Faux Charles Dickens by yurtgc548

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									Creative Writing Assignment
5 points

FAUX CHARLES DICKENS:
PRACTICING DIFFERENT WRITING STYLES
ASSIGNMENT

   Write:                     Requirements:
     Prequel                    Must be at least 3
     Sequel                      paragraphs
     Continuation of a          Written in Dickens’
      subplot                     writing style
     Alternate ending           Read aloud in class

     Something brilliant
                                  (by you or a friend)
      that is not in this
      list
SO WHAT IS HIS WRITING STYLE LIKE?
“Ornate, Grandiose, Verbose, Specific, Detailed, Surprising,
Peanut-packed, Oyster-y

“Dickens's likes to create little rooms with his sentences,
rooms that are so inviting and interesting that you feel that
if you don’t go inside and explore right away, you will be
missing out on something big. And when you do go inside
and look around for a while, you then suddenly realize that
you are TWENTY MILES AWAY from where you should be.
You’ve wandered too far, and you have to somehow find
your way back to your car. And it’s getting dark. And the gas
station is closed.
“What do literary critics mean by all this?

“…Dickens loves detail, and he loves spinning
elegant language, and sometimes those two
loves meet to create new worlds within the belly
of his overarching story. Stories within stories
are found everywhere in Great Expectations.
TAKE A LOOK AT THE EXCERPT BELOW:
   “...But, I saw that everything within my view which ought to
    be white, had been white long ago, and had lost its lustre,
    and was faded and yellow. I saw that the bride within the
    bridal dress had withered like the dress, and like the flowers,
    and no brightness but the brightness of her sunken eyes. I
    saw that the dress had been put upon the rounded figure of
    a young woman, and that the figure upon which it now hung
    loose, had shrunk to skin and bone...
   “So she sat, corpse-like, as we played at cards; the frillings
    and trimming on her bridal dress, looked like earthly paper. I
    knew nothing then of the discoveries that are occasionally
    made of bodies buried in ancient times, which fall to powder
    in the moment of being distinctly seen; but, I have often
    thought since, that she must have looked as if the admission
    of the natural light of day would have struck her to dust.”
  Notice the lengthy sentences. “Did you see the
  punctuation that lives in there?
…Literary critics say that the tone is oyster-y, because
  reading a Dickensian novel is like wading through miles of
  language and then suddenly stumbling upon a pearl: a
  piece of juicy gossip, a beautiful speech, a revelation of
  truth. And the fact that readers (you) wade through that
  language and hiked through the foliage of words makes
  the discovery all the sweeter and more profound.
…Critics say that the tone is peanut-packed because
  sometimes it feels like Dickens dropped some packing
  peanuts into his language to pad the juicy parts and to
  protect the novel’s architecture.”

								
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