D company how to accomplish a "dipping" operation without adding a
                     $1200 joint to its robot.
1999             Designed and built multi-mode timer for a dentist experimenting with improved control for
                     an electro-surgery unit.

11. Professional Recognition and Certification: Professional Engineer in Maryland

12. Principal Publications in the past five years:

Gaston, C.A., A New Way to Vote: Accessible, Affordable, Available, ITD Journal, Vol 10, No 2, 2004
December. (Information Technology and Disabilities E-Journal)
http://www.rit.edu/~easi/itd/itdv10n2/gaston.htm)
                                                      A7 – 9
                                       Self-Study Report Part 1
                           Appendix 7, Curricula Vitae for Full-time Faculty
Charles A. Gaston
Page 2 of 3

Gaston, C.A., A Better Way to Vote, Proceedings of the 38th Annual Hawaii International Conference on
Systems Sciences (HICSS'05) - Track 5, January 03-06, 2005, p. 117c,
(http://csdl.computer.org/comp/proceedings/hicss/2005/2268/05/22680117c.pdf)

Gaston, C.A., How Standards Can Inhibit Innovation, Workshop on Standards for Voting Equipment,
Cambridge, Mass, 2005 February.
(http://evote-mass.org/speakers/How%20standards%20can%20inhibit%20innovation.ppt)

13. Scientific and Professional Societies:

1. ASEE Member -- Attend all summer meetings that don't conflict with ASHRAE.
2. ASHRAE Member – Attend almost all summer & winter meetings. Was active member of three
     committees; now down to two. Helped develop a standard for duct efficiency. Proposed a simplified
     technique for duct leakage measurement that others have adopted and modified. Helping revise two
     chapters of the ASHRAE Handbook.
3. SME member -- Have attended some local meetings; not very active.
4. IEEE member -- Was active on a committee developing a standard for voting systems.

14. Honors and Awards:

1. Tau Beta Pi           2. Sigma Tau          3. Phi Eta Sigma
4. Phi Kappa Phi         5. Eta Kappa Nu       6.Phi Mu
7. Hamilton Watch Award
8. Curtis-Wright Award
9. Penn State Alumni Scholarship
10. Hughes Aircraft Fellowship
11. National Science Foundation Fellowship

15. Professional Development Activities in the past five years:

1. Read wide range of technical magazines
2. Spend considerable time roaming exhibits at national conferences
3. Tour manufacturing facilities
4. Refresh programming skills for voting system development
5. Review technical papers

16. Other Duties Performed for Regular Base Salary during Academic Year (with average hours
per week):

1. Advising, 2 hours per week
2. Campus Senate, 0.2 hour per week in past; however, became Chair-elect 2006 May
3. Strategic Planning Committee , 0.1 hour per week
4. EMET Group Leader (including TAC of ABET preparation), 1.0 hour per week
5. EMET curriculum committee, 1.1 hours per week
6. York Campus Open Houses (two per year), 0.7 hour per week
7. Industrial Advisory Committee, 0.2 hour per week

17. Other Duties Performed for Extra Compensation during academic year:

1. Teaching overload occasionally

18. Recent Summer or other Assignments not shown above: N/A



                                                    A7 – 10
                                        Self-Study Report Part 1
                            Appendix 7, Curricula Vitae for Full-time Faculty
Charles A. Gaston
Page 3 of 3

19. Additional Pertinent Information:

1. Four patents.
2. Four IBM Invention Awards, based on number of potentially patentable ideas generated. (3 patents or
     12 published ideas = 1 Award)
3. IBM Outstanding Innovation award, based on an idea deliberately not patented
4. Two patents pending
     – one for a PC-based voting system more trustworthy and secure than any other voting system;
     -- the other for a way to isolate a local ground from power line neutral (to test the resistance of the
     local ground) while maintaining the ability to trip circuit breakers
5. Continually creating or improving equipment and techniques used in teaching concepts of science,
     engineering and technology. (Tarzan Swing, Windmill test stand, Bridge tester, Wax cylinder casting
     process)

20. Institutional and Professional Service in the past five years:

1. Judge for Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (Philadelphia, 1999).
2. Judge for Siemens Westinghouse Science & Technology Competition (1999, 2000)
3. Judge for York County Science & Engineering Fair most years
4. Judge for Lancaster County Science & Engineering Fair some years
5. Lancaster-Lebanon Science & Technology Alliance -- presenter at 5th-8th grade career days 15-18
    times a year (showing voting system I invented)




                                                       A7 – 11
                                          Self-Study Report Part 1
                              Appendix 7, Curricula Vitae for Full-time Faculty

1. Name:                 Harley H. Hartman

2. Department: School of Engineering Design, Technology, and Professional Programs (SEDTAPP)
   Programs:          Associate Degree in Electrical Engineering Technology (2EET)
                      Associate Degree in Mechanical Engineering Technology (2MET)
                      Bachelors Degree in Electro-Mechanical Engineering Technology (4EMET)

3. Date Hired:           January 1992 as Part-time; July 2005 as full-time

4. Years of Service:     13

5. Rank:                 Instructor of Engineering

6. Education:

2003             AS, Electrical Engineering Technology, The Pennsylvania State University

2004             BS, Electro-Mechanical Engineering Technology, The Pennsylvania State University


7. Other teaching experience:

2000-Present     Part-Time Instructor, Schaedler / YESCO Distribution
                     Teaching Various Electrical Troubleshooting Topics

1981-1990        Instructor, York Industrial Management Club
                      Taught “Solid State Troubleshooting” & “Digital Techniques” courses

8. Full-time Industrial Experience:

1990-Present     Self-Employed Consultant, H-Cubed Engineering
1978-1990        Head of Engineering & Design Engineer, Swam Electric Co., Inc.

9. Part-time Industrial Experience (suumers, during college):

1978             Engineering Assistant, Federal Aviation Administration (F.A.A.)

10. Consulting work in the past five years:

1990-Present     Electro-mechanical Programming Consultant, Swam Electric Co., Inc.
                     Developed control programs for numerous projects and consulted on electrical-
                     industrial applications

11. Professional Registration and Certification: Professional Engineer in Pennsylvania and Maryland

12. Principal Publications in the past five years:
"Information Visualization Applied in Presenting Some Fundamental Power System Topics.", to be
presented at the ASEE Conference in Chicago, 2006 June.

13. Scientific and Professional Societies:

1. Pennsylvania Society of Professional Engineers (P.S.P.E.) member
2. National Society of Professional Engineers (N.S.P.E.) member




                                                     A7 – 12
                                      Self-Study Report Part 1
                          Appendix 7, Curricula Vitae for Full-time Faculty
Harley H. Hartman
Page 2 of 2

14. Honors and Awards:

1. Tau Alpha Pi National Honor Society, Iota Beta, Penn State York, April 2003
2. The President Sparks Award, Penn State University, May 2003
3. Alpha Sigma Lambda National Honor Society, Eta Xi, Penn State York, May 2003
4. Phi Kappa Phi National Honor Society, Penn State University Chapter, February 2004

15. Professional Development Activities in the past five years: N/A

16. Other duties performed for regular base salary during academic year: N/A

17. Other duties performed for extra compensation during academic year: N/A

18. Recent summer or other assignments not shown above: N/A

19. Additional Pertinent Information: N/A

20. Institutional and Professional Service in the past five years: N/A




                                                   A7 – 13
                                        Self-Study Report Part 1
                            Appendix 7, Curricula Vitae for Full-time Faculty

1. Name:                Michael Marcus

2. Department: School of Engineering Design, Technology, and Professional Programs (SEDTAPP)
   Programs:          Associate Degree in Electrical Engineering Technology (2EET)
                      Associate Degree in Mechanical Engineering Technology (2MET)
                      Bachelors Degree in Electro-Mechanical Engineering Technology (4EMET)

3. Date Hired:          August 1998

4. Years of Service:    7

5. Rank:                Associate Professor (current rank, obtained 2004) and Assistant Professor
                           (1998-2004).

6. Education:

1989             M.S., Electrical Engineering, Fairleigh Dickinson University
1972             B.S., Electrical Engineering, Penn State University
1968             A.S., Electrical/Electronics Technology, Penn State University

7. Other Teaching Experience:

1997-1998        Assistant Professor & Program Director, Dundalk Community College, Dundalk, MD, ,
                     Electricity/Electronics Maintenance Technology
1996-1997        Assistant Professor, Electrical Engineering, Technology Wor-Wic Community College,
                     Salisbury, MD,
1972-1978        Electronics Instructor, RETS Electronics Schools, Upper Darby, PA,

8. Full-time Industrial Experience:

1990-1995        Senior Project Engineer-Biomedical Instrumentation, Becton Dickinson, Sparks, MD,
1981-1990        Electrical Engineer, Becton Dickinson, Parsippany, NJ,
1979-1981        Assistant Electrical Engineer, Applied Medical Technology, Mountain View, CA,
1978-1979        Senior Electronic Technician - Pacemakers, Cordis Corporation, Miami, FL,

9. Part-time Industrial Experience: N/A

10. Consulting Work in the past five years: N/A

11. Professional Registration and Certification:

1. EIT, PA
2. Certified Biomedical Equipment Technician (CBET), 2004 - present
3. Institute for the Certification of Engineering Technicians, 1979, Associate Engineering Technician

12. Principal Publications in the past five years, ARTICLES PUBLISHED IN REFERRED
JOURNALS:

1. Marcus, M.L.; Winters, Dixie (PSY) Team Problem Solving Strategies with a Survey of These Methods
    Used by faculty Members in Engineering Technology. The Journal of STEM (Science, Technology,
    Mathematics, and Engineering) Education: Innovations and Research , pp. 24 – 29, January – June
    2004.
 2. Marcus, M.L.; Biersach, B. R. (Underwriters Laboratories) Regulatory Requirements for Medical
    Equipment. Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers Instrumentation & Measurement
    Magazine, vol. 6, No.4, pp. 23-29, December 2003
                                                      A7 – 14
                                        Self-Study Report Part 1
                            Appendix 7, Curricula Vitae for Full-time Faculty
Michael Marcus
Page 2 of 3

12. Principal Publications in the past five years, ARTICLES PUBLISHED IN REFERRED
JOURNALS, continued:

3. Marcus, M. L., Biersach, B. R. (Underwriters Laboratories) Avoiding Last Minute Redesign of Medical
    Electrical Equipment – Current Certification and Product Safety Requirements. Medical Devices
    and Diagnostic Industry. pp. 90-99, March 2003.
4. Marcus, M. L. Team Problem Solving Strategies Used by Industry and Implemented by Students of
    Engineering Technology. Tech Directions. pp. 23-25, February 2003.
5. Marcus, M. L. Uniform Laser Scanning in a Hematology Analyzer. Institute of Electrical and Electronic
    Engineers Instrumentation & Measurement Magazine, vol. 5, No.2, pp. 24-27, June 2002.
6. Marcus, M. L. Comparison of Methods for Uniform Laser Scanning of Centrifuged Blood Tubes to
    Acquire Data in a Hematology Analyzer. Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers Transactions
    on Instrumentation and Measurement, vol. 50, pp. 1568-1570, Dec. 2001.

12. Principal Publications in the past five years, ARTICLES PUBLISHED IN REFEREED
PROCEEDINGS:

Marcus, M. L.. A Simple Workshop on Project Teams for Secondary School Technology and Science
   Teachers and Their Students. Proceedings of the 2005 Annual Conference & Exposition of the
   American Society for Engineering Educators. Portland, Oregon.

13. Scientific and Professional Societies:

1. American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE)
2. The Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE)
3. Biomedical Engineering Society (BMES)

14.     Honors and Awards:

Penn State University - Jack P. Royer Award for Active and Collaborative Learning - 2002

15. Professional Development Activities in the past five years:

                      FURTHER ACADEMIC STUDIES AND TRAINING
Date Courses Completed           Location        Duration                  Description
5-00 Nanofabrication             PSU-State       3 days           Overview of Nanofabrication
      Workshop                   College                          Workshop for Educators
10-01 Quality Conference         PSU, York        1 day(0.5 ceu's) Quality Control
4-02 Technical Seminar           Rockville, MD 4 hrs.             PC-Based Data Logging Solutions
5-03 Technical Seminar           Aberdeen, MD 1 day               New LabVIEW Software (Ver. 7)
                         PARTICIPATION IN SEMINARS AND WORKSHOPS:
      Seminar/Workshop
             Title                            Dates         Sponsor                    Role
Association for the Advancement               6-9-01        AAMI                     Presenter
of Medical Instrumentation                    to 6-12
 Baltimore, MD
Workshop on Recruitment and                   11-16-01      NSF                      Participant
Retention, St. Louis, MO                      & 11-17
HealthTech Conference and                     4-30-02       Medical Care             Attendee
Exposition, Baltimore, MD                                   Communications
Technological Education Initiative            6-28-02       NSF & ABET             Participant
Workshop (TC2K), NJ                           to 6-30-02
   th
29 Annual Northeast Biomedical                3-22-03       IEEE EMB                 Attendee
Engineering Conference, NJ                    to 3-23-03

                                                      A7 – 15
                                        Self-Study Report Part 1
                            Appendix 7, Curricula Vitae for Full-time Faculty
Michael Marcus
Page 3 of 3

2005 ASEE Annual Conference &                  6-13-05       ASEE                    Attendee
Exposition, Portland, Oregon                   to 6-15-05
Pre-Conference Workshop by TAC of ABET         6-12-05       TAC of ABET             Attendee
 - Institutional Training, Portland, Oregon
IEEE Region 2 Student Activity Conference      4-9-05       IEEE Region 2              Advisor
New Jersey                                     to 4-10-05
Biomedical Engineering Society (BMES)          9-29-05      BMES                     Attendee
Annual Fall Meeting and Conference             to 10-1-2005
-- The Changing Face of Biomedical
Engineering, Baltimore, Maryland
ABET TEI Faculty Workshop Version 2.0          9-24-05        ABET                   Attendee
Assessment and Continuous Improvement
Process Linthicum, Maryland

16. Other duties performed for regular base salary during the academic year (with
       average hours per week):

1. EET Advising, 2.0 hours per week
2. Campus Senate, 0.2 hour per week
3. EET Group Leader, 2.0 hours per week
4. EMET curriculum committee, 1.0 hour per week
5. York Campus Open House, 0.5 hour per week
6. Industrial Advisory Committee, 0.2 hour per week

17. Other duties performed for extra compensation during the academic year: N/A

18. Recent summer or other assignments not shown above: N/A

19. Additional Pertinent Information: N/A

20. Institutional and Professional Service in the past five years:

1. Campus Coordinator EET program. (1998 - present)
2. Industrial Advisory Committee, member (1998-present)
3. Open House Committee (1999-present)
4. Faculty sponsor for students in IEEE (Institute for Electrical and Electronic Engineers) student
     chapter, (1998-present)
5. Engineering Open House Committee (1998-present)
6. ETCE Graduate & Employer, CQI Team - Member ( 1999 - present)
7. Course Chairperson for EET course E T 5 (1999-present)
8. Journal Article Reviewer - Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers Transactions on
     Instrumentation and Measurement (2002-present)
9. Reviewed proceeding papers for ASEE annual conference (2004)




                                                       A7 – 16
                                     Self-Study Report Part 1
                        Appendix 8, Curricula Vitae for Part-time Faculty




This Appendix contains the following Curricula Vitae:

       Faculty Name                                                  Page No.

       Barnes, Douglas P.                                            A8 - 2

       Hoffer, Roy                                                   A8 - 3

       Marteny, David L.                                             A8 - 5

       Runkle, Margaret E.                                           A8 - 6




                                                A8 - 1
                                         Self-Study Report Part 1
                            Appendix 8, Curricula Vitae for Part-time Faculty
1. Name:                Douglas P. Barnes

2. Department: School of Engineering Design, Technology, and Professional Programs (SEDTAPP)
   Program:           Associate Degree in Electrical Engineering Technology (2EET)

3. Date Hired:          January 2004

4. Years of Service:    2

5. Rank:                Adjunct Instructor

6. Education:

       MS, Computer Engineering, Loyola University of Maryland
       MS, Forest Resources, The Pennsylvania State University
       BS, Forest Products, The Pennsylvania State University

7. Other teaching experience: N/A

8. Full-time Industrial Experience:

1986-1996        Process Control Engineer, P.H. Glatfelter Co.
                     Managed software upgrades, maintenance paper machine control systems.
                     Lead computer process control engineer on a major facility expansion.

9. Part-time Industrial Experience: N/A

10. Consulting work in the past five years:

2003-Present     Automation Consultant
1996-2003        Batch Product Consultant/Principal Application Engineer, Wonderware Corporation

11. Professional recognition:N/A

12. Principal Publications: N/A

13. Technical Affiliations: N/A

14. Honors and Awards: N/A

15. Professional Development Activities in the past five years: N/A

16. Other duties performed for regular base salary during academic year: N/A

17. Other duties performed for extra compensation during academic year: N/A

18. Recent summer or other assignments not shown above: N/A

19. Additional Pertinent Information: N/A

20. Institutional and Professional Service in the past five years: N/A




                                                    A8 - 2
                                          Self-Study Report Part 1
                             Appendix 8, Curricula Vitae for Part-time Faculty
1. Name:                 Roy Hoffer

2. Department: School of Engineering Design, Technology, and Professional Programs (SEDTAPP)
   Program:           Associate Degree in Electrical Engineering Technology (2EET)

3. Date Hired:           January 2004

4. Years of Service:     2

5. Rank:                 Adjunct Instructor

6. Education:

1979             BS, Physics, Millersville University, Millersville, PA

1981             MS, Electrical Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA

7. Other teaching experience:

2004-Present     Adjunct Faculty, Lancaster General College of Nursing & Health Sciences,
                     Teaching Physics

1998-2000        Faculty, Thaddeus Stevens College of Technology
                    Developed and taught Fire and Explosion Investigation courses
                    Taught Physics, Mechanical Engineering/Strength of Materials, Math, Environmental
                    Science, Electricity, and Safety.

1994-1998        Substitute Instructor, Lancaster County (PA) Career & Technology Centers,
                    Taught industrial electricity, PLC systems, safety, electronics, auto repair, and data
                    processing.

8. Full-time Industrial Experience:

1994-96          Calibration Engineer, Warner-Lambert Company, Lititz, PA
                     Monitored plant wide instrument and equipment calibration and preventive
                     maintenance programs.

1991-93          Supervisor, Engineering, Datcon Instrument Co., East Petersburg, PA
                    Designed high-reliability microprocessor engine monitoring instruments, analog and
                    digital electronics, and power supplies.

1986-91          Product Engineer, York International Corp., York, PA
                    Analog and digital electronics: designed microprocessor based engine control,
                    propane and natural gas furnace safety controls, heat pump defrost controls, variable
                    speed motor drives, power supplies

1981-86          Research Engineer, Armstrong World Industries, Lancaster, PA
                    Designed new products to meet UL standards for safety.

9. Part-time Industrial Experience: N/A

10. Consulting work in the past five years:

2000-present     Consulting Engineer, Self-Employed, Lancaster, PA

11. Professional Registration and Certification: N/A

                                                       A8 - 3
                                           Self-Study Report Part 1
                              Appendix 8, Curricula Vitae for Part-time Faculty
Roy Hoffer
Page 2 of 2

12. Principal Publications: N/A

13. Technical Affiliations:

1. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (I.E.E.E), Senior Member

14. Honors and Awards:

1. Biography Cited in America's Registry of Outstanding Professionals and in Who’s Who in Science and
Engineering, America, Finance and Industry

15. Professional Development Activities: N/A

16. Other duties performed for regular base salary during academic year: N/A

17. Other duties performed for extra compensation during academic year: N/A

18. Recent summer or other assignments not shown above: N/A

19. Additional Pertinent Information: N/A

20. Institutional and Professional Service: N/A




                                                       A8 - 4
                                        Self-Study Report Part 1
                           Appendix 8, Curricula Vitae for Part-time Faculty
1. Name:               David L. Marteny

2. Department: School of Engineering Design, Technology, and Professional Programs (SEDTAPP)
   Programs:          Associate Degree in Electrical Engineering Technology (2EET)
                      Bachelors Degree in Electro-Mechanical Engineering Technology (4EMET)

3. Date Hired:         January 2004

4. Years of Service:   2

5. Rank:               Adjunct Instructor

6. Education:
                       AS,

7. Other teaching experience: N/A

8. Full-time Industrial Experience:

1977-Present           Senior Biomedical Technician, York Hospital, York, PA
1972-1977              Senior Biomedical Technician, Duke University Medical Center
1969-1972              Biomedical Technician, New York University Medical Center

9. Part-time Industrial Experience: N/A

10. Consulting work: N/A

11. Professional Registration and Certification: N/A

12. Principal Publications: N/A

13. Technical Affiliations: N/A

14. Honors and Awards: N/A

15. Professional Development Activities: N/A

16. Other duties performed for regular base salary during academic year: N/A

17. Other duties performed for extra compensation during academic year: N/A

18. Recent summer or other assignments not shown above: N/A

19. Additional Pertinent Information: N/A

20. Institutional and Professional Service: N/A




                                                   A8 - 5
                                        Self-Study Report Part 1
                           Appendix 8, Curricula Vitae for Part-time Faculty
1. Name:                Margaret E. Runkle

2. Department: School of Engineering Design, Technology, and Professional Programs (SEDTAPP)
   Program:           Associate Degree in Mechanical Engineering Technology (2MET)

3. Date Hired:

4. Years of Service:

5. Rank:                Adjunct Instructor

6. Education:

                 Mechanical Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University
                 Computer Science, The Pennsylvania State University
                 Vocational Industrial Education, The Pennsylvania State University
                 Adult Education, The Pennsylvania State University
                 Industrial Psychology, Millersville University
                 Media and Library Science, Western Maryland College

7. Other teaching experience:

       York County School of Technology
       McDaniel College (formerly Western Maryland College)
       Lincoln Intermediate Unit 12 - Summer Academy

8. Full-time Industrial Experience:

       Cremans Incorporated, El Paso, Texas
       Therm-Air Manufacturing Company, Inc., York, PA
       Borg-Warner Corporation, York, PA
       Martin Library, York, PA

9. Part-time Industrial Experience: N/A

10. Consulting work: N/A

11. Professional Registration and Certification:

1. Pennsylvania State Department of Education
        Drafting, Mechanical Design Technology, Cooperative Education, Masters Equivalency
        Instructional Technology Specalist (pending)
        Media and Library K-12
2. National Occupational Competency Testing Institute (NOCTI)
        Drafting, Mechanical Drafting, Master Examiner

12. Principal Publications: N/A




                                                     A8 - 6
                                           Self-Study Report Part 1
                              Appendix 8, Curricula Vitae for Part-time Faculty
Margaret E. Runkle
Page 2 of 2

13. Technical Affiliations:

1. National Education Association
2. Pennsylvania State Education Association
3. York County Vocational-Techncial Education Association
4. American Library Association
5. SkillsUSA (VICA)
6. York County Science and Engineering Fair
7. Phi Delta kappa
8. Delta Kappa Gamma
9. Iota Lambda Sigma
10. York County 4-H Clubs

14. Honors and Awards: N/A

15. Professional Development Activities: N/A

16. Other duties performed for regular base salary during academic year: N/A

17. Other duties performed for extra compensation during academic year: N/A

18. Recent summer or other assignments not shown above: N/A

19. Additional Pertinent Information: N/A

20. Institutional and Professional Service: N/A




                                                    A8 - 7

				
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