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          U.S. Presidential Transition Weekly Report 11-14-08
(The articles, reports and additional information contained in this edition were collected from 11-7
                                              to 11-14)

  "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of
                 patriots and tyrants. It is its natural manure."
                                    President Thomas Jefferson




The transition of the Office of the President of the United States can impact every aspect of
American culture and our relationship with the rest of the world. It is based on this fact that I have
decided to create this supplemental weekly report. It will contain articles and information on the
transition of the Bush Administration to the Obama Administration. This supplement will be
posted on the following websites:
     6P International
         (http://www.6pinternational.com/news.php?category=Emergency%20Managers%20Wee
         kly%20Report&)
     EMPOWER (http://www.empower-
         women.com/mc/page.do?sitePageId=49319&orgId=emp)
     All-Hands.net (http://www.all-
         hands.net/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=2235&Itemid=114)
     Pearce Global Partners (http://pearceglobalpartners.com/NewsArticles.html)
     California Emergency Services Association, Southern Chapter
         (http://cesa.net/aoi.cfm?color=st)
     Florida Emergency Preparedness Association (http://www.fepa.org)




   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 1
 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

                                  Table of Contents
Emergency Management and Homeland Security                                             3

National Security and Defense                                                          14

Domestic Policy                                                                        15

International Policy                                                                   16

Climate Change and Alternative Energy                                                  21

Other                                                                                  22

Reports                                                                                31

Additional Information                                                                 32




   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 2
 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

            Emergency Management and Homeland Security
Obama, McCain campaigns' computers hacked for policy data
http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/11/06/campaign.computers.hacked/index.html

Former FEMA Chief Eyed For Homeland Security Post
http://www.todaysthv.com/news/local/story.aspx?storyid=75296

GAO: Obama should address health preparedness, food safety
http://www.cidrap.umn.edu/cidrap/content/influenza/panflu/news/nov0708gao.html

Lieberman Resists Giving Up Homeland Panel as GOP Recruits Him
http://news.yahoo.com/s/cq/20081107/pl_cq_politics/politics2984317_4

Chertoff’s Challenge to Obama
http://www.laprensa-sandiego.org/current/Tom.Barry.110707.htm

Bush immigration chief resigns
http://www.cnn.com/2008/POLITICS/11/06/dhs.myers.resignation/index.html?section=cnn_latest

Among Obama's next challenges: his own security
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20081106/pl_afp/usvoteobamasecurity_081106031714

Al-Qaeda's 'mild' message to Obama
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/us_elections_2008/7717257.stm

Obama plans Guantanamo closure, US terror trials
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081110/ap_on_el_pr/obama_guantanamo

GAO OUTLINES CRITICAL HOMELAND SECURITY PRIORITIES FOR OBAMA
ADMINISTRATION
http://www.hstoday.us/content/view/5974/149/

DHS Seeks Seamless Transition
http://www.securitymanagement.com/article/dhs-seeks-seamless-transition-004764

The Latest Intel on Intel
http://blog.newsweek.com/blogs/poweringup/archive/2008/11/11/the-latest-intel-on-intel.aspx

The Renegade Is Loose. We Repeat, the Renegade Is Loose.
http://buzz.yahoo.com/buzzlog/92024/?fp=1

Jewish group mulls charges over neo-Nazi Obama slurs
http://www.breitbart.com/article.php?id=081110154826.x5cb3odp&show_article=1

Analysis: Pick will show Obama DHS vision
http://www.upi.com/Emerging_Threats/2008/11/10/Analysis_Pick_will_show_Obama_DHS_vision
/UPI-98551226362976/

Homeland Security Blues
http://blog.newsweek.com/blogs/poweringup/archive/2008/11/11/homeland-security-blues.aspx




   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 3
 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/



November 6, 2008
Want a Security Post? Say Nothing.
By HELENE COOPER


WASHINGTON — It is a fact universally acknowledged that every living, breathing Democrat —
and even some Republicans — who ever owned a passport is jostling for a job on President-elect
Barack Obama’s national security team.


The competition went into high gear on Wednesday when Mr. Obama began sifting through
names as he huddled with his top aides in Chicago. But the actual elbowing began in earnest
back in June, once Mr. Obama vanquished Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton for the Democratic
nomination.


Few people took note, what with the focus on the election campaign, but many of those aspiring
to join an Obama foreign policy team showed their hands by turning silent over the summer on
just about anything that might get them in trouble in a confirmation hearing.


Take the Russian invasion of Georgia, for example, an action that raised all sorts of complicated
questions. But in Congress, at universities and at research institutes, would-be Democratic
secretaries of state and national security advisers sought to navigate that potential minefield by
following the same cautious script.


They condemned Russia (without proposing specific punishment). They proclaimed heartfelt
support for President Mikheil Saakashvili of Georgia, the congressional darling (without any
questioning whether he was culpable in inviting the attacks). And they publicly voiced strong
backing for Georgia’s entry into NATO, a possibility that most of these same foreign policy
experts acknowledge privately is as likely as a warm winter in Moscow.


“At a time when we really needed penetrating, thoughtful foreign policy analysis about what we
should be doing towards Russia, all the people who work on this and wanted to be in the next
administration were saying nothing but domestic political posturing,” said George Perkovich, vice
president for studies at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, who makes clear that
he is not seeking a job in the next White House. “They were all protecting themselves and
positioning themselves for confirmation hearings.”




   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 4
 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
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That’s because everyone here remembers what happened to Strobe Talbott back in 1994, when
Mr. Talbott’s nomination to be deputy secretary of state was almost derailed after some
congressional critics dug up a few of his writings from his tenure at Time magazine that were
critical of Israel. While Democrats will have a majority in the Senate in the coming Obama
administration, it will not be difficult for congressional critics to tie up Mr. Obama’s nominations if
they see something they don’t like.


So, for now, mum will continue to be the word for the aspirants to the national security team;
indeed, a good way to tell that someone is no longer up for a job is that they suddenly start
blabbing.


In the meantime, here are lists of possibilities for some of the top national security jobs.
Remember, the quieter they are, the better chance they have. And don’t forget this disclaimer —
mentioning someone for a top job usually guarantees that they won’t get it.


Secretary of Defense Robert M. Gates, the current occupant of the top job at the Pentagon, is the
sun around which all other potential national security appointments apparently revolve. If Mr.
Obama decides he wants to keep Mr. Gates at the Pentagon, and Mr. Gates accepts, then things
dry up quickly for other Republicans who have been mentioned for top posts, including Senators
Chuck Hagel of Nebraska and Richard G. Lugar of Indiana, for either defense secretary or
secretary of state. Another possibility for Pentagon is Senator Jack Reed of Rhode Island.


Secretary of State Senator John F. Kerry of Massachusetts, who lost his bid for the presidency in
2004, has been lobbying heavily for the top diplomat’s job, congressional staffers say. The same
goes for Richard C. Holbrooke, the former United States ambassador to the United Nations.
Senators Hagel and Lugar are possibilities if Mr. Gates doesn’t stay at the Pentagon, under what
is widely thought to be the only-one-Republican-in-the-cabinet rule. The percolations about Bill
Richardson, the former presidential hopeful, at State seem to have died down, while there’s a lot
of chatter now about Gen. James L. Jones, a former NATO commander in Afghanistan and all-
round darling of both Republican and Democrats. General Jones would bring gravitas to the job,
and the rare combination of both defense and diplomatic credentials.


National Security Adviser James B. Steinberg, a deputy national security adviser under President
Clinton, is at the top of this list; Mr. Obama’s foreign policy adviser Susan E. Rice appears to be
headed somewhere else — to the United Nations, or perhaps to the No. 2 job on the National
Security Council. (You can’t really have two black female National Security Advisers named Dr.

   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 5
 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
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Rice, can you?) . Gregory B. Craig, another one of Mr. Obama’s foreign policy advisers, is also a
possibility, although he may be more likely for the deputy job at the security council or as deputy
secretary of state. A long shot as national security adviser is Dennis Ross, Mr. Clinton’s former
envoy to the Middle East.


C.I.A. Director The consensus seems to be that this job is Anthony Lake’s, should he decide to
accept it. That’s a big question though, as Mr. Lake, a close adviser to Mr. Obama, has told
friends he’s not sure he wants it. His failure to win Senate confirmation the last time he was
nominated to head the C.I.A., under Mr. Clinton, left him with a bad taste in his mouth.




November 8, 2008
Jihadi Leader Says Radicals Share Obama Victory
By MICHAEL SLACKMAN and SOUAD MEKHENNET


DUBAI, United Arab Emirates — The leader of a jihadi group in Iraq argued Friday that the
election of Barack Obama as president represented a victory for radical Islamic groups that had
battled American forces since the invasion of Iraq.


The statement, which experts said was part of the psychological duel with the United States, was
included in a 25-minute audiotaped speech by Abu Omar al-Baghdadi, leader of the Islamic State
of Iraq, an umbrella organization that claims ties to Al Qaeda. Mr. Baghdadi’s statement was
posted on a password-protected Web site called Al Hesbah, used to disseminate information to
Islamic radicals.


In his address, Mr. Baghdadi also said that the election of Mr. Obama — and the rejection of the
Republican candidate, Senator John McCain — was a victory for his movement, a claim that has
already begun to resonate among the radical faithful. In so doing Mr. Baghdadi highlighted the
challenge the new president would face as he weighed how to remove troops from Iraq without
also giving movements like Al Qaeda a powerful propaganda tool to use for recruiting.


“And the other truth that politicians are embarrassed to admit,” Mr. Baghdadi said, “is that their
unjust war on the houses of Islam, with its heavy and successive losses and the continuous

   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 6
 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/


operations of exhaustion of your power and your economy, were the principal cause of the
collapse of the economic giant.”


The audio statement came amid a very public discussion in the Middle East over what Mr.
Obama’s election meant for the future — and what it said about the past. Most of the public
reaction, in newspapers and on television and radio stations, was euphoric, with many
commentators marveling at the election of a black man whose father was from a Muslim family.
There was a general assessment that Mr. Obama’s election was a repudiation of the course
taken by President Bush and his inner circle over the past eight years.


“Obama’s election was a message against such destruction, against unjustified wars, wars that
are fought with ignorance and rashness, without knowledge of their arenas or the shape of their
surroundings,” wrote Ghassan Charbel in Thursday’s issue of the Saudi-owned, pan-Arab daily
newspaper Al Hayat. “It was a message against the pattern that became a burden on the U.S.
and transformed the U.S. into a burden on the world.”


Some even pointed to Mr. Obama’s election as a lesson to the rest of the region. In Kuwait, Sheik
Hamed al-Ali, an Islamic scholar known for his support of jihadi fighters, posted a message titled
“We Want Change!” on his Web site.


Sheik Ali said, “It remains the obligation of our Islamic nation to benefit from this example and
request change, also, and to get rid of any regime that leads with ignorance and injustice,
plunders from the country, enslaves the worshipers, drives us to destruction.” The comments
were then circulated on other Islamic Web forums.


But there was also a growing chorus of caution, as commentators began to try to tamp down
expectations of any change in American policies in the region. And other commentators echoed
Mr. Baghdadi’s view that the election was a victory for the insurgents in Iraq, the Taliban in
Afghanistan, Hamas in the Gaza Strip and Hezbollah in southern Lebanon.


“It would be no exaggeration to say that we Arabs and Muslims were the main unseen voters who
decided the outcome of these elections,” wrote Abdelbari Atwan in Wednesday’s issue of the
London-based pan-Arab daily newspaper Al Quds Al Arabi.


He wrote, “The transformation that will begin in the U.S. starting today in various political,
economic, military, and social domains may well have been delayed for decades, had the new

   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 7
 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
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                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/


American century been crowned with victory, and had the situation in Iraq and Afghanistan taken
the directions sought by the neo-cons — in other words, had there been political stability and
economic prosperity, and had the citizens of the two countries targeted by the U.S.’s designs
been totally subjugated by it.”


Mr. Baghdadi also used his address to offer Mr. Obama an unlikely deal, one certain to do little to
bring any resolution to the conflict between radical Islamic groups and the United States. He
offered a truce of sorts in exchange for the removal of all forces from the region.


“On behalf of my brothers in Iraq, Afghanistan, Somalia and Chechnya, I offer you what is better
for you and us: you return to your previous era of neutrality, you withdraw your forces, and you
return to your homes,” Mr. Baghdadi said. “You do not interfere in the affairs of our countries,
directly or indirectly. We in turn will not prevent commerce with you, whether it is in oil or
otherwise, but with fairness, not at a loss.”


Faris bin Hizam, an expert on Al Qaeda, said the offer of a trade relationship had struck a new
note. “How can he call for establishing a relationship with the United States if it withdraws?” Mr.
Bin Hizam said. “The main principle of Al Qaeda prohibits any relation with infidels.”


Marwan Shehadeh, a Jordanian researcher and expert in radical Islamic groups, said that Al
Qaeda leaders outside Iraq might balk at such a relationship, but that jihadis might view Mr.
Obama’s election as an opportunity.


“Of course there is a shift, because there is a new president who came from an oppressed class,
and people who had little opportunity,” Mr. Shehadeh said. “He wants to give Obama the chance
to make a change, since Obama has no previous animosity with Islam.”


Intelligence officials working in the region said that they did not see Mr. Obama’s election as
having any fundamental effect on Al Qaeda, and that any talk of a truce was likely to go nowhere.
But two intelligence officials who spoke on the condition of anonymity because of the nature of
their work said that they were concerned that any step that could be perceived as a victory for Al
Qaeda, like pulling troops out of Iraq right away, would only strengthen its ability to recruit.


“If he withdraws the soldiers from Iraq before the country gets really stable, Al Qaeda will see it as
their victory, and they might get stronger again,” one regional intelligence official said. That
dynamic was already beginning to play out on Al Hesbah.

   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 8
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                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
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As with other Web sites, it is impossible for an outsider to verify the identity, or integrity, of posted
comments. But experts recognize Al Hesbah as the one remaining online forum for those aligned
with Al Qaeda, after two other Web sites were apparently hacked and taken offline.


On the same day Mr. Baghdadi posted his statement, others chatted about the need to continue
the fight against the United States. “All of them are low and dirty, and their hatred of Islam is the
same,” one participant wrote. Of Mr. Obama, he wrote, “Even in his speech rejoicing his victory
he said, ‘To those who fight us, we will defeat you.’ Let us see who will be victorious.”




Nov. 11, 2008

Experts Like Obama’s Preparedness Plans, Eager to See the Details
By Daniel Fowler, CQ Staff

Emergency managers, former FEMA officials and academics agree that President-elect Barack
Obama’s priorities for preparing for terrorist attacks and natural disasters are in order. But?

“I think the devil’s going to be in the details,” said John Copenhaver, who headed the Federal
Emergency Management Agency’s Atlanta-based Region IV from 1997 to 2001. “How do you do
those things?”

Although sparse on details, Obama’s plan calls for supporting first-responders, preparing effective
emergency response plans, improving interoperable communications systems, working with state
and local governments and the private sector, and allocating funds based on risk.

“Those areas of focus will work for a natural disaster as well as a terrorism attack,” said Larry J.
Gispert, president of the International Association of Emergency Managers and director of
Hillsborough County, Fla., Emergency Management. “What my objection would be is if they just
[singularly] focused on terrorism and only terrorism because we at the local level who, by the
way, have to respond to this [stuff], the biggest chance of something occurring is Mother Nature.”

Copenhaver said he wouldn’t add anything to Obama’s list, but noted it’s very broad.

“I think that those five priorities are incredibly important to the next FEMA administrator,”
Copenhaver said. “And I would support those priorities being established as priorities for the
Department of Homeland Security and for FEMA.”

While Obama’s outline is a good start, the details will be key, said Irwin Redlener, director of
Columbia University’s Center for Disaster Preparedness, who served as senior health adviser to
the Obama campaign.

   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 9
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                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
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“I’m totally comfortable with the way it’s broken down and . . . going beyond that in terms of
assessing are those enough, are there more issues, will the details of those particular topics as
they get worked out be sufficient — all that is what remains to be seen,” he said. “But in terms of
a starting point . . . it was the right place to start from.”

Working Together

Copenhaver suggested there needs to be a new emphasis on training first-responders, and there
has been a tendency “to go overboard on spending money for equipment.”

“I think that the money that we spend on first-responders needs to be spent a little differently than
it has been and needs to focus more on the first-responders themselves and their training and
their skill sets,” he said.

Obama is “committed not only to rolling back the funding cuts that have affected first-responders,
but also increasing federal resources and logistic support to local emergency planning efforts,” his
plan says.

The plan also calls for getting the locals more involved in preparing effective emergency response
plans by creating better coordination between the layers of government.

That is the priority most in need of attention, Redlener said.

“The planning process for disaster response needs to be broadened and deepened so they’re
able to cope with the return to normalcy of individuals and families who have been so badly
affected by a major disaster,” he said.

Obama’s plan also calls for making the improvement of interoperable communications a national
priority and he intends to “appoint a national Chief Technology Officer who will have the
responsibility to ensure that the current non-interoperable plans at the federal, state and local
levels are combined, funded, implemented and effective.”

But interoperable communications is not just a technology issue. It “is as much a cultural issue as
it is an equipment issue — trying to get people to actually . . . organizationally talk to each other
as opposed to just giving them the radios that have the same frequency,” said George Haddow,
deputy chief of staff under former FEMA Director James Lee Witt.

In relation to working with state and local government and the private sector, Obama believes the
federal government needs to start by listening to local concerns and acknowledging their
priorities, and plans to reach out to the private sector “to leverage its expertise and assets to
protect our homeland.”

“I think that there needs to be a much more dynamic program for incorporating the private sector
as a full partner in homeland security in this country,” said Copenhaver, president and chief
executive officer of the Disaster Recovery Institute. “And that’s coming from somebody that’s
happily in the private sector right now.”

As far as allocating funds based on risk, Obama says he will look to the Quadrennial Homeland
Security Review “to help inform and shape re-prioritization at the federal level” and supports
“taking politics out of funding for homeland security and investing in city and state preparedness
and resiliency in a way that will effectively and efficiently keep Americans safe.”


   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 10
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                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
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                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

Resiliency is a theme that should run through all five priorities, said Robert W. Kelly, a senior
adviser for homeland and national security at The Reform Institute, who worked informally with
the McCain campaign.

“Basically what resilience is all about is building a nation that can take a punch, that can absorb
the blow of a catastrophic event, irrespective of what the genesis of the catastrophic event is and
can return to a state of near normalcy as rapidly as possible,” said Kelly, who said Obama’s
priorities are on point.

Haddow said what’s encouraging to him and what the five goals have in common is that they
promote “working together” and “everybody being involved.”

“I think one of the problems that’s happened in the last few years is that DHS and its wholly
owned subsidiary FEMA have been trying to centralize more and more of these activities in
FEMA, in the federal government and what you get is confusion and you get interminable time to
get things approved and you lose flexibility,” Haddow said.

So what would Haddow like to see added to the list?

“I think they need to focus on . . . how are they going to rebuild the federal response capability,”
he said. “In other words, do they go back to what the federal response plan was in the ’90s —
where FEMA was the coordinating body among all federal agencies that ensured that all the
resources of the federal government were made available to help state and local to meet the
disaster response in a major event?”

Whatever path the Obama team chooses, accomplishing the stated goals won’t be easy.

“They’re going to have their hands full,” said the Reform Institute’s Kelly. “If they can accomplish
a fifth of these, they’ll be doing great.”




Obama Team Faces Major Task in Justice Dept. Overhaul
Goal Is to Restore Confidence in Law Enforcement Actions

By Carrie Johnson
Washington Post Staff Writer
Thursday, November 13, 2008; A02

As a transition team for the Obama administration begins work on a Justice Department overhaul,
the key question is where to begin.

Political considerations affected every crevice of the department during the Bush years, from the
summer intern hiring program to the dispensing of legal advice about detainee interrogations,
according to reports by the inspector general and testimony from bipartisan former DOJ officials
at congressional hearings.
    Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 11
  opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                 organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

Although retired federal judge Michael B. Mukasey, who took charge of the department in the
winter, has drawn praise for limiting contacts between White House officials and prosecutors, and
for firmly rejecting the role of politics in law enforcement, restoring public confidence in the
department's law enforcement actions will be central, lawmakers and former government officials
say.

"The infusion of politics into the Justice Department and an abdication of responsibility by its
leaders have dealt a severe blow," Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Patrick J. Leahy (D-
Vt.) and Sen. Arlen Specter (Pa.), the panel's ranking Republican, wrote in an opinion piece last
month. "Great damage has been done to the credibility and effectiveness of the Justice
Department."

Ron Klain, who was chief of staff to Vice President Al Gore, said that the preelection
brainstorming sessions of Democrats who want to fix the Justice Department sound like "an
escalating composition of woes," not unlike the health-related talk at his mother's mah-jongg
games. "Oh, my knee; no, my back; no . . . " he moaned over audience laughter at a recent
luncheon held by the American Constitution Society.

Topping the list of concerns is the Office of Legal Counsel, a once-obscure operation whose
advice guides some of the government's most sensitive and controversial policies, from domestic
wiretapping to the appropriateness of handing out public funding to religious groups.

Many of the OLC's memos on interrogation and warrantless eavesdropping remain secret, even
though lawmakers have clamored for their release. Democrats say they expect to find fresh
surprises when they open the legal vault.

Officials at interest groups, including the Center for American Progress and People for the
American Way, have called on President-elect Barack Obama to devote significant attention to
the legal office. Christopher Anders, senior legislative counsel at the American Civil Liberties
Union, urged this week that the new administration withdraw all of the OLC opinions in the
interrogation and detention area and replace them with "a single opinion that should be made
public."

Walter E. Dellinger III, a Justice official during the Clinton administration, has encouraged the
next president to recruit OLC veterans from both Democratic and Republican camps to review the
national security opinions and recommend changes.

Obama will have to do a careful balancing act. At a conference in Washington this week, former
department criminal division chief Robert S. Litt asked that the new administration avoid fighting
old battles that could be perceived as vindictive, such as seeking to prosecute government
officials involved in decisions about interrogation and the gathering of domestic intelligence.
Human rights groups have called for such investigations, as has House Judiciary Committee
Chairman John Conyers Jr. (D-Mich.).

"It would not be beneficial to spend a lot of time calling people up to Congress or in front of grand
juries," Litt said. "It would really spend a lot of the bipartisan capital Obama managed to build up."

Another critical, early judgment must be made about how to allocate scarce resources without
shortchanging national security. Since the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, more than 7 percent of the
department's budget shifted to terrorism, away from drug trafficking, organized crime and white-
collar misdeeds, according to an analysis by the Government Accountability Office.


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                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
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Jamie S. Gorelick, who served as the department's second in command during the Clinton
administration, said the resource issue poses "a very big problem."

"It appears the buildup in national security has come at the expense of criminal enforcement
resources," she said. "I don't know how they are going to do it in a tight budget environment. Just
sorting out whether they've cut meat or bone, or both, is going to be important."

The Obama advisers leading the Justice Department transition will have only a few weeks to
make last-minute adjustments to the $25.4 billion budget for 2009. By early February, the 2010
budget will be due, another significant time crunch.

David Ogden, a chief of the department's civil division in the Clinton years, will lead the transition
effort. Thomas J. Perrelli, who was a counselor to Attorney General Janet Reno and a classmate
of Obama's at Harvard Law School, will serve as a deputy.

Within the Justice Department, career employee Lee Lofthus and political appointee Brian A.
Benczkowski have been preparing binders for the transition team that contain sensitive
information about ongoing investigations, positions the department has taken in forthcoming legal
disputes and more run-of-the-mill data.

Early signals about Obama's view on presidential powers could come in several ongoing court
cases that turn on executive privilege, including a House lawsuit against former White House
counsel Harriet E. Miers and Chief of Staff Joshua B. Bolten that rests with an appeals court in
the District. The Obama team could decide to dial back its use of the privilege in that case, and in
Freedom of Information Act lawsuits filed by the ACLU, which seeks information on detainee
issues in New York federal courts.

Moreover, by summer, key provisions of intelligence law are set to expire, including a
controversial measure that gives the government more power to seize information from libraries
under the USA Patriot Act. Civil libertarians say they will watch how Obama handles such issues
and what he does even earlier, to review new guidelines for FBI agents conducting national
security investigations that will take hold Dec. 1.

Personnel issues will pose another challenge, given the inspector general's findings in three
blistering reports that said hiring by Bush Justice Department officials routinely flouted civil
service laws.

William Yeomans, a former department civil rights division official who serves as a counselor to
Sen. Edward M. Kennedy (D-Mass.), said that "the new team needs to make it very clear that
ideology won't trump merit in hiring. There needs to be a comprehensive review, including what
needs to be done to correct the hiring situation we now find. . . . There is a great deal of latitude
among management to move people around."

One lawyer who offered Democrats advice during the presidential campaign suggested that
Obama could decide to keep on several of the nation's 93 U.S. attorneys, such as Patrick J.
Fitzgerald in Chicago, in a bid to demonstrate that merit trumps political connections. Fitzgerald,
who prosecuted former vice presidential aide I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby and Antoin "Tony" Rezko, a
Democratic fundraiser with ties to Obama, is a political independent.




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                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
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                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

                           National Security and Defense
Pentagon prepares for wartime transition
http://www.cnn.com/2008/POLITICS/11/06/pentagon.transition/index.html

Easing In Obama as Commander in Chief
http://www.time.com/time/nation/article/0,8599,1857054,00.html

Obama adviser: No commitment on defense shield
http://www.cnn.com/2008/WORLD/europe/11/08/obama.us.poland.missile.shield/index.html

Obama taps veteran Dems for DoD, State handovers
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081112/ap_on_go_pr_wh/obama_national_security

Top U.S. intelligence officials expect to lose jobs
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/27674395/




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                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
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                                    Domestic Policy
Congress Gets Ready for the Obama Era
http://www.time.com/time/politics/article/0,8599,1857137,00.html?cnn=yes

Economy's worsening slide challenges Obama
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/27576844/

Bush, Obama focus on economy in radio addresses
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081108/ap_on_go_pr_wh/bush

Obama outlines government reform plan
http://www.federaltimes.com/index.php?S=3805553

Obama reviews Bush orders on stem cells, drilling
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081109/ap_on_el_pr/obama

As a road to a better economy, an old idea gains ground
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-na-infrastructure9-
2008nov09,0,7223067.story

Obama team reviewing 'virtually every agency,' aide says
http://www.cnn.com/2008/POLITICS/11/09/obama.transition/index.html

Obama to use executive orders for immediate impact
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081109/ap_on_go_pr_wh/obama

Fears of a Dem crackdown lead to boom in gun sales
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081107/ap_on_re_us/obama_gun_sales

Obama health plan to cost $75 billion: analysis
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20081112/ts_nm/us_usa_obama_healthcare

Obama health plan to cost $75 billion: analysis
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20081112/ts_nm/us_usa_obama_healthcare

City Halls call out for help from Obama
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/27583162/

California official reportedly a candidate for top EPA post
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-nichols13-2008nov13,0,2795029.story




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                                  International Policy
Analysis: High hopes and high expectations abroad for Obama
http://www.cnn.com/2008/POLITICS/11/05/labott.foreign.policy/index.html

Obama Speaks with 9 World Leaders
http://www.time.com/time/politics/article/0,8599,1857359,00.html

Obama Chats with Russia's Medvedev
http://www.time.com/time/nation/article/0,8599,1857802,00.html

Iran blasts Obama's nuclear criticism
http://www.cnn.com/2008/WORLD/meast/11/08/iran.obama/index.html

N. Korea says it's 'ready to deal with' Obama
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/27581937/

Some in Africa expect miracles from Obama
http://www.usatoday.com/news/world/2008-11-09-africa_N.htm?loc=interstitialskip

Obama: how will he influence global security?
http://www.info4security.com/story.asp?sectioncode=10&storycode=4120917&c=1

Obama's Afghan War Plans May Run Into Weary Public, Deficits
http://news.yahoo.com/s/bloomberg/ahmpijwa6cp0

Could Obama victory lead to Iran talks?
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/ml_iran_obama

Blair: Obama can help forge Israeli-Palestinian peace
http://www.cnn.com/2008/WORLD/meast/11/09/blair.obama.mideast/index.html

Gorbachev calls on Obama to carry out 'perestroika' in the U.S.
http://en.rian.ru/russia/20081107/118196981.html

How Obama's Win Will Affect Middle East Elections
http://www.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,1857351,00.html

Obama's plan for Iraq about to meet reality
http://www.usatoday.com/news/military/2008-11-11-obama-wars_N.htm

World leaders reach out to Obama team
http://www.usatoday.com/news/washington/2008-11-11-obama-_N.htm

Obama's Victory Inspires European Minorities
http://www.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,1858658,00.html

Could Obama victory lead to Iran talks?
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/ml_iran_obama

US general urges Obama to keep missile defense
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081112/ap_on_go_ca_st_pe/missile_defense_obama



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Obama to Face Big Policy Decisions on Iran, N. Korea and Mideast

By Glenn Kessler
Washington Post Staff Writer
Saturday, November 8, 2008; A04

President-elect Barack Obama stepped carefully yesterday when he was asked about the
unusual letter of congratulations that Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad sent him -- the
first time an Iranian leader has congratulated the victor of a U.S. presidential election since the
1979 Islamic revolution.

"I will be reviewing the letter from President Ahmadinejad, and we will respond appropriately," he
said, leaving open the question about whether he will reply. President Bush chose not to respond
to a rambling 18-page letter he received from Ahmadinejad in 2006, but during the campaign
Obama indicated he would be willing to meet with Iranian leaders.

"Iran's development of a nuclear weapon, I believe, is unacceptable," Obama said yesterday.
"And we have to mount an international effort to prevent that from happening."

Diplomatic issues rarely begin or end cleanly with a change of administrations, but Bush will be
leaving his successor an extensive list of foreign policy processes. The new administration will
have to quickly evaluate them and decide whether to continue along Bush's path, make minor
modifications or forge ahead in a different direction. Obama will inherit at least three foreign policy
structures, built largely by Bush and Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, aimed at thwarting
Iran's development of a nuclear weapon, eliminating North Korea's nuclear arsenal and promoting
Israeli-Palestinian peace talks.

During the campaign, Obama issued a series of foreign policy pronouncements that often
appeared designed not to box himself in. One prominent exception was a pledge to remove most
U.S. combat troops from Iraq within 16 months of his inauguration. But in many cases, Obama
appears to have left himself wiggle room on many issues that will confront him. During the
campaign, in fact, internal briefing materials purposely focused on defining the challenges facing
the next president, but did not detail possible policy options, advisers said.

Eight years ago, when Bush took office, he famously pursued a policy dubbed "ABC" -- anything
but Clinton. President Bill Clinton believed he was so close to a missile deal with North Korea that
he nearly traveled to Pyongyang in his final weeks in office. But when Bush arrived in the White
House, he quickly rejected following in Clinton's footsteps and opted for a confrontational
approach.

Clinton passed up the North Korea trip to make an unsuccessful attempt at a Middle East peace
agreement. The effort collapsed amid a wave of Palestinian attacks known as the second intifada,
and Bush opted not to make a serious effort at a peace agreement until much later in his second
term.
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Obama campaign officials and advisers declined to discuss how they will handle the diplomatic
initiatives Bush will leave behind, but Obama's leanings can be gleaned from his campaign
statements.

In the Middle East last year, Bush began what is known as the Annapolis process, which seeks to
encourage Israeli and Palestinian leaders to agree on the parameters of a peace accord. Rice
has taken on the task of shepherding the effort, making almost monthly trips to the region to try to
persuade the two sides to reach an agreement. Any progress that has been made has remained
secret; both sides say the talks have been productive and far-reaching.

But the White House this week formally gave up any hope of achieving a peace accord between
the Israelis and Palestinians before Bush leaves office. Analysts have criticized the Annapolis
process for not finding a way to accommodate the interests of Hamas, which has been labeled a
terrorist group by the State Department but which controls the Gaza Strip with nearly half of the
Palestinian population. Rice has also been faulted for investing so much in the effort, to the
detriment of other issues, that her clout has been diminished.

Obama has not indicated that he will offer any fresh thinking on how to deal with Hamas; at one
point during the campaign, he accepted the resignation of an outside adviser who met with
Hamas officials as part of his job for an international mediation group. But, during a visit to Israel
in July, Obama said he would not wait "until a few years into my term or my second term" to seek
a peace deal. This suggests that he may appoint a high-level Middle East peace envoy, freeing
his secretary of state to concentrate on other issues.

On North Korea, Obama will inherit a process that is probably in worse shape than what Clinton
left for Bush. In a dramatic change in approach during his second term, Bush avidly pursued a
deal to end North Korea's nuclear weapons programs. But the effort nearly collapsed this fall
before Bush agreed to remove North Korea from the State Department's list of state sponsors of
terrorism.

Obama supported the decision to delist North Korea. During the campaign, he criticized Bush for
taking so long to engage with North Korea, suggesting he would be eager to find ways to keep
the disarmament process alive. Li Gun, a senior North Korean official, told reporters in New York
on Thursday that "we are ready to deal" with the incoming Obama administration.

Obama may face some of his toughest choices on the diplomatic process concerning Iran. Rice
has painstakingly assembled a coalition of six nations -- Britain, France, Germany, Russia, China
and the United States -- to confront Iran, offering incentives if it will suspend its enrichment of
uranium. The group has won approval for three U.N. Security Council resolutions sanctioning
Iran, but Iran has shrugged off the pressure.

During the campaign, Obama offered to conduct direct talks with Iran, a statement that unnerved
European allies invested in the diplomatic approach. Obama's comment yesterday that "an
international effort" is required indicated that he would seek to build on the structure Rice
assembled.




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In India, a World of Hurt Over a Perceived Obama Slight

By Emily Wax
Washington Post Foreign Service
Thursday, November 13, 2008; A07

NEW DELHI, Nov. 12 -- In the days after Barack Obama's historic victory, Indians began to sound
just like a long-suffering South Asian mother nagging her son abroad: Why haven't you called?

The U.S. president-elect had spoken to 15 world leaders, Indian newspapers reported, including
Pakistani President Asif Ali Zardari, the leader of India's on-again, off-again adversary, with whom
Obama was said to have chatted for 20 minutes.

So when Obama and Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh still hadn't connected over the
weekend, newspapers and TV talk shows were filled with bruised feelings over what has been
dubbed "the no-call incident." "Obama snubs India," read a headline on the OneIndia news portal.

"You found time to call Pakistan," chided Azhar Usman, a visiting Indian American stand-up
comic performing at a New Delhi college campus Sunday. "Why not call India?" he said, wagging
his finger. "We are waiting."

The issue loomed so large that Singh addressed the flap Tuesday, explaining that Obama had
attempted to call him Saturday. Singh said he had been unable to take the call because he was
on his way to Oman and Qatar.

Asked by an Indian reporter why Obama had chosen to "ignore India," Singh said: "That is not
true. What happened was we could not establish contact because the time suggested was too
short for us to interact. And I was traveling."

The prime minister's office announced plans for "a telephonic conversation" with Obama within
days or hours. Early Wednesday, the long-awaited call finally took place.

"The prime minister said that relations between India and the United States were very good, but
that we could not be satisfied with the status quo," said a statement released by Singh's office.

Singh congratulated Obama and said his victory would inspire "oppressed people" all over the
world, sources in the prime minister's office said. He also invited Obama and his wife, Michelle, to
visit India.

Obama praised the contribution that Singh had made to India's progress as a former finance
minister and as the country's current leader.

The perceived slight highlights a certain ambivalence here about Obama. The Indian government
has enjoyed close relations with the Bush administration, which helped it secure an
unprecedented and controversial nuclear deal this year, ending its isolation on the issue.

"Often reviled as America's worst president, Bush was New Delhi's darling, courted irrespective of
the popular mood," said a cover story in India's Outlook magazine last weekend.


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Although many Indians celebrated Obama's win as historic, some said they were nervous about
his views on outsourcing jobs to India. Obama has said he would offer financial incentives to
create jobs in the United States. There is also dismay over the idea Obama has floated of
sending a third-party mediator to the disputed region of Kashmir.

"India is watching closely what will happen on these issues," said Mahesh S. Panicker, a political
analyst in New Delhi. "There is a mood of caution, and that's why there is chatter over the
communications."

Still, many Indians said they were not worried about the no-call incident. It was Indian astrologers
who first predicted victory for Obama, they said, and Obama boosted his popularity among
Indians when he mentioned the Gandhi poster hanging in his office and the tiny figurine of
Hanuman, the Indian monkey god, that he carries.

"We are making a mountain out of a molehill. We are a great nation and a global player. So we
don't become lesser or greater because of a phone call," said Lalit Mansingh, a former
ambassador to the United States. "Let's give this situation the benefit of the doubt."




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                  Climate Change and Alternative Energy
Obama expected to back auto-emission waiver
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-
bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2008/11/10/MNLI141O9P.DTL&type=politics&tsp=1

Obama victory offers climate talks hope
http://www.cosmosmagazine.com/news/2291/obama-victory-offers-climate-talks-hope

Party tussle ensnares Obama's global warming goals
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081108/ap_on_go_co/congress_global_warming;_ylt=AoC1JU35Y
.SI0ZJmNP7y6edvieAA

UN climate chief seeks Obama input in December talks
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20081105/sc_afp/climatewarmingunusobama_081105174045;_ylt=A
jgvE.sqYNJsc26kLaBzd4zPOrgF




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                                            Other
Emanuel pick gets mixed reaction
http://www.cnn.com/2008/POLITICS/11/06/emanuel.reaction/index.html

Historians: Bush presidency 'battered,' 'incompetent,' 'unlucky'
http://www.cnn.com/2008/POLITICS/11/06/bush.legacy/index.html

Obama's win ushers in new group
http://www.usatoday.com/news/politics/election2008/2008-11-06-power_N.htm

Like Lincoln and FDR, Obama faces nation in crisis
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081108/ap_on_go_pr_wh/presidents_in_crises

Moderates to blame for GOP losses, conservative leader says
http://www.cnn.com/2008/POLITICS/11/07/conservatives.election/index.html

Obama's former pastor says he was exploited
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/27588197/

Young voters not essential to Obama triumph
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/27582147/

Commentary: What Alaska learned about Palin
http://www.cnn.com/2008/POLITICS/11/06/johnson.palin.alaska/index.html

When New President Meets Old, It's Not Always Pretty
http://www.time.com/time/politics/article/0,8599,1857862,00.html

Biden's new role: Good cop
http://news.yahoo.com/s/politico/15462

Obama, Candidate of Change, Looks to Old Hands From Clinton Era
http://news.yahoo.com/s/bloomberg/au5kqtuqgkhu

Bushes welcome Obamas to White House
http://www.cnn.com/2008/POLITICS/11/10/obama.bush/index.html

Palin: GOP ticket was too ‘status quo’
http://news.yahoo.com/s/politico/15474

Obama team works to flesh out staff
http://www.cnn.com/2008/POLITICS/11/11/obama.transition/index.html

Commentary: Conservatives didn't lose election, GOP did
http://www.cnn.com/2008/POLITICS/11/10/sanford.conservatives/index.html

Obama team announces new rules on lobbyists
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/27665871/

Temporary amnesia tops agenda as President Bush, President-elect Obama huddle at White
House
http://www.nydailynews.com/news/politics/2008/11/11/2008-11-11_untitled__analy11m.html


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Can Republican Governors Rebuild Their Party?
http://www.time.com/time/politics/article/0,8599,1858315,00.html

Obama faces less pressure for diverse Cabinet
http://news.yahoo.com/s/politico/20081112/pl_politico/15531

Cheney, Biden to meet, discuss handoff
http://www.usatoday.com/news/politics/2008-11-12-cheney-biden_N.htm?loc=interstitialskip

Looking Past Defeat: How Can McCain Recover?
http://www.time.com/time/politics/article/0,8599,1856613,00.html

Dems sketch Obama staff, Cabinet
http://www.mlive.com/us-politics/index.ssf/2008/10/dems_sketch_obama_staff_cabine.html

Bush: 'I regret saying some things I shouldn't have said'
http://www.cnn.com/2008/POLITICS/11/11/bush.post.presidency/index.html

Georgia congressman warns of Obama dictatorship
http://www.breitbart.com/article.php?id=D94CDDM80&show_article=1

For a Washington job, be prepared to tell all
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/27690267/



High Hopes for a New Friend in the White House

By Joe Davidson
Thursday, November 6, 2008; D03

Federal employee unions worked hard for Barack Obama during his winning presidential
campaign.

Now they'd like him to return the favor.

They have a variety of concerns they want acted on after the new administration takes office in
January. They expect to have a new friend in the White House and a greater number of buddies
on Capitol Hill, with the increased Democratic margin in Congress.

"The only thing the unions are looking for Obama to do is be fair," said John Gage, president of
the American Federation of Government Employees. "We understand that he's not going to be in
lock step with our positions on everything."

In a call with reporters as well as a news release issued yesterday, Gage placed great emphasis
on efforts to secure collective-bargaining rights for airport screeners employed by the
Transportation Security Administration.

He cited an October letter to Gage from Obama that said advocating for transportation security
officers "to receive collective bargaining rights and workplace protections will be a priority for my
administration."



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That's the first item, Gage said, on "a huge plate in front of us of issues that we think we need to
correct."

The union has hired 35 business agents to set up locals in airports. "We're going to step out real
hard on the TSA," Gage said.

Not to be outdone, Colleen M. Kelley, president of the National Treasury Employees Union, said
her organization is chartering two new Florida chapters for screeners, one at Fort Lauderdale-
Hollywood International Airport and another at Miami International Airport. With three additional
chapters the union plans to charter by the end of November, she said NTEU would represent
approximately 2,000 TSA employees nationwide.

"I am optimistic," she said, that the effort to organize screeners "will be successful under an
Obama administration."

She also said she hoped Obama would reestablish a program like the partnerships President Bill
Clinton undertook with unions. Under it, federal agencies set up local labor-management
councils, worked with unions to identify problems and solutions, and trained managers and union
representatives in alternative dispute resolution.

A National Partnership Council was established to oversee the program. The results were mixed -
- the idea took hold in some places, not in others. The program and the council were dissolved
soon after President Bush took office.

Gage released a series of letters from Obama that outline his positions on various federal labor
related issues. The letters, Gage said, can serve as "a baseline for accountability with the new
administration."

· The Pentagon's pay for performance system: Obama said he was concerned about a
disconnect between pay and performance, forced distribution of performance ratings and
suppression of wages in the National Security Personnel System. As president, he said, he would
substantially revise the system's regulations "and strongly consider a complete repeal."

· Social Security Administration: Obama said there was a critical need to increase funding for the
agency because its staffing has fallen as its beneficiary population has increased.

· Veterans Affairs: Obama promised to "address the VA's personnel policies that have greatly
eroded the . . . collective-bargaining rights of nurses and doctors and other providers who work in
VA medical facilities."

Beyond the specifics, the leaders of the two largest federal unions welcomed an improved labor-
management environment they expect will accompany Obama's move to the White House.

"President-elect Obama has said that he wants to make public service 'cool' again," Kelley said.

He has the personality and the soaring rhetoric to do it.




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Sometimes Continuity Trumps Change
Three Bush Appointees in Crucial Positions Likely to Remain Under Obama

By Alec MacGillis and Ann Scott Tyson
Washington Post Staff Writers
Monday, November 10, 2008; A01

As President-elect Barack Obama prepares to fill top positions for his incoming government, he
faces a stubborn reality: Some of the key individuals he will rely upon to tackle the country's most
serious challenges are holdovers from the current administration -- a trio of Bush appointees who
will likely stay in place for at least the first year or two of Obama's presidency.

In confronting the financial crisis and weakening economy, Obama must turn to Ben S. Bernanke,
a Republican and former chairman of President Bush's Council of Economic Advisers, who will
lead the Federal Reserve for at least the first year of the new administration.

In assuming control of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, Obama must work with Adm. Michael
Mullen, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, who was appointed by Defense Secretary Robert M.
Gates for a two-year term that will end in late 2009 and, by tradition, can expect to be appointed
for a second term as the president's top military adviser. Mullen shares Obama's belief in
focusing more on Afghanistan but is wary of a timeline for withdrawing troops from Iraq.

And in guarding against terrorist attacks -- while correcting what he considers the Bush
administration's excesses -- Obama will rely upon FBI Director Robert S. Mueller III, whose term
expires in 2011.

Obama has made it a point of pride to seek consensus with those who do not fully agree with
him, and he is even considering keeping Gates at the Pentagon to ensure a smooth transition.
But the need to rely heavily on officials who served in the Bush administration -- an era from
which he promises a sharp break -- underscores his constraints. His campaign's success was
based partly on the selection of a team he personally trusted, but in his first years in the White
House, he will not be able to rely solely on advisers of his choosing.

"It's a challenge," but not an insurmountable one, said William A. Galston, a domestic policy
adviser to President Bill Clinton. Bernanke, Mullen and Mueller "appear to be genuinely public-
spirited civil servants and not rabid partisans," he said, adding that "if you're thinking about how to
deal with someone like J. Edgar Hoover, this is not what we're talking about."

And Obama might be uniquely suited to the task, said Galston, a governance expert at the
Brookings Institution. "This is not someone who feels comfortable [only if] he has constructed his
own cocoon around him. We've had presidents like that, but he's not one of them. His life has
trained him to move through different environments and adjust accordingly."

The Fed's Consensus Builder

Few officials will be as pivotal in Obama's first years in office as Bernanke, a leading authority on
the Great Depression who is helping lead the country through a likely recession.

Bernanke was appointed by Bush to a four-year term that began in early 2006, under a system
designed to keep the Fed independent from political pressure. But the Fed chairman also serves
as the economist in chief, routinely meeting with the president to offer advice and collaborating
closely with the Treasury secretary.

   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 25
 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

Obama and Bernanke have spoken on the phone several times, and met in person once, at
Obama's request. In that meeting, held in Bernanke's office, Obama stressed that he respects the
independence of the Fed. That suggests he will follow the recent precedent, set by Clinton and
Bush, of not jawboning the central bank toward his preferred monetary policy, as aides to
Presidents Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush did.

There is reason to think Obama and Bernanke will get along. Although Bernanke is a Republican,
his response to the financial crisis has won him plaudits from congressional Democrats who view
him as pragmatic and non-ideological. The former Princeton professor has a calm manner, a
penchant for building consensus and unquestioned academic expertise, qualities valued by
Obama.

Finally, the top candidates to be Treasury secretary have strong relationships with Bernanke.
Lawrence H. Summers, who held the position for part of the Clinton administration, has known
Bernanke for decades. And Timothy F. Geithner, president of the Federal Reserve Bank of New
York, has been among Bernanke's closest collaborators during the financial crisis; they speak by
phone many times each day and more than a few times have spoken through the night.

Obama will have to decide by January 2010 whether to reappoint Bernanke. The decision could
hinge on a number of factors, including how the economy does in the coming year, whether the
two men develop a good rapport, Obama's view on whether Bernanke should have been more
aggressive in preventing a crisis and how eager Obama is to put a Democrat in the job.

A Troop Withdrawal Debate

On Thursday, Mullen sent a note to his staff members, urging them to assist the Obama team.
"Transitions of administrations have in the past proven challenging and even awkward," he wrote.
"Our duty will be to remain apolitical."

As Obama's chief military adviser for at least the next year, Mullen will lay out options for Iraq and
Afghanistan, define the global risks the military faces, weigh the strain on the force and advise on
budget priorities. Mullen moved early to create a Joint Staff transition team for the handover
period. "My goal is to be foundational -- and sort of a rock during that change," he said in October
2007.

On the two wars, Mullen's views align broadly with those of the president-elect: He sees an
urgent need to devote more troops and resources to Afghanistan, and he supports continuing
troop reductions from Iraq. But there are also important differences: Although Obama has long
cast Afghanistan as the only legitimate war to pursue in response to the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks,
Mullen's priorities for that country are driven more by the escalating insurgency since 2006 than
by any sense that Iraq is the wrong war for U.S. troops.

In Mullen's ranking of military priorities, Iraq takes precedence, then Afghanistan, followed by
finding ways to reduce the overall strain on the nation's fighting forces. Unlike Obama, who
pledges to withdraw U.S. combat brigades from Iraq by mid-2010, Mullen opposes any drawdown
timeline there as "dangerous," saying reductions must depend on conditions on the ground.

Mullen's view coincides with that of Gen. David H. Petraeus, the former top U.S. commander in
Iraq who now heads U.S. Central Command, with responsibility for operations in both war zones.

Obama's relationship with Mullen and other military advisers could prove smooth and productive
if Obama takes the pragmatic approach that his advisers are indicating, allowing each side to

   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 26
 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

adjust at the margins, defense experts said. But if Obama presses for the withdrawal of two
brigades per month, conflict is inevitable, they warn.

"That would be hard for Mullen, exceedingly hard for Petraeus, and almost impossible for [Gen.
Ray] Odierno," who replaced Petraeus as the top U.S. commander in Iraq, said Peter D. Feaver,
a national security official in the Clinton and Bush administrations and professor at Duke
University. "That would be a civil-military crisis."

Petraeus, who has wielded great influence after his success overseeing the troop "surge" in Iraq,
will remain a pivotal figure well into the Obama administration. His appointment as chief of
Central Command lasts for three years. If Mullen is reappointed in 2009, Obama can decide on
the next chairman in 2011, and Petraeus is considered one of the most highly qualified officers for
that job.

"Petraeus will make every effort to avoid a confrontation. But he does have that independent
credibility because he's been very successful, and because of the personal attacks by the left
wing of the Democratic Party, where Obama came from, Obama will have to treat him very
gingerly," said Thomas Donnelly, a defense expert at the American Enterprise Institute.

During Petraeus's highly publicized congressional testimony in the fall of 2007, Obama, then
campaigning for the Democratic nomination, criticized what he considered the shifting standards
for the U.S. mission in Iraq. "We have now set the bar so low that modest improvement in what
was a completely chaotic situation . . . is considered success," he said. "And it's not."

Although it may seem that Obama's early opposition to the Iraq war puts him at odds with Mullen
and Petraeus, that overlooks the fact that many military officers were unsure about the war at the
outset, said Rep. James P. Moran Jr., a Virginia Democrat who sits on the House Appropriations
subcommittee on defense. And there is considerable agreement with Obama that there needs to
be a greater emphasis on diplomacy, civilian aid and counterinsurgency techniques to augment
conventional military action.

"You're going to see a lot more sympathy than you might expect between Obama and his chief
military advisers," Moran said.

Mullen has only briefly met Obama, said Navy Capt. John Kirby, a spokesman for Mullen. But
Mullen's portfolio, which includes global strategy as well as strains on the force, encompasses all
military issues Obama must address.

Obama made those global demands clear after a two-hour briefing in July in Baghdad by
Petraeus, who reportedly assembled a slew of maps, charts and PowerPoint slides to argue
against a 16-month timetable for withdrawing most troops from Iraq. An intense exchange
followed, during which Obama emphasized that as president he would not "rubber-stamp" the
recommendations of a ground commander, and that he would consider a range of factors beyond
the conditions in one country or region.

"Sometimes it is appropriate for the president to overrule a military commander," Feaver said.
"Obama's statement was spot on."

From 9/11 to Local Crime




   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 27
 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

Mueller took over as FBI director days before terrorists struck the World Trade Center and the
Pentagon in 2001. Since then, he has scrambled to reorient the bureau toward domestic
intelligence gathering.

Mueller, a Justice Department official under George H.W. Bush, has had little contact with Obama
-- and, at first glance, a former constitutional law professor such as Obama and a FBI man may
seem unlikely to have much in common. But Mueller is known to many of Obama's advisers,
including campaign co-chairman Eric H. Holder Jr. While U.S. attorney in the District, Holder hired
Mueller as chief of the homicide section and later sent him to shore up the U.S. attorney's office
in San Francisco.

Behind the scenes, Mueller has pushed back on some of the more controversial legal policy
decisions during the George W. Bush years. In 2004, along with other senior Justice officials,
Mueller was prepared to resign over the administration's warrantless wiretapping program. He
removed FBI agents from interrogation sessions of terrorism suspects held at the Guantanamo
Bay naval base in Cuba after hearing allegations of abuse.

Obama will have direct contact with Mueller at weekly threat briefings, during which he will
receive raw intelligence about terrorist movements. Though few FBI directors have lasted their full
10-year terms, Mueller has given no public indications of planning to leave government.

In some areas, Mueller has signaled agreement with Obama's priorities. In a rarity among Bush
administration officials, Mueller has backed calls by local and state police for more resources to
combat traditional crimes. During the campaign, Obama called for more funds to support such
authorities, and he and Vice President-elect Joseph R. Biden Jr. said they would consider
additional funding to hire more FBI agents to shore up ordinary criminal enforcement.

But the FBI may part company with Obama on other issues. Mueller has championed new
guidelines, set to take effect Dec. 1, that give agents pursuing terrorism leads the power to
conduct long-term surveillance of suspects, engage in pretext interviews in which agents conceal
their identities and infiltrate groups that the FBI thinks may threaten national security. Obama has
not spoken out on the guidelines, which have roiled civil-liberties advocates, but has indicated
support for a new domestic intelligence czar who would provide more oversight of the FBI's
intelligence operations.

As an Illinois state senator, Obama helped pass a law that required taping law enforcement
interviews with suspects in death-penalty cases. FBI agents have resisted an across-the-board
requirement for interview taping.

Rep. Artur Davis (D-Ala.), a member of the Judiciary Committee, said he foresees Obama
pushing the FBI to put more resources into white-collar crimes linked to the financial meltdown,
as well as hate crimes. Davis also predicted that the two men would agree on the need to involve
Congress more in such debates than has been the case under Bush.

Rep. Luis V. Gutierrez (D-Ill.) said he found it hard to imagine any intransigence among holdover
officials under an Obama administration. "Do we expect them not to be like everyone else and
say no to this person who has an overwhelming mandate?" he said. "He's president-elect of the
United States . . . It bodes well for anyone who works for the administration to give their opinion --
to make sure it's a sound opinion and voice it."




   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 28
 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/




'Plum Book' Is Obama's Big Help-Wanted Ad

By Lyndsey Layton and Lois Romano
Washington Post Staff Writers
Thursday, November 13, 2008; A01

As the national unemployment rate climbs to a 14-year high, a treasure trove of about 8,000 new
jobs surfaced in one place on Capitol Hill yesterday. The federal government published the Plum
Book, an inventory of positions that will soon be vacated by the Bush administration and open for
hire.

The 209-page paperback, officially titled "The United States Government Policy and Supporting
Positions," is exciting reading for people coveting jobs in the incoming Obama administration. It
details the positions -- some high-level, some almost comically obscure -- that are likely to
change hands as a Democrat moves into the White House after eight years of Republican rule.

The Marine Mammal Commission has three openings, each paying $100,000 a year. The Harry
S. Truman Scholarship Foundation will need a new executive secretary who will earn $139,600 to
$191,300 a year. And at the Department of Health and Human Services, there's an opening for a
confidential assistant to the deputy director of child support enforcement in the Administration for
Children and Families (whew), for an annual salary of $48,148 to $62,593, depending on
experience.

While the Plum Book may seem like one humongous neon "help wanted" sign, job seekers may
not want to pack their bags and head for Washington just yet.

Many of the positions are highly specific, such as assistant secretary for terrorist financing at the
Treasury Department. Some, like the jobs that will turn over in the vice president's office, are not
included because the office technically is not part of either the executive branch or the legislative
branch.

All of the listed posts require political connections. About one-third of the jobs are strictly
presidential appointments -- that is, patronage positions that will go largely to Democrats who
know how to network.

"This isn't an open job search," said Paul C. Light, an expert in federal government who teaches
at New York University. "If you don't have someone who's going to take your résumé in on your
behalf, don't sell your house. Everyone thumbs through this and likes to imagine themselves in
these jobs. But it's really more like the Neiman Marcus Christmas catalogue -- a lot of people pick
it up and say, 'Oh, wouldn't it be nice to have that tiara?' "

Published every four years, the Plum Book is about 1,000 jobs heavier this year than it was in
2004, evidence that the federal government has expanded. Priced at $38 at the government's
bookstore on North Capitol Street or available online for purchase or viewing
(http://www.gpoaccess.gov/plumbook/2008), it announces every political job in the outgoing
administration, including the name of the officeholder and the current salary.

Pay runs the range -- from well-compensated jobs such as chief of staff at the Commodity
Futures Trading Commission, who earns $221,100 a year, to a member of the Arctic Research
Commission, a part-time, four-year post paying $571 annually.

   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 29
 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

All that specific information is helpful not just to job seekers but also to those who want to do
business with the new government.

Bill Dingell, a software vendor to federal agencies, picked up his copy of the Plum Book yesterday
afternoon. "It tells you which are appointed and which are career, so you know who's leaving and
who's landing," he said.

Gary Somerset, a spokesman for the Government Printing Office, said that the bookstore sold
150 copies yesterday and that 200 more were purchased online. The number of page views of
the online version of the book was not available last night.

One of the buyers is a 34-year-old woman who quit her job in public health and moved from
Chicago to Washington on Sunday in the hope of snagging a job in the new administration.

"I don't know how to do this, but I thought getting the Plum Book would be the first step to see
what the jobs are," said the woman, who had volunteered for Barack Obama's campaign and
spoke on the condition of anonymity because she feared that publicity could hurt her job
prospects. She read about the book and showed up at the government bookstore yesterday to
claim her copy and begin her job hunt.

Mark D. Gearan, deputy director of Bill Clinton's 1992 transition and now president of Hobart and
William Smith Colleges, said the Plum Book "gives people a good overview of responsibilities and
opportunities." He added: "People are coming at you from all directions -- the campaign, private
and public sectors -- and so it's a good starting point."

Gearan says he still vividly recalls the landslide of job applications his office received after the
election. He was startled by the quantity of material that some applicants submitted. "It reminds
me of the old college counselors' saying: 'The thicker the file, the thicker the applicant,' " he said.

Chase Untermeyer, who handled political appointments for President George H.W. Bush in 1988,
found the Plum Book marginally useful.

"It's less valuable than it appears. All it is is snapshots of the jobs the outgoing administration
filled," he said. "The new administration might abolish many of those positions. They might not
want a director of fish and fowl. . . . The real value for me was as a reference for salary levels."

The incoming Eisenhower administration produced the first comprehensive political job list in
1952.

Democrats had controlled all the political jobs in the prior two decades, and the Republican Party
urged the compilation of a list of government positions that would be available to Republicans.

The Plum Book appeared again in 1960 and has since been published after every presidential
election.

For all the hundreds of unusual posts described in the book, one appears to be missing: job
counselor for outgoing administration employees.




   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 30
 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

                                           Reports
Building a Resilient Nation: Enhancing Security, ensuring a Strong Economy
http://www.reforminstitute.org/uploads/publications/Building_Resilience_SEPT25.pdf

International Association of Police Chiefs, “To Protect and Serve”: Challenges to Public Safety
and Homeland Security facing the next U.S. President
http://www.theiacp.org/documents/pdfs/PressRelease/ProtectDefend%2Epdf

Homeland Security Advisory Council, Top Ten Challenges Facing the Next Secretary of
Homeland Security
http://www.dhs.gov/xlibrary/assets/hsac_dhs_top_10_challenges_report.pdf




   Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 31
 opinions of the editor or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or support any agency,
                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

                               Additional Information
President-Elect Obama’s Transition website
http://www.change.gov

District of Columbia Inauguration Day website
http://www.inauguration.dc.gov/

White House Transition Website
http://www.whitehouse.gov/infocus/transition/

Joint Congressional Committee on Inaugural Ceremonies
http://inaugural.senate.gov/

U.S. Government Accounting Office, 2009 Congressional and Presidential Transition Website
http://www.gao.gov/transition_2009/index.php

2008-2009 Presidential Transition Resources
http://directory.presidentialtransition.gov/

Puppy Cam: For When You're Sick of Politics
http://www.time.com/time/arts/article/0,8599,1858007,00.html

United States Policy and Supporting Positions for 2008
http://www.gpoaccess.gov/plumbook/2008/index.html

Top 10 Modern Cabinet Members
http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1858368_1858367,00.html

Government Executive, Presidential Transition
http://www.govexec.com/specialreports/transition.htm

Secrets of the 2008 Elections (Videos)
http://www.newsweek.com/id/40211#?l=1904732925&t=1906937043

White Supremacists Vent Rage over Obama's Win
http://www.adl.org/main_Extremism/rage.htm




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                organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.

				
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