Understanding AB12 for Post-Secondary Education ... - CalSWEC by wuzhenguang

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									             AB12: The California
           Fostering Connections to
                  Success Act




Understanding AB12 for Post-Secondary
Education Professionals:
The Top 10 Things You Need to Know

Trainer’s Guide


Version 1.1 | February 22, 2012

              Understanding AB12 for Post-Secondary Education Professionals
                               v1.1, February 22, 2012
            Understanding AB12 for Post-Secondary Education Professionals:
                        The Top Ten Things You Need to Know

                                                          TRAINER’S GUIDE


                       Training Tips, Activities, & Transfer of Learning (TOL) Exercises


                                                          Table of Contents

Segment                                                                                                                           Page

Introduction ....................................................................................................................... 3

General Training Tips ......................................................................................................... 5

Resources ........................................................................................................................... 6

Learning Objectives ........................................................................................................... 7

Suggested Lesson Plan ...................................................................................................... 8

Welcome and Introduce Trainers..................................................................................... 10

Introduction .......................................................................................................................11

Eligibility ............................................................................................................................ 14

Placement Options ........................................................................................................... 17

Helping Young People to Maximize Benefit .................................................................. 20

Questions and Answers ....................................................................................................25

Evaluation and Close ........................................................................................................ 26




This curriculum was developed by Debbie Raucher of the John Burton Foundation.



           Supporting Youth to Successful Transitions from Foster Care, Version 1.1, February 22, 2012                                        2
                                                Trainer Guide
Introduction
The purpose of this training is to provide an overview of AB 12 that is targeted to those
working in post-secondary education.

AB12: Fostering Connections to Success

In 2010, 4,800 youth aged out of foster care in California. Currently, foster youth are
transitioned from foster care at age 18, and in some cases age 19. Unfortunately, foster
youth are often ill equipped to handle the realities of adult life at such a young age.

Foster youth are more likely to be underemployed, experience poverty, have unplanned
pregnancies, and experience the adult criminal system.

In order to counter some of these poor outcomes, AB12, the California Fostering
Connections to Success Act was signed into law on September 30, 2010. The legislation was
sponsored by Speaker Karen Bass and Assembly Member Jim Beall and goes into effect on
January 1, 2012.

Partnering for the future of our Youth
Like no time before, CDSS has engaged its stakeholders to develop the deliverables for AB12.
These stakeholders include the co-sponsor agencies:

   Judicial Council of California
   California Alliance of Child and Family Services
   California Youth Connection (CYC)
   Children’s Law Center of Los Angeles
   County Welfare Director’s Association of California (CWDA)
   John Burton Foundation
   Service Employees International Union
   The Alliance for Children’s Rights
   Youth Law Center

Values and Principles in Action
AB12 legislation is guided by the following principles:
 Value Permanency
 Help youth transition to lifelong connections
 Create a collaborative youth-centered process
 Work proactively with youth to develop and reach independent living goals
 Allow youth to gain real life experiences with independence and allow them to learn
   from their mistakes


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                                            Trainer Guide
   Be a safety net for the most vulnerable youth so they can achieve success living as
    independent adults

Anticipated Benefits
 Permanency is promoted for foster youth
 Enables youth to maintain a safety net of support while experiencing independence in a
   secure supervised living environment
 Youth will be better prepared for successful transition into adulthood

Partnering with Post-Secondary Education
The implementation of AB12 provides an unprecedented opportunity to create collaboration
between child welfare and systems of higher education to promote improved educational
outcomes for youth. This training is designed to begin the process of providing information
to our educational partners about the benefits of AB12 and educating them about the crucial
role that they can plan in making this groundbreaking new policy a success.

Model for the Future
This far reaching legislation has been analyzed and synthesized to create a newly emerging
Extended Foster Care system. Partnering to create this system has been innovative and a
model of achievement for others to emulate. With vision and leadership by CDSS, AB12 Co-
Sponsors, CWDA, and Foundations, this program is sure to be a true safety net for the most
vulnerable in our society!




       Supporting Youth to Successful Transitions from Foster Care, Version 1.1, February 22, 2012   4
                                            Trainer Guide
General Training Tips
     The information included in this curriculum was reviewed and approved by the AB12
      Youth Engagement, Training and Informing Focus Area Team. The materials are
      intended for public use, to be distributed widely and at no cost, providing that proper
      citation is noted. Sections of the training may also be used and modified for specific
      audiences. Please note that any modifications of the factual information within the
      curriculum may result in provision of incorrect information to training participants. If
      you have questions or concerns about the content, please contact Debbie Raucher at
      the John Burton Foundation (Debbie@johnburtonfoundation.org).

     The curriculum is intended primarily for those who work in post-secondary education
      programs, in particular support programs that work with current and former foster
      youth.

     The information provided in the tables for each section of the training includes each
      PowerPoint slide along with comments that offer additional information that should
      be included beyond what is provided on the slide. Trainers should make sure to
      cover both the information included on the slide along with the additional
      information.

     Prior to the training the facilitator should read and be familiar with the following
      documents for each topic area:
                  Trainer guide
                  PowerPoint
                  Additional Resources

     The following training supplies will be needed to present this curriculum:
                 Laptop computer
                 LCD
                 Projection screen
                 Optional handouts
                        o Definitions of Participation Conditions
                        o Shared Living Agreement
                        o Voluntary Re-entry Agreement




      Supporting Youth to Successful Transitions from Foster Care, Version 1.1, February 22, 2012   5
                                           Trainer Guide
Resources
Highly recommended reading:

California Department of Social Services All County Letters and All County Information
Notices about Extended Foster Care (all accessed via
http://www.dss.cahwnet.gov/lettersnotices/PG931.htm):
          All County Letter 11-61, Extended Foster Care,
          All County Letter 11-69, Extension of Foster Care Beyond Age 18: Part One
          All County Letter 11-67, Case Plan and Kinship Guardianship Assistance Payment
           Program
          All County Letter 11-15, New Kinship Guardianship Assistance Payment Program
           Requirements
          All County Letter 11-74, Adoption Assistance Program Rates
          All County Letter 11-78, California Work Opportunity And Responsibility To
           Kids: Extending Benefits To Non-Minor Dependents
          All County Information Notice I-40, Program Information Regarding Assembly Bill
           (AB) 12 and the Extension of Foster Care to Age 20

Realizing the Promise of AB12: Recommendations for Improving Higher Education Outcomes
for Foster Youth
http://www.cafosteringconnections.org/pdfs/Realizing%20the%20Promise%20of%20AB12%20-
%20Higher%20Ed.pdf

Helpful reading:

THP+ Primer
http://www.cafosteringconnections.org/pdfs/THP-Plus%20Primer%2011-3-10.pdf

California’s Fostering Connections to Success Act and the Costs and Benefits of Extending
Foster Care to 21 (2009) Mark Courtney, et. al.
http://www.chapinhall.org/research/report/midwest-evaluation-adult-functioning-former-
foster-youth

Midwest Evaluation of the Adult Functioning of Former Foster Youth: Outcomes at Ages 23
and 24
http://www.cafosteringconnections.org/pdfs/Midwest_Study_Age_23_24.pdf

For more information and additional resources, visit www.cafosteringconnections.org




       Supporting Youth to Successful Transitions from Foster Care, Version 1.1, February 22, 2012   6
                                            Trainer Guide
Learning Objectives
CORE COMPETENCY

The trainee will understand concepts related to the implementation of AB 12 and how they
intersect with the role of post-secondary education professionals.

Knowledge:
K1.  The trainee will have an understanding of the benefits available to non-minor
     dependents through AB12.

K2.    The trainee will have a basic understanding of eligibility and participation
       requirements for AB 12.

K3.    The trainee will have a basic understanding of the placement options available
       through AB 12.

K4.    The trainee will understand how they can play a role in assisting youth to re-enter
       foster care and to exercise their legal and due process rights.

K5.    The trainee will understand how they can advise youth regarding the tools available
       to them to promote independence.

Values:
V1.    The trainee will recognize the value of AB 12 and how it can improve educational
       outcomes for foster youth.

V2.    The trainee will value assisting young people with whom they work in a post-
       secondary education setting to access AB 12 benefits.

V3.    The trainee will value strengthening collaboration between local post-secondary
       educational institutions and child welfare systems in order to facilitate positive
       outcomes for foster youth.




       Supporting Youth to Successful Transitions from Foster Care, Version 1.1, February 22, 2012   7
                                            Trainer Guide
Suggested Lesson Plan

Segment                           Learning Objective                        Methodology
Segment 1                                                                   Slide 1
5 min
Welcome and
introduction of trainers

Segment 2                        V1. The trainee will recognize             Present slides 2 - 9
15 min                           the value of AB 12 and how it can
Introduction                     improve educational outcomes
  o Relationship                 for foster youth.
     between child               V3. The trainee will value
     welfare and higher          strengthening collaboration
     ed in the context of        between local higher educational
     AB12                        institutions and child welfare
  o Overview of                  systems in order to facilitate
     benefits                    positive outcomes for foster
                                 youth.
                                 K1. The trainee will have an
                                 understanding of the benefits
                                 available to non-minor
                                 dependents through AB12.
Segment 3                        K2. The trainee will have a basic          Present slides 10 - 17
15 min                           understanding of eligibility and
Overview of Eligibility          participation requirements for
  o Age                          AB 12.
  o Participation
     Conditions
  o Probation youth
  o Ineligibility




      Supporting Youth to Successful Transitions from Foster Care, Version 1.1, February 22, 2012    8
                                           Trainer Guide
Segment                          Learning Objective                        Methodology
Segment 4                       K3. The trainee will have a basic          Present slides 18 – 24
15 min                          understanding of the placement
Placement options               options available through AB 12.
  o      Overview
  o      Restrictions on
     group homes and
     THPP
  o      THP Plus FC
  o      SILP
  o Shared Living
     Agreements


Segment 5                       K4. The trainee will understand            Present slides 25 – 33
20 min                          how they can play a role in
Supporting youth – Role         assisting youth to re-enter foster
of Post Secondary Ed            care and to exercise their legal
  o Legal rights                and due process rights
  o Resolving disputes          K5. The trainee will understand
  o Financial Aid               how they can advise youth
  o Re-entry                    regarding the tools available to
  o What you can do             them to promote independence.
                                V2. The trainee will value
                                assisting young people with
                                whom they work in a higher
                                education setting to access AB 12
                                benefits.
Segment 6                                                                  Present slide 34 and
15 min                                                                     respond to questions.
Q&A

Segment 7
5 min
Evaluation and Close




     Supporting Youth to Successful Transitions from Foster Care, Version 1.1, February 22, 2012    9
                                          Trainer Guide
SEGMENT 1
                                                         Welcome and Introduce Trainers
                                                                         Total Segment Time: 10 min


Materials:
• PowerPoint Slide: 1

Training Tips and Discussion Points:
   Step #1. Welcome participants and introduce yourself. Explain any logistics and ground
rules you or the group want to include. If the group includes participants who do not know
one another, facilitate introductions.



                                             End of Activity

PowerPoint Slide, Segment 1: Slide 1




       Supporting Youth to Successful Transitions from Foster Care, Version 1.1, February 22, 2012    10
                                            Trainer Guide
SEGMENT 2
                                                                                          Introduction
                                                                         Total Segment Time: 10 min


Materials:
• PowerPoint Slides: 2-9

Training Tips and Discussion Points:
   Step #1. Display slide 2 and review the statistics on the slide about youth aging out of
foster care. Explain that the second bullet which states that 83% of youth aging out of foster
care want to go to college comes from a survey of 136 youth.

Note that from these statistics it is clear that emancipating foster youth are significant in
number and have aspirations of going to college and yet these youth are not living up to
their dreams.

   Step #2. Display slide 3 and discuss the challenges that foster youth currently face in
higher education:
     Inadequate housing;
     Lack of financial resources;
     Poor preparation for higher education;
     Lack of adult role models;
     Lack of information about higher education, financial aid, support and resources.

Research has shown that the factors contributing to these poor outcomes are varied.

  Step #3. Display slide 4 and explain how AB12 addresses these challenges by helping
youth with:
     Housing
     Financial assistance (provided directly to the youth in some cases)
     Support and assistance in the transition process
     Continued health coverage
     Independent living services

Note that the most fundamental benefit received by extended foster care (EFC) participants
is a roof over their heads. One key difference with extended care is that in some cases the
young adult can receive the payment directly. More about housing options will be presented
later.




       Supporting Youth to Successful Transitions from Foster Care, Version 1.1, February 22, 2012    11
                                            Trainer Guide
In addition, youth who access EFC receive the support of a social worker/probation officer
and depending on placement type, other services as well. Regardless of whether a youth
chooses to stay in care or not they are entitled to Medi-Cal and Independent Living Program
services.

  Step #4. Display slide 5 and provide basic information about the benefits available via
AB12:
     The Federal Act provided the authorization that allowed California to access federal
      funds to pay for foster care up to age 21.
     The foster care extension is currently funded through age 20. The final year of
      extension is dependent upon a legislative appropriation.

   Step #5. Display slide 6 and note that prior to AB12, a student’s involvement with post-
secondary education typically did not overlap with child welfare. They exited foster care at
18 or when they graduated high school and were on their own by the time they came to you.

   Step #6. Display slide 7 and explain that the extension of foster care beyond age 18 allows
for child welfare and post-secondary education to overlap. This creates new opportunities
for leveraging resources to support foster youth and makes the creation of a bridge
between the two systems that much more imperative.

   Step #7. Display slide 8 and emphasize the role of the higher education professional in
assisting youth to access the benefits available via AB12. In order for young adults to fully
realize the benefits of AB12 it will take all of those who help support them – not just the child
welfare system. Post secondary education professionals can be a key component of this
support. There are many ways you can help and we will be discussing each of these in more
detail as we go through the presentation.

   Step #8. Display slide 9 and emphasize this by identifying this as the first of the “Top Ten”
things that the trainees need to know about AB12: extended foster care improves
educational outcomes. Highlight the data that shows improved outcomes for youth who
spend time in EFC. The Midwest Study (Courtney et al, 2010) a longitudinal study that
interviewed 732 youth 4 times over 6 years found that the value of extending foster care
goes beyond just being the “right thing to do.” Extended care results in significant positive
outcomes for foster youth and society. In particular as you can see from the statistics cited
on the slide, AB12 presents a tremendous opportunity for young people in foster care to
have dramatically improved educational outcomes. To make this vision a reality for
California foster youth, you, our higher education partners need to be a key player in the
implementation of AB12.


                                             End of Activity


       Supporting Youth to Successful Transitions from Foster Care, Version 1.1, February 22, 2012   12
                                            Trainer Guide
PowerPoint Slide, Segment 2: Slides 2-9




      Supporting Youth to Successful Transitions from Foster Care, Version 1.1, February 22, 2012   13
                                           Trainer Guide
SEGMENT 3
                                                                                               Eligibility
                                                                         Total Segment Time: 25 min
Materials:
• Handout #1: Definition of the Participation Conditions
• PowerPoint Slides: 10-17

Training Tips and Discussion Points:
   Step #1. Display slide 10 and explain the roll out timeline for AB12. Note that this is
number 2 in the “Top Ten” list. Emphasize that in order for the final year of EFC to go into
effect, the legislature must approve it prior to January 1, 2014.

   Step #2. Display slide 11 and explain who is eligible for AB12. Describe the two ways
someone could stay in care after 18: high school completion rule or court chooses to retain
jurisdiction.

Provide a hypothetical example to illustrate the options.

  Step #3. Display slide 12 and identify eligibility requirements as the third thing in the “Top
Ten” list. Provide the following EFC eligibility requirements:
      Have an open court case at age 18 (with an order for out-of-home placement)
      Satisfy a participation condition (more about this later)
      Sign an agreement
      Meet regularly with the social worker or probation officer
      Agree to work on transitional independent living skills
      Live in a licensed or approved setting

Note that one of the key components of helping young people access extended care is
understanding who is eligible and provide the following clarifications:
     Any young person who had an open dependency court case when they turn 18 is
      eligible. This is true even if they were on AWOL status or awaiting placement (e.g. in
      juvenile hall b/c no placement available).
     The mutual agreement is not a condition of payment so that there is no risk of getting
      dropped from foster care at 18 just because a form wasn’t signed. It must be signed
      within 6 months of 18th b-day.
     The youth must be willing to meet monthly with their social worker or probation
      officer and update their transitional independent living plan at least every 6 months.

  Step #4. Display slide 13 and further clarify about eligibility for specific populations.
    Parenting youth are eligible and in a SILP, the parenting non-minor dependent can
     receive the foster care payment directly ($776), plus the Infant Supplement ($411).

       Supporting Youth to Successful Transitions from Foster Care, Version 1.1, February 22, 2012      14
                                            Trainer Guide
      For parenting non-minor dependents in licensed/approved facilities, the Infant
       Supplement is paid to the provider.
      Involvement in the criminal justice system does not disqualify young adults from
       participation in AB12

   Step #5. Display slide 14 and discuss the following specific eligibility issues for youth on
probation:
     Probation youth who had an order for foster care placement at the time they turned
      18 are also eligible for extended benefits.
     In some cases, once an eligible youth’s probation ends they can be converted to a
      new status called “transitional jurisdiction” which enables them to access AB12
      benefits without having to stay in the delinquency system.
     This new jurisdiction can also be used by youth who wish to re-enter. If you are
      working with a former ward they can potentially access AB12 benefits without having
      to re-enter the delinquency system and can instead re-enter through the dependency
      system.

   Step #6. Display slide 15 and identify participation conditions as the fourth thing in the
“Top Ten” list. Introduce the list of participation conditions. Provide Handout #1: Definition
of the Participation Conditions. Each young adult must meet one of these 5 participation
conditions:
      Be enrolled in high school or pursuing GED
      Be enrolled in college/vocational school
      Participate in a program or activity that removes barriers to employment
      Work at least 80 hours per month
      Be unable to meet one of the other conditions due to a medical or mental health
       condition.

  Step #7. Display slide 16 and focus on the participation condition related to participating in
post-secondary education.

In order to provide a safety net for those young people most at risk the participation
conditions were defined, by design, very broadly. In order to qualify under condition #2
(post-secondary education) a student must be enrolled half time and non-credit courses
such as remedial courses count towards this requirement.

Verification does not need to be in the form of an official transcript and can include an
unofficial transcript, copy of electronic course schedule, letter from institution, etc.

Per federal law, students maintain their eligibility over scheduled breaks, including summer
and are not required to take classes to keep their housing.



       Supporting Youth to Successful Transitions from Foster Care, Version 1.1, February 22, 2012   15
                                            Trainer Guide
It is anticipated that some youth will struggle and end up dropping classes or experiencing
other problems. Participation condition #3 is defined very broadly and can be used to
maintain eligibility during these transition periods. Examples of eligible activities include
volunteering, mental health or substance abuse treatment, participating in ILP, enrollment in
one college course, driver’s education, or job search activities (this is not a complete list).

Provide a sample scenario for how this might work.

   Step #8. Display slide 17 and explain the required child welfare and court involvement for
youth in EFC. The youth will have monthly interactions with a social worker or probation
officer, ongoing court hearings and administrative reviews, and a Transitional Independent
Living Plan (TILP).

Note that although there is more independence in extended care than when the student
was a minor, they do have to be willing to participate in certain activities. The creation of
the TILP is done collaboratively between the student and the social worker/probation
officer. This is an area where you can play a role by helping the student to determine
realistic goals and timelines that can then be used to create the plan.


                                             End of Activity

PowerPoint Slide, Segment 3: Slides 10-17




       Supporting Youth to Successful Transitions from Foster Care, Version 1.1, February 22, 2012   16
                                            Trainer Guide
SEGMENT 4
                                                                               Placement Options
                                                                         Total Segment Time: 15 min
Materials:
• Handout #2: Shared Living Agreement
• PowerPoint Slides: 18-24

Training Tips and Discussion Points:
   Step #1. Display slide 18 and identify the many placement options for youth in extended
foster care as the fifth thing in the “Top Ten” list. Review the placement options for youth
in EFC.

The first six options listed on the slide are all current foster care placements:
       Approved relative or nonrelated extended family member
       Foster family
       Non-related legal guardian
       Dual agency homes (for youth with developmental disabilities)
       Transitional Housing Placement Program (THPP)
       Group home

The final two are new options created under AB12:
      THP-Plus Foster Care
      Supervised Independent Living

Youth can stay living in any of these once they turn 18 with some restrictions on THPP and
group homes (described later).

Another important factor in helping young people make informed decisions about staying in
foster care is understanding their housing options.

   Step #2. Display slide 19 and discuss the limitations on group home and THPP placements
for youth in EFC.

Youth can stay in these placements only until they complete HS or turn 19 – whichever
comes first. Group home and THPP placement must be short term.

Because of the restrictions on group homes and THPP, social workers/probation officers will
need to work with young adults in these placements to transition out. It is anticipated that
once THP-Plus FC is available, this will be a good option for many of these youth.




       Supporting Youth to Successful Transitions from Foster Care, Version 1.1, February 22, 2012    17
                                            Trainer Guide
   Step #3. Display slide 20 and describe the new placement type: THP-Plus FC. This
placement type is modeled after the existing THP-Plus program for youth who have exited
foster care. Like THP-Plus, THP-Plus-FC will offer affordable housing and supportive services.
Because THP-Plus FC is now part of the foster care system receiving federal foster care funds
(known as IV-E funds) the standards for approval of providers and sites will change. The
benefit of this is that the availability of federal funds reduces costs to the state and will
therefore hopefully make this option available to more youth than currently have access to
THP-Plus.

Trainer Note: If the presentation is taking place prior to the availability of THP-Plus FC trainer
should note that implementation has been delayed. The regulations should be out late
winter or early spring of 2012.

   Step #4. Display slide 21 and identify the new placement type: Supervised Independent
Living Placement (SILP) as the sixth thing in the “Top Ten” list. The SILP is a new option
that many students may be interested in. The SILP is independent living and can include the
following options:
      Apartment living
      Renting a room
      Roommate situations
      Dorms

Note that in some situations, youth will receive the cash benefit directly and they will pay
their rent (youth who are parenting would also receive the infant supplement).

   Step #5. Display slide 22 and review the process for approving a SILP. Because there is no
service provider or designated caregiver, the youth must be assessed regarding their
readiness for a SILP. They should be ready for independent living with very minimal support,
but there are creative ways to build varying levels of support into a SILP. The readiness
assessment will also include affordability. For example, if the youth finds a place to live that
costs more than his or her income and doesn’t include roommates; the SW will assist the
youth to find housing they can afford. If a youth struggles to maintain a steady income, the
social worker or probation officer may recommend a different placement and a plan to build
skills for independent living prior to approving a SILP.

Readiness includes ability to do things like grocery shopping, preparing meals, budgeting,
managing money, paying bills, etc. Examples of circumstances that could cause a social
worker/probation officer to disapprove a SILP would be rent and utilities exceed income,
unstable income, or no knowledge of how to count money, budget, or pay bills.

   Step #6. Display slide 23 and note that in addition to assessing the youth’s SILP readiness,
the social worker or probation officer must assess each SILP to be sure it meets basic health
and safety standards.

       Supporting Youth to Successful Transitions from Foster Care, Version 1.1, February 22, 2012   18
                                            Trainer Guide
The health and safety inspection is designed so that only true health and safety issues (e.g.
no working toilet available to the unit or major vermin infestation) will disallow a site.
Peeling paint, cracked windows, unkempt living situations, etc. do not disqualify a site. The
inspection includes occupancy standards (no more than 2 adults per room), but social
workers/probation officers can waive this in certain circumstances (e.g. several young adults
sharing a large loft).

   Step #7. Display slide 24 and describe the shared living agreement that youth in EFC will
have with caregivers. The shared living agreement will include basic expectations such as
curfew, rules for overnight guests, use of kitchen, and allowance. Provide Handout #2:
Shared Living Agreement.

Explain that another way that post-secondary education staff who work with foster youth
can help them is to help negotiate shared living agreements. In particular, the changing role
between caregivers and young adults as they transition to adulthood may present
challenges. The state has created a form for the shared living agreement that youth can use
to help guide these negotiations and strongly encourages EFC participants to use this tool.
It can also be used to help youth negotiate living arrangement with peer roommates.


                                             End of Activity

PowerPoint Slide, Segment 4: Slides 18-24




       Supporting Youth to Successful Transitions from Foster Care, Version 1.1, February 22, 2012   19
                                            Trainer Guide
SEGMENT 5
                                        Helping Young People to Maximize Benefit
                                                                         Total Segment Time: 20 min

Materials:
• Handout#3: Voluntary Re-Entry Agreement
• PowerPoint Slides: 25-33

Training Tips and Discussion Points:
    Step #1. Display slide 25 and identify the rights of non-minor dependent youth as adults as
the seventh thing in the “Top Ten” list. Explain if youth in EFC stay with a relative or a foster
parent, the rules change when they turn 18 to reflect their status as an adult. The list on the
slide includes some of their new rights that they didn’t have as minors:
       Control over personal cash and property (including the right to own a car)
       Control over health care decisions
       The right to access the internet if it is available in the home
       The right to access cooking and cleaning supplies in the home
       The right to stay overnight unattended

Note that this is not a comprehensive list of the new licensing standards.

This information should be presented in the context of encouraging youth to stay in care. It
is important to be able to explain how EFC is different to overcome some student’s
reluctance to stay in or re-enter foster care.

   Step #2. Display slide 26 and describe the additional legal rights that youth in EFC have,
including:
      Their parents no longer receive notice of hearings
      The focus is on planning for independence
      There are no warrants issued if the youth is AWOL from placement
      Psychotropic medication cannot be ordered

This information should be presented in the context of encouraging youth to stay in care.
For example, a student may have been previously ordered to take medication by a judge and
doesn’t want to re-enter foster care because of concerns about this happening again. The
student should be informed that the judge will no longer have this authority once the
student is over 18.

   Step #3. Display slide 27 and review the process for resolving disputes. Disputes could
include disagreements regarding eligibility for extended foster care and disputes over
placement (in particular when the young person is interested in a SILP). Emphasize that the

       Supporting Youth to Successful Transitions from Foster Care, Version 1.1, February 22, 2012    20
                                            Trainer Guide
first contact the youth should make in the effort to settle any dispute is with the social
worker or probation officer. Trainees can assist youth by discussing how the youth can best
approach the social worker or probation officer to work towards a mutually agreeable
resolution of the dispute. In some cases a youth may benefit from the advice of their
attorney and trainees can suggest that the youth contact his or her attorney if they continue
to have difficulty.

In addition to working with the social worker/probation officer, if a young person needs
additional support to resolve the dispute, there are resources that may help, including:
      Local grievance processes
      Court
      The foster care ombudsman

Counties are encouraged to develop local grievance processes such as using team decision
making meetings and higher education professionals can help by assisting the youth in
identifying what avenues are available to them. It is not recommended that you engage in
efforts to resolve disputes but rather support the youth to be their own advocate and utilize
the resources available to them to reach a satisfactory resolution to the dispute.

Ultimately, the judge is the final arbiter of any disputes and the youth can ask to go to court.
To do this the youth will need to contact the attorney assigned to his or her case. Youth
who don’t know who their attorney is can ask the social worker/probation officer or contact
the foster care ombudsman via the number at the bottom of the slide. This court review can
take place at the next 6 month review or a “walk-on” request can be submitted where the
youth asks to go before the judge prior to the next regularly scheduled 6-month review.
Youth can bring others to this hearing.

If the dispute is about eligibility, the social worker or probation officer will be required to
present a description of the reasonable efforts made to provide youth with assistance to
maintain eligibility.

   Step #4. Display slide 28 and provide information about the role of foster care benefits in
determining financial aid. Identify this as the eighth thing in the “Top Ten” list. Note that
these funds are explicitly exempt from income reporting on the FAFSA.

The Higher Education Act, Sec. 480(d) specifically provides for an exemption of payments
authorized under Title IV-E. For a small percentage of youth, they qualify for foster care
under a state program rather than the federal program. This is often due to the income of
their biological parents at the time they went into foster care. The John Burton Foundation
is conducting additional research regarding how AB12 benefits will effect these youth. Stay
tuned for future updates.



       Supporting Youth to Successful Transitions from Foster Care, Version 1.1, February 22, 2012   21
                                            Trainer Guide
Trainer Note: No AB12 income will be received until Jan 2012 and therefore this will not be
relevant for reporting purposes on the FAFSA until the 2013 FAFSA application round.

   Step #5. Display slide 29 and identify the right to re-enter foster care as the ninth thing in
the “Top Ten” list. Youth who do not participate in EFC have the right to re-enter unlimited
times prior to turning 20 (21 if approved).

Understanding how to help youth re-enter is one of the most crucial roles that post-
secondary education professionals can play. If a young person meets the age criteria and is
not enrolled in extended foster care, they could be missing out on a key resource that can
make it much more feasible for them to stay in school. Explaining the SILP option, the
possibility that they can get the money directly and the differences between being in care as
a minor versus as an adult may help them to make the choice to pursue this resource.

  Step #6. Display slide 30 and describe the process for re-entry. Provide Handout#3:
Voluntary Re-Entry Agreement.

Describe the re-entry process:
     The youth who wishes to re-enter contacts the child welfare department and signs a
      voluntary re-entry agreement.
     Aid begins the date the youth signs the agreement and resides in a qualified
      placement.
     The initial meeting with the social worker temporarily satisfies the participation
      conditions.
     After the youth signs the voluntary agreement, the agency has 15 days to file the court
      petition, but it can take up to 6 weeks to have the petition heard in court

Note that youth don’t have to be working or in school to re-enter. Meeting with the social
worker/probation officer counts as “removing a barrier to employment” temporarily while
they figure out how they want to meet the participation conditions long term.

   Step #7. Display slide 31 and summarize how the training participants can help youth
access benefits available via AB12, including:
     Assisting youth to meet participation conditions
     Supporting youth as they plan for independence
     Guiding youth as they negotiate shared living agreements
     Assisting students to understand the benefits and the re-entry process
     Providing guidance regarding dispute resolution processes
     Engaging in systems level collaboration with social workers and probation officers

This is number ten on the list of the ten things the trainees need to know about AB12.




       Supporting Youth to Successful Transitions from Foster Care, Version 1.1, February 22, 2012   22
                                            Trainer Guide
Emphasize that one key role of the trainees is to assist youth to access educational
opportunities so that youth maintain eligibility for extended foster care. As higher
education professionals, the training participants' primary function will likely be to assist
youth to successfully enroll in and maintain participation in coursework that is academically
appropriate and leads towards the completion of educational goals. Remind participants
that this task that is already their goal, now has the additional consequence of potentially
impacting a foster youth's eligibility for AB12. Ideally, youth will maintain the two course
minimum required to meet the post-secondary education criteria. In cases where this does
not occur, trainees should consider how they can work with youth to ensure that they
maintain eligibility through one of the other participation conditions while working towards
re-engagement with education.

Note that in addition to assisting individual youth, participants can encourage their
institutions to reach out to the local county child welfare agency regarding system level
collaboration. Some counties have established partnerships between higher education and
child welfare where they meet monthly or quarterly to discuss how to more effectively
collaborate to support foster youth’s educational goals.

   Step #8. Display slide 32 and encourage participants to think about or write down their
ideas for immediate action they can begin to take to help support foster youth in the
context of AB12.

In particular, discuss contacting the child welfare agency regarding opportunities for
collaboration and providing a resource list with contact information to the child welfare
agency. Institutions will often need to be pro-active to ensure that child welfare staff
members are aware of the local resources available at individual institutions and who to
contact. Staff can offer to conduct in-services for social workers/probation officers, offer
campus tours, provide contact lists for key individuals, etc.

If time allows, have participants brainstorm what specific action steps they could take.

   Step #9. Display slide 33 and explain that the remaining training time will be for questions
from the participants and evaluation of the training.

Note that the website listed on the slide (www.cafosteringconnections.org) has all of the
most updated information including state regulations, training opportunities, background
information, etc.


                                             End of Activity

PowerPoint Slide, Segment 5: Slides 25-33



       Supporting Youth to Successful Transitions from Foster Care, Version 1.1, February 22, 2012   23
                                            Trainer Guide
Supporting Youth to Successful Transitions from Foster Care, Version 1.1, February 22, 2012   24
                                     Trainer Guide
SEGMENT 6
                                                                        Questions and Answers
                                                                         Total Segment Time: 20 min

Materials:
• PowerPoint Slide: 33

Pre-training Preparation:
In order to prepare for any questions the trainees might have, it is recommended that you
familiarize yourself with the basics of AB12 using the resources listed above. Be sure to
review the most recently available information prior to the training.

Training Tips and Discussion Points:
   Step #1. Open the floor to the participants for any final questions or comments.

   Step #2. If there are details still not established about AB12 implementation or benefits,
identify that for the group and refer them to the California Fostering Connections website
for more information.


                                             End of Activity

PowerPoint Slide, Segment 6: Slide 33




       Supporting Youth to Successful Transitions from Foster Care, Version 1.1, February 22, 2012    25
                                            Trainer Guide
SEGMENT 7
                                                                            Evaluation and Close
                                                                         Total Segment Time: 5 min
Materials:
• Evaluation Form
• PowerPoint Slide: 33

Pre-training Preparation:
Post the values posters on the walls with enough space between them to allow participants
to gather and have conversation. Print the developmental domains on different colored
bright paper and place a different domain on each table.

Training Tips and Discussion Points:
   Step #1. Ask for volunteers to share the ideas they plan to implement back at work to
assist emerging adults in this transition.

   Step #2. Thank the trainees for their participation and complete any evaluation materials
for the training.


                                             End of Activity

PowerPoint Slide, Segment 7: Slide 33




       Supporting Youth to Successful Transitions from Foster Care, Version 1.1, February 22, 2012   26
                                            Trainer Guide

								
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