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					STAFF REPORT

DATE:                March 10, 2009

      TO:            City Council

FROM:                Carol Poole, Planning Director

    RE: Revised Public Review Draft of the City of St. Helena Housing Element Update
including the Housing Needs Assessment with a Sites Inventory and Analysis and the Goals,
Policies and Five Year Action Plan


The City Council reviewed the draft 2009 Housing Element and heard public comments at the
February 10, 2009 meeting. The documents have been revised to reflect the comments made by
the City Council. All documents were posted to the City of St. Helena website and the General
Plan Update website on Friday, March 27.

The documents for review include:
   1. The Housing Element Needs Assessment Draft dated 02/26/09. This document includes
      the Key Housing Opportunity Sites Inventory and Analysis (distributed separately).
   2. The Goals, Policies and Five-Year Action Plan Draft dated 02/26/09 (distributed
      separately).
   3. 2002 and 2009 Housing Policies Comparison Chart (attached to staff report).
   4. The 2002 Housing Policies with 2008 update (attached to staff report).

The substantive revisions to the Housing Needs Assessment are as follows:

             Page v, Executive Summary. A change was made regarding the income necessary to
              purchase the median single-family home in St. Helena to accurately reflect the data
              reported in Table 19;

             Pages 3 and 111, Public Participation. Updated descriptions of public participation to
              include Planning Commission and City Council meeting;

             Pages 4 and 10, Review of Existing Housing Element. Changes were made to the
              discussion of the diversity of housing needs to acknowledge that the City of St. Helena
              implemented program 1A-5 from the 2002 Housing Needs Assessment;

             Page 28, Demographic and Economic Trends Summary. Summary now highlights
              information from page 25 regarding ratio of two jobs per employed residents;

             Page 54, Rental Housing. Updated to read "547 rental apartments";


C:\Documents and Settings\GregD\Local Settings\Temporary Internet Files\OLK8A\Draft staff report for City Council 031009.doc

                                                                            Page 1 of 19
       Page 55, Affordable Housing Complexes. Information about current waiting lists for
        units in affordable rental complexes added;

       Page 71, Farmworkers. Additional information regarding vacancy rates at the County’s
        farm labor centers added;

       Page 87, Governmental Constraints. Information about agricultural land preservation
        policies and the purpose of the urban limit line added;

       Page 92, Water. Revised section with additional information about water supply in St.
        Helena added;

       Page 110, Sites Inventory. References deleted to the Mixed Density Overlay District and
        GMS exemptions for market rate units in projects with high proportions of affordable
        housing;

       Page 114 & Table 37, Sites Inventory. Ruston property added as new Site #8, numbering
        updated for Sites 9-16. Total acres and unit capacity updated throughout Sites Inventory
        Analysis;

       Appendix G. New tables with salary ranges for public employees in St. Helena and
        salaries for various occupational categories added.

The Goals, Policies and Five-Year Action Plan has been substantially revised and should be read
in its entirety. The 2002 Housing Element document, provided for comparison purposes,
includes an update of what has and has not been accomplished since it was adopted. The chart
contained in the 2002 and 2009 Housing Policy Comparison document shows which policies
were carried over from 2002, which were modified, and which ones are new.

CEQA ANALYSIS:
An initial study and environmental determination will be done in May /June, prior to adoption of
the final Housing Element. CEQA analysis is not required for review and comment on the draft
document.

SCHEDULE
The preparation of the Housing Element is on an expedited schedule to meet the requirements of
the state. HCD requires that a final/approved Housing Element be presented to them by June 30,
2009. They also require 60 days to review and comment on the draft document before it is
adopted by the City Council. The revised schedule is as follows:

   March 10, 2009: City Council reviews draft Housing Element and authorizes document
    to be forwarded to HCD.
   Mid March 2009: Draft Housing Element is submitted to HCD for 60 day review.
   Mid May 2009: Staff and consultants receive comments on draft from HCD.
   End of May: HEUSC discusses comments from HCD, changes and revisions. Staff
    prepares environmental documentation (Initial Study).
   June: Final Draft Housing Element Update is reviewed by the Planning Commission,
    recommends approval to City Council.
   June/July: Final Draft Housing Element Update presented to City Council for Adoption.
   June/July: Submit Adopted Housing Element to HCD. It is likely that we will miss the June
    30, 2009 deadline.


RECOMMENDED CITY COUNCIL ACTION:
Review and discuss the City of St. Helena Housing Element Update. Authorize staff and
consultant to forward to HCD for preliminary review.
Summary of Changes in the 2009 Draft Housing Element Policy Document from
the 2002 Adopted Housing Element.
February 25, 2009


    2009 Goal/ Policy/ Action                  Comparison to 2002 Housing Element
Goal 1                          No Change
   Policy 1.1                   Same as Policy 1A
   Policy 1.2                   Same as Policy 1B
   Policy 1.3                   Same as Policy 1C
   Policy 1.4                   Slight Modification of Previous Program 6A-1
   Policy 1.5                   Same as Policy 1D
   Policy 1.6                   Same as Policy 1E
         Action 1A              Updated Program 1A-1
         Action 1B              Combines Updated Programs 1A-2 and 1A-3 with New Workforce Action
         Action 1C              Updated Program 1A-4
         Action 1D              New - to Comply with Government Code section 65589.7
         Action 1E              New - Streamline Multifamily Permitting
         Action 1F              New - Adams Street
         Action 1G              New - Adams Street
         Action 1H              Combines and Updates Programs 1B-1 through 1B-7
         Action 1I              New - Flood Protection Project
         Action 1J              Same as Program 1C-3
         Action 1K              New - Affordable Housing Overlay Zone
         Action 1L              New - Local Preference Policy
         Action 1M              New - Workforce Housing
         Action 1N              New - Second Unit Workforce Housing
         Action 1O              Updated program 1D-1 to Include 'Green' Manufactured Homes
         Action 1P              New - 'Green' Manufactured Housing
         Action 1Q              Updated 1E-1 to Comply with State Law
2009 Goal/ Policy/ Action                Comparison to 2002 Housing Element
Goal 2                      No Change
 Policy 2.1                 Same as Policy 2A
 Policy 2.2                 Slight Language Modification to Policy 2B
 Policy 2.3                 Same as Policy 2D
 Policy 2.4                 Slight Language Modification to Policy 2E
 Policy 2.5                 Same as Policy 2F
 Policy 2.6                 New - Balance of Housing Types
   Action 2A                New- higher density incentives
   Action 2B                New - facilitate higher density/discourage oversized homes
   Action 2C                Update of Program 2B-2
   Action 2D                New - Manufactured Housing
   Action 2E                New- Subdivisions
   Action 2F                New - Update General Plan
   Action 2G                Combines and Updates Programs 2D-1 and 2D-3
   Action 2H                New - Mixed Use and Live/Work
   Action 2I                Same as Program 2E-1
   Action 2J                Same as Program 2E-2
   Action 2K                Same as Program 2E-3
   Action 2L                Same as Program 2E-4
   Action 2M                Update of Program 2E-5
   Action 2N                Update of Program 2E-6
   Action 2O                Same as Program 2F-1
   Action 2P                Same as Programs 2F-2 and 2F-3
   Action 2Q                New - Affordable Unit Infill Clusters
Goal 3                      No Change
 Policy 3.1                 Update of Policy 3A to Include Market Rate Units
 Policy 3.2                 Same as Policy 3B
   Action 3A                Update of Program 3A-1
   Action 3B                Update of Program 3A-2
   Action 3C                Update of Program 3A-3
   Action 3D                New - Prohibit Conversion to Vacation Rentals
   Action 3E                Same as program 3B-1
2009 Goal/ Policy/ Action                  Comparison to 2002 Housing Element
Goal 4                      No Change
 Policy 4.1                 Same as Policy 4A
 Policy 4.2                 Same as Policy 4B
 Policy 4.3                 Eliminate Homelessness from Policy 4C
 Policy 4.4                 Same as Policy 4D
 Policy 4.5                 New- Increase Housing Trust Fund Money
   Action 4A                New - Review and Amend Inclusionary Ordinance
   Action 4B                Same as Program 4A-4
   Action 4C                Same as Program 4A-5
    Action 4D               New - prioritize Housing Trust Funds for extremely low- income units
    Action 4E               Same as Program 4B-1
    Action 4F               Same as Program 4B-2
    Action 4G               Same as Program 4B-3
    Action 4H               Same as Program 4C-1
    Action 4I               Updated 4C-2 to Comply with State Law
    Action 4J               Modified Programs 4D-1 and 4D-2 to Require Unit Production
    Action 4K               Same as Program 4D-3
    Action 4L               New - Mediation
    Action 4M               New- Use of Housing Trust Fund
Goal 5                      No Change
 Policy 5.1                 Slight Modification to Policy 5A
 Policy 5.2                 Slight Modification to Policy 5B
   Action 5A                New - Green Building Ordinance
   Action 5B                Combines Programs 5A-1 and 5A-2
   Action 5C                Same as Program 5A-3
   Action 5D                Combines Programs 5B-1 and 5B-2
   Action 5E                Same as Program 5B-3
   Action 5F                Same as Program 5B-4
   Action 5G                New - Bicycle and Pedestrian Amenities
   Action 5H                New - Municipal Code Provisions for Water
   Action 5I                New - Passive Heating and Cooling
   Action 5J                New - On-site Alt. Wastewater
   Action 5K                New - Local Contractors
 2009 Goal/ Policy/ Action                Comparison to 2002 Housing Element
Goal 6                       No Change
  Policy 6.1                 Same as Policy 6A
    Action 6A                Same as Program 6A-2
    Action 6B                Updated Program 6A-3



Policies and Programs in 2002 Adopted Housing Element Excluded in 2009 Draft Housing
Element Policy Document:

     Policy / Program             Reason Excluded
Program 1A-5                  Completed
Program 1A-6                  Completed
Program 1C-1                  Completed
Program 1C-2                  Completed
Program 2A-1                  Completed
Program 2A-2                  Completed
Program 2B-1                  Completed
Policy 2C / Program 2C-1      Completed
Program 2D-4                  Replaced with Action 2H
Program 3A-4                  Program Outdated
Program 4A-1                  Completed
Program 4A-2                  Completed
Program 4A-3                  Completed
Program 4C-3                  Replaced with Action 1Q
Program 4C-4                  Replaced with Action 1Q
Program 6A-1                  Now Policy 1.4
Program 6A-4                  Program Not Necessary
                                       City of St. Helena
                                     2008 Progress Report

The policies below are from the 2002 Housing Element. Progress on meeting the goal is
explained in the underline narrative following each policy.


Policy 1 A
Ensure that the General Plan’s Growth Management Policies Do Not Limit Our Ability to
Meet Regional Housing Needs

1A-1 Amend the Growth Management System to exempt permits for regulated Affordable
Units.
The Growth Management System exempts building permits for regulated affordable housing,
pursuant to municipal code section 17.152.040.A.10. Other types of housing units that are
exempt from the Residential Growth Management System include second units, replacement
housing, houses that are moved to a new site, and guest houses.

1A-2 Continue to allow a maximum of 9 market rate units per year.
There is a new allocation for 9 building permits for market rate units each year.

1A-3 Provide for a process to give priority allocation of market rate permits to developers of
projects that are affordable or are a mix of market rate and affordable units.
Building permits that remain unused at the end of the calendar year roll over into a special
category of permits that are only available to the market rate housing component of a housing
development project that is 40% (or more) affordable. The year 2008 started with 40 building
permits in this special “rollover” category. Five (5) market rate building permits remained
unused at the end of 2008 and rolled over into this category, making a total of forty (45) permits
available in 2009. The Magnolia Oaks project, approved in November 2007, will use 27 of the
40 permits for their market rate houses. The 18 affordable housing units are exempt from the
Growth Management System.

1A-4 Amend or delete General Plan Policy 2.6.10, which states: Maintain a cap on
residential development of 2,850 total dwelling units citywide by the year 2010. The total
number of dwelling units shall not be construed as a goal, but shall be an absolute maximum
allowable number. If amended, the number should be consistent with the 2000 Census numbers
and additional growth rate thereafter. (As of January 2000 there were 2,380 households in St.
Helena and 2,707 housing units).

Policy 2.6.10 was amended to read:
“The 2002 Housing Element update stated that the prior General Plan Goal 2.6.10 should be
amended to reflect the data of the Year 2000 Census. The 2000 Census found that the City had
2,707 total dwelling units. With a limitation of 9 building permits for market rate housing per
year, issued over 10 years, the number of dwelling units will be approximately 2,800 by the year
2010, not including regulated affordable units, guest cottages, accessory dwelling units or
second units. This number shall not be construed as a goal, but as a maximum number of units.”
As of December 31, 2008, the City of St. Helena had approximately 2,540 housing units built or
with issued building permits. This does not include 218 regulated affordable housing units
(listed below) and approximately 30 guest cottages, accessory dwelling units or second units.
        Woodbridge Village (50 units, rental)
        Stonebridge (80 units, rental)
        Hunts Grove (56 units, rental)
        Wallis (20 units, ownership)
        Marietta Townhouses (10 units, ownership)
        Eagle & Rose (1 unit, rental)
        Vintner’s Court (1 unit, ownership)


1A-5 Revise the Growth Management Policies of the General Plan to recognize the different
levels of impact of different types and sizes of housing units.
This has not been done. The Growth Management System allocates the number of residential
building permits on a dwelling unit basis and does not make a distinction between the number of
permits available for apartments, small houses or large houses. Affordable housing units and
second units are exempt from the Growth Management System.

1A-6 Address the impacts of other uses, too. The Growth Management policies of the General
Plan focus specifically on limiting new housing to address concerns related to water use. The
City should take action to address the impacts of other uses as well, including but not limited to:

• Restrict the number of permits issued for swimming pools.
The section of the City of St. Helena Municipal Code pertaining to Water Conservation and Use
Guidelines was amended in March 2004. The number of toilet retrofits required to compensate
for the water use of new development was revised to require the 5 retrofits for single family
detached homes; 4 retrofits for condominiums, townhouses or duplexes; and 3.5 retrofits for
apartments, mobile homes and guest houses or second units. Swimming pools require 1 to 3
retrofits, depending upon the pool size.

•  Encourage or require drought-tolerant landscaping in both residential and commercial
   developments (new construction as well as rehabs/ re-landscaping).
Municipal Code Section 17.112.140 pertains to water efficient landscaping and applies to
new construction, both residential and commercial.

•  Place an annual cap on the amount of new commercial space, especially high-water
   consumption commercial uses.
This has not been done. The Growth Management System only applies to residential
construction.

_________________________________
Policy1B
Focus on Key Opportunity Sites and Work with Property Owners and Developers to
Facilitate Development of New Affordable Housing

1B-1 Facilitate mixed use housing development on the Adams Street property.
The General Plan Update Steering Committee, staff and consultants have hosted a series of
community meetings to determine the use of the Adams Street property. The preferred
alternative will be presented to and discussed by the City Council in early Spring 2009.

1B-2 Facilitate development on the Romero Property (Land Inventory site #28).
The Romero property has been on the market since December 2006. Staff has informed buyers of
the 2002 Housing Element goals for this property of 120 housing units, including 34 affordable
units. A non-profit housing developer has submitted a pre-application for 112 units including
affordable, workforce and market rate units within various housing types.

1B-3 Explore opportunities created through the Flood Protection Project. (Land Inventory
sites #30 & #31).
The implementation of the St. Helena flood control project has been slowed due to litigation and
lack of funding. These properties cannot be developed until they are protected from floods.

1B-4 Facilitate mixed use development behind ‘Taylor’s Refresher.’ (Land Inventory site #
42).
Development of this property is hindered by flooding issues (it is adjacent to Sulphur Springs
Creek), lack of sewer and only one ingress/egress point at an impacted intersection (Charter Oak
/ Main Street).

1B-5 Explore opportunities on the parcel behind the Bonita Motel. (Land Inventory sites #25
and #33).
The Magnolia Oaks development project was approved for site #33 in November 2007. The
project has 45 housing units, including 18 affordable housing units. The application includes a
lower housing density than originally projected for this property because reducing the density
helped to preserve the many oak trees that are on the site.

Site #24 is currently developed to vineyard and the owners have expressed no interest in
developing it.


1B-6 Highway 29 Specific Plan Area. (Land Inventory sites #32 and #45).
Site #32, the Beckstoffer property, is planted to vineyard and probably will not be developed into
non-agricultural uses.

A development proposal for a portion of site #45, the Doumani property, was approved for
hospital office develpment.

1B-7 Spring Street area sites (Land Inventory #20, #21, and #23)
Neither of the owners of sites #20 or #23 has expressed interest in developing the land to more
intensive residential uses. A development of three market rate homes plus one second unit was
approved for site #21 after the owner sold the property to a buyer who subdivided it into smaller
parcels, thereby reducing the density required.

                         __
Policy 1C
Ensure that Affordable Housing Gets Built

1C-1 Establish ‘Inclusionary Zoning’ for affordable housing.
In 2004, the City Council passed ordinance 2004-7, An Ordinance Adding Chapter 17.146 to the
St. Helena Municipal Code Creating and Establishing a Housing Trust Fund, a Housing Impact
Fee on Non-Residential Development, and an Inclusionary Housing Requirement or Inclusionary
In-Lieu Fee Requirement for Residential Development Projects. The inclusionary housing
requirement is for 20% affordable housing in residential developments of 5 units (or 5 lots) or
more. The fees apply to residential developments of 4 or fewer units/lots and to non-residential
development.
(See response below to Policy 4A).

1C-2 Remove conditional use requirements for multi-family developments.
Public hearings were held in 2004 to amend the two primary residential zoning districts, Medium
Density Residential (MR) and High Density Residential (HR). The HR district was revised to
allow as permitted uses multiple-family dwellings, apartments and dwelling groups containing
four units or less consistent with the density requirements of the district. Multiple-family
dwelling with more than five units remained a conditional use. The MR regulations were
amended to allow attached duplex or triplex units or conversion of an existing single family
dwelling to duplex or triplex as a conditional use. This district had previously only allowed
single-family detached homes and condominiums.

1C-3 Fast-track housing developments that meet lower income and special housing needs.
Staff has given priority to projects that include affordable housing including the Magnolia Oaks
project (18 affordable units proposed), the Grandview Hotel project (22 affordable units
approved) and the Vintner’s Court project (1 affordable home approved).

_________________________
Policy1D
Encourage Innovative Housing Types and Designs

1D-1 Encourage development of co-housing, ecohousing, and other ‘nontraditional’ forms
of housing.
There has been little interest by owners/developers in constructing non-traditional forms of
housing in St. Helena. One developer explored the possibility of a live/work development in the
Industrial zoning district, however there was concern about the appropriateness of the location
for housing, particularly for families. Planning staff has supported the use of the PD: Planned
Development overlay zone to assist developers in creating housing developments with higher
densities than could be achieved with strict adherence to the development standards of the
district.

____________________________
Policy 1E
Address Emergency Shelter and Transitional Housing Requirements

1E-1 Allow emergency shelters and transitional housing facilities in appropriate locations.
Define ‘emergency shelters’ and ‘transitional housing facilities’ in the Zoning Ordinance and list
them as a conditional use in the Central Business, Service Commercial, Office, and
Public/Quasi-Public zoning districts.
This has not been accomplished.

____________________________
Policy 2A
Encourage Higher Density Development Where Appropriate.

2A-1 Increase the maximum density in ‘Medium Density Residential’ (MR) to 16 dwelling
units per acre (DUA) net with a 25% density bonus up to 20 DUA for affordable projects.

2A-2 Increase the maximum density in ‘High Density Residential’ (HR) to 28 DUA net with
a 25% density bonus of up to 35 DUA for affordable projects.

This General Plan and Zoning Ordinance Text amendment was approved in 2005. The density
range for the MR district was increased to 5.1 – 16 dwelling units per acre (dua). HR was
increased from 16.1 dua to 28 dua, or up to 35 dua with a 25% density bonus.

Also in 2005, Municipal Code Chapter 17.144, Affordable Housing, was added to the zoning
ordinance to satisfy requirements of Government Code Section 65915 and the City’s Housing
Element by specifying how the City shall provide density bonuses and other incentives or
concessions for the construction of certain housing projects affordable to lower income, very low
income, senior households, and for condominium and planned development projects for
moderate income.

In December, 2007, the City Council approved a Zoning Ordinance Text Amendment to Chapter
17.32 LR: Low Density Residential; Chapter 17.40 MR: Medium Density Residential; and
Chapter 17.44 HR: High Density Residential to revise the regulations to require housing density
calculations to be based on gross parcel area instead of net parcel area.


2B-1 Establish minimum density requirements in the Zoning Ordinance.
The Planning Commission and City Council first adopted a policy to enforce minimum densities
in 2003. The zoning ordinance was subsequently amended to include this regulation when a
comprehensive zoning ordinance amendment to address housing policies was adopted in 2005.

2B-2 Establish policies to discourage or restrict rezoning of Higher Density Residential
Properties to Lower Densities and/or nonresidential uses.

The General Plan and the zoning ordinance are consistent. Property cannot be rezoned to a
lower density unless a General Plan Amendment is also approved. The City Council reviews
potential General Plan Amendments twice per year. Before approving a General Plan
Amendment or a zoning amendment, the Planning Commission and City Council must make the
following finding:

“If, considering the reduction of residential density, ensure compliance with Government Code
Section 65863 by either finding that the remaining sites identified in the housing element are
adequate to accommodate the city’s share of the regional housing need or by identifying
sufficient additional, adequate, and available sites with an equal or greater density so that there is
no net loss in residential density.”

____________________________
Policy 2C
Make Sure Development Standards Do Not Constrain Development at the Zoned Densities

2C-1   Revise the Zoning Ordinance to address regulatory inconsistencies.

   Amendments to the Medium Density Residential standards that could be considered to
   achieve higher densities without dramatically changing the visual characteristics of the
   district include:

   a) A Use Permit should be required for the development of one single family home on a
      parcel if that parcel could be legally divided into two or more parcels. The structure
      should be sized and sited so as not to preclude future development at the minimum
      density (5.1 units per acre) of the district.
   b) Allow the construction of duplexes or triplexes, but keep the FAR the same as that for
      single family homes.
   c) Allow the conversion of single family homes to multiple units if only minor
      modifications are made to the exterior of the structure.
   d) Allow “flag lots” to also be “small lots”. The flag lot regulations currently require a
      minimum 7,000 square foot size.
   e) Allow density to be determined on a net acre (excluding roads) basis, not a gross acre
      basis.

   Amendments to the High Density Residential standards that could facilitate higher density
   infill development include the following:

   f ) Allow development of single family homes in the High Density Residential district only
       by Use Permit. Houses should be sized and sited so as not to preclude future development
       at the minimum density of the district.
   g) Revise the Floor Area Ratio restrictions to accommodate reasonably sized units at all
       allowed density ranges.
   h) Allow smaller lot sizes to allow land divisions at maximum density.
   i) Allow multiple family dwellings of four units or less as a permitted use.
   j) Encourage use of the PD: Planned Development overlay zone to vary development
       standards to achieve higher densities.
   k) Allow “flag lots” to also be “small lots”. The flag lot regulations currently require a
       minimum 7,000 square foot size.
   l) Allow density to be determined on a net acre (excluding roads) basis, not a gross acre
       basis.
   m) Allow an increase in the height limit to 35 feet for multi-family buildings.
   n) Review standards to provide parking on a per unit/parking space ratio that is variable
       depending upon the size of the residential units in a multi-family development.
Amendments to the zoning ordinance that addressed these goals were reviewed in public
hearings in 2004 and approved in 2005.

____________________________
Policy 2D
Be more aggressive in promoting mixed use developments.

2D-1 Promote both ‘vertical’ and ‘horizontal’ mixed use.
Planning staff encouraged the submittal of an application for a live/work mixed light industrial
and residential development at a site in the Industrial district. The residential units were to be
located over the light industrial uses to achieve a “vertical” mixed use. A PD: Planned
Development overlay was to be used to modify the industrial development standards. The owner
ultimately withdrew the project after doing market research on the feasibility of the project.

Staff also worked with another developer to plan a “horizontal” mixed use of offices and
townhouses. The developer did not submit the project for planning review and processing,

2D-2 Allow residential uses on commercial properties, where appropriate, in excess of the
established FAR.
2D-3 Allow/encourage ‘shared parking’ in mixed use developments.
These ideas were explored with the above mentioned projects.

2D-4 Identify specific sites or areas to ‘target’ mixed use development, providing incentives
to facilitate such development in those areas.
This has not been accomplished.

____________________________
Policy 2E
Be More Aggressive in Promoting Second Units

2E-1 Review and revise development standards pertaining to second units.
In compliance with state law, the zoning ordinance was amended to make second units permitted
uses in all of the residential zoning districts, except in certain areas of the WW: Woodlands and
Watershed district where environmental impacts may need to be mitigated. The maximum size
of a second unit was increased from 600 sq. ft. to 850 sq. ft. to increase the likelihood of full time
occupancy of the units, yet to keep them small enough so that rents will be in the moderate
range.

2E-2 Provide financial incentives for second unit development. Incentives might include low
interest loans, fee waivers, or a floor area bonus.
An incentive has been added to allow an increase in the floor area ratios permitted within
residential districts if the site includes a second unit. The increase allows up to 400 sq. ft. of
additional floor area.

2E-3 Target specific areas for second unit incentives. Encourage second units in the medium
density areas near downtown.
Staff routinely encourages second units, especially when owners propose building a guest house.
Guest houses (no kitchens) are conditional uses. The addition of a full kitchen creates a legal
second unit.

2E-4 Provide public information regarding second units. Develop a guide for homeowners
explaining the benefits and procedures for adding a second unit.
This has not been accomplished.

2E-5 Link incentives and development standard revisions to affordability provisions. Require
use agreements as a condition of approval for second units to require that either the main house
or the second unit is used as a rental unit that is affordable to moderate income persons.
As a permitted use, second units no longer have conditions of approval. Therefore, there is no
readily available mechanism to regulate the rental price. However, Magnolia Oaks, a recently
approved housing development project includes single family detached homes on small lots with
second units located above the garages. The second units will be dedicated as rental units
affordable to low and moderate income persons and regulated through the housing authority.
The income from the second unit will allow a moderate income household to qualify for the
mortgage.

2E-6 Consider an amnesty program for illegal second units.
This has been discussed; however we have not come to consensus as how to treat those illegal
units that may have serious defects under either the zoning or building code.

____________________________
Policy 2F
Allow conversion of Single Family Homes to Multi-Unit Dwellings

2F-1 Identify appropriate ‘target’ areas.

2F-2 Develop criteria and standards for conversions.

2F-3 Provide public information regarding conversions.
The housing market in St. Helena is for large single family detached homes. There has been
little interest in dividing a large home into multiple housing units. Second units may be achieved
by new construction, either attached or detached from the main residence, or by converting floor
area within an existing structure. Similarly, duplexes and triplexes can be created from existing
dwellings in the MR district by use permit. The City of St. Helena is rich in historic architecture
and modifications to structures that are considered a historic resource is of concern.

____________________________
Policy 3A
Protect the Existing Stock of Affordable Housing

3A-1 Restrict the conversion of rental units to condominiums.
In November 2006, the City of St. Helena received an application to convert a 10 unit apartment
building to condominiums. The City Council ultimately denied this application because they
could not make the following required finding “the proposed conversion will not displace a
significant percentage of low and moderate income tenants, senior citizen tenants or tenants with
children, and will not remove a significant number of low and moderate income rental units from
the city’s housing stock at a time when no equivalent housing is readily available in the
community.”

3A-2    Charge an affordable housing impact fee whenever affordable units are converted to
      other uses.
In 2005 the City Council approved the conversion of a historic property that contained a mix of
40 different types of rental housing units, to use as a 35 room inn and 22 very low and low
income studio housing units. Although market rate rental units will be lost in this conversion,
the City will gain the renovation and restoration of a significant historic structure and will have
22 regulated affordable units available in perpetuity. In this situation where a General Plan
Amendment was requested, the City did not believe that housing impact fee was appropriate
mitigation, and instead, they required the provision of housing.

3A-3 Address the potential loss of assisted units.
A residential care facility in St. Helena closed in 2003 and the property was sold. The City did
not have the funds to purchase the property, nor did a new operator for the facility come forward.
The property was purchased by a culinary school and has been converted into dormitory use for
students, thereby reducing their demand for housing elsewhere in the community.

3A-4 Support programs such as ‘Christmas in April’
The City of St. Helena used to contribute funds annually to a program that targets one or two
residential homes for cosmetic upgrades and renovation, however this program has ceased.

___________________________
Policy 3B
Monitor Housing Conditions

3B-1 Review housing needs, conditions, achievements and challenges as part of the City’s
regular General Plan review.
This has not been accomplished.

_____________________________
Policy 4A
Develop permanent local sources of funding to support affordable housing

4A-1 Establish an Inclusionary Zoning Program with in-lieu fee payments.
4A-2 Levy an affordable housing impact fee for commercial development.
4A-3 Establish an Affordable Housing Trust Fund. Encourage voluntary donations.

The City Council passed ordinance 2004-7, An Ordinance Adding Chapter 17.146 to the St.
Helena Municipal Code Creating and Establishing a Housing Trust Fund, a Housing Impact Fee
on Non-Residential Development, an Inclusionary Housing Requirement or Inclusionary In-Lieu
Fee Requirement for Residential Development Projects. The inclusionary housing requirement
is for 20% affordable housing in residential developments of 5 or more units/lots. The fee for
residential development of 4 or fewer units/lots is 2.5% of the valuation of construction.
4A-4 Generate Revenues for Affordable Housing through the Transient Occupancy Tax.
The City of St. Helena has other policies that limit the development of hotels, motels, and other
transient occupancies or vacation rentals. These policies are in place to try to maintain a healthy
balance between tourist serving and local serving uses. TOT flows into the General Revenue
Fund where it is available for all city services and needs. There has been no interest in
dedicating TOT for affordable housing only.

4A-5 Reduce, defer, or waive fees for affordable housing developments.
Municipal Code section 3.32.120 provides for fee adjustments for affordable housing and other
projects. These are reviewed by the City Council on a case by case basis. In addition, incentives
offered under Municipal Code Chapter 17.144, Affordable Housing, allows for concessions or
incentives for affordable housing projects. These may include, but are not limited to a
modification of zoning code requirements such as reductions in lot size, frontage requirements,
setbacks, yards, parking, or open space or fencing requirements; height increases; or a
modification of architectural design requirements.

4A-6 Establish a Real Estate Transfer Tax for Affordable Housing.
The City of St. Helena collects a real estate transfer tax, as provided for in Municipal Code
Chapter 3.20, Real Property Transfer Tax. This tax was imposed many years ago and is at the
rate of rate of twenty-seven and one-half cents for each five hundred dollars ($500.00) or
fractional part thereof, on any transaction exceeding $100.00. The City Council has not
discussed or explored the issue of increasing the tax and dedicating the funds to affordable
housing.

____________________________
Policy 4B
Aggressively Pursue and ‘Leverage’ State and Federal Housing Funds

4B-1 Pursue mortgage revenue bonds and/or mortgage credit certificates. Promote affordable
      homeownership opportunities for moderate and lower income households.
4B-2 Continue Section 8 rent subsidy certificates.
4B-3 Explore the possibility of establishing a fulltime, shared Housing Coordinator for the
      up-valley communities.
The City of St. Helena has a contract with the Housing Authority City of Napa to provide
services related to affordable housing. There have been some informal discussions about the up-
valley communities having a housing coordinator, but no formal actions.

____________________________
Policy 4C
Address Farmworker Housing Needs and Homelessness.

4C-1 Collaborate with countywide efforts to address farmworker housing needs.
The City of St. Helena works through the Napa County Housing Authority to address
farmworker housing needs. In 2004 Napa Valley vintners and grapegrowers voted to self impose
a tax on vineyard land to collect funds for farmworker housing. Many of these vineyards are
within the City of St. Helena. With the assistance of these funds, plus a Joe Serna Jr.
Farmworker Housing Funds the NVHA was able to build a new camp, the River Ranch Center,
and substantially rehabilitate two farmworker camps, the Mondavi Farm Center and the
Calistoga Farm Center.

4C-2 Establish seasonal farmworker housing as a conditional use in all zoning districts.
Farm labor housing for transient labor is allowed as a conditional use in the A-20: Twenty Acre
Agriculture and W: Winery districts, which encompass nearly 1500 acres of agricultural land
within the city limits. Seasonal farmworker housing is currently not allowed in other districts.

4C-3 Allow homeless shelters as a conditional use in the Central Business District, Service
     Commercial, Office, and Public/Quasi-Public zoning districts.
This has not been accomplished.

4C-4 Support the Housing Authority’s ongoing efforts to address homelessness in the
     County.
The City of St. Helena supports this effort through membership and participation in the Napa
County Housing Authority.

___________________________
Policy 4D
Support Housing that Meets Special Needs, Including Senior Citizens and People with
Disabilities.

4D-1 Encourage the development of housing that meets the needs of seniors and the inclusion
of accessible units in all new development.

4D-2 Encourage the development of housing that meets the needs of seniors.

4D-3 Reasonable Accommodation. The City shall amend its Municipal code to provide
individuals with disabilities reasonable accommodation in rules, policies, practices and
procedures that may be necessary to ensure equal access to housing.
These goals have not been accomplished.

____________________________
Policy 5A
Alternative Energy Sources

5A-1 Promote the use of solar energy.

5A-2 Promote the use alternative energy technologies.

5A-3 Provide public information on alternative energy technologies for residential developers,
contractors, and property owners.
The City of St. Helena formed a Climate Protection Task Force in 2006. One recommendation
that the task force has made to the City Council is to reduce building permit and inspection fees
for the installation of solar energy systems. The Council passed a resolution waiving fees for
photovoltaic installations in 2007.
The Planning and Building Department has had study sessions with the Planning Commission to
draft a green building ordinance and will be taking an ordinance to public hearing in summer
2008.

___________________________
Policy 5B
Encourage Energy Conservation

5B-1 Promote the energy conservation measures in all new and rehabilitated housing.

5B-2 Require cost-effective energy conservation measures in new housing to promote long-
term affordability for occupants.

5B-3 Provide low-interest loans for implementation of energy conservation measures.

5B-4 Provide public information on energy conservation measures for homeowners, tenants,
developers, contractors and property owners.
The City of St. Helena has not promoted energy conservation measures beyond those that are
required in the Building Code, but will be addressed with the green building ordinance.
____________________________
Policy 6A
Ensure equal housing opportunities for all residents of St. Helena.

6A-1 Support a jobs/housing balance by encouraging housing that provides for St. Helena’s
workforce.
There are 31 homes that are regulated for re-sale to moderate income families. The resale of the
homes is restricted to qualifying families and the City of St. Helena works with Housing
Authority City of Napa to oversee the resale process. In October 2005 the City Council adopted
Resolution 2005-98, Approving a Local Preference Policy for Affordable Housing. This policy
sets forth a process by which qualifying families are entered into a lottery for the homes that
come up for resale. The lottery process allows for a weighted preference for persons who
already live or work in St. Helena.

6A-2 Provide educational materials at City Hall, through the press and directly to interested
parties to educate real estate professionals, property owners and tenants on their rights and
responsibilities and the resources available to address fair housing issues.

6A-3 Identify a ‘Fair Housing Officer’ among the City staff.

6A-4 Document efforts at equal opportunity housing loans as part of annual Community
     Reinvestment Act from Savings and Loans.

Fair housing issues are handled through the Fair Housing Napa and Housing Authority City of
      Napa.
   PUBLIC REVIEW DRAFT

         City of St. Helena
  Housing Element Update
Housing Needs Assessment



                 Submitted to:
                    Carol Poole
              Planning Director
              City of St. Helena




             February 26, 2009
Table of Contents

List of Tables and Figures............................................................................................. iii
Executive Summary ........................................................................................................ v
Introduction ..................................................................................................................... 1
     Housing Element Purpose ......................................................................................................... 1
     Authority ................................................................................................................................... 1
     Status ......................................................................................................................................... 1
     Consistency with the General Plan............................................................................................ 2
     Public Participation ................................................................................................................... 2
Review of Existing Housing Element ............................................................................ 4
     Progress in Implementation....................................................................................................... 4
Demographic and Economic Trends........................................................................... 19
     Population and Employment Characteristics .......................................................................... 19
     Employment Trends ................................................................................................................ 23
     Population, Household and Employment Projections, 2010-2035.......................................... 25
     Summary ................................................................................................................................. 27
Housing Conditions ...................................................................................................... 39
     Existing Housing Conditions .................................................................................................. 39
     Housing Market Conditions .................................................................................................... 53
     Summary ................................................................................................................................. 55
Special Needs Populations .......................................................................................... 63
     Persons with Disabilities ......................................................................................................... 63
     Elderly ..................................................................................................................................... 64
     Large Households.................................................................................................................... 67
     Single Female-Headed Households with Children ................................................................. 68
     Farmworkers ........................................................................................................................... 69
     Families and Persons in Need of Emergency Shelters ............................................................ 71
     Summary ................................................................................................................................. 72
Non-governmental and Governmental Constraints ................................................... 84
     Non-governmental Constraints ............................................................................................... 84
     Governmental Constraints....................................................................................................... 87
     Summary ............................................................................................................................... 101


Public Review Draft Housing Element Needs Assessment                                          City of St. Helena General Plan Update
2/25/2009                                                                                                                             Page i
Opportunities for Energy Conservation.................................................................... 105
Sites Inventory and Analysis and Zoning for a Variety of Housing Types ............ 108
     Regional Housing Needs Allocation ..................................................................................... 108
     Housing Sites Inventory ........................................................................................................ 109
     Zoning for a Variety of Housing Types ................................................................................ 114
     Summary ............................................................................................................................... 118
Appendix A: Definitions............................................................................................. 126
Appendix B: Acquisition and Preservation Costs for Affordable Housing .......... 130
Appendix C: Construction Costs, Recent Affordable Housing Projects .............. 131
Appendix D: Rental Subsidy Costs for Affordable Housing .................................. 132
Appendix E: List of Entities Qualified to Assist with Preservation of Affordable
Housing ........................................................................................................................133
Appendix F: CDBG Housing Conditions Survey..................................................... 134
Appendix G: Salaries by Occupation ....................................................................... 135




Public Review Draft Housing Element Needs Assessment                                     City of St. Helena General Plan Update
2/25/2009                                                                                                                       Page ii
List of Tables and Figures
Table 1: Summary of 2002 Housing Element Policies, and Five-Year Action Plan .......................12
Table 2: Population and Household Trends, 1990, 2000, and 2008 ................................................29
Table 3: Age Distribution, 1990, 2000, and 2008............................................................................30
Table 4: Household Income Distribution, 1999 and 2008...............................................................31
Table 5: Household Income Categories, City of St. Helena, 1999 ..................................................32
Table 6: Labor Force Trends, 2000 and 2007..................................................................................33
Table 7: Jobs by Industry, 2000 and 2005 .......................................................................................34
Table 8: St. Helena Workers by Place of Residence, 2000 .............................................................35
Table 9: St. Helena Residents by Place of Work, 2000 ...................................................................36
Table 10: Ratio of Jobs to Employed Residents, 2005 .....................................................................37
Table 11: ABAG Population, Household, and Employment Projections ........................................38
Table 12: Housing Stock Characteristics, 2000 and 2008 ...............................................................46
Table 13: Housing Stock by Year Built, 2000.................................................................................47
Table 14: Housing Occupancy and Vacancy Status, 2000 ..............................................................48
Table 15: Overcrowding by Income Category and Tenure, St. Helena, 2000 .................................49
Table 16: Housing Cost Burden, City of St. Helena, 1999..............................................................50
Table 17: Housing Conditions Survey Results for St. Helena, October 2008 .................................51
Table 18: Costs of Replacement and Preservation ...........................................................................52
Table 19: Single-Family Housing Sales Prices, St. Helena, August 2007 to August 2008 ..............57
Table 20: Affordable For-Sale Housing Prices, Napa County, 2008...............................................58
Table 21: Multi-Family Housing Survey Results for St. Helena, October 2008 ..............................59
Table 22: Market-Rate Apartment Rental Rates, St. Helena, 2008 .................................................60
Table 23: Affordable Rents, Napa County, 2008 ............................................................................61
Table 24: Affordable Housing Developments, St. Helena ..............................................................62
Table 25: Civilian Non-Institutionalized Population with Disabilities, 2000 and 2008 ..................74
Table 26: Household Tenure by Age of Householder, 2000 and 2008............................................75
Table 27: Elderly Households and Household Cost Burden, City of St. Helena, 1999...................76
Table 28: Family and Non-Family Households by Size, 2000 and 2008 ........................................77
Table 29: Large Family Households and Housing Cost Burden, City of St. Helena, 1999.............78
Table 30: Single Female-Headed Households with Children, 2000 and 2008 ................................79
Table 31: Farm Employment, Napa County, 1993 - 2007...............................................................80
Table 32: Farmworkers, Napa County, 2005...................................................................................81
Table 33: Farmworker Rents and Income, Napa County, 2005.......................................................82
Table 34: Emergency, Transitional, and Permanent Supportive Housing, Napa County, 2007......83
Figure 1: Building Permit and Development Impact Fees, Single-Family Home, 2008 ..................96
Table 35: St. Helena Residential Zoning Districts ........................................................................103
Table 36: St. Helena Regional Housing Needs Allocation, 2007 – 2014......................................120
Table 37: Available Land Inventory Summary, Key Housing Sites..............................................121

Public Review Draft Housing Element Needs Assessment                            City of St. Helena General Plan Update
2/25/2009                                                                                                         Page iii
Table 38: Available Land Inventory Summary, Other Vacant/Underutilized Sites ......................123
Figure 2: Key Housing Opportunity Sites .....................................................................................124
Figure 3: Other Vacant/Underutilized Sites...................................................................................125




Public Review Draft Housing Element Needs Assessment                          City of St. Helena General Plan Update
2/25/2009                                                                                                       Page iv
Executive Summary
This document represents the first of two documents that will constitute the 2009 St. Helena
Housing Element Update. The Housing Element is one of the seven General Plan elements, and
every jurisdiction in the State of California is required to submit a Housing Element to the
Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD) for review and certification. St.
Helena is a member of the Bay Area Association of Governments (ABAG) and, therefore, must
submit an updated Housing Element to HCD by June 30, 2009.

Review of Existing Housing Element
Since the City of St. Helena adopted a Housing Element in 2002, the City of St. Helena has
successfully removed many of the previously identified governmental constraints to housing
production, maintenance, and rehabilitation, and increased the production and funding of
affordable housing with assistance from the private sector under Municipal Code Chapter 17.146
Housing Trust Fund, Housing Impact Fee, and Inclusionary/In Lieu Fee Requirements. The City
could improve upon its policies, however, related to special needs populations including the
homeless, disabled, and senior citizens. Review of the City’s progress since adopting the 2002
Housing Element indicates that the City has not yet been able to fully meet these groups’ needs.

Demographic and Economic Trends
Since 2000, the City of St. Helena experienced a slight population decline and an increase in the
number of households, causing the average household size in St. Helena to fall. The median age of
St. Helena residents decreased slightly while the average age of Napa and Bay Area residents
continued to rise. The median household income in St. Helena ($79,200 in 2008) exceeds the
medians of both Napa County and the Bay Area. Many people travel into St. Helena from the
surrounding area for work, and that pattern will continue as local population and household growth
projections lag strong employment growth estimates for the next three decades.

Existing Housing and Market Conditions
Around 2,750 housing units exist in St. Helena in 2008, an increase of about 40 units since 2000.
Almost all of the new homes are single-family units. There is a significant difference between the
income necessary to purchase the median priced single-family home in St. Helena (nearly $210,000
a year) and St. Helena’s 2008 median household income of $79,200. Rental units in St. Helena,
while limited in supply, provide more affordable options for low- and moderate-income
households, but remain unaffordable to some very low-income households and all extremely low-
income households. This highlights the need for subsidized affordable housing, to meet the needs
of local households in these lower income categories. While only about seven percent of
households in St. Helena live in overcrowded conditions, most households experiencing
overcrowding are renters.



Public Review Draft Housing Element Needs Assessment        City of St. Helena General Plan Update
2/25/2009                                                                                 Page v
Special Housing Needs
Both St. Helena and Napa County have high concentrations of disabled persons compared to the
Bay Area, with residents ages 65 and over experiencing more than half of the total disabilities in St.
Helena. In addition, a disproportionately large number of St. Helena’s elderly households have
severe housing cost burdens compared to the overall population. The percentage of large family
households in St. Helena closely aligns with the rates in Napa County and the Bay Area, but St.
Helena has a higher percentage of single female-headed households. While the number of
farmworkers and homeless persons in need of permanent or transitional housing specifically within
the City of St. Helena is unknown, these two special needs populations have an unmet need for
housing in Napa County as a whole and St. Helena must work with surrounding jurisdictions to
meet that need.

Non-governmental and Governmental Constraints
The non-governmental constraints that restrict building in St. Helena are the price of land, the
availability of financing with the tightening of the national credit market, and the hazards from
frequent flooding of the Napa River. The governmental constraints present in St. Helena include
sewer capacity, given that the City has yet to receive approval for increased capacity from the
California Regional Water Quality Resource Board, the incomplete Flood Protection Project,
uncertainty regarding the processing and permitting procedures for multifamily projects, and
failure to create and adopt a Reasonable Accommodations Ordinance in accordance with Senate
Bill 520. Other non-governmental and governmental conditions such as construction costs, zoning
code, General Plan land use designations, and impact fees do not unnecessarily inhibit housing
production.

Sites Inventory and Analysis and Zoning for a Variety of Housing Types
The housing sites inventory analysis indicates that St. Helena has a sufficient number of housing
sites to meet the City’s 2007-2014 Regional Housing Needs Allocation (RHNA). St. Helena
received a RHNA of 121 total units distributed across very low-income (30 units), low-income (21
units), moderate-income (25 units), and above moderate-income (45 units) categories. Given the
66 units built or approved through December 2008, the City needs sites for at least 55 more
housing units. After accounting for possible site constraints, the City has the capacity to
accommodate between 374 and 1,024 housing units on 13 sites, which allows the City to fulfill its
RHNA obligations. In addition, although the current St. Helena Zoning Ordinance allows for a
variety of housing types, changes to the codes regarding agricultural employees and emergency
homeless shelters are necessary to comply with State law.




Public Review Draft Housing Element Needs Assessment          City of St. Helena General Plan Update
2/25/2009                                                                                   Page vi
Introduction
Since 1969, California Housing Element Law has required that local governments develop plans to
                                                                                          1
accommodate and facilitate housing for current and future residents, at all income levels.

Housing Element Purpose
The purpose of the Housing Element is to establish a comprehensive plan to address housing needs
in St. Helena over the five-year planning period between July 1, 2009 and June 30, 2014. The
Housing Element sets the policies surrounding the development, rehabilitation, and preservation of
housing units that meet the needs of St. Helena residents.

The Housing Element consists of two parts, the Housing Needs Assessment and a Housing Element
Policy Document. The Housing Needs Assessment identifies and analyzes the existing and
projected housing needs for St. Helena and also identifies sites for housing development that are
adequate to accommodate the City’s regional housing needs allocation. The forthcoming Housing
Policy document will state goals, policies, quantified objectives, and implementation programs for
the development, rehabilitation, and preservation of housing, based upon the findings of the
Housing Needs Assessment and input received through the public outreach that the City
incorporated into the Housing Element Update process. Then, throughout the five-year planning
period, St. Helena will implement a set of programs to meet the goals included in the Housing
Element Policy Document.

Authority
Housing Elements are required by section 65302(c) of the California Government Code. Housing
Elements are one of seven mandatory General Plan Elements. Specific requirements for Housing
Elements are set forth beginning at section 65580 of the Government Code, with additional
guidance provided by the State Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD). The
combination of the Housing Needs Assessment and the Housing Element Policy Document will
address all applicable requirements of State law.

Status
The St. Helena City Council adopted the prior Housing Element in 2002. Upon review of the
adopted Housing Element, HCD sent the City of St. Helena a letter of compliance on October 21,
     2
2002. The 2009 Housing Element Update will plan for St. Helena’s housing needs through June


    1
     California Department of Housing and Community Development. “Housing Element Compliance Report.”
    June 18, 2008. http://www.hcd.ca.gov/hpd/hrc/plan/he/status.pdf. Accessed on September 19, 2008.
    2
     California Department of Housing and Community Development. “Housing Element Compliance Report.”
    June 18, 2008. http://www.hcd.ca.gov/hpd/hrc/plan/he/status.pdf. Accessed on September 19, 2008.


Public Review Draft Housing Element Needs Assessment              City of St. Helena General Plan Update
2/25/2009                                                                                       Page 1
30, 2014 in accordance with the Housing Element planning period for jurisdictions in the
                                      3
Association of Bay Area Governments.

Consistency with the General Plan
State Law requires that a General Plan and its constituent elements “comprise an integrated,
                                                             4
internally consistent, and compatible statement of policies.” Each and every element has equal
standing in the eyes of the law. The City of St. Helena is undertaking a comprehensive General
Plan Update concurrent with the Housing Element Update. Due to mandated schedule for
adoption of the Housing Element Update, the remainder of the General Plan Update will be
completed after adoption of the Housing Element. This will provide the City with the opportunity
to review and revise all policies and programs in the remaining General Plan elements, to ensure
internal consistency across all seven General Plan elements.

Public Participation
Public participation in the Housing Element process began with the formation of a Housing
Element Subcommittee that included members of the General Plan Steering Committee. At their
first meetings in fall 2008, subcommittee members received an overview of the Housing Element
update process and then gave City staff and BAE input on local challenges and opportunities to
consider when updating the Housing Element. Given the input from the subcommittee, BAE began
work on the Housing Needs Assessment and in mid-November submitted a draft of the Housing
Needs Assessment for both City Staff and the subcommittee to review.

Approximately 25 people attended the first public Housing Element Workshop on December 1,
2008. The attendees represented a variety of organizations such as local housing advocacy
organizations, developers, the St. Helena Chamber of Commerce, and members of the general
public. Attendees were presented with a summary of the preliminary key findings from the
Housing Needs Assessment regarding special housing needs, existing housing and market
conditions, demographic and economic trends, and a review of the 2002 St. Helena Housing
Element. A breakout session with three different work stations gave participants the opportunity to
learn more about the housing element needs assessment findings, give input on potential housing
development opportunity sites, and review the existing (2002) St. Helena Housing Element goals
and policies. At the second Housing Element Workshop on January 8, 2008, attendees had the
opportunity to comment on a public review draft of the Housing Needs Assessment, give further
feedback on housing development opportunity sites, and participate in an exercise to identify
needed changes and updates to the Housing Element goals and policies.


    3
     California Department of Housing and Community Development. Schedule for ABAG Regional Housing
    Needs Allocation. http://www.hcd.ca.gov/hpd/hrc/plan/he/abag_update.pdf. September 19, 2008.
    4
        Government Code Section 65300.5


Public Review Draft Housing Element Needs Assessment             City of St. Helena General Plan Update
2/25/2009                                                                                      Page 2
To augment the public outreach process, BAE also conducted interviews with the key housing
stakeholders in St. Helena. City staff generated an initial list of key stakeholders and BAE
completed interviews with six stakeholders including two market rate developers, one affordable
housing developer, and three people representing different special needs populations in the
community. The input from these key stakeholders is reflected and attributed accordingly within
the remainder of this document.

In addition, public hearings were held at Planning Commission and City Council meetings in
January and February of 2009, with both those bodies providing comments and direction regarding
the Housing Element update.




Public Review Draft Housing Element Needs Assessment        City of St. Helena General Plan Update
2/25/2009                                                                                 Page 3
Review of Existing Housing Element
This section examines the effectiveness of the 2002 Housing Element, the progress made in
achieving the goals, objectives and policies outlined in the Housing Element, along with a
discussion of the Element’s appropriateness given current conditions within the City of St. Helena.
This evaluation will inform the policies and programs developed as part of the 2009 Housing
Element Update.

Progress in Implementation
The 2002 Housing Element established the following six main goals and a coordinated set of
polices and implementing programs.

    1.   A Diversity of Housing to Meet Local Needs
    2.   Efficient Land Use and High Quality Neighbors
    3.   Conservation of Existing Housing
    4.   Assistance to Support Affordable Housing
    5.   Resource Conservation
    6.   Equal Housing Opportunities

Table 1 provides a summary of the policies and implementing programs that support each of these
goals, and the subsequent sections discuss the extent to which the 2002 Housing Element policies
and implementing programs helped the City of St. Helena meet the goals.

Diversity of Housing to Meet Local Needs
In order to supply a diversity of housing types to meet local needs, the 2002 Housing Element
developed Policies 1A through 1E. Almost all of the implementing programs outlined under Policy
1A address how the Growth Management System (GMS) policies impact the production of housing
in St. Helena. The City of St. Helena completed all six implementing programs including 1A-1
through 1A-5, and the majority of 1A-6.

Completion of the first five implementing programs involved exempting affordable housing from
the GMS-established maximum of nine building permits per year, only allowing surplus building
permits not used in previous years to be allocated towards housing developments with 40 percent
of the total units designated as either affordable rental or for-sale units, and differentiating between
different sizes of housing units. The last implementing program, 1A-6 relates to water
conservation, and St. Helena has amended the Municipal Code rules pertaining to swimming pools
and landscaping, but has not changed the water conservation guidelines for commercial uses.

Policy 1B outlined ways the City of St. Helena could intervene to facilitate the development of


Public Review Draft Housing Element Needs Assessment            City of St. Helena General Plan Update
2/25/2009                                                                                     Page 4
affordable housing on some of the opportunity sites identified in the City of St. Helena’s
vacant/underutilized land inventory from 2001. The City approved the Magnolia Oaks
development for Site #33 in November 2007, and three market rate units with one second unit on
Site #21. The Magnolia Oaks development will contain 45 units, including 18 affordable housing
                                                                              5
units including 6 very low-income, 4 low-income, and 8 moderate-income. Development is still
pending on Site #45, and no development occurred on Sites #44, #28, #30, #31, #42, #25, #32, #20,
or #23 due to a lack of community consensus, limited interest from prospective developers,
flooding issues, or vineyard activities. Site #31 will be necessary in the flood protection project
and it is no longer available for housing. The City has received a pre-application for development
of Site #28. Therefore, St. Helena completed portions of implementing programs 1B-2, 1B-5 1B-6
and 1B-7 under Policy 1B, leaving the remaining implementing programs incomplete.

The implementing programs listed for Policy 1C changed the St. Helena Municipal Code and
Planning Department protocol related to affordable housing development. The addition of Chapter
17.146 to the Municipal Code established Inclusionary Housing Requirements on all market rate
housing developments so that 20 percent of each development is affordable rental or for-sale units.
Other changes to Title 17 of the St. Helena Zoning Code mandate that apartments and dwelling
groups of four units or less are allowed in the high-density residential (HR) district by right and
that the medium-density residential district (MR) permits attached duplex or triplex units by right.
Consequently, St. Helena completed all of the implementing programs listed with Policy 1C in the
last Housing Element planning period.

The final two policies under Goal 1, Policy 1D and 1E, each have only one implementing program.
Under Policy 1D, the City set out to encourage the development of nontraditional housing, but the
City could not find interested owners or developers, and nontraditional housing such as ecohousing
or cohousing was not built in St. Helena. Policy 1E called for changes in the zoning code to permit
emergency shelters and transitional housing facilities as a conditional use in the Central Business
(CB), Service Commercial (SC), and Quasi and Public/Quasi-Public zoning districts, but the
current zoning code still does not define or include provisions for emergency shelters or
transitional housing.

The City of St. Helena met a significant portion, but not all of the quantified objectives related to
the construction of affordable housing. The original quantified objective for Policy 1A called for
the construction of 31 very low-income, 20 low-income, and 36 moderate-income homes. From
January 1, 1999 through December 31, 2006, 10 very-low income, 10 low-income and 21
moderate-income units were either approved or built within the City of St. Helena.



    5
        Personal communication. City of St. Helena Staff, January 2009.


Public Review Draft Housing Element Needs Assessment                      City of St. Helena General Plan Update
2/25/2009                                                                                               Page 5
Efficient Land Use and High Quality Neighbors
Policies 2A through 2F facilitate “efficient use of land within the Urban Limit Line to protect
agricultural lands, promoting compact, well-designed developments that ‘fit in’ with existing
                                                                                         6
neighborhoods, and contribute to the overall livability of our [St. Helena] community.” The first
policy, Policy 2A, aimed to increase the density of development by increasing the maximum
density, and establishing a set minimum density for both the MR and HR districts. The MR district
now has a density range of 5.1 to 16 dwelling units per acre (dua), and the HR district now allows
16.1 to 28 dua plus a 25 percent density bonus for affordable projects. In addition, Municipal Code
Chapter 17.144 sets additional provisions for a density bonus, incentives, and concessions for
development that are affordable to “lower income, very low income, senior households, and for
                                                                            7
condominium and planned development projects, [for] moderate income.” St. Helena completed
all of the implementing programs for Policy 2A.

Policies 2B and 2C, each with one implementing program, address monitoring the supply of high-
density residential land and altering the zoning code to eliminate regulatory inconsistencies. The
City of St. Helena made changes to its policies and does not permit a rezone of high-density
residential land unless the rezone complies with Government Code Section (GCS) 65863, and the
City Council approves a General Plan amendment. The City also changed the provisions of the
MR and HR zones in 2005 to eliminate regulatory inconsistencies, thus completing the
implementing programs related to Policies 2B and 2C.

Policy 2D presents four implementing programs that promote mixed-use development in St. Helena
but, during the Housing Element planning period, no developers completed mixed-use
developments. City Planning Department staff did however offer assistance to these projects.
Therefore, despite the City’s efforts to facilitate mixed-use development, the policy did not result
in additional mixed-use development in St. Helena. In the future, the City may wish to consider
targeting specific sites or areas and offering incentives for mixed-use development as
recommended by implementing program 2D-4.

Implementing programs for Policy 2E relate to second unit development. St. Helena amended its
Municipal Code to permit second units by right in all residential zones except some areas within
the Woodland/Watershed (WW) district. In addition, the maximum size of second units was
increased to 850 square feet. The only two implementing programs associated with second units
that are not complete are the dissemination of information to the public (program 2E-4) and an
amnesty program for illegal second units (program 2E-6).



    6
        City of St. Helena, Housing Element Update. 2002 (Pg. 48)
    7
        City of St. Helena Municipal Code 17.144.010.


Public Review Draft Housing Element Needs Assessment                City of St. Helena General Plan Update
2/25/2009                                                                                         Page 6
Finally, Policy 2F aimed to convert some single-family units to multi-unit dwellings. There was
very limited interest from owners in this type of unit conversion, despite the fact that the City
allows existing dwellings in the MR district to be converted into duplexes and triplexes. The City
implemented programs 2F-2 and 2F-3, but could not fully implement 2F-1 because of a lack of
interest from property owners.

Conservation of Existing Housing
Policies 3A and 3B compliment one another, as Policy 3B called for St. Helena to monitor existing
housing conditions and Policy 3A works to maintain the current supply of affordable housing. In
implementing program 3A-1, the City Council denied the conversion of an apartment building to a
condominium in an effort to preserve rental units. The remaining implementing programs under
Policy 3A have not been completed.

Implementing program 3A-2 recommended that the City of St. Helena charge an affordable
housing impact fee if existing affordable housing converted to market rate, but in 2005 when this
issue arose, the City did not charge a fee, but rather required that units in the newly renovated
Grandview Apartment building be regulated as affordable units. For implementing programs 3A-3
and 3A-4, the City did not have the resources to preserve the one residential care facility that
closed in 2003, and the City no longer supports the Christmas in April program because it is no
longer active.

In addition to implementing programs, Policy 3A also contains a quantified objective that all
affordable housing units remain affordable and that the City provide 20 low-interest loans to
moderate-, low-, and very low-income households for rehabilitation. St. Helena did not provide
loans for rehabilitation.

Finally, the only implementing program under Policy 3B, an annual review of housing issues in St.
Helena, was not completed as part of the City’s annual General Plan Review.

Assistance to Support Affordable Housing
There are four policies and two quantified objectives designed to support this fourth goal. Policy
4A presents multiple ways to collect money for affordable housing from local sources. In
accordance with implementing programs 4A-1, 4A-2, and 4A-3, the City established Municipal
Code Chapter 17.146, which provides for a housing trust fund, housing impact fee for
nonresidential development, and an inclusionary housing requirement for residential development
with five or more units, charging an in-lieu fee for residential development of four units or less.

With regard to implementing programs 4A-4 and 4A-6, while the City has both a Transient
Occupancy Tax (TOT) and a Real Estate Transfer Tax (RETT), neither of these taxes is directed



Public Review Draft Housing Element Needs Assessment          City of St. Helena General Plan Update
2/25/2009                                                                                   Page 7
explicitly towards affordable housing. The last implementing program, 4A-5, a reduction, or
waiver of fees for affordable housing developments, is not applicable universally, but rather
decided on a case-by-case basis. Overall, St. Helena implemented three of the programs under
Policy 4A.

Policy 4B presents ways that St. Helena could acquire State and Federal funding for affordable
housing. Due to the small size of St. Helena, the City contracts with the City of Napa Housing
Authority for affordable housing services that City of St. Helena staff are not able to provide.
Therefore, the City of Napa handles implementing programs 4B-1 and 4B-2 for the City of St.
Helena. The City of St. Helena, along with surrounding cities and the County of Napa have
discussed sharing a housing coordinator for all of the “up-valley” communities, as recommended in
implementing program 4B-3, but a coordinator has not been hired. Therefore, the City of St.
Helena’s contract with the City of Napa Housing Authority implements programs 4B-1 and 4B-2,
but 4B-3 remains incomplete. The quantified objective for Policy 4B was partially achieved
because Woodbridge continues to receive Section 8 rental assistance, but the City did not provide
assistance to 10 first-time homebuyers by 2006, as targeted in the 2002 Housing Element.

Policy 4C addresses the special needs of farmworkers and the homeless population. The housing
of farmworkers and the homeless is handled on a countywide basis. The County improved housing
conditions for farmworkers when the Napa Valley Housing Authority built the River Ranch Center
and rehabilitated the Mondavi and Calistoga farmworker housing facilities with private and public
funds in accordance with Policy 4C-1. In addition, the City of St Helena now allows farm labor
housing with a conditional use permit in the A-20 and W zoning districts.

St. Helena continually supports the needs of the homeless through the Napa County Housing
Authority as recommended in implementing program 4C-4, but St. Helena does not allow homeless
shelters as a conditional use in certain commercial zones as suggested by implementing program
4C-3. Overall, the City of St. Helena completed implementing programs 4C-1 and 4C-4 and a
portion of 4C-2, however, implementation of program 4C-3 remains outstanding.

The final policy, 4D, addresses the needs of senior citizens and the disabled, and the City of St.
Helena completed none of the implementing programs under this heading to date. Furthermore, the
City did not assure that of the new units built in St. Helena, 20 percent were available for seniors
and 10 percent available to the disabled.

Resource Conservation
The City of St. Helena took an active role in promoting the use of alterative energy sources and
encouraging energy conservation, as targeted by Policies 5A and 5B. The City of St. Helena
formed a Climate Protection Task Force in 2006, and per the recommendation of the task force, the



Public Review Draft Housing Element Needs Assessment         City of St. Helena General Plan Update
2/25/2009                                                                                  Page 8
City passed a resolution waiving the building permit fees for photovoltaic (PV) installations. The
City also adopted the 2007 State Building Codes and a new City Green Building Ordinance will be
presented for adoption after City staff are trained in the implementation measures. Through these
steps, the City has implemented all of the programs under Policies 5A and 5B, with the exception
of program 5B-3, which called for the City to administer low-interest loans for energy conservation
measures.

Equal Housing Opportunities
The sixth and final goal has only one policy, and four implementing programs. Implementing
program 6A-1 (City support of a job/housing balance) led the City Council to adopt Resolution
2005-98: Local Preference Policy for Affordable Housing, and to continue regulating the resale of
the 31 affordable single-family homes in St. Helena. The last three implementing programs 6A-2,
6A-3, and 6A-4, are all administered through St. Helena’s contract with the City of Napa Housing
Authority.

Summary
In summary, the major polices and implementing programs completed since 2002 include the
following:

         Modification of the City’s Growth Management System under Policy 1A.
         Establishment of Municipal Code Chapter 17.146 Housing Trust Fund, Housing Impact
         Fee and Inclusionary/In-Lieu Fee Requirements, which assisted in the completion of
         implementing programs for both Policies 1C and 4A.
         Changes to the density and uses permitted by right in the MR and HR zoning districts to
         facilitate Policies 2A and 2F.

The most crucial remaining incomplete policies and implementing programs are listed below.

         The development of affordable housing did not occur on the majority of sites listed under
         Policy 1B.
         The City’s zoning code still does not permit homeless shelters as a conditional use in all
         the zones as recommended under Policy 4C.
         Implementing programs for Policy 4D addressing the needs of senior citizens and the
         disabled were not completed.
         There are currently no City policies to address the need for the reasonable accommodation
         of persons with disabilities.
         The City did not provide low-interest loans to moderate-, low- and very low-income
         households to help them rehabilitate their homes.




Public Review Draft Housing Element Needs Assessment          City of St. Helena General Plan Update
2/25/2009                                                                                   Page 9
Effectiveness of 2002 Housing Element
This section evaluates the effectiveness of the prior Housing Element’s goals, policies, and
implementing programs by analyzing the progress made towards implementing the quantified
objectives. The section also examines completed policies and the reason behind why certain
policies or actions in the 2002 Housing Element were not fully implemented.

As outlined in the summary the City made many policy changes that facilitated housing production.
In some cases, the City made the necessary policy changes, but the changes did not have the
desired results. For example, the City worked with potential mixed-use developers and discussed
concessions, but the developers still decided not to follow through with development. Also, the
City now allows second units as a permitted use in many residential zoning districts and increased
the maximum size, but second unit production still fell short of the number necessary to help St.
Helena meet its 1999-2006 RHNA for moderate-income households. In these instances, the City
may wish to consider additional policy or program changes to bolster mixed-use and second unit
production in the 2009-2014 planning period.

Certain policies and implementing programs were incomplete because the City did not change City
regulations. This includes program 1E-1 which called for the City to change the Municipal Code to
allow emergency shelters and transitional housing as a conditional use in given zoning districts,
and 4A-4 and 4A-6 which called for the City to allocate funds generated from transient occupancy
tax and real estate transfer tax for affordable housing. Meanwhile the development of some of the
housing sites as outlined under Policy 1B did not occur because of delays in the implementation of
the flood protection program due to litigation that the City could not have predicted back in 2002.

The City of St. Helena did not fully achieve any of the quantified objectives. The City did,
however, make significant progress towards the construction of homes for very low-, low-, and
moderate-income households, and Section 8 rental assistance continued at the Woodbridge
Apartments.

The 2009 Housing Element Update Policy Document will consider the progress made by the City
of St. Helena in implementing the 2002 Housing Element goals, policies, and programs. The
Policy Document maintains or expands upon many of the major policy and program changes made
since 2002, abandons policy and programs that are no longer feasible, and inserts additional
policies as dictated by State Housing Element Law and the results of the 2009 Housing Needs
Assessment and public outreach process.

Some of the effective policies from the 2002 Housing Element include those related to the GMS
(Programs 1A-2 and 1A-3) and the promotion of second units (Programs 2E-1 through 2E-6).
These are updated and incorporated into the 2009 Policy Document. Other policies from the 2002



Public Review Draft Housing Element Needs Assessment         City of St. Helena General Plan Update
2/25/2009                                                                                  Page 10
Housing Element are expanded upon in the 2009 Housing Policy document. For example, all of
the programs under Policy 2D from the 2002 Housing Element related to mixed use development
are more broad and aggressive in the 2009 Housing Element Policy Document because Policy 2D
in the 2002 Housing Element did not generate any new mixed-use developments. Finally, certain
2002 policies that were either completed or deemed no longer applicable are not included in the
2009 Housing Policy document, including programs under Policies 1B related to specific sites,
which are no longer feasible for housing development.




Public Review Draft Housing Element Needs Assessment       City of St. Helena General Plan Update
2/25/2009                                                                                Page 11
Table 1: Summary of 2002 Housing Element Policies, and Five-Year Action Plan (Page 1 of 7)
Policies                                             Responsibility (a)        Timeframe                          Results

Policy 1A: Ensure that the General Plan's Growth Management Policies Do Not Limit Our Ability to Meet Regional Housing Needs.
  1A-1: Amend the Growth Management                Planning Department            2002          Complete. The GMS exempts building
  System (GMS) to exempt permits for               Planning Commission                          permits for regulated affordable
  regulated Affordable Units.                          City Council                             housing, pursuant to Municipal Code
                                                                                                Section (MCS) 17.152.040.A.10.

  1A-2: Continue to allow a maximum of             Planning Department            2002        Complete. There is a new allocation for
  nine market rate units per year.                 Planning Commission                        nine building permits for market rate
                                                       City Council                           units each year.

  1A-3: Provide for a process to give priority      Planning Department           2002        Complete. Unused building permits
  allocation of market rate permits to                                                        roll over into a special category of
  developers of projects that are affordable                                                  permits available only to market rate
  or are a mix of market rate and affordable                                                  developments with 40 percent or more
  units.                                                                                      of the total units in the development
                                                                                              designated as affordable.

  1A-4: Amend or delete General Plan (GP)          Planning Department            2002        Complete. Policy 2.6.10 was amended.
  Policy 2.6.10.                                   Planning Commission
                                                       City Council

  1A-5: Revise the GMS Policies of the GP to       Planning Department            2002        Complete. Amended MCS 17.152.050 so
  recognize the different levels of impact of      Planning Commission                        that attached housing units with a floor area
  different types and sizes of housing units.          City Council                           of 850 square feet or less per dwelling unit
                                                                                              shall count as ½ unit.

  1A-6: Address impact of other uses,               Planning Department           2003        Partially complete. Water Conservation
  including swimming pools, drought-tolerant                                                  and Use Guidelines amended in March
  landscaping, and high water consumption                                                     2004, which addresses swimming pools;
  commercial uses.                                                                            MCS 17.112.140 pertains to water
                                                                                              efficient landscaping; but changes for
                                                                                              commercial uses not completed.

  Quantified Objectives for Policy 1A:              Planning Department         Ongoing       Partially Complete. Either built or
  Construction of 31 units of housing                   City Council                          approves 10 very low-income, 10
  affordable to very low-Income                                                               low-income, and 21 moderate-income
  households; 20 units for low-income                                                         housing units from Jan. 1, 1999
  households, and 36 units for moderate                                                       through December 31, 2006.
  Income households.

Policy 1B: Focus on Key Opportunity Sites and Work with Property Owners and Developers to Facilitate Development of New
Affordable Housing.
  1B-1: Facilitate mixed use housing               Planning Department        2002-2004      Not complete. Development of the
  development on the Adams Street Property         Planning Commission                       property delayed until there is a
  (Site #44).                                           City Council                         community consensus on how the
                                                                                             property should be utilized.

  1B-2: Facilitate development on the Romero       Private Property Owner         2003        Complete. Property not developed
  Property (Site #28).                              Planning Department                       although the City has received a
                                                                                              pre-application from a non-profit housing
                                                                                              developer for a 112 unit project with
                                                                                              varying levels of affordability.

  1B-3: Explore opportunities created through       Planning Department           2005        Not complete. Site #31 will be used for
  the Flood Protection Project (Site #30 and            Public Works                          the St. Helena flood protection project,
  #31).                                                                                       which has been slowed due to litigation
                                                                                              and lack of funding. Site #30 will remain
                                                                                              a potential housing site.

Note:
(a) The duties previously performed by the Napa Valley Housing Authority (NVHA) are now handled by the City of Napa Housing Authority
through a contract agreement with the City of St. Helena.

Sources: 2002 City of St. Helena Housing Element, 2008; City of St. Helena 2007 Annual Report of Compliance with Housing Element,
June 2008; City of St. Helena Staff, 2008; BAE, 2008.
Table 1: Summary of 2002 Housing Element Policies, and Five-Year Action Plan (Page 2 of 7)
Policies                                             Responsibility (a)        Timeframe                          Results

  1B-4: Facilitate mixed use development            Planning Department           2004        Not complete. Development hindered by
  behind Taylor Refresher (Site #42).                   Public Works                          flooding issues, lack of sewer, and only
                                                   Private Property Owner                     one ingress/egress point at an impacted
                                                                                              intersection.

  1B-5: Explore opportunities on the parcel        Private Property Owner         2004        Complete. Site #25 remains a vineyard,
  behind the Bonita Motel (Site #25 and #33).       Planning Department                       and Site #33 was approved for the
                                                                                              Magnolia Oaks Development in November
                                                                                              2007.

  1B-6: Highway 29 Specific Plan Area (Sites       Private Property Owner         2003        Complete. Site #32 remains a vineyard,
  #32 and #45).                                     Planning Department                       and the development proposal for Site
                                                                                              #45 is currently being revised to include
                                                                                              both housing and office development.

  1B-7: Spring Street Area (Sites #20,#21,         Private Property Owner         2005        Complete. Sites #21 and #23 remain
  and #23).                                         Planning Department                       unchanged. Three market rate homes
                                                                                              plus one second unit were approved for
                                                                                              Site #20.

Policy 1C: Ensure that Affordable Housing Gets Built.
  1C-1: Establish Inclusionary Zoning for             Planning Department         2002        Complete. In 2004, the City Council
  affordable housing.                                 Planning Commission                     passed ordinance 2004-7, adding Chapter
                                                                                              17.146 to the St. Helena Municipal Code,
                                                                                              creating and establishing a Housing Trust
                                                                                              Fund, a Housing Impact Fee on
                                                                                              Non-Residential Development, and an
                                                                                              Inclusionary Housing Requirement.

  1C-2: Remove conditional use requirements        Planning Department            2003        Partially complete. The HR district was
  for multifamily developments.                    Planning Commission                        revised to allow multifamily dwellings,
                                                                                              apartments, and dwelling groups
                                                                                              containing four units or less as permitted
                                                                                              uses. The MR regulations were amended
                                                                                              to allow attached duplex or triplex units,
                                                                                              or conversion of existing single-family
                                                                                              units, as conditional uses.

  1C-3: Fast-track housing developments that        Planning Department         Ongoing       Complete. Staff has given priority to
  meet lower-income and special housing                                                       projects that include affordable housing.
  needs.

Policy 1D: Encourage innovative Housing Types and Designs.
  1D-1: Encourage development of cohousing,       Planning Department           Ongoing       Complete. There has been little interest
  ecohousing, and other nontraditional forms of                                               by owners/developers in constructing
  housing.                                                                                    nontraditional forms of housing in St.
                                                                                              Helena.

Policy 1E: Address Emergency Shelter and Transitional Housing Requirements.
  1E-1: Allow emergency shelters and               Planning Department            2003        Not complete.
  transitional housing facilities in appropriate
  locations.


Note:
(a) The duties previously performed by the Napa Valley Housing Authority (NVHA) are now handled by the City of Napa Housing Authority
through a contract agreement with the City of St. Helena.

Sources: 2002 City of St. Helena Housing Element, 2008; City of St. Helena 2007 Annual Report of Compliance with Housing Element,
June 2008; City of St. Helena Staff, 2008; BAE, 2008.
Table 1: Summary of 2002 Housing Element Policies, and Five-Year Action Plan (Page 3 of 7)
Policies                                             Responsibility (a)         Timeframe                          Results

Policy 2A: Encourage Higher Density Development.
  2A-1: Increase the maximum density in MR       Planning Department              2002        Complete. The density range for the MR
  to 16 dua net with a 25 percent density        Planning Commission                          district was increased to 5.1-16 dua. In
  bonus up to 20 dua for affordable projects.        City Council                             addition, under Municipal Code Chapter
                                                                                              (MCC) 17.144, the City provides density
                                                                                              bonuses and other incentives or
                                                                                              concessions for the construction of
                                                                                              certain affordable housing projects.

  2A-2: Increase the maximum density in HR         Planning Department            2002        Complete. HR was increased to 16.1-28
  to 28 dua net with a 25 percent density bonus    Planning Commission                        dua, or up to 35 dua with a 25 percent
  of up to 35 dua for affordable projects.             City Council                           density bonus.

Policy 2B: Make Sure Higher Density Lands are Not Lost to Lower Density Uses.
  2B-1: Establish minimum density                  Planning Department            2002        Complete. Adopted the most recent
  requirements in the Zoning Ordinance.            Planning Commission                        minimum density requirements in 2005.
                                                        City Council

  2B-2: Establish policies to discourage or        Planning Department            2003        Complete. Property cannot be rezoned
  restrict rezoning of high-density residential    Planning Commission                        to a lower density unless a General Plan
  properties to lower densities and/or                 City Council                           Amendment is approved that complies
  nonresidential uses.                                                                        with California State Government Code
                                                                                              Section (GCS) 65863.

Policy 2C: Make Sure Development Standards Do Not Constrain Development at the Zoned Densities.
  2C-1: Revise the Zoning Ordinance to          Planning Department            2002      Complete. Made amendments in 2005 to
  address regulatory inconsistencies.           Planning Commission                      the MR and HR districts to achieve higher
                                                    City Council                         densities without dramatically changing
                                                                                         the visual characteristics of the districts.

Policy 2D: Be More Aggressive in Promoting Mixed Use Developments.
  2D-1: Promote both vertical and horizontal      Planning Department             2002        Complete. Worked with developers on
  mixed use developments.                                                                     two proposed projects, but the developers
                                                                                              decided not to move forward with the
                                                                                              projects.

  2D-2: Allow residential uses on commercial        Planning Department           2002        Complete. Discussed these concessions
  properties, where appropriate, in excess of                                                 in regard to the two proposed projects
  established FAR.                                                                            mentioned above in Policy 2D-1.

  2D-3: Allow/encourage 'shared parking' in         Planning Department           2002        Complete. Discussed these concessions
  mixed use developments.                                                                     in regards to the two proposed projects
                                                                                              mentioned above in Policy 2D-1.

  2D-4: Indentify specific sites or areas to        Planning Department           2002        Not complete.
  'target' mixed uses development, providing
  incentives to facilitate such development in
  those areas.

Policy 2E: Be More Aggressive in Promoting Second Units.
  2E-1: Review and revise development             Planning Department             2003        Complete. Second units are permitted
  standards pertaining to second units.                                                       uses in all of the residential zoning
                                                                                              districts, except in WW district where
                                                                                              environmental impacts may need to be
                                                                                              mitigated. Increased maximum size of
                                                                                              second units from 600 sq. ft. to 850 sq.
                                                                                              ft. to increase the likelihood of full-time
                                                                                              occupancy.

Note:
(a) The duties previously performed by the Napa Valley Housing Authority (NVHA) are now handled by the City of Napa Housing Authority
through a contract agreement with the City of St. Helena.
Sources: 2002 City of St. Helena Housing Element, 2008; City of St. Helena 2007 Annual Report of Compliance with Housing Element,
June 2008; City of St. Helena Staff, 2008; BAE, 2008.
Table 1: Summary of 2002 Housing Element Policies, and Five-Year Action Plan (Page 4 of 7)
Policies                                              Responsibility (a)       Timeframe                           Results

  2E-2: Provide financial incentives for second     Planning Department           2003        Complete. Up to 400 sq. ft. of additional
  unit development.                                                                           floor area permitted for a primary
                                                                                              residence within a residential districts if
                                                                                              the site include a second unit.

  2E-3: Target specific areas for second unit       Planning Department           2003        Complete. Staff suggests to those
  incentives. Encourage second units in the                                                   seeking a conditional use permit for a
  medium density areas not near downtown.                                                     guest house (without a kitchen) to add a
                                                                                              kitchen thus creating a legal second unit.

  2E-4: Provide public information regarding        Planning Department           2003        Not complete.
  second units.

  2E-5: Link incentives and development             Planning Department           2003        Not complete. As a permitted use,
  standard revisions to affordability provisions.                                             second units no longer have conditions of
                                                                                              approval. Therefore, there is no readily
                                                                                              available mechanism to regulate the
                                                                                              rental price.

  2E-6: Consider an amnesty program for             Planning Department           2003        Not complete. Concerns regarding
  illegal second units.                                                                       potential illegal units with serious defects.

Policy 2F: Allow Conversion of Single-Family Homes to Multi-Unit Dwellings.
  2F-1: Indentify appropriate target areas for      Planning Department           2004        Not complete. Owners have little interest
  conversion from single-family homes to                                                      in converting single-family units into
  multi-unit dwellings.                                                                       multifamily units.

  2F-2: Develop criteria and standards for          Planning Department           2004        Complete. City allows second units,
  conversions.                                                                                duplexes, and triplexes to be created
                                                                                              from existing dwellings in the MR district
                                                                                              by use permit.

  2F-3: Provide public information regarding        Planning Department           2004        See Policies 2F-1 and 2F-2 above.
  conversions.

Policy 3A: Protect the Existing Stock of Affordable Housing.
  3A-1: Restrict the conversion of rental units       Planning Department         2002        Complete in November 2006, the City
  to condominiums.                                                                            Council denied an application to convert a
                                                                                              10-unit apartment building to
                                                                                              condominiums.

  3A-2: Charge an affordable housing impact         Planning Department       2002, Ongoing   Not complete. When this issue arose in
  fee whenever affordable units are                                                           2005, the City did not believe that a
  converted to other uses.                                                                    housing impact fee was appropriate
                                                                                              mitigation, and instead, the City required
                                                                                              the provision of housing that is regulated
                                                                                              as affordable on site.

  3A-3: Address the potential loss of assisted      Planning Department       2002, Ongoing   Not complete. A residential care facility
  units.                                                                                      in St. Helena closed in 2003. The City
                                                                                              did not have the funds to purchase the
                                                                                              property, nor did a new operator come
                                                                                              forward.

  3A-4: Support programs such as Christmas          Planning Department         Ongoing       Not complete. Christmas in April
  in April.                                                                                   program is no longer active locally.

Note:
(a) The duties previously performed by the Napa Valley Housing Authority (NVHA) are now handled by the City of Napa Housing Authority
through a contract agreement with the City of St. Helena.

Sources: 2002 City of St. Helena Housing Element, 2008; City of St. Helena 2007 Annual Report of Compliance with Housing Element,
June 2008; City of St. Helena Staff, 2008; BAE, 2008.
Table 1: Summary of 2002 Housing Element Policies, and Five-Year Action Plan (Page 5 of 7)
Policies                                                  Responsibility (a)       Timeframe                       Results

  Quantified Objective for Policy 3A:                    Planning Department        Ongoing    Not complete
  Conservation of all existing affordable
  housing units. Low-interest loans for
  rehabilitation provided to 20 moderate-, low-,
  or very low-income households by 2006.

Policy 3B: Monitor Housing Conditions.
  3B-1: Review housing needs, conditions,                Planning Department        Annually   Not complete.
  achievements, and challenges as part of the
  City's regular General Plan review.

Policy 4A: Develop Permanent Local Sources of Funding to Support Affordable Housing.
  4A-1: Establish an Inclusionary Zoning          Planning Department            2002          Complete. Inclusionary requirement for
  Program with in-lieu fee payments.              Planning Commission                          20 percent affordable housing in
                                                       City Council                            residential developments of five or more
                                                                                               units/lots. The fee for residential
                                                                                               development of four or fewer units/lots is
                                                                                               2.5 percent of the valuation of
                                                                                               construction.

  4A-2: Levy an affordable housing impact                Planning Department         2002      Complete. MCC 17.146 established fees
  fee for commercial development.                            City Council                      for nonresidential development.

  4A-3: Establish an Affordable Housing                  Planning Department         2002      Complete. MCC 17.146 established a
  Trust Fund.                                         Napa Valley Community Fund               Housing Trust Fund.

  4A-4: Generate revenues for affordable                 Planning Department         2003      Not complete. TOT money goes into
  housing through the Transient Occupancy                    City Council                      the General Fund.
  Tax (TOT).

  4A-5: Reduce, defer, or waive fees for                 Planning Department        Ongoing    Complete. MCS 3.32.120 provides for fee
  affordable housing development.                        Planning Commission                   adjustments for affordable housing
                                                             City Council                      projects on a case-by-case basis. MCC
                                                                                               17.144 allows for concessions or
                                                                                               incentives for affordable housing projects.


  4A-6: Establish a Real Estate Transfer Tax             Planning Department         2002      Not complete. RETT money collected is
  (RETT) for affordable housing.                             City Council                      not targeted for affordable housing.

Policy 4B: Aggressively Pursue and 'Leverage' State and Federal Housing Funds.
  4B-1: Pursue mortgage revenue bonds and/or        Planning Department     2002, Ongoing      Complete. The City of St. Helena has a
  mortgage credit certificates. Promote                    NVHA                                contract with the City of Napa Housing
  affordable homeownership opportunities for                                                   Authority to provide services related to
  moderate and lower income households.                                                        affordable housing.

  4B-2: Continue Section 8 subsidies.                           NVHA                Ongoing    Complete.

  4B-3: Explore the possibility of establish a full      Planning Department         2002      Discussed, but not complete.
  time, shared Housing Coordinator for the                   City Council
  up-valley communities.                                        NVHA

  Quantified Objectives for Policy 4B: Provide           Planning Department        Ongoing    Woodbridge continues to receive Section
  assistance to 10 first-time homebuyers                     City Council                      8 rental assistance, but did not provide
  through 2006. Facilitate the continuance of                   NVHA                           assistance to first-time homebuyers by
  Section 8 rental assistance.                                                                 2006

Note:
(a) The duties previously performed by the Napa Valley Housing Authority (NVHA) are now handled by the City of Napa Housing Authority
through a contract agreement with the City of St. Helena.

Sources: 2002 City of St. Helena Housing Element, 2008; City of St. Helena 2007 Annual Report of Compliance with Housing Element,
June 2008; City of St. Helena Staff, 2008; BAE, 2008.
Table 1: Summary of 2002 Housing Element Policies, and Five-Year Action Plan (Page 6 of 7)
Policies                                             Responsibility (a)        Timeframe                          Results

Policy 4C: Address Farmworker Housing Needs and Homelessness.
  4C-1: Collaborate with countywide efforts to  Planning Department               2002        Complete, in 2004, Napa Valley vintners
  address farmworker housing needs.                 City Council                              and grape- growers voted to self impose a
                                                                                              tax on vineyard land for farmworker
                                                                                              housing. With these and other funds the
                                                                                              NVHA built the River Ranch Center, and
                                                                                              substantially rehabilitated the Mondavi
                                                                                              and Calistoga Farm Centers.

  4C-2: Establish seasonal farmworker               Planning Department           2002        Partially complete. Farm labor housing is
  housing as a conditional use in all zoning                                                  allowed as a conditional use only in the
  districts.                                                                                  A-20, W and AP districts.

  4C-3: Allow homeless shelters as a                Planning Department           2002        Not complete.
  conditional use in the Central Business
  District, Service Commercial, Office, and
  Public/Quasi-Public zoning districts.

  4C-4: Support the Housing Authority's             Planning Department         Ongoing       Complete.
  ongoing efforts to address homeless needs             City Council
  in the County.

Policy 4D: Support Housing that Meets Special Needs, Including Senior Citizens and People with Disabilities
  4D-1: Encourage the development of               Planning Department           Ongoing       Not complete.
  housing that meets the needs of seniors and
  the inclusion of accessible units in all new
  development

  4D-2: Encourage the development of                Planning Department         Ongoing       Not complete.
  housing that meets the needs of seniors.

  4D-3: Reasonable Accommodation.                  Planning Department            2002        Not complete.
                                                   Planning Commission
                                                       City Council
  Quantified Objectives for Policy 4D: 20          Planning Department          Ongoing       Not complete
  percent of new units to meet senior housing      Planning Commission
  needs; 10 percent accessible to people with          City Council
  disabilities.

Policy 5A: Alternative Energy Sources
  5A-1: Promote the use of solar energy.            Planning Department           2002        Complete. The City of St. Helena formed
                                                                                              a Climate Protection Task Force in 2006.
                                                                                              The Council passed a resolution waiving
                                                                                              fees for photovoltaic installations in 2007.

  5A-2: Promote the use of alternative energy       Planning Department         Ongoing       Partially Complete. Drafted a Green
  technologies.                                                                               Building Ordinance will be presented for
                                                                                              adoption after staff is trained for
                                                                                              implementation.

  5A-3: Provide public information on               Planning Department      2003, Ongoing    See Policy 5A-2 above.
  alternative energy technologies for
  residential developers, contractors, and
  property owners.



Note:
(a) The duties previously performed by the Napa Valley Housing Authority (NVHA) are now handled by the City of Napa Housing Authority
through a contract agreement with the City of St. Helena.

Sources: 2002 City of St. Helena Housing Element, 2008; City of St. Helena 2007 Annual Report of Compliance with Housing Element,
June 2008; City of St. Helena Staff, 2008; BAE, 2008.
Table 1: Summary of 2002 Housing Element Policies, and Five-Year Action Plan (Page 7 of 7)
Policies                                              Responsibility (a)          Timeframe                        Results

Policy 5B: Encourage Energy Conservation
  5B-1: Promote the energy conservation              Planning Department           Ongoing       Complete. Adopted 2004 State Building
  measures in all new and rehabilitated units.                                                   Code. The City plans additional energy
                                                                                                 conservation measures in the form of a
                                                                                                 local Green Building Ordinance.

  5B-2: Require cost-effective energy                Planning Department           Ongoing       See Policy 5B-1 above.
  conservation measures in new housing
  to promote long-term affordability for
  occupants.

  5B-3: Provide low-interest loans for the           Planning Department         2003, Ongoing   Not complete.
  implementation of energy conservation
  measures.

  5B-4: Provide public information on energy         Planning Department           Ongoing       See Policy 5B-1 above.
  conservation measures.

  Quantified Objective for 5B: Low-interest          Planning Department           Ongoing       Not complete.
  loans for rehabilitation, including energy
  conservation provided to 20 moderate-, low-,
  or very low-income households by 2006.

Policy 6A: Ensure Equal Housing Opportunities for all Residents of St. Helena.
  6A-1: Support a jobs/housing balance by            Planning Department           Ongoing       Complete. 31 homes are designated for
  encouraging housing that provides for St.                                                      re-sale to moderate-income families. The
  Helena's workforce.                                                                            City Council adopted Resolution 2005-98,
                                                                                                 approving a Local Preference Policy for
                                                                                                 Affordable Housing.

  6A-2: Provide educational materials.               Planning Department           Ongoing       Complete. Fair housing issues are
                                                                                                 handled through the City of Napa Housing
                                                                                                 Authority.

  6A-3: Indentify a Fair Housing Officer among           City Manager            2002, Ongoing   See Policy 6A-2 above.
  the City staff.

  6A-4: Document efforts at equal opportunity        Planning Department           Annually      See Policy 6A-2 above.
  housing loans.

Note:
(a) The duties previously performed by the Napa Valley Housing Authority (NVHA) are now handled by the City of Napa Housing Authority
through a contract agreement with the City of St. Helena.

Sources: 2002 City of St. Helena Housing Element, 2008; City of St. Helena 2007 Annual Report of Compliance with Housing Element,
June 2008; City of St. Helena Staff, 2008; BAE, 2008.
Demographic and Economic Trends
In order to understand the current housing needs of St. Helena residents, this section examines
historic, current, and projected population, household, and employment trends. The figures for St.
Helena are compared with the equivalent figures for Napa County and the Bay Area, to frame the
                                                           8
St. Helena figures within the trends of the greater region.

The data for the analysis of population, household characteristics, and employment come from the
1990 and 2000 Censuses, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), the
California Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD), the 2000 Census
Transportation Planning Package (CTPP), the California Department of Finance (DoF), and the
California Employment Development Department (EDD). Claritas Inc., a private data vendor,
provided the information regarding estimated 2008 population and household characteristics, and
the Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG) supplied the growth projection data.

Population and Employment Characteristics
This section presents information regarding population, household, and employment trends
between 2000 and 2008, with some additional analysis for the period between 1990 and 2000.

Population Trends
Table 2 compares the population counts from 1990, 2000, and 2008 in St. Helena, Napa County,
and the Bay Area. St. Helena averaged a 1.8 percent annual growth rate from 1990 to 2000,
increasing from 4,990 to 5,950 persons. Then, from 2000 to 2008, St. Helena experienced a slight
decrease of 0.1 percent in population, dropping by only 30 people to 5,920 persons in 2008 based
on DoF 2008 population estimates.

In comparison, between 1990 and 2000, Napa County and the Bay Area both grew at an annual rate
of 1.2 percent between the two Censuses. Napa County maintained a similar annual growth rate
from 2000 to 2008 of 1.1 percent, and the growth rate of the Bay Area registered significantly
lower, at 0.6 percent annually.

Household Trends
As shown in Table 2, between 1990 and 2000, the number of households in St. Helena increased
slightly, by 1.1 percent annually. This closely corresponds to both Napa County and the Bay Area,
which both averaged 0.9 percent annual household growth from 1990 to 2000.

    8
      For the purposes of this Housing Needs Assessment, the Bay Area is defined to include the following counties
    in the Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG): Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San Francisco,
    San Mateo, Santa Clara, Sonoma, and Solano.




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DoF estimated that the number of households in St. Helena increased by only 0.2 percent annually,
or about 35 households, between 2000 and 2008. Table 2 shows that the number of households in
the City is approximately 2,410 in 2008. In contrast, the number of Napa County households grew
by 1.1 percent annually, to 49,400 households in 2008. Napa County’s growth rate represents an
increase of about 4,000 households. The number of Bay Area households grew by 0.5 percent
annually from 2000 to 2008.

Average Household Size
Average household size is a function of the number of people living in households divided by the
number of occupied housing units in a given area. In general, a decline or increase in average
household size signals that the population and the number of households are growing at different
rates. Overall, the average household size in St. Helena was slightly smaller than in Napa County
in 1990, 2000, and 2008. With the number of households growing, and a slight drop in population
in St. Helena between 2000 and 2008, average household sizes fell from 2.48 to 2.43 persons per
household, possibly reflecting a trend towards smaller retiree and empty nester households
purchasing homes in the area. In contrast, the population in Napa County and the Bay Area
increased more rapidly than the number of households, leading to increases in the average
household size from 2.62 to 2.65 persons per household in Napa County, and from 2.69 to 2.72 in
the Bay Area between 2000 and 2008.

Households by Type
Figures reported in Table 2 reveal that the percentage of households with children in 1990 was
about 27 percent in St. Helena, and 33 percent in both Napa County and the Bay Area. Then, from
1990 to 2000, the percentage of households with at least one member under the age of 18 rose to
nearly 33 percent in St. Helena and around 34 percent in Napa County and the Bay Area. In St.
Helena, Napa County, and the Bay Area, the distribution of households with and without children
did not change significantly between 2000 and 2008.

Household Tenure
As shown in Table 2, homeownership levels in St. Helena declined slightly between 1990 and 2000
and then dropped again in 2008, falling from 60 to 56 percent, and then to 55 percent. Relative to
the County and the Bay Area, where 66 percent and almost 58 percent of households, respectively,
own their homes in 2008, St. Helena has a lower percentage of homeowners.

Age Distribution
Based on data reported in Table 3, in 1990, 2000, and 2008, the median age of the St. Helena
population slightly decreased from around 41 years of age in 1990, and fell closer to 39 by 2008.
In contrast, the median age of Napa County’s population increased slightly, from just over 36 years



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in 1990 to around 38.5 years in 2008. Though the median age in St. Helena was higher than in
Napa County in 1990, 2000, and 2008, the age gap between the two areas diminished during that
time period. Furthermore, the median age in the Bay Area continually rose from about 33.5 in
1990 to 35.5 in 2000 and, finally, 38.1 in 2008.

Of all age groups, the 55 to 64 age category grew most markedly in St. Helena between 1990 and
2008. The number of people between the ages of 55 and 64 increased by over 381, raising the
share of the total population in this age category from 7.5 to 13 percent. As in St. Helena, between
1990 and 2008, the 55 to 64 age category grew from nearly 9 to 12 percent of the total population
in Napa County, and from around 8 to 12 percent in the Bay Area.

In St. Helena, the categories of persons under the age of 18, and between 45 to 54 years
experienced high levels of growth between 1990 and 2000, but then the number of persons in each
category decreased, albeit by a slightly lesser degree, from 2000 to 2008. By 2008, the percentage
of persons under the age of 18 represented nearly 24 percent of the total population and those
between 45 and 54 constituted nearly 14 percent of St. Helena residents. Similarly, in 2008,
persons under 18 equaled about 23 percent of the total population and the share of persons aged 45
to 54 was around 15 percent of the population in both Napa County and the Bay Area.

The number of persons between 18 and 24 years rose by over 185 persons in St. Helena, increasing
this category’s share of the total population from about seven to nine percent from 1990 to 2008.
In Napa County, the 18 to 24 age bracket increased in absolute numbers, but the share of the total
population in 1990 (nine percent) was nearly identical to the share in 2008. The age category 65
and over was the only category decrease in numbers from 1990 to 2000 and then again between
2000 and 2008. The number of persons over 65 in St. Helena stood at 1,250 in 1990 before falling
to about 940 in 2008. The net effect of these changes was that the St. Helena median age decreased
by over one year, while the median age in Napa County and the Bay Area rose by nearly two years
and almost five years, respectively.

Household Income Distribution
Table 4 summarizes the distribution of household incomes in 1999 and 2008. From 1999 to 2008,
the median household income in St. Helena, adjusted for inflation, increased from $72,900 to
$79,200, or by over $6,300. In 2008, the City of St. Helena median household income is higher
than the median household income of Napa County, and that of the Bay Area. The Bay Area
showed an inflation-adjusted decline in median income, of just over $3,500 from about $78,000 in
1999 to $74,300 in 2008.

The general trends for St. Helena indicate that inflation-adjusted household incomes grew over the
past eight years, with around 40 percent of St. Helena households having incomes of $100,000 or



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more in 2008. This compares to around 22 percent just eight years earlier. In addition, the number
of households in each of the income categories below $100,000 decreased between 1999 and 2008
in the City. A similar income distribution trend occurred in Napa County between 1999 and 2008,
though not to the same degree as in St. Helena. In Napa County, the percent of total households
with incomes above $100,000 increased from 19 percent in 1999 to 30 percent in 2008. While the
share of total households fell in each of the income categories below $75,000, the absolute number
of households only declined in the four income categories below $45,000. In comparison, between
1999 and 2008 the percentage of households in the Bay Area with incomes above $100,000 rose
from around 27 percent, to 35 percent. In the Bay Area, the share of total households fell in each
of the income categories below $75,000, and the absolute number of households also fell in each of
these income categories.

Household Income Categories
Table 5 presents figures from the HUD 2000 Comprehensive Housing Affordability Strategy
(CHAS) data set. This table illustrates the distribution of households among various income
categories by tenure. The Department of Housing and Urban Development defines income
categories as a percentage of the Area Median Family Income (AMFI). Households whose income
equal 30 percent or less of the AMFI are considered extremely low-income; households with
incomes between 30 and 50 percent of the AMFI are classified as very low-income; those between
50 and 80 percent of the AFMI are low-income; those between 80 and 120 percent are moderate-
income; and households with incomes above 120 percent of the AMFI constitute the above
moderate-income category.

In 1999, a higher percentage of households in St. Helena had incomes in the extremely low-income
and the above moderate-income categories compared to Napa County. In St. Helena,
approximately 47 percent of households had incomes in the above moderate income category,
compared to around 40 percent for Napa County. Furthermore, 11 percent of St. Helena
households had extremely low-incomes compared to ten percent in Napa County. This suggests
that St. Helena overall has a higher level of income disparity relative to Napa County.

Examination of the distribution of owner and renter households indicates that owner households
exhibited a lower percentage of extremely low-incomes (about 6 percent) and a higher percentage
of above moderate-incomes (63 percent) than renter households in St. Helena (17 percent
extremely low-income, and 27 percent above moderate-income). In addition, St. Helena had a
lower percentage of owner households in the extremely low-, very low-, low-, and moderate-
income categories, compared to Napa County. Approximately 49 percent of owner households in
Napa County fell in the above moderate-income category, compared to 63 percent in St. Helena.

Renter households in St. Helena exhibited a more even distribution among the income categories



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relative to owner households, with 17 percent of renter households in the extremely low-income
category, 12 percent in the very low-income category, 19 percent in the low-income category, 26
percent in the moderate-income category, and nearly 27 percent in the above moderate-income
category. The higher concentration of renter households in the moderate-income categories and
below, compared to owner households, is attributable to the fact that market rate housing in St.
Helena typically requires households to have incomes above the moderate level.

Employment Trends

Labor Force
As presented in Table 6, the unemployment rates in St. Helena were lower than Napa County and
the Bay Area in 2000 and 2007. St. Helena exhibited a small increase of 300 employed residents
between 2000 and 2007 (almost ten percent), while the number of unemployed residents held at
100. In comparison, Napa County experienced a similar percent increase of employed residents of
nearly 11 percent, while the Bay Area experienced a decrease in employed residents of about four
percent. Note that the preceding discussion refers to employed residents, or the number of local
area residents who are currently working. This does not equate to the number of jobs in the local
area, which is discussed in the following section.

The unemployment rate in St. Helena between 2000 and 2007 followed a distinctly different
pattern than in Napa County or the Bay Area over the same time period. The unemployment rate in
St. Helena decreased slightly, from about 3.1 percent to 2.9 percent, while the rate rose in Napa
County from 3.6 percent to 4.2 percent and the Bay Area rate rose from 3.4 percent to 4.6 percent.

Jobs by Industry
Table 7 presents 2000 and 2005 ABAG estimates of the number of jobs by industry sector in both
St. Helena and Napa County. According to ABAG, the number of jobs in St. Helena increased by
4 percent, or 210 jobs, between 2000 and 2005. Over the same period of time, the number of Napa
County jobs grew by almost seven percent, but in the Bay Area the number of jobs decreased by
around 8 percent. The distribution of jobs held relatively steady in both St. Helena and Napa
County between 2000 and 2005.

In both St. Helena and Napa County, ABAG estimated that all sectors experienced some level of
job growth between 2000 and 2005 while all sectors in the Bay Area experienced a loss of jobs.
Employment in the “Health, Education, and Recreational Service” sector increased by the greatest
number of jobs in both St. Helena and Napa County, growing by 60 and 1,570 jobs, respectively.
This ABAG-defined industry sector includes jobs in the arts and entertainment, recreation,
accommodation, and food service industries, as well as the education, health care, and social
services sectors. This industry sector held the highest job concentration in Napa County, with 36



Public Review Draft Housing Element Needs Assessment        City of St. Helena General Plan Update
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percent of the total in 2000 and 2005. However, in St. Helena, the “Health, Education, and
Recreational Service” sector comprised only 26 percent of total jobs in both 2000 and 2005.

In St. Helena, the greatest concentration of jobs was in the “Manufacturing, Wholesale, and
Transportation” sector, with 27 percent of total jobs in 2000 and 2005. This sector, which includes
the manufacturing operations of the wine industry, increased by 40 jobs in the City between 2000
and 2005. Napa County added approximately 860 jobs, and the Bay Area lost around 154,000 in
this sector for the same time period. These data highlight the growth of the Napa County wine
industry relative to the decline of other manufacturing sectors more commonly found elsewhere in
the Bay Area. This sector represented 22 percent of total jobs in the County, in both 2000 and
2005, and about 21 percent of Bay Area jobs by 2005.

In addition to the “Manufacturing, Wholesale, and Transportation” sector, St. Helena demonstrated
slightly higher concentrations of jobs relative to Napa County and the Bay Area in the “Agriculture
and Natural Resources,” and “Retail,” sectors. In 2005, approximately 6.5 percent of St. Helena
jobs compared to 5 percent in Napa County and one percent in the Bay Area were in the sector
“Agriculture and Natural Resources.” The same pattern appeared in the “Retail” sector in 2005
with the percentage of total jobs equaling about 12 percent, in St. Helena and 11 percent in Napa
County and Bay Area.

Commuting Patterns
Tables 8 and 9 show the commuting patterns for the St. Helena workforce as well as the number of
employed City residents as reported by the Census 2000 Transportation Planning Package (CTPP)
As summarized in Table 8, nearly 77 percent of the local workforce commuted into the City from
residence locations elsewhere, while employees who also resided in St. Helena filled only 23
percent of local jobs. Approximately 60 percent of St. Helena workers lived elsewhere in Napa
County, with over a third of those workers living in the City of Napa. In addition, about five
percent of St. Helena workers lived in Sonoma County, nearly four percent resided in Lake County,
and almost four percent commuted in from Solano County.

Table 9 provides further detail regarding the commuting patterns of employed St. Helena residents.
Only 43 percent of local residents worked in St. Helena in 2000, and approximately 57 percent of
employed St. Helena residents commuted out of St. Helena for work each day. Most of the out-
commuters worked elsewhere in Napa County, primarily in the City of Napa. An additional 6
percent of employed St. Helena residents worked in Sonoma and Alameda Counties combined.

Ratio of Jobs to Employed Residents
Table 10 shows that St. Helena has a significantly higher proportion of jobs to employed residents
as compared to other incorporated cities in Napa County. Countywide, there was just over one job



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per employed resident in 2000. However, the ratio of jobs to employed residents in St. Helena was
nearly double the County ratio, with two jobs per employed resident. This means that even if all
employed residents worked in St. Helena, the City would still be reliant upon in-commuters to fill
approximately half of the local jobs. No other Napa County community exhibited a higher ratio of
jobs to employed residents in 2000. While Yountville’s ratio of jobs to employed residents
approached St. Helena’s ratio, this community had a smaller share of employed residents relative to
the total population, 0.34, compared to 0.47 countywide and in St. Helena. In addition, other
communities, such as American Canyon and the City of Napa had ratios of less than one job per
employed resident.

Our Town St. Helena is an advocacy organization working to provide housing opportunities for all
members of the St. Helena community. Three important goals outlined in the organization’s
mission statement include “advocate for low- and moderate-priced housing in St. Helena; partner
with others to create that housing; and create a clearinghouse to share information about local
                         9
housing opportunities.” Mary Stephenson, a founding member of the organization, uses the
analogy of a tree to explain the organizations goals, whereby the roots of the tree represent
unskilled labor like farmworkers who can only afford rental housing, the trunk is comprised of
skilled labor such as wine industry managers, and finally the branches of the tree are the
professionals in the community who make a decent living but cannot affordable market rate
                       10
housing in St. Helena. To improve the housing availability for all members of the community,
Ms. Stephenson believes that City should increase its growth rate, albeit in a very managed fashion,
that additional funding needs to be made available for affordable housing projects, and the approval
process for residential development, especially developments containing affordable housing,
should be streamlined.

Population, Household and Employment Projections, 2010-2035
Table 11 reports ABAG projections of the total population, number of households, and number of
employed residents. These projections provide information on St. Helena, Napa County, and the
Bay Area from 2010 to 2035.

Population
ABAG projects an average annual growth rate of one-tenth of a percent for St. Helena’s population
between 2010 and 2035, as shown in Table 11. This low growth rate translates into an anticipated
net population increase of only 100 persons over this time period. ABAG projects a 0.4 percent
annual average population growth rate for Napa County, which translates to approximately 16,400

9
 Duarte, Jesse “Grass Roots Effort for Upvalley Housing” Napa Valley Register. August 23rd, 2008.
http://www.napavalleyregister.com/articles/2008/08/23/news/local/doc48af9582be4f6301775655.txt Accessed on
December 17, 2008
10
     Personal Communication, Mary Stephenson, Our Town St. Helena. December 8, 2008.


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new County residents between 2010 and 2035. For the Bay Area, ABAG projects a higher average
annual growth rate of 0.6 percent with a net population increase of 1.6 million between 2010 and
2035.

The California Department of Finance (DoF) projects the increase in the population by age and sex
in Napa County as a whole in ten-year increments from 2000 to 2050. While the total population
of Napa County is expected to increase by about 126,500 persons (a 101 percent increase over the
50 year period, or a 1.4 percent average annual increase), the increase in the total population over
the age of 64 is expected to outpace that of the total population. The DoF projects the number of
people over 64 will increase 118 percent over the period (a 1.6 percent average annual increase).
The increase of 22,700 persons over the age of 64 will include an estimated 10,900 males and
11,800 females. St. Helena can expect to feel the impact of this aging trend as well.

Households
ABAG also anticipates a 0.2 percent annual average growth rate for households in St. Helena
between 2010 and 2035. Assuming a similar income distribution of households in St. Helena in
2035 as in 2008, it is projected that approximately eleven percent, or just fewer than 280
households, of the total 2,600 households in St. Helena would be extremely low-income
households. Another approximately 230 would be very low-income and 290 would be low-income
households.

As reported in Table 11, ABAG projects the number of St. Helena households will rise from 2,450
in 2010 to 2,600 in 2035, a net increase of 150 households. The disparity between ABAG’s
population and household projection figures for St. Helena indicates an anticipation that, on
average, households in the City will decrease in size from the present average. In Napa County,
ABAG projects the number of households will rise at an average annual growth rate of 0.6 percent,
which is 0.2 percentage points higher than the projected population growth, for a total 8,180 new
households by 2035. In the Bay Area, ABAG projects an average annual increase in households of
0.8 percent, which mirrors the anticipated increase in population.

Jobs
ABAG projects that the annual average job growth rate for St. Helena, reported in Table 11, will
slightly exceed the City’s projected population and household growth rates, meaning that the City’s
                                                                           11
already high ratio of jobs to employed residents may well increase further. With an expected 0.4


    11
      ABAG utilizes the Subarea Allocation Model (SAM) to allocate job projections to the 1,405 Census tracts in
    the region. According to ABAG’s website: “Employment is distributed to Census tracts according to a
    weighted combination of a tract's share of employment potential and its previous share of its zone's
    employment. Employment potential is indicated by the amount of land available for development as
    determined in the ABAG’s land use database.”


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percent average annual growth rate in employment, the number of jobs will increase by nearly 550
between 2010 and 2035. The greatest increases in jobs are projected in the “Health, Education, and
Recreational Services” sector, with 250 new jobs by 2035, and the “Financial and Professional
Services” sector with 130 jobs by 2035.

In Napa County, ABAG projects an average annual employment growth rate of just over 1 percent,
or approximately 23,200 new jobs between 2010 and 2035. The greatest employment increase for
the County is anticipated in the “Health, Education and Recreational Services” sector, with 8,700
new jobs, followed by nearly 5,000 new jobs in the “Manufacturing, Wholesale and
Transportation” sector. ABAG expects that employment in the latter industry sector will grow by
only 50 jobs in St. Helena between 2005 and 2035.

The projected Bay Area employment growth rate also exceeds the projected population and
household growth rates, indicating a possible regional increase in the ratio of jobs to employed
residents. As in St. Helena, the largest employment increases are expected in the “Health,
Education and Recreational Services” and “Financial and Professional Services” sector through
2035.

Summary
Between 2000 and 2008, St. Helena experienced a small loss in population and modest household
growth, with the local population decreasing by 0.4 percent and the number of households
increasing by almost 1.5 percent. This is in contrast to the nearly 20 percent and 11 percent
increase in population and households, respectively, seen in St. Helena from 1990 to 2000. In
Napa County and the Bay Area from 1990 to 2000, and 2000 to 2008, the population and
households continually increased. St. Helena’s decrease in population may reflect a trend in
purchase of St. Helena homes for use as second homes.

The size of households in St. Helena rose from 1990 to 2000, before a small drop between 2000
and 2008, while in both Napa County and the Bay Area the household size rose over both time
periods. St. Helena’s homeownership rate fell between 2000 and 2008, placing St. Helena further
behind Napa County and the Bay Area.

By 2008, decreases in the median age in St. Helena coupled with increases in the median ages in
Napa County and the Bay Area resulted in only a one year difference between the median age in St.
Helena (39.3) and the median age in Napa County and the Bay Area (just over 38 years). St.
Helena maintained higher shares of residents in the 55 to 64, and 65 and over age categories than
both Napa County and the Bay Area in 2000 and 2008. However, the share and number of
residents age 65 and over decreased in St. Helena between 1990 and 2008. Furthermore, the City
of St. Helena had a lower percentage of residents in the 25 to 34 and 35 to 44 age categories than


Public Review Draft Housing Element Needs Assessment         City of St. Helena General Plan Update
2/25/2009                                                                                  Page 27
both Napa County and the Bay Area.

St. Helena residents have continually become wealthier. By 2008, while only 30 percent of Napa
County, and 35 percent of Bay Area households have incomes of $100,000 or more, the St. Helena
percentage is close to 40 percent. In addition, the percentage of St. Helena households with
incomes of less than $25,000 fell from about 19 percent in 1999 to 14 percent in 2008. St.
Helena’s inflation-adjusted median income of $79,200 in 2008 exceeds that of Napa County and
the Bay Area, $67,400 and $74,300, respectively.

In both 2000 and 2007, St. Helena had a lower unemployment rate than Napa County and the Bay
Area. The greatest job concentration in St. Helena was in the “Manufacturing, Wholesale, and
Transportation” sector, in both 2000 and 2005. However, the largest increase in jobs within the
City between 2000 and 2005 occurred in the “Health, Educational, and Recreational Services”
sector, which was nearly as large as the “Manufacturing, Wholesale, and Transportation”
employment category in St. Helena in both years.

According to the Census 2000 Transportation Planning Package (CTPP) most people who work in
St. Helena commuted in from residences located outside of the City. Furthermore, 57 percent of
employed St. Helena residents commuted to jobs outside of the City. The ratio of jobs to employed
residents confirms that St. Helena had approximately two jobs per employed resident in 2005.
Therefore, even if all employed St. Helena residents worked in St. Helena, the City would still need
in-commuters to fill approximately half of the local jobs. ABAG projects that the number of
residents, households, and jobs in St. Helena will continue to grow at a conservative rate through
2035, with the annual average job growth rate slightly outpacing population and household growth
rates.




Public Review Draft Housing Element Needs Assessment         City of St. Helena General Plan Update
2/25/2009                                                                                  Page 28
Table 2: Population and Household Trends, 1990, 2000, and 2008
                                                                                               Average                Average
                                                                                            Annual Growth          Annual Growth
City of St. Helena                     1990            2000           2008 (est.) (a)         1990-2000              2000-2008
Population                               4,990           5,950                   5,924                 1.8%                  -0.1%

Households                                2,138           2,380                  2,414                  1.1%                   0.2%

Average Household Size                     2.31 (b)        2.48                   2.43                  0.7%                   -0.2%

Household Type
  HH with Children (c)                   26.9%           32.6%                  32.7%
  HH without Children                    73.1%           67.4%                  67.3%

Tenure
  Homeowners                             60.3%           56.0%                  54.5%
  Renters                                39.7%           44.0%                  45.5%

                                                                                               Average                Average
                                                                                            Annual Growth          Annual Growth
Napa County                            1990            2000             2008 (est.)           1990-2000              2000-2008
Population                             110,765         124,279                136,092                  1.2%                   1.1%

Households                              41,312           45,402                49,403                   0.9%                   1.1%

Average Household Size                     2.54 (b)        2.62                   2.65                  0.3%                   0.1%

Household Type
  HH with Children (c)                   33.3%           34.4%                  34.3%
  HH without Children                    66.7%           65.6%                  65.7%

Tenure
  Homeowners                             64.5%           65.1%                  66.2%
  Renters                                35.5%           34.9%                  33.8%

                                                                                               Average                Average
                                                                                            Annual Growth          Annual Growth
Bay Area (d)                           1990             2000            2008 (est.)           1990-2000              2000-2008
Population                           6,023,577        6,783,760             7,092,031                  1.2%                   0.6%

Households                           2,246,242        2,466,019             2,556,790                   0.9%                   0.5%

Average Household Size                     2.61 (b)        2.69 (e)               2.72                  0.3%                   0.1%

Household Type
  HH with Children (c)                   33.4%           34.7%                  34.9%
  HH without Children                    66.6%           65.3%                  65.1%

Tenure
  Homeowners                             56.4%           57.7%                  57.8%
  Renters                                43.6%           42.3%                  42.2%

Notes:
(a) 2008 figures for the City of St. Helena are based on total population and household estimates from the California Department of Finance
and household type and tenure distribution estimates from Claritas. 2008 figures for all other areas are based solely on estimates provided
by Claritas.
(b) Average household size estimates for 1990 are calculated by dividing the number of households by total population minus population in
group quarters.
(c) Households with children have at least one member under the age of 18.
(d) The Bay Area includes the following nine counties encompassed by the Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG): Alameda, Contra
Costa, Marin, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Solano, and Sonoma.
(e) The 2000 average household size for the Bay Area is a Claritas estimate.

Sources: Census 1990, 2008; Census 2000, 2008; Department of Finance, 2008; Claritas, 2008; BAE, 2008.
Table 3: Age Distribution, 1990, 2000, and 2008
                                                               City of St. Helena
                                   1990                               2000                         2008 (est.) (a)
                                          Percent                            Percent                           Percent
Age Distribution        Number            of Total          Number           of Total          Number          of Total
Under 18                    1,065             21.3%             1,494            25.1%             1,400           23.6%
18-24                         325              6.5%               383             6.4%               510            8.6%
25-34                         659             13.2%               685            11.5%               723           12.2%
35-44                         773             15.5%               877            14.7%               778           13.1%
45-54                         546             10.9%               917            15.4%               820           13.8%
55-64                         372              7.5%               566             9.5%               753           12.7%
65 and Over                 1,250             25.1%             1,028            17.3%               939           15.9%
Total                       4,990              100%             5,950             100%             5,924            100%

Median Age                     40.8 (b)                            39.9                               39.3

                                                                 Napa County
                                   1990                             2000                             2008 (est.)
                                          Percent                         Percent                              Percent
Age Distribution        Number            of Total          Number        of Total             Number          of Total
Under 18                   25,720             23.2%            29,998         24.1%               30,829           22.7%
18-24                      10,244              9.2%            10,510          8.5%               12,832            9.4%
25-34                      16,830             15.2%            15,562         12.5%               18,263           13.4%
35-44                      17,697             16.0%            18,884         15.2%               18,527           13.6%
45-54                      12,145             11.0%            18,392         14.8%               19,730           14.5%
55-64                       9,790              8.8%            11,847          9.5%               16,234           11.9%
65 and Over                18,339             16.6%            19,086         15.4%               19,677           14.5%
Total                     110,765              100%           124,279          100%              136,092            100%

Median Age                     36.4 (b)                            38.3                               38.4

                                                                    Bay Area
                                   1990                              2000                             2008 (est.)
                                          Percent                          Percent                              Percent
Age Distribution        Number            of Total          Number          of Total           Number           of Total
Under 18                 1,387,341            23.0%          1,601,858          23.6%           1,644,471           23.2%
18-24                      620,499            10.3%            595,173           8.8%             610,013            8.6%
25-34                    1,177,834            19.6%          1,120,919          16.5%             952,858           13.4%
35-44                    1,040,415            17.3%          1,172,570          17.3%           1,117,804           15.8%
45-54                      656,003            10.9%            964,638          14.2%           1,093,401           15.4%
55-64                      476,007             7.9%            571,095           8.4%             820,904           11.6%
65 and Over                665,478            11.0%            757,507          11.2%             852,580           12.0%
Total                    6,023,577             100%          6,783,760           100%           7,092,031            100%

Median Age                     33.6 (b)                            35.6 (b)                           38.1

Notes:
(a) 2008 figures for the City of St. Helena are based on total population estimates from the California Department of Finance
and age distribution estimates from Claritas. 2008 figures for all other areas are based solely on estimates provided by Claritas.
(b) 1990 median age estimates for the City of St. Helena, Napa County and the Bay Area, and the 2000 median age estimate for
the Bay Area are Claritas estimates.

Sources: Census 1990, 2008; Census 2000, 2008; California Department of Finance, 2008; Claritas, 2008; BAE, 2008.
Table 4: Household Income Distribution, 1999 and 2008
                                           City of St. Helena                                       Napa County                                              Bay Area
                                    1999 (a)               2008 (est.) (b)               1999 (a)             2008 (est.) (b)                    1999 (a)               2008 (est.) (b)
                                          Percent                   Percent                    Percent                 Percent                         Percent                  Percent
Income Range                   Number     of Total     Number       of Total        Number     of Total    Number      of Total           Number       of Total     Number      of Total
Less than $15,000                  273       11.5%           177         7.3%         4,398        9.7%       3,430         6.9%            246,466       10.0%       208,322       8.1%
$15,000 - $24,999                  184        7.7%           165         6.8%         4,826       10.6%       3,430         6.9%            192,887        7.8%       163,949       6.4%
$25,000 - $34,999                  220        9.3%           139         5.8%         5,248       11.6%       4,363         8.8%            214,136        8.7%       177,443       6.9%
$35,000 - $44,999                  219        9.2%           167         6.9%         5,154       11.4%       4,515         9.1%            222,298        9.0%       193,152       7.6%
$45,000 - $59,999                  311       13.1%           253       10.5%          6,200       13.7%       6,397       12.9%             306,465       12.4%       285,108     11.2%
$60,000 - $74,999                  254       10.7%           254       10.5%          5,127       11.3%       5,226       10.6%             278,418       11.3%       263,484     10.3%
$75,000 - $99,999                  386       16.2%           316       13.1%          6,023       13.3%       7,039       14.2%             345,888       14.0%       362,903     14.2%
$100,000 - $149,999                261       11.0%           459       19.0%          5,063       11.2%       8,151       16.5%             370,968       15.0%       474,017     18.5%
$150,000 or more                   270       11.4%           485       20.1%          3,365        7.4%       6,852       13.9%             288,492       11.7%       428,412     16.8%
Total Households                 2,380        100%        2,414         100%         45,402        100%     49,403         100%           2,466,019        100%     2,556,790      100%

Unadjusted Median
Household Income (c)           $58,902                   $79,208                     $51,738                  $67,367                       $63,056                     $74,256

Adjusted Median
Household Income (d)           $72,883                   $79,208                     $64,018                  $67,367                       $78,023                     $74,256

Notes:
(a) 1999 figures are based on Census 2000, Summary File 1 total household figures and Summary File 3 income distribution estimates.
(b) 2008 figures for the City of St. Helena are based on total household estimates from the California Department of Finance and income distribution estimates from Claritas. 2008 figures
for all other areas are based solely on estimates provided by Claritas.
(c) 1999 median household income figures are from Census 2000, while figures for 2008 and the 1999 Bay Area are based on Claritas estimates.
(d) The 1999 median household income estimates are adjusted to represent 2008 dollars using the California Department of Finance San Francisco Consolidated Metropolitan Statistical
Area (CMSA) Consumer Price Index (CPI) of 1.237, revised on May 14, 2008.

Sources: Census 2000, 2008; California Department of Finance, 2008; Claritas, 2008; BAE, 2008.
Table 5: Household Income Categories, City of St. Helena, 1999 (a)
                                                     City of St. Helena                                                          Napa County
                              Owner Occupied         Renter Occupied         Total Households          Owner Occupied           Renter Occupied          Total Households
                                      Percent                    Percent               Percent                 Percent                   Percent                   Percent
Income Categories            Number    of Total     Number       of Total   Number     of Total      Number     of Total      Number      of Total     Number      of Total

Extremely Low Income
(Less than 30% of AMFI)           80       6.0%          175      16.6%         255      10.7%           1,815       6.1%        2,525      15.9%          4,340       9.6%

Very Low Income
(30% to 50% of AMFI)              85       6.4%          125      11.9%         210       8.8%           2,465       8.3%        2,590      16.4%          5,055      11.1%

Low Income
(50% to 80% of AMFI)             160      12.0%          199      18.9%         359      15.0%           4,525     15.3%         3,575      22.6%          8,100      17.8%

Moderate Income
80% to 120% of AMFI)             175      13.1%          274      26.0%         449      18.8%           6,195     21.0%         3,745      23.6%          9,940      21.9%

Above Moderate Income
(Over 120% of AMFI)              835      62.5%          280      26.6%       1,115      46.7%         14,560      49.3%         3,405      21.5%         17,965      39.6%

Total Households               1,335       100%        1,053       100%       2,388       100%         29,560       100%        15,840       100%         45,400      100%

Note:
(a) Figures reported above are based on the HUD-published CHAS 2000 data, which reports 1999 incomes. CHAS data reflect HUD-defined household income limits, for various
household sizes. Total household figures may vary from those reported in Table 2 due to different estimation methodologies.

Sources: CHAS 2000, huduser.org, 2008; BAE, 2008.
Table 6: Labor Force Trends, 2000 and 2007

                                  City of St. Helena                 Napa County                       Bay Area
                                 2000            2007            2000                2007       2000              2007
Employed Residents                 3,100           3,400          64,200              71,200   3,609,700      3,468,100
Unemployed Residents                 100               100          2,400              3,100    126,000           165,700
Labor Force (a)                    3,200           3,500          66,600              74,300   3,735,700      3,633,800


Unemployment Rate (b)               3.1%               2.9%          3.6%               4.2%        3.4%             4.6%


Notes:
(a) The labor force consists of the employed and unemployed residents combined.
(b) The unemployment rate is the percentage of the labor force that is unemployed.


Sources: EDD, 2008; BAE, 2008.
Table 7: Jobs by Industry, 2000 and 2005
                                                                    City of St. Helena (a)                                 Napa County                                         Bay Area
                                                                  2000                     2005                     2000                   2005                       2000                    2005
                                                         Employed    Percent     Employed     Percent      Employed    Percent    Employed    Percent        Employed    Percent     Employed    Percent
Industry (b)                                              Workers     of Total    Workers      of Total     Workers     of Total   Workers     of Total       Workers     of Total    Workers     of Total
Agriculture and Natural Resources Jobs (c)                    360        6.4%          380        6.5%        3,090        4.7%       3,460       4.9%          24,470       0.7%       24,170       0.7%
Manufacturing, Wholesale, and Transportation Jobs (d)       1,520      27.1%         1,560      26.9%        14,690      22.1%      15,550      22.0%          863,420     23.0%       709,380     20.6%
Retail Jobs (e)                                               640      11.4%           670      11.5%         7,020      10.6%        7,450     10.5%          402,670     10.7%       367,680     10.7%
Financial and Professional Service Jobs (f)                   880      15.7%           910      15.7%         8,630      13.0%        9,240     13.1%          851,610     22.7%       780,160     22.6%
Health, Educational, and Recreational Service Jobs (g)      1,470      26.3%         1,530      26.3%        24,150      36.4%      25,720      36.4%        1,056,030     28.1%     1,055,010     30.6%
Other Jobs (h)                                                730      13.0%           760      13.1%         8,780      13.2%        9,270     13.1%          555,260     14.8%       513,240     14.9%
Total                                                       5,600       100%         5,810       100%        66,360     100.0%      70,690     100.0%        3,753,460      100%     3,449,640      100%

Notes:
(a) ABAG figures for St. Helena are based on the City's sphere of influence.
(b) Industry employment figures report the number of jobs in each geography, not the number of employed residents.
(c) Includes North American Industrial Classification System sectors 11 and 21: Agriculture, Fishing, Forestry, and Mining.
(d) Includes North American Industrial Classification System sectors 22, 31-33, 42, and 48-49: Utilities, Manufacturing, Wholesale, Transportation, and Warehousing.
(e) Includes North American Industrial Classification System sectors 44 and 45: Retail Trade.
(f) Includes North American Industrial Classification System sectors 52-56: Finance, and Insurance; Real Estate and Rental and Leasing; Professional, Scientific, and Technical Services;
and Management of Companies and Enterprises, as well as Administrative Supports, Waste Management, and Remediation Services.
(g) Includes North American Industrial Classification System sectors 61, 62, 71, 72, and 81: Educational Services, Health Care and Social Assistance; Arts, Entertainment,
and Recreation; Accommodation and Food Services; and Other Services.
(h) Includes North American Industrial Classification System sectors 23, 51 and 92: Construction, Information, and Public Administration.

Sources: ABAG, 2008; BAE, 2008.
Table 8: St. Helena Workers by Place of Residence, 2000
                                          Number of workers            Percent
Workers Employed in St. Helena (a)                    5,043                100.0%

Workers Commuting
into St. Helena                                          3,873              76.8%



Detailed Place of Residence for Workers Commuting Into St. Helena (b)

                                                                     Percent of
                                                                      workers
                                                                    Employed in
                                          Number of workers          St. Helena
Live in Napa County                                      4,185              83.0%
  St. Helena                                             1,170              23.2%
  Napa                                                   1,410              28.0%
  Calistoga                                                245               4.9%
  Angwin                                                   165               3.3%
  Yountville                                                85               1.7%
  Remainder of County                                    1,110              22.0%

Live in Sonoma County                                      263               5.2%
  Santa Rosa                                                80               1.6%
  Remainder of County                                      183               3.6%

Live in Lake County                                        185               3.7%
  Hidden Valley Lake                                        55               1.1%
  Remainder of County                                      130               2.6%

Live in Solano County                                      180               3.6%
  Vallejo                                                   70               1.4%
  Remainder of County                                      110               2.2%

Live Elsewhere in California                               230               4.6%

Notes:
(a) Table excludes a small number of workers who commute into St. Helena from out of the state.
(b) All places reporting 50 or more workers commuting into St. Helena are shown.

Sources: Census 2000 Transportation Planning Package, 2007; BAE, 2008.
Table 9: St. Helena Residents by Place of Work, 2000
                                           Number           Percent
Employed St. Helena Residents (a)              2,703           100.0%

Workers Commuting
out of St. Helena                              1,533            56.7%



Detailed Place of Work for Workers Commuting Out of St. Helena (b)

                                                           Percent of
                                                           Employed
                                                           St. Helena
                                           Number          Residents
Work in Napa County                           2,400              88.8%
 St. Helena                                   1,170             43.3%
 Remainder of County                            780             28.9%
 Napa                                           300             11.1%
 Calistoga                                       80               3.0%
 Yountville                                      70               2.6%

Work in Sonoma County                              88             3.3%

Work in Alameda County                             64             2.4%

Work Elsewhere in California                     151              5.6%

Notes:
(a) Table excludes a small number of workers who commute out of the state.
(b) All places reporting 50 or more workers commuting out of St. Helena are shown.

Sources: Census 2000 Transportation Planning Package, 2007; BAE, 2008.
Table 10: Ratio of Jobs to Employed Residents, 2005

                                                                2000 (a)                                                                         2005 (a)
                                                                                                                                          Percent                     Percent
                                        Employed         Employed Residents/                     Jobs/Employed                            Change                      Change
Community               Population     Residents (b)         Population             Jobs (c)       Residents           Population (c)    2000-2005      Jobs (c)     2000-2005
Napa County                124,279           58,501                     0.47          66,360               1.13              133,700          7.6%        70,690          6.5%
  American Canyon            9,813            4,199                     0.43           1,940               0.46               14,700         49.8%         2,340         20.6%
  Calistoga                  5,190            2,374                     0.46           2,710               1.14                5,200          0.2%         2,770          2.2%
  Napa City                 72,781          34,378                      0.47          33,290               0.97               80,100         10.1%        35,470          6.5%
  St. Helena                 5,951            2,797                     0.47           5,600               2.00                6,100          2.5%         5,810          3.8%
  Yountville                 2,916              991                     0.34           1,900               1.92                3,400         16.6%         2,120         11.6%

Notes:
(a) 2000 figures report Census estimates. 2005 figures are based on ABAG projection data.
(b) Employed civilian population age 16 and over.
(c) ABAG figures for American Canyon, Calistoga, St. Helena and Yountville are based on each city's sphere of influence. City of Napa ABAG figures are based on the Napa
subregional study area defined by ABAG.

Sources: Census 2000, 2008; ABAG, 2008; BAE, 2008.
Table 11: ABAG Population, Household, and Employment Projections

                                                                                                                                                        Average Annual
                                                                                                                                                        Percent Change
                                                              2010              2015          2020            2025           2030            2035         2010-2035
City of St. Helena (a)
  Population                                                     6,100            6,100          6,100           6,200          6,200          6,200         0.1%
  Households                                                     2,450            2,480          2,510           2,540          2,570          2,600         0.2%
  Employment                                                     5,850            5,970          6,100           6,190          6,290          6,400         0.4%
    Agriculture and Natural Resources                              360              370            380            390             400            390         0.3%
    Manufacturing, Wholesale and Transportation                  1,560            1,560          1,570           1,580          1,590          1,610         0.1%
    Retail                                                         660              670            680            690             700            710         0.3%
    Financial and Professional Services                            920              950            980           1,000          1,020          1,050         0.5%
    Health, Education and Recreational Services                  1,590            1,650          1,710           1,750          1,790          1,840         0.6%
    Other jobs (b)                                                 760              770            780            780             790            800         0.2%


Napa County
  Population                                                  139,300           144,400       148,100         151,100        153,500         155,700         0.4%
  Households                                                    51,470           53,650        55,740          57,210          58,640         59,650         0.6%
  Employment                                                    75,360           80,440        85,460          90,090          94,310         98,570         1.1%
    Agriculture and Natural Resources                            3,740            3,930          4,130           4,340          4,560          4,560         0.8%
    Manufacturing, Wholesale and Transportation                 16,530           17,560        18,570          19,580          20,500         21,500         1.1%
    Retail                                                       7,920            8,440          8,960           9,480          9,910         10,370         1.1%
    Financial and Professional Services                          9,900           10,710        11,520          12,230          12,920         13,600         1.3%
    Health, Education and Recreational Services                 27,440           29,360        31,280          32,950          34,470         36,120         1.1%
    Other jobs (b)                                               9,830           10,440        11,000          11,510          11,950         12,420         0.9%


Bay Area
  Population                                                 7,412,500         7,730,000    8,069,700       8,389,600      8,712,800        9,031,500        0.8%
  Households                                                 2,696,580         2,819,030    2,941,760       3,059,130      3,177,440        3,292,530        0.8%
  Employment                                                 3,693,920         3,979,200    4,280,700       4,595,170      4,921,680        5,247,780        1.4%
    Agriculture and Natural Resources                           24,520           24,870        25,070          25,270          25,470         25,490         0.2%
    Manufacturing, Wholesale and Transportation               740,960           780,680       823,110         867,490        913,480         959,120         1.0%
    Retail                                                    392,400           422,880       455,450         489,510        524,960         560,730         1.4%
    Financial and Professional Services                       841,160           913,800       990,550       1,070,460      1,153,760        1,236,590        1.6%
    Health, Education and Recreational Services              1,142,400         1,239,920    1,343,550       1,452,070      1,565,430        1,679,070        1.6%
    Other jobs (b)                                            552,480           597,050       642,970         690,370        738,580         786,780         1.4%


Notes:
(a) ABAG figures for St. Helena are based on the City's sphere of influence.
(b) Includes North American Industrial Classification System sectors 23, 51 and 92: Construction, Information, and Public Administration.


Sources: ABAG, 2008; BAE, 2008.
Housing Conditions
The following section details the housing conditions in St. Helena and, where available, compares
the data to Napa County and the Bay Area. Data sources include the 2000 Census, 2007 American
Community Survey, California Department of Finance (DoF), U.S. Department of Housing and
Urban Development (HUD), the California Department of Housing and Community Development
(HCD), Claritas Inc., and Dataquick, a private real estate transactions data vendor. Property
owners and managers of local residential apartment complexes were also interviewed for
information regarding residential rental market conditions.

Existing Housing Conditions

Housing Stock Characteristics
Table 12 reports the distribution of housing units by type for St. Helena, Napa County, and the Bay
Area. In St. Helena between 2000 and 2008, the total number of detached single-family units
increased by approximately 50 units, while the number of attached single-family units remained
relatively constant. Overall, St. Helena had about 40 more units in 2008 than in 2000, due to some
losses in mobile homes. The overall increase in housing units represents a 1.4 percent increase in
the quantity of housing in St. Helena between 2000 and 2008. In Napa County and the Bay Area,
the number of housing units increased by ten percent (4,700 units) and five percent (128,000 units),
respectively, over the same time period, greatly surpassing the housing growth rate in St. Helena.

Napa County has a higher share of single-family homes relative to St. Helena, about 74 and 66
percent of total units respectively in 2008, and a higher share of mobile homes; around 9 percent
compared to 6 percent. Furthermore, St. Helena exhibits a higher proportion of multifamily units
in structures with five or more units (19 percent in 2008) compared to the County’s ten percent.
This percentage was still low by regional standards, with nearly 25 percent of Bay Area housing
stock in structures with five or more units.

Age of Housing Stock
Based on data from the 2000 Census reported in Table 13, Napa County and the Bay Area had
slightly older housing stocks relative to St. Helena. Approximately 32 percent of St. Helena’s
housing units were built between 1980 and 2000, which surpassed the 28 percent in Napa County
and 24 percent in the Bay Area. In addition, approximately 54 percent of the housing stock in
Napa County and 52 percent in the Bay Area was constructed between 1950 and 1979. In St.
Helena, only 44 percent of the housing units were built in that time period. St. Helena and the Bay
Area had slightly higher proportions of historic homes, with around 24 percent of housing units in
both areas built prior to 1950, compared to 19 percent in Napa County.




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Occupancy Rates
In St. Helena, the overall housing vacancy rate reached 12 percent in 2000 according to the 2000
        12
Census. Homes kept for seasonal, recreational, or occasional use accounted for about 114 units,
or one-third of total vacant units. These units for seasonal, recreational, or occasional use also
                                                            13
represented over 4 percent of all housing units in the City. In Napa County, units for seasonal,
recreational, or occasional use represented approximately 3 percent of total housing units, but
nearly one-half of residential vacancies. In the Bay Area, the vacancy rate was significantly lower,
at 3.4 percent, with less than one percent of homes vacant because of seasonal, recreational, or
occasional use. Overall, after controlling for vacancies due to seasonal, recreational, or occasional
uses, the vacancy rate in St. Helena was nearly 8 percent. This was significantly higher than in
Napa County or the Bay Area, where the comparable figures were close to 3 percent for both areas.

Vacant for-sale units represented 3.7 percent of total units in St. Helena, which was higher than
vacant for-rent units at approximately 1.8 percent of total units. These percentages represent nearly
50 vacant rental units and close to 100 vacant for-sale units in St. Helena. These figures compare
to 114 vacant units in the City for seasonal, recreational or occasional use.

A comparison of 2000 Census data with 1990 Census data revealed that the overall vacancy rate in
1990 was about 10 percent, which is about two percent lower than in 2000. One of the major
reasons for the lower overall vacancy rate is that in 1990 St. Helena had only 50 vacant units for
seasonal, recreational, or occasional use, but by 2000, the number had risen to more than 110
vacant units.

DoF also provides overall annual housing vacancy rate estimates, although DoF’s data do not detail
the composition of vacant units. DoF vacancy estimates for 2008 parallel the 2000 Census figures;
with about a 12 percent overall vacancy rate in St. Helena and a 6 percent vacancy rate in Napa
County.

In the real estate industry, a five percent residential vacancy rate is considered an indicator of a
healthy housing market, with a reasonable balance between supply and demand. The 2000 data
indicate that, after setting aside the units held vacant for seasonal or vacation use, St. Helena’s
vacancy rate was above industry standards. Absent more detailed data, it is difficult to tell if the

12
  The Census Bureau reports that “vacancy status and other characteristics of vacant units were determined by
enumerators obtaining information from property owners and managers, neighbors, rental agents, and others.” Census
2000 Brief: Housing Characteristics. http://www.census.gov/ prod/2001pubs/c2kbr01-13.pdf. Accessed on December
12, 2008.
13
   The census defines seasonal, recreational or occasional use as “housing units including vacant units used or intended
for use only in certain seasons, for weekends, or other occasional use throughout the year. Interval ownership units,
sometimes called shared ownership or timesharing condominiums are included in this category.”
http://www.census.gov/prod/cen2000/dp1/2kh00.pdf Accessed on December 17, 2008.


Public Review Draft Housing Element Needs Assessment                       City of St. Helena General Plan Update
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2008 overall vacancy rate is due to a large number of units held vacant for seasonal, recreational or
occasional use, or due to other factors affecting demand for permanent housing. Based on
anecdotal information, the former may be more likely as City staff and members of the Housing
Element Steering Committee think the number of homes for seasonal, recreational, or occasional
use, i.e. second homes, has increased within the community since 2000.

Overcrowding
                                                                                                14
The U.S. Census defines overcrowding as more than one person per room in a given housing unit,
and Table 15 details overcrowding by income category and tenure. The 2000 Census provides the
information on persons per room. As of 2000, more than 93 percent of St. Helena housing units had
less than one person per room, leaving slightly over 6.5 percent of the units with overcrowded
conditions. Of the 158 households living in overcrowded conditions, only 10 were owner
households s and the remainder were renters.

Among extremely low-income households, only 4 households (0.2 percent of total households)
lived in overcrowded conditions, and they were all renters. In the very low-income category, the
number of households living in overcrowded conditions increased to 29 (1.2 percent of total
households) and again only represented renters. In the low-income category, owner and renter
households endured overcrowded conditions, with 10 owner households (0.4 percent of total
households) and 55 renter households (2.3 percent of total households) having more than one
person per room. Finally, the moderate and above income category had a total of 60 renter
households living in overcrowded conditions (2.5 percent of total households).

Housing Cost Burden
Table 16 presents household income limits, as defined by HCD, and estimates of housing cost
burden based on the 2000 Comprehensive Housing Affordability Strategies (CHAS) database from
HUD. Income limits are defined relative to the Area Median Family Income (AMFI) for Napa
County. In addition, housing cost burden refers to the share of a household’s income spent on
housing costs. All households experience some level of housing cost burden, but households
paying between 30 and 50 percent of their income for housing experience “excessive” housing cost
burden. The housing cost burden qualifies as “severe” at levels above 50 percent of household
        15
income.

    14
      According to the U.S. Census, a room includes all “whole rooms used for living purposes…including living
    rooms, dining rooms, kitchens, bedrooms, finished recreation rooms, enclosed porches suitable for year-round
    use, and lodgers' rooms. Excluded are strips or pullman kitchens, bathrooms, open porches, balconies, halls or
    foyers, half-rooms, utility rooms, unfinished attics or basements, or other unfinished space used for storage. A
    partially divided room is a separate room only if there is a partition from floor to ceiling, but not if the partition
    consists solely of shelves or cabinets.”
    15
      U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Office of Policy Development and Research.
    “Affordable Housing Needs: A Report to Congress on the Significant Need for Housing.” 2003.


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In 2000, St. Helena households with a housing cost burden of less than 30 percent of their income
represented around 68 percent of all households in St. Helena, meaning these households had a
manageable housing cost burden. Of the remaining households, approximately 17 percent had
excessive cost burdens and 15 percent had severe housing cost burdens. Overall, the incidence of
excessive and severe housing cost burdens was greater among owner households than renter
households, but the severity of the housing cost burden varied by income level and among owners
versus renters.

Of the 266 extremely low-income households (less than 30 percent AMFI) in St. Helena, around 34
percent have a housing cost burden less than 30 percent, but nine percent and 58 percent,
respectively, have excessive and severe housing cost burdens. Of all of the income categories,
extremely low-income households are the most likely among renters to experience severe housing
cost burden (93 households).

In the case of very low-income households (30 to 50 percent of AMFI), a much higher percentage
of households (46 percent), had housing cost burdens of less than 30 percent of household income
compared to extremely low-income households. In addition, just over 20 percent and 34 percent of
households had excessive and severe housing cost burdens, respectively. More very low-income
renter households (almost 80 households) than owner households (40 households) had excessive or
severe housing cost burdens.

Among low-income households (50 to 80 percent of AMFI), 60 percent of households had housing
cost burdens of less than 30 percent. In 2000, there were 70 low-income renter households and 85
low-income owner households with excessive or severe housing cost burdens.

For households in the moderate and above category, about 79 percent had housing cost burdens of
less than 30 percent. While the percentage of renter households with severe or excessive housing
cost burdens equaled about 2.5 percent of all moderate and above income households, the
percentage of owners with severe or excessive housing cost burdens totaled almost 18.5 percent of
this income category. Thus, a very small number of this income category’s renter households had
excessive (39) or severe (0) housing cost burdens, but among owner households, significantly
higher numbers had excessive (225) and severe (65) housing cost burdens.

Overall, as the income category rises from extremely low-income to moderate-income and above,
the numbers and percentages of renter households that experienced excessive or severe housing
cost burdens fell. The same relationship, however, did not apply to owner households. The
number of owner households with excessive and severe housing cost burdens varied with each

    http://www.huduser.org/Publications/pdf/AffHsgNeedsRpt2003.pdf. Accessed on November 27, 2007.


Public Review Draft Housing Element Needs Assessment                City of St. Helena General Plan Update
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income category and the highest incidence of excessive and severe housing cost burdens occurred
in owner households with moderate and above moderate incomes. Therefore, rental subsidies are
most crucial for St. Helena households with the lowest incomes, while the need for assistance
among owner households crosses all income categories.

Physical Housing Conditions
City of St. Helena staff, with the assistance of BAE staff, performed a visual survey of all of the
housing units in St. Helena in October 2008. City and BAE staff drove by all of the housing units
and evaluated the exterior condition of the units. Survey forms based on a model provided by
HCD were completed for all of the units in need of repair or replacement. The survey form,
available in Appendix F, covers five major components: foundation, roofing, windows,
siding/stucco, and electric. Since electrical systems often cannot be fully evaluated from a
windshield survey, this part of the evaluation was not completed. The results of the survey indicate
that of the 2,745 housing units in St. Helena, 13 units were in need of minor repair and three
required major repair. City and BAE staff did not deem any of the units in need of substantial
repair. The 16 total units in need of repair represent less than one percent of the housing stock in
St. Helena, indicating that any rehabilitation programs undertaken by the City would be very small
in scale.

“At Risk” Units
State law requires an analysis of the risk of conversion of affordable housing to market-rate
housing within the next ten years. Since at least one St. Helena housing complex was identified as
at-risk, this section estimates the costs to preserve this complex as affordable housing, or develop
replacement affordable housing.

Inventory of At-Risk Units and Conversion Risk Assessment
HUD’s 2008 inventory of Multifamily Assistance and Section 8 contracts indicates that the 50-unit
Woodbridge Apartments are at risk of conversion due to the expiration of their Section 8 contract
                16
on May 11, 2018.

Replacement and Preservation Costs
Table 18 summarizes the cost to replace or preserve the Woodbridge Apartments. Appendix B,
Appendix C and Appendix D provide detailed information on the calculations presented in Table
18.

The net cost per unit of preserving Woodbridge as an affordable complex through acquisition by an
affordable housing developer is approximately $78,300, given that a subsidy of about $3,960,000

    16
         HUD. http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/mfh/exp/mfhdiscl.cfm. Accessed on September 17, 2008.


Public Review Draft Housing Element Needs Assessment                   City of St. Helena General Plan Update
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would be required to bridge the gap between the total capitalized value of the property (based on
market rate rents) and the maximum supportable mortgage of the Woodbridge Apartment Complex
(based on affordable rents). This estimate of preservation costs only covers the acquisition costs,
and therefore any necessary improvements would require additional subsidy.

If the Woodbridge Apartments convert to market rate, replacement of the complex would cost
around $266,000 per unit, based upon average total cost information from recent affordable
housing complexes built in Napa County by Napa Valley Community Housing, Mid-Peninsula
Housing Coalition, and Calistoga Affordable Housing Inc. However, given that the occupants of
these units would pay rent that would help to offset the development costs of these units, the net
cost to build these affordable units is $195,900 per unit.

The third option for preserving these units as affordable is through direct rental subsidy
commitments whereby the difference between the market rents and affordable rents would be
subsidized if Woodbridge Apartments became a market rate complex. Rent subsidies would cost
around $42,000 per unit in 2008 dollars over 20 years. Under current conditions, both preservation
options are less expensive than new construction, but a more in-depth analysis will be necessary in
2018 if and when the Woodbridge Apartments decides to opt out of the Section 8 program when its
current contract expires. Since conversion will not occur earlier than 2018, after the end of the
2009 Housing Element Update’s 5-year planning period, the Implementation Action in the Housing
Element Policy Document calls for “monitor[ing] the Woodbridge Apartments and establish[ing] a
funding plan in anticipation of either preserving or replacing the 50 units of affordable housing in
2018 when the Section 8 contract for Woodbridge expires.”

Entities Qualified to Preserve At-Risk Units
Appendix E lists the organizations approved by HCD as qualified entities to purchase units at-risk
                                                                                   17
of conversion in Napa County, pursuant to Government Code Section 65863.11. While any
organization can purchase an at-risk unit, when a qualified entity makes an offer they “have a right
of first refusal to submit a counteroffer that meets the terms and conditions of any other pending
                                   18
offer for an additional 180 days.” Therefore, qualified entities have an advantage over other
organizations when bidding on affordable housing units at risk of conversion to market rates.




    17
      California Department of Housing and Community Development. http://www.hcd.ca.gov/
    hpd/hrc/tech/presrv/hpd00-01.xls. Accessed on September 17, 2008.
    18
      California Department of Housing and Community Development. “Building Blocks for Effective Housing
    Elements Housing Programs: Preserve Units At-Risk of Conversion to Market Rate Uses”
    www.hcd.ca.gov/housingelement. Accessed on September 17, 2008.




Public Review Draft Housing Element Needs Assessment                City of St. Helena General Plan Update
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Financing and Subsidy Resources
The County has access to several financial resources that could be leveraged to assist in covering
the cost of preservation of affordable housing units. These include local resources like the City of
St. Helena Housing Trust Fund, State and Federal housing grant programs, Low Income Housing
Tax Credits (LIHTC), and HUD Section 8 Vouchers.




Public Review Draft Housing Element Needs Assessment          City of St. Helena General Plan Update
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Table 12: Housing Stock Characteristics, 2000 and 2008
                                                St. Helena                                    Napa County                                         Bay Area
                                       2000                 2008 (a)                   2000              2008 (est.)                     2000                  2008 (est.)
                               Number      Percent     Number     Percent      Number      Percent   Number     Percent         Number       Percent     Number       Percent
Units in Structure             of Units    of Total    of Units   of Total     of Units    of Total  of Units   of Total        of Units     of Total    of Units     of Total
Detached Single Family           1,644      60.7%        1,691     61.6%        32,569      67.1%     35,723     67.1%          1,376,911     53.9%      1,438,127     53.7%
Attached Single Family             215        7.9%         215       7.8%        3,215        6.6%     3,421       6.4%           224,837       8.8%       236,113       8.8%
2 to 4 units                       210        7.8%         216       7.9%        3,637        7.5%     3,798       7.1%           266,321     10.4%        274,628     10.2%
5 or more units                    478      17.7%          478     17.4%         5,204      10.7%      5,495     10.3%            623,345     24.4%        662,851     24.7%
Mobile Homes                       161        5.9%         145       5.3%        3,832        7.9%     4,672       8.8%            57,129       2.2%        63,712       2.4%
Boats, RV's, Vans, Other              0       0.0%         n.a.       n.a.          97        0.2%       109       0.2%             3,859       0.2%         4,738       0.2%
Total Units (b)                  2,708       100%        2,745      100%        48,554       100%     53,218      100%          2,552,402      100%      2,680,169      100%

Notes:
(a) 2008 figures for the City of St. Helena are based on estimates from the California Department of Finance which does not report figures for boats, RVs, vans and other
types of housing as reported in the 2000 Census. 2008 figures for all other areas a provided by Claritas.
(b) Figures may differ from those reported in Table 14 due to the use of Census 2000 Summary File 3 versus Summary File 1.

Sources: Census 2000, 2008; California Department of Finance, 2008; BAE, 2008.
Table 13: Housing Stock by Year Built, 2000
                                        St. Helena                      Napa County                         Bay Area
                                 Number          Percent          Number         Percent            Number          Percent
Year Structure Built             of Units        of Total         of Units       of Total           of Units        of Total
1999 to 2000 (a)                          33          1.2%               807          1.7%              36,332           1.4%
1995 to 1998                            272          10.0%             1,826          3.8%            103,607            4.1%
1990 to 1994                            155           5.7%             3,665          7.5%            131,962            5.2%
1980 to 1989                            394          14.5%             7,129         14.7%            339,335           13.3%
1970 to 1979                            611          22.6%            10,722         22.1%            483,380           18.9%
1960 to 1969                            326          12.0%             7,545         15.5%            442,075           17.3%
1950 to 1959                            265           9.8%             7,854         16.2%            401,120           15.7%
1940 to 1949                            191           7.1%             3,839          7.9%            220,559            8.6%
1939 or earlier                         461          17.0%             5,167         10.6%            394,032           15.4%
Total Units (b)                      2,708            100%            48,554          100%          2,552,402            100%

Notes:
(a) Census 2000 figures report units built through March of 2000.
(b) Figures may differ from those reported in Table 14 due to the use of Census 2000 Summary File 3 versus Summary File 1 data.

Sources: Census 2000, 2008; BAE, 2008.
Table 14: Housing Occupancy and Vacancy Status, 2000
                                                              St. Helena               Napa County                    Bay Area
                                                          Number     Percent        Number    Percent          Number      Percent
Housing Units                                             of Units   of Total       of Units  of Total         of Units     of Total
Occupied Housing Units                                      2,380     87.9%          45,402    93.5%           2,466,019     96.6%
Vacant Housing Units                                          327     12.1%           3,152      6.5%             86,383       3.4%
  For rent                                                     48      1.8%             450     0.9%              25,272      1.0%
  For sale only                                                99      3.7%             390     0.8%               9,469      0.4%
  Rented or sold, not occupied                                 36      1.3%             267     0.5%               9,471      0.4%
  For seasonal, recreational or occasional use                114      4.2%           1,574     3.2%              21,211      0.8%
  Migrant Labor Housing                                         0      0.0%               8     0.0%                 415      0.0%
  Other Vacant (a)                                             30      1.1%             463     1.0%              20,545      0.8%
Total Units (b)                                             2,707      100%          48,554     100%           2,552,402      100%

Notes:
(a) If a vacant unit does not fall into any of the classifications specified above, it is classified as "other vacant." For example,
this category includes units held for occupancy by a caretaker or janitor, and units held by the owner for personal reasons.
(b) Figures may differ from those reported in Tables 12 and 13 due to the use of Census 2000 Summary File 1 versus Summary
File 3 data.

Sources: Census 2000, 2008; BAE, 2008.
Table 15: Overcrowding by Income Category and Tenure, St. Helena, 2000
                                    All Income                Extremely Low Income            Very Low Income           Low Income          Moderate and Above
                                       Levels                (Less than 30% of AMFI)        (30% to 50% of AMFI)    (50% to 80% of AMFI)    (Over 80% of AMFI)
                                            Percent                        Percent                      Percent                 Percent                Percent
                                            of Total                        of Total                    of Total                of Total               of Total
Persons Per Room (a)            Number    Households         Number       Households       Number     Households   Number     Households   Number     Households

Owner Occupied
 1.00 Person or less              1,325          55.5%             80              3.4%         85         3.6%        150         6.3%     1,010         42.3%
 1.01 - 1.50 Persons                  0           0.0%              0              0.0%          0         0.0%          0         0.0%         0          0.0%
 1.51 Persons or More                10           0.4%              0              0.0%          0         0.0%         10         0.4%         0          0.0%

Subtotal: Owner-Occupied          1,335            56%             80                3%         85           4%        160           7%     1,010           42%

Renter Occupied
  1.00 Person or less               905          37.9%            171              7.2%         96         4.0%        144         6.0%       494         20.7%
  1.01 - 1.50 Persons                73           3.1%              4              0.2%          4         0.2%         20         0.8%        45          1.9%
  1.51 Persons or More               75           3.1%              0              0.0%         25         1.0%         35         1.5%        15          0.6%

Subtotal: Renter Occupied         1,053            44%            175                7%        125           5%        199           8%       554           23%

Total Households (b)              2,388           100%            255               11%        210           9%        359          15%     1,564           65%

Notes:
(a) Overcrowding is defined as more than one person per room.
(b) Figures may differ from those reported in Table 16 due to variances between HUD-based data sets.

Sources: 2000 CHAS dataset, huduser.org, 2008; BAE, 2008 .
Table 16: Housing Cost Burden, City of St. Helena, 1999 (a)
                                                  All Income          Extremely Low-Income        Very Low-Income            Low-Income           Moderate and Above
                                                    Levels           (Less than 30% of AMFI)    (30% to 50% of AMFI)     (50% to 80% of AMFI)     (Over 80% of AMFI)
                                                          Percent                  Percent                  Percent                  Percent                 Percent
Owner Households                               Number     of Total     Number      of Total      Number     of Total      Number     of Total     Number     of Total
  With 0% to 30% Housing Cost Burden              877      36.0%             20        7.5%           49      22.2%            84      21.9%          724       46.2%
  With 30% to 50% Housing Cost Burden             290      11.9%             20        7.5%           10       4.5%            35       9.1%          225       14.4%
  With 50% or Greater Housing Cost Burden         205        8.4%            60       22.6%           30      13.6%            50      13.1%           65        4.1%
Subtotal: Owner-Occupied Households             1,372      56.3%            100       37.6%           89      40.3%           169      44.1%        1,014       64.7%

Renter Households
  With 0% to 30% Housing Cost Burden               780     32.0%             69        26.0%           52      23.5%           144      37.6%          515        32.9%
  With 30% to 50% Housing Cost Burden              128      5.2%              4         1.5%           35      15.8%            50      13.1%           39         2.5%
  With 50% or Greater Housing Cost Burden          158      6.5%             93        34.9%           45      20.4%            20       5.2%            0         0.0%
Subtotal: Renter-Occupied Households             1,066     43.7%            166        62.4%          132      59.7%           214      55.9%          554        35.3%

Total Households                                 2,438      100%            266         100%          221       100%           383       100%         1,568       100%

Note:
(a) Figures reported above are based on the HUD-published CHAS 2000 data, which reports 1999 incomes. CHAS data reflect HUD-defined household income limits, for various
household sizes. Total household figures may vary from those reported in Table 2 due to different estimation methodologies. Figures may differ from those reported in Table 4
due to variances between HUD-based data sets.

Sources: CHAS 2000, huduser.org, 2008; BAE, 2008.
Table 17: Housing Condition Survey Results for St. Helena, October 2008 (a)
Housing Problems                       Units
Minor (b)                                      13
Moderate (c)                                    3
Substantial (d)                                 0
Dilapidated (e)                                 0
Total                                          16

Total Housing Units in St.
Helena (f)                                 2,745

% of Units in Need of
Repair or Replacement                       0.6%

Notes:
(a) Appendix F contains a copy of the survey instrument, which evaluated the condition of the foundation, roofing,
siding/stucco and windows for each unit, assigning points for observed defects.
(b) Units in need of "minor" repairs received a survey score between 10 and 15.
(c) Units in need of "moderate" repairs received a survey score of 16 to 39.
(d) Units in need of "substantial" received a score of 40 to 55.
(e) "Dilapidated" units received a survey score of 56 and over.
(f) Total units in St. Helena in 2008 according to the Department of Finance.

Sources: HCD, 2008; Department of Finance, 2008; BAE, 2008.
Table 18: Costs of Replacement and Preservation (a)
                                                                                                Cost for the 50 units in the
                                                                      Cost per Unit (b)         Woodbridge Apartments (b)
Preservation (as an affordable complex)                                        $78,331                            $3,916,542

Replacement (construction of a new affordable complex)                          $195,880                            $9,794,024 (c)

Preservation (through rental subsidies over 20 years)                            $42,034                            $2,101,680

Notes:
(a) See Appendices B, C, D and E for detailed information on preservation and replacement costs, as well as a list of entities
qualified by HCD to purchase at-risk units in Napa County.
(b) Reported in 2008 dollars.
(c) Construction of affordable units minus the supportable mortgage.

Sources: Personal communication Napa Valley Community Housing, Mid-Peninsula Housing Coalition, and Calistoga Affordable
Housing Inc., 2008; HCD income limits for Napa County, 2008; Marcus & Millichap, 2nd Quarter 2008; HCD, 2008; BAE, 2008.
Housing Market Conditions
This section provides information on the private housing market in St. Helena and assesses the
market’s ability to accommodate the housing needs of local residents. Data on recent home sales
and rental rates form the basis of an analysis of the level of income required to afford housing in St.
Helena.

For-Sale Housing
Table 19 supplies detailed information on recent single-family home sales in St. Helena, as well as
estimates of household income levels required to afford units at the reported minimum sales prices.
Of the 39 reported sales between August 2007 and August 2008, 14 (about 36 percent) involved
sale prices over $1,000,000. Furthermore, only one home sold for a price below $600,000 during
that time period. Overall, the median housing price over the past year was $872,500 in St. Helena.

Table 19 also shows that in order to afford the lowest-priced home in St. Helena, a household must
typically have a minimum income of approximately $107,200. This is far more than the St. Helena
median income of $79,200 reported in Table 4. The minimum annual household income
requirement estimates are based on the assumption of a standard 30-year fixed rate mortgage with a
20 percent downpayment, a six percent interest rate, annual property tax rate of 1.16 percent, and
an annual hazard insurance cost of 0.22 percent of the home value. These values represent the
market conditions at one given point in time and will change as local and national economic
                     19
conditions fluctuate.

Affordable Home Purchase Prices
Table 20 examines affordability in a different way. Instead of presenting the income required to
buy a market rate house in St. Helena, Table 20 examines how much very low-, low-, and
moderate-income households in St. Helena could afford to pay for housing, along with the
corresponding maximum affordable home price. The assumptions align with those from Table 19
except for the downpayment percentage, which is five percent, modeling a situation that is more
typical of first-time homebuyers who have not amassed sufficient financial resources to make a
larger downpayment. These buyers are more likely to be in need of affordable housing options
than the typical buyers of market rate housing in St. Helena. The lower downpayment amount
requires the owner to buy mortgage insurance.

Given this set of assumptions, in the case of a three-person household, the affordable home price
varies from approximately $110,100 for very low-income, to $171,600 for low-income, and

    19
       Note that some of the assumptions used here by BAE differ from the assumptions used by the City of Napa
    Housing Authority. Assumptions used for this analysis were collected to represent conditions for a property in
    the City of St. Helena specifically. This analysis allows for a maximum of 30 percent of income to be allocated
    to housing costs, to be consistent with the definition of affordability used in State housing element guidelines.


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$266,500 for moderate-income households. The income limits increase with household size, and a
five-person household with very low, low, or moderate income can afford to buy a home priced at
$133,300 $205,800, and $319,600, respectively. Therefore, home prices that are significantly
lower than current market levels would be necessary for even moderate-income St. Helena
households to purchase a home.

Rental Housing
Table 21 contains a list of rental complexes containing 547 rental apartments in St. Helena. This
includes substantially all of the existing multifamily complexes within the City. Table 22 then
provides a list of the current apartment rental rates for three of the larger market rate complexes in
St. Helena. The Grandview Apartments is a historic complex located in downtown St. Helena with
studio and one-bedroom apartments. The monthly rent for a studio is between $650 and $850 and
for a one-bedroom the rent rises to between $700 and $1,100. The monthly rental rate for the two
bedroom/two bath Cottages at Stonebridge is $1,475, and the rates for the Tripoli apartments are
$650 and $850 per month for two bedroom/one bath and three bedroom/one bath apartments,
respectively.

In addition to apartment complexes, there are also single-family homes for rent in St. Helena. The
St. Helena Star online classified adds listed six single-family homes for rent between July 25, 2008,
and September 17, 2008. Four of the units for rent were three bedroom/two bath units with a
monthly rent ranging from $2,100 to $6,000 per month. The classifieds also listed a two
bedroom/two bath unit for $2,450 per month and a home on 76 acres with a private garden for
$30,000 per month.

Affordable Rental Rates
Based on Napa County 2008 income limits published by HCD, Table 23 calculates affordable
rental rates for households in each income category by household size. These estimates take into
account utility costs provided by the Housing Authority of the City of Napa. Affordable rents for
extremely low-income households range from around $370 to $490 per month, depending on both
household and unit size. The maximum rent affordable to a very low-income four-person
household is approximately $890 per month. A one-bedroom unit renting for $900 per month is
both affordable and appropriately sized for two-person low-income and moderate-income
households, though market-rate rental housing is not affordable to most extremely low-, and very
low-income households.

While the studio, one-bedroom, and some of the two-bedroom market rate apartments in St. Helena
are affordable to low-income and a portion of very low-income households, they are in limited
supply. The Grandview Apartment complex has only 23 units with their own kitchens as opposed
to communal kitchen facilities, and the Tripoli apartments only 18 units. The units in the Cottages



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at Stonebridge are significantly more expensive, making them affordable to only households with
moderate incomes and above. In addition, the single-family rental units listed in the last three
months have all been significantly more expensive.

Affordable Housing Complexes
Table 24 lists the six affordable housing complexes in St. Helena. These include three rental
complexes and three for-sale subdivisions that increase the supply of housing and focus on meeting
the housing needs unmet by the private housing market. The three rental complexes, Hunt’s
Grove, Stonebridge, and Woodbridge, provide 186 units of affordable housing to St. Helena
residents. According to City staff, both Hunt’s Grove and Stonebridge currently have significant
waiting lists. Hunt’s Grove has an estimated two-year waiting period, while Stonebridge reports a
waiting list of approximately five families for each type of unit they offer. The three for-sale
subdivisions (Marietta Townhomes, Wallis Subdivision, and Vintner’s Court) provide 31
affordable for-sale units with deed restrictions. The City of St. Helena contributed funds to the
Marietta townhomes in 1997, including $130,000 in silent second mortgages and $12,500 in
building fees.

In addition, mobile home parks like Vineyard Valley, although not officially regulated as
affordable housing, do represent a housing option in St. Helena that is affordable to moderate
income households.

Summary
The number of housing units in St. Helena increased by around 40 units between 2000 and 2008,
driven by an increase in the number of single-family units. However, the number of mobile homes,
a more affordable housing option than many market-rate units, has declined over the same period
due to acquisition of property to construct a flood project. Single-family units constituted 66
percent of the total housing units in St. Helena, followed by complexes containing five or more
units, which represent approximately 19 percent of total units. The housing stock in St. Helena is
relatively new with a higher percentage of homes built between 1980 and 2000 than in Napa
County or the Bay Area.

The housing market in St. Helena exhibited an above average vacancy rate. The high rate is
partially attributable to the inclusion of homes held vacant for seasonal, recreational, and
occasional use, but even after controlling for such homes, the vacancy rate in 2000 was still higher
than in Napa County or the Bay Area. Of occupied homes, almost 7 percent were overcrowded
while the majority of incidences of overcrowding occurred among renter households.

The incidence of excessive or severe housing cost burdens varies among owner and renter
households. For renters, the share of households with excessive or severe housing cost burden was



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higher in the lower income categories. However, significant portions of owner households in all
income categories faced high housing cost burdens.

The current market conditions in St. Helena enable only above moderate-income households to
purchase homes. The median price of a St. Helena home between August 2007 and August 2008
was $872,500. While some of the market rate apartment units are affordable to low-income and a
portion of very-low income households, the limited supply of market rate units affordable to very
low-income households and below means that affordable units are necessary to meet the needs
households at the lowest income levels. Three affordable rental and three for-sale housing
complexes in St. Helena provide 217 units of affordable housing. With the Woodbridge
Apartments’ Section 8 contract set to expire in 2018, an analysis of preservation and replacement
costs found that preservation of the units, assuming that the apartments are in good condition,
presents a less expensive option as compared to constructing new replacement units. There are a
number of qualified entities that the City could seek to engage in the process of developing a viable
plan to maintain the supply of affordable units. The City will need to pay particular attention to
this situation in the next Housing Element Update cycle, when the Section 8 contract will expire.




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Table 19: Single-Family Housing Sales Prices, St. Helena, August 2007 to August 2008
                            Units (a)              Minimum                          Annual                                     Total        Minimum Annual
                                   Percent            Unit           Down         Principal &      Property       Property    Annual       Household Income
Unit Sales Price        Number      Total            Price          Payment        Interest       Insurance        Taxes     Payment        Requirement (b)
Under $600,000               1         2.6%          $450,000        $90,000          $26,154           $796        $5,220     $32,170              $107,233
$600,000 - $649,999          1         2.6%          $600,000       $120,000          $34,871         $1,062        $6,960     $42,893              $142,978
$650,000 - $699,999          5        12.8%          $650,000       $130,000          $37,777         $1,150        $7,540     $46,468              $154,892
$700,000 - $749,999          4        10.3%          $700,000       $140,000          $40,683         $1,239        $8,120     $50,042              $166,807
$750,000 - $799,999          5        12.8%          $750,000       $150,000          $43,589         $1,327        $8,700     $53,617              $178,722
$800,000 - $849,999          2         5.1%          $800,000       $160,000          $46,495         $1,416        $9,280     $57,191              $190,637
$850,000 - $899,999          2         5.1%          $850,000       $170,000          $49,401         $1,504        $9,860     $60,765              $202,551
$900,000 - $949,999          1         2.6%          $900,000       $180,000          $52,307         $1,593       $10,440     $64,340              $214,466
$950,000 - $999,999          4        10.3%          $950,000       $190,000          $55,213         $1,681       $11,020     $67,914              $226,381
Over $1,000,000             14        35.9%        $1,000,000       $200,000          $58,119         $1,770       $11,600     $71,489              $238,296
Total                       39         100%

Median Single-Family Home Price $872,500

Notes:
(a) Number of single-family units sold in St. Helena between August 2007 and August 2008.
(b) Based upon the minimum unit price with the following ownership cost assumptions:
        Percent of Income for Housing Costs
         (Principal, Interest, Taxes, and Insurance)                     30%     of gross annual income
        Mortgage Terms
          Down Payment                                                   20%     of home value
          Annual Interest Rate                                            6%     fixed
          Loan Term                                                       30     years
        Annual Property Tax Rate                                       1.16%     of home value
        Annual Hazard Insurance                                        0.22%     of home value (c)
(c) Hazard Insurance includes the basic premium for hazard insurance plus an additional payment for flood insurance.

Sources: Dataquick.com, 2008; HCD, 2008; personal communication, State Farm Insurance, 2008; www.bankrate.com, 2008; Karen Scalabrini, Finance Director, City of St. Helena,
2007; BAE, 2008.
Table 20: Affordable For-Sale Housing Prices, Napa County, 2008
                                    Household Size        Household Size       Household Size
2008 Income Limits (a)                3-Persons             4-Persons            5-Persons
Very Low-Income                            $35,800               $39,800             $43,000
Low-Income                                 $55,350               $61,500             $66,400
Moderate-Income                            $86,000               $95,500            $103,100

                                                                                                                                                          Maximum
                                      Amount Avail.          Principal &           Property        Property    Mortgage     Total Monthly    Down-       Affordable
3-Person Household                     for Housing            Interest            Insurance         Taxes      Insurance      Payment       Payment      Home Price
 Very Low-Income                               $895                  $632                  $20         $107          $135          $895        $5,547       $110,943
 Low-Income                                   $1,384                 $977                  $32         $166          $209         $1,384       $8,578       $171,559
 Moderate-Income                              $2,150               $1,518                  $49         $258          $325         $2,150      $13,326       $266,511

                                                                                                                                                          Maximum
                                      Amount Avail.          Principal &           Property        Property    Mortgage     Total Monthly    Down-       Affordable
4-Person Household                     for Housing            Interest            Insurance         Taxes      Insurance      Payment       Payment      Home Price
 Very Low-Income                               $995                  $703                  $23         $119          $151          $995        $6,167       $123,339
 Low-Income                                   $1,538               $1,086                  $35         $184          $233         $1,538       $9,532       $190,648
 Moderate-Income                              $2,388               $1,686                  $55         $286          $361         $2,388      $14,801       $296,013

                                                                                                                                                          Maximum
                                      Amount Avail.          Principal &           Property        Property    Mortgage     Total Monthly    Down-       Affordable
5-Person Household                     for Housing            Interest            Insurance         Taxes      Insurance      Payment       Payment      Home Price
 Very Low-Income                              $1,075                 $759                  $25         $129          $163         $1,075       $6,663       $133,255
 Low-Income                                   $1,660               $1,172                  $38         $199          $251         $1,660      $10,289       $205,771
 Moderate-Income                              $2,578               $1,820                  $59         $309          $390         $2,578      $15,978       $319,565

Ownership Cost Assumptions
% of Income for Housing Costs                                         30% of gross annual income
Mortgage Terms
 Down Payment                                                           5%   of home value
 Annual Interest Rate                                                   6%   fixed
 Loan Term                                                              30   years
Annual Mortgage Insurance                                            1.54%   of mortgage
Annual property tax rate                                             1.16%   of home value
Annual Hazard Insurance                                              0.22%   of home value
Note:
(a) Income limits defined by the California Department of Housing and Community Development for Napa County.

Sources: Dataquick.com, 2008; HCD, 2008; personal communication, State Farm Insurance, 2008; personal communication, Umpqua Bank, 2008; www.bankrate.com, 2008; Karen
Scalabrini, Finance Director, City of St. Helena, 2007; BAE, 2008.
Table 21: Multi-Family Housing Survey Results for St. Helena, October 2008

                                                       Year Built/                      Number
       Complex Name                 Address            Renovated                        of Units    Zoning (a)
Woodbridge Apts.               727 Hunt Ave           Unknown                              50      HR
Unknown                        957 Hunt               1880                                  8      MR
Christine Apartments           723 Hunt               1971                                  4      MR
Hunts Grove Apartments         548 Hunt St.           1992                                 56      HR
Unknown                        933 Brown St.          Unknown                               4      HR
Cottages at Southbridge        1000 Brown St          1997                                 17      HR
Charter House                  1026 Charter Oak       Unknown                               5      MR
Stonebridge Apartments         990 College Ave        1993                                 80      HR
Unknown                        1332 Main St.          Unknown                              12      CB
Tripoli Court Apartments       1600 Main St.          Unknown                              18      MR
Grandview Apartments           1915 Main St           1901-1965                            48      MR
Unknown                        1520/1536 Main St.     1976                                  8      MR
Unknown                        1650 Main              Unknown                               5      MR
Unknown                        1095 Crinella          1972                                  7      MR
Unknown                        825 Allison            Unknown                               4      MR
Unknown                        1018 Allison           1965                                 12      HR
Silverado Orchards             601 Pope               Unknown                              94      HR
Unknown                        911 Pope               Unknown                               5      MR
Ogletree Apartments            1005 Pope              Unknown                               5      HR
Ogletree Apartments            999 Pope               Unknown                              28      HR
Unknown                        1043 Pope              Unknown                               5      MR
Unknown                        1112 Edwards           1940                                  4      MR
Unknown                        1133 Edwards           1888                                  6      MR
Unknown                        1145 Edwards           Unknown                               4      MR
Unknown                        1313 Monte Vista       1969                                  6      MR
Unknown                        1327 Monte Vista       Unknown                               6      MR
Unknown                        1328 Monte Vista       1980                                  4      MR
Unknown                        1336 Monte Vista       Unknown                               6      MR
Unknown                        1337 Monte Vista       1973                                  8      MR
Unknown                        1346 Monte Vista       Unknown                               4      MR
Unknown                        1347 Monte Vista       1972                                  6      MR
Unknown                        1356 Monte Vista       Unknown                               6      MR
Unknown                        1357 Monte Vista       1972                                  6      MR
Unknown                        1366 Monte Vista       1972                                  6      MR

TOTAL UNITS                                                                                  547

Note:
(a) MR = Medium Density Residential, HR = High Density Residential, CB = Central Business.

Sources: City of St. Helena, 2008; BAE, 2008.
Table 22: Market Rate Apartment Rental Rates, St. Helena, 2008
                                                  Year Built/       Number        Bedrooms/                         Square
Complex Name                      Address      Renovated            of Units      Bathrooms        Monthly Rent     Footage
Grandview Apartments           1915 Main St.      1901-1965               41   Studio                  $650-$850     Unknown
                                                                           7   1 Bdrm/1 Bath          $700-$1,100



Cottages at Stonebridge        1000 Brown St         1993                17    2 Bdrm/2 Bath               $1,475         960


Tripoli Court Apartments       1600 Main St.   Mid to late 1950’s        18    2 Bdrm/1 Bath                $650     1,000 +/-
                                                                          1    3 Bdrm/1 Bath (a)            $850     1,500 +/-

Note:
(a) This unit is a house on site.

Sources: Respective Property Owners and Managers, 2008; Bay Area Economics, 2008.
Table 23: Affordable Rents, Napa County, 2008
                                                                                 Income Limits/Household Size
Year/Income Category (a)           1 Person         2 Person        3 Person        4 Person      5 Person           6 Person        7 Person        8 Person
2008: Median $79,600
  Extremely Low-Income                $16,750         $19,100         $21,500          $23,900         $25,800         $27,700         $29,650         $31,550
  Very Low-Income                     $27,850         $31,850         $35,800          $39,800         $43,000         $46,150         $49,350         $52,550
  Low-Income                          $43,050         $49,200         $55,350          $61,500         $66,400         $71,350         $76,250         $81,200
  Median Income                       $55,700         $63,700         $71,600          $79,600         $86,000         $92,300         $98,700        $105,100
  Moderate-Income                     $66,900         $76,400         $86,000          $95,500        $103,100        $110,800        $118,400        $126,100


                                                                           Unit Size
Affordable Rents (b)                 Studio        1-Bedroom       2-Bedroom      3-Bedroom        4-Bedroom        5-Bedroom

Extremely Low-Income
  1-Person                               $365            $351
  2-Person                                               $410             $389
  3-Person                                                                $449            $430
  4-Person                                                                                $490            $458
  5-Person                                                                                                $505            $494

Very Low-Income
  1-Person                               $642            $628
  2-Person                                               $728             $707
  3-Person                                                                $806            $787
  4-Person                                                                                $887            $855
  5-Person                                                                                                $935            $924

Low-Income
  1-Person                             $1,022          $1,008
  2-Person                                             $1,162           $1,141
  3-Person                                                              $1,295          $1,276
  4-Person                                                                              $1,430          $1,398
  5-Person                                                                                              $1,520          $1,509

Moderate-Income
 1-Person                              $1,619          $1,605
 2-Person                                              $1,842           $1,821
 3-Person                                                               $2,061          $2,042
 4-Person                                                                               $2,280          $2,248
 5-Person                                                                                               $2,438          $2,427

Included Utilities (c)                    $59              $60             $68             $76             $85              $87

Notes:
(a) Income limits are 2008 California Department of Housing and Community Development income limits for Napa County.
(b) Affordable rents equal 30 percent of gross monthly income minus a utility allowance derived from figures released by the City of Napa Housing Division in January 2007. Allowances
include electricity for heating, cooking, water heating and other electric.
(c) Included utilities represents utility costs normally included in rent. These are water, sewer and trash collection.

Sources: HCD, 2008; HUD, 2008; City of Napa Housing Division, 2008; BAE, 2008.
Table 24: Affordable Housing Developments, St. Helena

                                                                        Bedrooms/
                                               Affordable Units         Bathrooms          Special      Current                                                              Affordability      Earliest Date
Project Name                   Address              Units                 Units            Needs         Owner                   Funding Sources                 Status      Requirement        of Expiration
Rental Housing
  Hunts Grove             548 Hunt Ave.                56           14- 1Bdr/ 1 Bath      n.a.        Bridge         9% Tax Credit Equity; Residential           Active    Low and                    2022
                                                                    28 - 2 Bdr/1 Bath                 Housing        Housing Construction Program; Bank                    Very-Low
                                                                    14 - 3 Bdr/2 Bath                                of America, First Nationwide Bank,                    Income
                                                                                                                     City of St. Helena, First Financial                   Households
                                                                                                                     Management.

  Stonebridge Apts.       990 College Ave.             80           8 - 1Bdr/1Bath        n.a.        EAH            9% Tax Credit Equity; HCD; Residential      Active    Low and                    2023
                                                                    36 - 2 Bdr/1 Bath                 Nonprofit      Housing Construction Program; City                    Very-Low
                                                                    28 - 3 Bdr/2 Bath                 Housing        of St. Helena; Federal Home Loan                      Income
                                                                    8 - 4 Bdr/2 Bath                  Corporation    Bank, Affordable Housing Program.                     Households

  Woodbridge Apts.        727 Hunt Ave.                50           48-1Bdr/1 Bath        Senior      Woodbridge     CHFA, Section 8                             Active    Very                     May, 2018
                                                                    2 - 2Bdr/1 Bath       Citizens    Guild                                                                Low-Income
                                                                                                                                                                           Households



For-Sale
  Wallis Subdivision                                   20           Unknown               n.a.        n.a.           Developer Financed                          Active    Moderate Income            n.a.
  Marietta Townhomes                                   10           Unknown               n.a.        n.a.           Napa Valley Community; City of St.          Active    Moderate Income            n.a.
                                                                                                                     Helena
  Vintner's Court         1012 Allison Ave.            1            5-bedroom             n.a.        n.a.           Developer Finance                           Active    Moderate Income            n.a.

Sources: City of St. Helena, Planning Department, 2008; Bridge Housing website, 2008; EAH Nonprofit Housing Corporation website, 2008; HUD Multifamily Affordable Housing and Section 8 Contracts
database, 2008; BAE, 2008.
Special Needs Populations
California Government Code Section 65583 (a) (7) requires an analysis of any special housing
needs, “such as those of the elderly, persons with disabilities, large families, farm workers, families
                                                                                           20
with female heads of household and families and persons in need of emergency shelter.” This
section provides estimates of the prevalence of each of these special needs populations, discusses
special housing concerns, and analyzes their housing cost burdens within St. Helena to the extent
that available data allows. Data sources include the 2000 Census, Claritas Inc., the California
Department of Finance (DoF), the HUD CHAS data set, California Employment Development
Department (EDD), as well as the Napa County Continuum of Care.

Persons with Disabilities
Disabilities can take many forms and have numerous implications for housing needs. Many
disabled people can live in conventional housing without any modifications, or with only minor
modifications, while some disabled people require substantial modifications and/or on-site care to
facilitate everyday living. Accessible units can be more expensive to build, due to features such as
ramps, extra wide doors, handrails, lowered counters, raised toilets, and a variety of other
accessibility elements. Compared to the general population, disabled persons are more likely to
                                        21
live alone, earn less, and be homeless.

Table 25 presents data on the estimated number of disabled persons in St. Helena, Napa County,
and the Bay Area. The 2008 estimates were derived by applying the Census 2000 distribution of
disabled persons to DoF and Claritas 2008 population estimates. As the total populations of St.
Helena, Napa County, and the Bay Area rose from 2000 to 2008, the data assume that the number
of disabled persons increased proportionately. Around 800 disabled persons over the age of five
lived in St. Helena in both 2000 and 2008. In 2008, this includes approximately 97 persons
between the ages of 5 and 20, 288 between the ages of 21 and 64, and 424 persons age 65 and
older. St. Helena and Napa County have almost the same percentage of disabled persons (around
15 to 16 percent of the total population). This represents a significantly higher percentage of
disabled persons relative to the five percent of Bay Area residents that are disabled.

In St. Helena and Napa County, a concentration of disabled persons exists among persons in the 21
to 64 age bracket, and the 65 and over category, relative to the Bay Area. About 13 and 15 percent
of the population over the age of 21 in St. Helena and Napa are disabled, compared to less than
four percent in the Bay Area. In St. Helena, the 21-64 age group features a concentration of

    20
         California Government Code Section 65583 (a)(7)
    21
      Tootelian, Dennis, and Gaedeke, Ralph. “The Impact of Housing Availability, Accessibility, and
    Affordability on People with Disabilities”. Sacramento, CA: State Independent Living Council. April, 1999.
    As cited in the Analysis of Senate Bill 1025.


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sensory disabilities, employment disabilities, and those individuals with two or more disabilities.
Furthermore, high rates of sensory, physical, and two or more disabilities account for a large part of
the 21 to 64, and 65 and over disabled population.

Elderly
The elderly population often requires special housing to accommodate part-time or full time care.
Meanwhile, the elderly are also more likely to have lower incomes than the population in general.
Other requirements can include modifications to doors and steps to improve accessibility and
installation of hand rails and grab bars to make bathing, toileting, and other daily activities safer.
Housing types such as apartments or condominiums that do not entail high maintenance
requirements can also be beneficial as the elderly continue to age and become less able to perform
extensive home maintenance work on their own. The elderly are also commonly on fixed incomes
while expending more of their income on medical care, which can result in a need for affordable
housing.

Elderly Households
Table 26 presents data for 2000 and 2008 for age of householder. Table 26 is different from Table
3 in that Table 3 presents the age of all residents while Table 26 presents the age of the person
whose name the unit is owned or rented under.

St. Helena, similar to Napa County, had a higher percentage of residents over the age of 65
compared to the Bay Area. Around 27.5 percent of St. Helena households, 25.5 percent in Napa
County, and almost 19 percent of Bay Area households had heads of households over the age of 65
in both 2000 and 2008. Across all three jurisdictions, more elderly households owned rather than
rented their homes.

In 2008, among owner-occupied St. Helena households there are 220 households (about 9 percent
of total households) with a head of household between the ages of 65 and 74, and 230 households
(9.5 percent of total households) with a householder age 75 and older. A smaller number of elderly
households in St. Helena live in rental units, with 50 households (2.1 percent of total households)
having a householder between ages 65 and 74, and about 160 households (almost seven percent of
total households) with a head of household age 75 and older. Napa had a similar percentage of
elderly owner-occupied households, with nearly 10 percent of total households with a head of
household between the ages of 65 and 74, and 10.6 percent of total households headed by an
individual age 75 or older. Napa, however, had a lower percentage of elderly renter households,
with 1.7 percent and 2.0 percent of total households headed by a householder aged 65 to 74 or age
75 and older, respectively. The Bay Area had lower percentages of both owner-occupied
households with householders aged 65 to 74 (about 7 percent of total households), with
householders age 75 or older (6.7 percent of total households) as compared to St. Helena and Napa.



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For renter households, the 2.3 percent of total Bay Area households had a head of household
between the ages of 65 and 74, and 2.8 percent were headed by a person age 75 or older.

Additional data from the 2000 Census reveal that St. Helena has a somewhat disproportionate
number of females over the age of 64. In 2000, there were about 370 males (about 6 percent of the
total population) and 660 females (approximately 11 percent of the total population) over the age of
64. In Napa, the population over age 64 is comprised of the 8,200 males (6.6 percent of the total
population) and 10,900 females (nearly 9 percent of the total population). Therefore, the
percentage of females over the age of 64 is slightly higher in St. Helena than in Napa. Considering
that the DoF projects that the number of elderly females will grow more rapidly than the number of
elderly males in Napa County through 2050, it appears likely that St. Helena’s concentration of
elderly females will increase in the coming years.

Elderly Housing Cost Burden
Table 27 contains information from the 2000 Comprehensive Housing Affordability Strategy
(CHAS) database. Elderly households, which the CHAS database defines as households with at
least one person over the age of 62, are again much more likely to be owner households (72 percent
of total elderly households) than renter households (28 percent of total elderly households). The
majority of elderly households (62 percent) have housing cost burdens of less than 30 percent,
while the remaining households have excessive (17 percent) or severe (21 percent) housing cost
burdens.

The 62 percent of elderly households with housing cost burdens of less than 30 percent represent a
slightly smaller proportion of this subpopulation relative to the share of total St. Helena
households, as shown in Table 16 (68 percent). The share of elderly households with excessive
housing cost burdens closely aligned with trends in total St. Helena households. However, the
percentage of elderly households with severe housing cost burdens (21 percent) was higher than the
share exhibited across all St. Helena households (15 percent).

Across both extremely low-income owner and renter households, about one-half of the households
had housing cost burdens of less than 30 percent, nine percent experienced excessive housing cost
burdens, and 40 percent had severe housing cost burdens. For elderly extremely low-income
households, there were fewer owners (60) than renters (about 90), though the number of owner and
renter households experiencing severe housing cost burdens was comparable.

Only 45 percent of elderly very low-income households had housing cost burdens below 30
percent. Elderly very low-income households with an excessive or severe housing cost burdens
amounted to 20 and 35 percent, respectively. Of the 100 very low-income elderly households, 65
are owners and 35 are renters. Though the same number of very low-income elderly renter and



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owner households experienced excessive housing cost burdens, proportionately fewer owner
households compared to renter households had a severe housing cost burden.

Just over one-half of elderly low-income households had housing cost burdens of less than 30
percent, while 16 percent experienced severe housing cost burdens and 28 percent had excessive
housing cost burdens. For low-income households, the ratio of owners to renters favors owners,
with 95 owner households and only 30 renter households. Unlike very low-income households,
severe housing cost burdens were more common among owner than renter households.

Finally, in the moderate-income and above category, 75 percent of elderly households had housing
cost burdens below 30 percent, while 20 percent had a excessive and five percent severe housing
cost burdens. For moderate-income and above households a higher proportion own their homes,
with 270 homeowners relative to the 35 households that rent their homes. Among this income
group, owner households represent the majority of those with excessive housing cost burdens.
Furthermore, severe housing cost burdens in this income category only occurred in the case of
owner households, and not in renter households.

Additional Elderly Housing Needs
Given the high proportion of the St. Helena households that are elderly, especially elderly age 75
and older, it is important to work to address their housing needs. In her work with the Area
Agency on Aging serving Napa and Solano Counties, planner Terry Restelli-Deits identified a
number of needs of the elderly in St. Helena that are currently being met as well as those needs
                                                                                 22
which St. Helena could help meet during this Housing Element planning period. Ms. Restelli-
Deits cited the work of the Rianda house, which provides seniors with a meeting place and valuable
information on topics ranging from housing and income-assistance to medical referrals, as a
welcome and positive resource for the elderly in St. Helena.

There are still many needs of the elderly that are not being met, however, and changes to St.
Helena’s housing policies could make it easier for the elderly to age in place. Often, when the
elderly person are released from a hospital stay and return to their own homes, they have trouble
navigating inside the home and getting to neighborhood services like the grocery store and doctor’s
office. Two possible ways to help remedy this situation within the scope of the Housing Element
would be for the City of St. Helena to consider the proximity to public transportation, paratransit
routes, and local services when approving senior housing, and to adopt design standards for new
residential construction that would ensure accessibility.

Certain design strategies incorporated into the City’s policies and programs concerning new and


    22
         Personal Communication. Terry Restelli-Deits, Planner, Area Agency on Aging. December 15, 2008.


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existing housing can help prevent falls. For example, incorporating features detailed in AB 1400
can help reduce falls and accommodate the needs of people of all ages and abilities. Examples
include:

·        zero-step entrances                            ·     grab bars near toilets and bath/shower
·        accessible first floor bathrooms               ·     reinforced handrails on stairs and ramps
·        wider doorways                                 ·     accessible kitchen appliances, shelving
·        no step bathtubs and showers                   ·     more energy efficient, brighter lighting

Additional policies and programs that the City should consider include zoning that encourages
families to use options such as Accessory Dwelling Units to accommodate their aging relatives or
caregivers. Such policies could also provide for more elder-friendly neighborhoods, improved
lighting to increase visibility, and safe sidewalks and walking paths. For example, sidewalks that
allow for safe tree root growth, such as sidewalk materials made of rubber (used in Santa Barbara
and other communities) would help improve pedestrian safety.

Large Households
The U.S. Census defines a large family as one containing five or more related members. The
California Department of Housing and Community Development recommends using this definition
                  23
of a large family. As displayed in Table 28, almost all large households in St. Helena are family
households. In 2008, only two non-family households have five members or more, while there are
over 280 large family households.

As of 2000, St. Helena had about 255 large households, including only one non-family large
household, representing close to 11 percent of the total households in St. Helena. The increase of
almost 30 large households, to about 285 households, coupled with a decrease in 2-person
households led the percent of large family households to increase to nearly 12 percent in 2008.
The share of large households in St. Helena in 2008 closely aligns with that of Napa County (just
over 12 percent) and the Bay Area (about 13 percent).

Large Family Housing Cost Burden
Table 29 presents the housing cost burdens for large family households in St. Helena by tenure.
The total number of large family households in Table 28 (about 240 households) derived from
HUD-published CHAS data is slightly below the estimate presented in Table 29, derived from
Claritas and DoF data. Across all income levels, the majority of large households (78 percent of
large family households) have housing cost burdens of less than 30 percent.

    23
      California Department of Housing and Community Development. Building Blocks for an Effective Housing
    Element: Special Needs, Large and Female-Headed Households. http://www.hcd.ca.gov/hpd/
    housing_element/index.html. Accessed on Jun 12, 2008.


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About 19 percent of large households have excessive housing cost burdens, with the remaining
three percent experiencing severe housing cost burdens. A comparison of all the housing cost
burdens for all households in St. Helena from Table 16 with the housing cost burdens of large
families indicates that a greater share of large family households have housing cost burdens of less
than 30 percent relative to the 68 percent of total households experiencing this level of housing cost
burden. In addition, 15 percent of total households in St. Helena had severe housing cost burdens
in 2000 as compared to only three percent for large families.

Of the 18 extremely low-income large family households in St. Helena, there were ten owner and
eight renter households. All of the owners had an excessive housing cost burdens and every renter
household had a severe housing cost burdens. In the case of very low-income households, all 22
households rented their housing units. These renters were split almost evenly between those with
housing cost burdens of less than 30 percent and those with excessive housing cost burdens.

There were significantly more low-income large family households than either extremely low- or
very low-income households. All of the 53 low-income households had housing cost burdens of
less than 30 percent. None of the owner households (14) or the renter households (39) had
excessive or severe housing cost burdens.

The almost 150 moderate-income and above households represented over 60 percent of total large
family households. About 83 percent of the moderate-income and above households had housing
cost burdens of less than 30 percent, while around 17 percent had excessive housing cost burdens,
and none of these households had severe housing cost burdens. The incidences of excessive
housing cost burden are concentrated among owner households, with 25 of the 94 owner
households experiencing excessive housing cost burdens. All 55 renter households had housing
cost burdens less than 30 percent.

Single Female-Headed Households with Children
Single female-headed households with children tend to have a higher need for affordable housing
compared to family households in general. In 1999, the poverty rate of female-householder
families nationally stood at a record low of 27.8 percent, but that was still significantly above the
                                                                               24
poverty rate of all families (9.3 percent) and married couples (4.8 percent). In addition, single
female-headed households with children are more likely to need childcare since the mother is often
the sole source of income and the sole caregiver for children within the family.


    24
      U.S Department of Commerce News “Poverty Rate Lowest in 20 Years, Household Income at Record High,
    Census Bureau Reports” September 26, 2000. http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/2000/cb00-158.html.
    Accessed on June 10, 2008.


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In 2000, the percent of single-female headed households with children in St. Helena (6.5 percent of
total households) slightly exceeded the percentages calculated in both Napa County (about five
percent) and the Bay Area (5.5 percent). Assuming that the percentage of single female-headed
households held steady from 2000 to 2008, then the number single female-headed households
barely increased given that the total households in the City of St. Helena only rose by 35
households.

Among St. Helena single-female households in 2008, the share of owner households (three percent
of total households) is less than the share of renter households (3.5 percent of total households).
Napa County and the Bay Area have a lower percentage of owner households (1.7 and 1.8 percent
of total households, respectively) and a similar percentage of renter households (3.2 and 3.7 percent
of total households, respectively) compared to St. Helena

Farmworkers
Vineyards in and around St. Helena employ both full-time and seasonal farmworkers. Data on the
conditions of farmworkers specifically residing in St. Helena are not available; therefore,
information regarding farmworkers in Napa County is used to examine the conditions in St.
Helena. The housing needs of full-time, permanent farmworkers is very similar to those of other
low-income households, however the additional seasonal workers who are only employed during
harvest time need short-term affordable housing options.

Two data sources provide statistics on the number of farmworkers in Napa County: the California
Employment Development Department (EDD) and a 2007 study by the California Institute for
Rural Studies. The EDD provided the information presented in Table 30. EDD data are derived
from Current Employment Statistics (CES) data and CES defines employment as “the total number
of persons on establishment payrolls employed full or part-time who receive pay for any part of the
                                                    25
pay period that includes the 12th day of the month.” Seasonal employees may not all be captured
in the CES figures. Over the 15 years from 1993 through 2007, Table 31 indicates that Napa
County farm employment continually fluctuated, but overall farm employment has risen by 1,700
jobs over the period. In 1993, farm employment was 3,400 and farm employment peaked at 5,300
in 2002. Since 2001, it remained relatively consistent, registering employment of 5,100 in 2007.

The California Institute for Rural Studies completed an extensive assessment of farmworker
housing needs in Napa County in 2007. The Institute completed a survey of agricultural
employers, interviewed farmworkers and others with knowledge of farmworker housing needs,
conducted focus groups, and gathered additional data from secondary data sources. Table 32
presents an estimate of the total farmworkers in Napa County from the assessment. Workers are

    25
      Bureau of Labor Statistics. http://www.bls.gov/ces/cesfaq.htm. Accessed on April 14th, 2008.


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categorized by employment period. A “regular worker” works seven months or more, a “seasonal
worker” between three and six months, and a “harvest worker” less than three months. As of 2005,
Napa County employed almost 6,800 farmworkers, including 3,800 regular workers, 1,300
seasonal workers, and the remaining 1,800 harvest workers.

While the study does not allow for an estimation of the number of farmworkers who work
specifically in St. Helena, information is available on the number of farmworkers who live in St.
Helena. Part of the study involved face-to-face interviews with 189 farmworkers employed in
                                                    26
Napa County during the 2006 wine grape harvest. Of the interviewees, 64 percent (121 people)
lived in Napa County. Among this subgroup, only five percent (six people) lived in St. Helena.
Assuming that the interviewees were representative of the 6,800 farmworkers in Napa County this
would indicate that around 217 farmworkers lived in St. Helena in 2005.

The Institute’s face-to-face interviews with farmworkers revealed that during the week, 46 percent
of farmworkers stay in apartments, 40 percent in homes, five percent in labor centers, four percent
                                                                           27
in garages, three percent in motels, and the final two percent in trailers. The interview questions
also covered the amount of money that farmworkers spend on housing and Table 33 summarizes
the results. The majority of farmworkers (87 percent) rent housing units. Accompanied
farmworkers, those with a spouse and/or children, reported paying $319 per adult for rental
                                                                  28
housing compared to $218 per adult for unaccompanied adults. Among survey respondents living
in Napa County, the rent rises to $345 for accompanied and $254 for unaccompanied farmworkers.
In addition to the rental costs listed above, 55 percent of respondents who live in apartments
indicated that they had to pay extra money to cover utilities, which averaged $66 dollars per month.
Those farmworkers who own their own homes (11 percent of survey respondents) reported average
monthly mortgage costs of $2,167 plus an additional $225 for utilities.

Table 33 also provides additional information on the income of farmworkers, to assess the
affordability of housing units. The average income is categorized by farmworker occupation with
general laborers annually earning $15,745, specialized laborers $26,317, and foremen or
supervisors $37,000. These income levels rise when taking into account the income of other
members of farmworker households, with general laborers, specialized laborers, and foreman or
supervisors’ reporting average household incomes of $19,122, $33,268, and $50,294, respectively.
Given these levels of income, the Institute study calculated “that housing costs represent 23% of

    26
      California Institute for Rural Studies “An Assessment of the Demand for Farm Worker Housing in Napa
    County” March, 2007. (Pg. 3).
    27
      California Institute for Rural Studies “An Assessment of the Demand for Farm Worker Housing in Napa
    County” March, 2007. (Pg. 15).
    28
      California Institute for Rural Studies “An Assessment of the Demand for Farm Worker Housing in Napa
    County” March, 2007. (Pg. 16).


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gross annual income. Nonetheless, rental costs are 35% of income when remittances are subtracted
                                29
from gross household income.” This suggests that, at least among the sample of farmworkers
surveyed, housing costs are at or above the affordability levels, indicating continued need for
additional affordable housing for farmworkers or for other types of assistance to farmworker
households.

The results of the study “An Assessment of the Demand for Farm Worker Housing in Napa
County” indicate that the existing farm labor centers address the needs of about five percent of the
                             30
farmworkers in the County. Only unaccompanied persons can live at the three public farm labor
centers in the County, the Calistoga Center, the Mondavi Center, and the River Ranch Center.
Across the three centers, the occupancy rate did not reach 100 percent in fiscal year 2004-2005,
                                                                                    31
and the occupancy rate was below 50 percent in many of the non-summer months. In recent
years, the temporary, overflow housing available for farmworkers in the County has not been
         32
utilized. The remaining 95 percent of farmworkers and their families live in housing outside of
these centers. The cost of market rate rentals can exceed farmworker household incomes and may
result in overcrowding. St. Helena can help to remedy this problem by creating additional rental
housing that is affordable to lower income households such as farmworkers.

Families and Persons in Need of Emergency Shelters
As previously mentioned, data are not available on the homeless population of St. Helena
specifically. Consequently, data for Napa County inform a discussion of families and persons in
need of emergency shelter in St. Helena. The two main sources of data on homeless in Napa
County are 2005 Ten Year Plan to End Homelessness and the 2007 annual homelessness plan
completed by the Napa County Continuum of Care (CoC). The CoC is a HUD-regulated document
that is required to receive federal assistance. The CoC survey, sponsored by homeless
organizations and agencies throughout the county, estimates the difference between the demand for
emergency shelter, transitional housing, and permanent supportive housing and the supply of such
faculties.

Exhibit 1 in the Napa CoC presents a point-in-time survey of the homeless persons in Napa County
on January 1, 2007. This is not an annual estimate of homeless needs throughout the year, but
rather an estimate of the needs of the homeless in Napa County on one particular day. As shown in

    29
      California Institute for Rural Studies “An Assessment of the Demand for Farm Worker Housing in Napa
    County” March, 2007. (Pg. 26).
    30
      California Institute for Rural Studies “An Assessment of the Demand for Farm Worker Housing in Napa
    County” March, 2007. (Pg. 15).
    31
      California Institute for Rural Studies “An Assessment of the Demand for Farm Worker Housing in Napa
    County” March, 2007. (Pg. 4).
    32
         Ibid.


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Table 32, the Napa County survey estimated a need for approximately 430 emergency shelter,
transitional housing, and permanent supportive housing beds. At present, there are only 274 beds
available countywide, leaving an unmet need of approximately 156 beds, including 63 for
individuals and 93 for families. The needs of St. Helena residents also appear to be growing. The
St. Helena Community Food Pantry run by the Seventh Day Adventist Church serves around 120
                                                                             33
families per week, and this is about a 25 percent increase from one year ago. This year the Food
Pantry had received about 8 to 10 new applications for food each month.

Given the documented need for emergency shelters in Napa County, St. Helena is subject to
Government Code Section 65583(a)(4). This code section, which became effective as of January 1,
2008, requires that St. Helena accommodate the development of at least one, year-round,
emergency shelter within its jurisdiction and have capacity in either St. Helena or County
                                             34 35
emergency shelters for homeless residents.         St. Helena can meet this requirement in one of two
ways, 1) designate zone(s) within one year that allow emergency shelters as a permitted use or 2)
“adopting and implementing a multi-jurisdictional agreement, with no more than two adjacent
                                                                                         36 37
jurisdictions, to develop at least one year-round emergency shelter within two years.”

Therefore, St. Helena must further its efforts to provide emergency shelters by either amending the
Municipal Code to allow emergency shelters as a permitted use by State established deadline of
August 31, 2010 or by establishing plans with adjacent jurisdictions to build new emergency
shelter facilities to meet the bed shortage by August 31, 2011. In relation to unmet transitional and
supportive housing needs, State law only requires that there are no undue governmental constraints.

Summary
The disabled population of St. Helena equals around 15 percent of the total population ages five
years and above. Napa County has a similar percentage, while the in the Bay Area as a whole, only
about five percent of the total population has disabilities. In St. Helena, people in the 65 and older
age category represent the greatest number of people with disabilities.

The elderly population of St. Helena represents a higher percentage of the total population, at about

    33
      Personal Communication. Linda Bertoli, Board President of the St. Helena Food Pantry. December 19,
    2008.
    34
     Building Block for Effective Housing Elements, “Adequate Sites Inventory and Analysis: Zoning for
    Emergency Shelters and Transitional Housing”. http://www.hcd.ca.gov/hpd/housing_element/index.html.
    Accessed on April 25, 2008.
    35
     Senate Bill 2, Chapter 633. Amendment to Acts 655582, 65583 and 65589.5. Approved by Governor on
    October 13, 2007. Effective January 1, 2008.
    36
         Ibid.
    37
         Ibid.


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27.5 percent as compared to approximately 25.5 percent in Napa County and almost 19 percent in
the Bay Area. Elderly households are less likely to have housing cost burdens of less than 30
percent, and more likely to have severe housing cost burdens compared to the total population of
St. Helena.

Large family households in St. Helena constitute almost 12 percent of total households, which
closely aligns to the rates in Napa County and the Bay Area. Among these large family
households, a higher percentage has housing cost burdens below 30 percent compared to the
general population of St. Helena. However, all extremely low- and very low-income large families
experienced excessive or severe housing cost burdens in 2000.

Single female-headed households with children represent around 6.5 percent of total St. Helena
households. Although the number of single female-headed households is small, it is likely that a
higher percentage of these types of households relative to the general household population in St.
Helena have incomes below the poverty line.

Finally, St. Helena addresses the needs of both farmworker and homeless needs through
countywide cooperation. The study by the California Institute for Rural Studies, which examines
the housing needs of farmworkers, concluded that farm labor centers only meet the needs of a small
subsection of farmworkers. The majority of farmworkers rely on market rate housing, which is
often overcrowded. In addition, the current supply of emergency shelters, transitional housing, and
permanent supportive housing does not meet the demand for each of these housing types.
Therefore, St. Helena must work with the County and other incorporated cities to address the
unmet demand for emergency shelters in accordance with the provisions outlined in Government
Code Section 65583(a)(4).




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Table 25: Civilian Non-Institutionalized Population with Disabilities, 2000 and 2008
                                                           City of St. Helena                                  Napa County                                          Bay Area
                                                   2000                    2008 (est.) (a)              2000               2008 (est.) (a)                 2000                2008 (est.) (a)
                                                          Percent                   Percent                 Percent                 Percent                    Percent                  Percent
Age Range and Disability Type            Population       of Total     Population   of Total   Population   of Total  Population    of Total      Population   of Total   Population    of Total
Age 5-15                                        24           0.4%             24        0.4%         791       0.7%         866         0.7%         42,278       0.7%       44,118         0.7%
  Sensory Disability                              0          0.0%               0      0.0%           36      0.0%           39        0.0%           3,858      0.1%         4,026        0.1%
  Physical Disability                             0          0.0%               0      0.0%           30      0.0%           33        0.0%           2,802      0.0%         2,924        0.0%
  Mental Disability                             18           0.3%             18       0.3%         437       0.4%          478        0.4%         24,611       0.4%        25,682        0.4%
  Self-Care disability                            0          0.0%               0      0.0%           37      0.0%           41        0.0%           1,969      0.0%         2,055        0.0%
  Two or More Disabilities (b)                    6          0.1%               6      0.1%         251       0.2%          275        0.2%           9,038      0.1%         9,431        0.1%

Age 16-20                                        74         1.3%             73       1.3%         1,150       1.0%          1,259       1.0%        55,421      0.9%        57,833       0.9%
  Sensory Disability                              0         0.0%              0       0.0%            38       0.0%             42       0.0%         1,992      0.0%         2,079       0.0%
  Physical Disability                             0         0.0%              0       0.0%            65       0.1%             71       0.1%         1,729      0.0%         1,804       0.0%
  Mental Disability                               0         0.0%              0       0.0%          210        0.2%           230        0.2%         7,533      0.1%         7,861       0.1%
  Self-Care disability                            0         0.0%              0       0.0%             0       0.0%              0       0.0%           278      0.0%           290       0.0%
  Go-Outside-Home Disability                      6         0.1%              6       0.1%            94       0.1%           103        0.1%         8,378      0.1%         8,743       0.1%
  Employment Disability                          18         0.3%             18       0.3%          315        0.3%           345        0.3%        14,758      0.2%        15,400       0.2%
  Two or More Disabilities (b)                   50         0.9%             50       0.9%          428        0.4%           469        0.4%        20,753      0.3%        21,656       0.3%

Age 21-64                                      290          5.2%            288       5.2%        10,006       8.6%         10,955       8.6%       164,364      2.6%       171,519       2.6%
  Sensory Disability                            15          0.3%             15       0.3%           945       0.8%          1,035       0.8%         7,650      0.1%         7,983       0.1%
  Physical Disability                           10          0.2%             10       0.2%         1,421       1.2%          1,556       1.2%        15,931      0.3%        16,624       0.3%
  Mental Disability                              3          0.1%              3       0.1%           354       0.3%            388       0.3%         6,788      0.1%         7,083       0.1%
  Self-Care disability                           0          0.0%              0       0.0%            16       0.0%             18       0.0%           349      0.0%           364       0.0%
  Go-Outside-Home Disability                     0          0.0%              0       0.0%           416       0.4%            455       0.4%         8,878      0.1%         9,264       0.1%
  Employment Disability                         61          1.1%             61       1.1%         3,398       2.9%          3,720       2.9%        45,414      0.7%        47,391       0.7%
  Two or More Disabilities (b)                 201          3.6%            200       3.6%         3,456       3.0%          3,784       3.0%        79,354      1.3%        82,808       1.3%

Age 65 and Over                                427          7.6%            424       7.6%         7,147       6.1%          7,825       6.1%        61,895      1.0%        64,589       1.0%
  Sensory Disability                            79          1.4%             78       1.4%           913       0.8%          1,000       0.8%         5,002      0.1%         5,220       0.1%
  Physical Disability                           71          1.3%             71       1.3%         1,758       1.5%          1,925       1.5%        12,921      0.2%        13,483       0.2%
  Mental Disability                              0          0.0%              0       0.0%           188       0.2%            206       0.2%         1,762      0.0%         1,839       0.0%
  Self-Care disability                           0          0.0%              0       0.0%            13       0.0%             14       0.0%           256      0.0%           267       0.0%
  Go-Outside-Home Disability                    39          0.7%             39       0.7%           747       0.6%            818       0.6%         8,428      0.1%         8,795       0.1%
  Two or More Disabilities (b)                 238          4.3%            236       4.3%         3,528       3.0%          3,863       3.0%        33,526      0.5%        34,985       0.5%
Total Disabled Population                      815           15%            809        15%        19,094        16%         20,904        16%       323,958        5%       338,060         5%

Total Population 5 Years and Over             5,591                       5,553                  116,716                   127,783                 6,345,489               6,621,706

Notes:
(a) 2008 figures were derived using California Department of Finance and Claritas population estimates with Census 2000 disability distribution figures.
(b) Not counted in individual categories listed above.

Sources: Census 2000, 2008; California Department of Finance, 2008; Claritas, 2008; BAE, 2008.
Table 26: Household Tenure by Age of Householder, 2000 and 2008
                                             City of St. Helena                                Napa County                                          Bay Area
                                     2000 (a)               2008 (est.) (b)          2000 (a)            2008 (est.) (b)                 2000 (a)             2008 (est.) (b)
                                           Percent                   Percent               Percent                Percent                      Percent                 Percent
Age of Householder               Number     of Total     Number      of Total    Number     of Total  Number      of Total          Number      of Total   Number      of Total
Owner-Occupied
  15-24                                9        0.4%            9       0.4%          152         0.3%        168        0.3%           8,496        0.3%          8,810          0.3%
  25-34                               25        1.1%           25       1.0%        1,943         4.3%      2,151        4.4%         134,030        5.4%        138,990          5.4%
  35-54                              542       22.8%          536      22.2%       12,934        28.5%     14,314       29.0%         695,711       28.2%        721,458         28.2%
  55-64                              301       12.7%          298      12.3%        5,365        11.8%      5,938       12.0%         245,606       10.0%        254,695         10.0%
  65-74                              221        9.3%          218       9.1%        4,426         9.7%      4,898        9.9%         174,781        7.1%        181,249          7.1%
  75 and older                       233        9.8%          230       9.5%        4,734        10.4%      5,240       10.6%         165,335        6.7%        171,454          6.7%
Subtotal: Owner-Occupied           1,332         56%        1,316        55%       29,554          65%     32,708         66%       1,423,958         58%      1,476,657           58%

Renter-Occupied
  15-24                               21        0.9%           22       0.9%        1,030         2.3%      1,085        2.2%          78,151        3.2%         81,006          3.2%
  25-34                              241       10.1%          252      10.4%        3,927         8.7%      4,137        8.4%         316,675       12.8%        328,245         12.8%
  35-54                              489       20.5%          513      21.2%        7,083        15.6%      7,462       15.1%         437,577       17.7%        453,564         17.7%
  55-64                               93        3.9%           97       4.0%        1,369         3.0%      1,442        2.9%          83,920        3.4%         86,986          3.4%
  65-74                               48        2.0%           50       2.1%          799         1.8%        841        1.7%          56,975        2.3%         59,056          2.3%
  75 and older                       157        6.6%          164       6.8%        1,640         3.6%      1,728        3.5%          68,763        2.8%         71,276          2.8%
Subtotal: Renter-Occupied          1,048         44%        1,098        45%       15,848          35%     16,695         34%       1,042,061         42%      1,080,133           42%

Total Households                   2,380        100%        2,414       100%       45,402        100%      49,403        100%       2,466,019       100%       2,556,790         100%

Notes:
(a) 2000 figures were derived using Census Summary File 1 total household figures, and Census Summary File 3 households by age of householder and tenure distribution figures.
(b) 2008 figures were estimated by applying a calculation of the Census 2000 age of householder percentage allocation for each tenure subcategory to the 2008 California
Department of Finance and Claritas total households estimates.

Sources: Census 2000, 2008; California Department of Finance, 2008; Claritas, 2008; BAE, 2008.
Table 27: Elderly Households and Housing Cost Burden, City of St. Helena, 1999 (a)
                                                   All Income           Extremely Low-Income           Very Low-Income               Low-Income             Moderate and Above
                                                     Levels            (Less than 30% of AMFI)       (30% to 50% of AMFI)        (50% to 80% of AMFI)       (Over 80% of AMFI)
                                                           Percent                   Percent                     Percent                    Percent                    Percent
Owner Households                                Number     of Total     Number       of Total       Number       of Total       Number      of Total       Number      of Total
  With 0% to 30% Housing Cost Burden               320       47.1%           20          13.4%           45          45.0%           50         40.0%         205          67.2%
  With 30% to 50% Housing Cost Burden               90       13.3%           10           6.7%           10          10.0%           20         16.0%          50          16.4%
  With 50% or Greater Housing Cost Burden           80       11.8%           30          20.1%           10          10.0%           25         20.0%          15           5.0%
Subtotal: Owner-Occupied Households                490       72.2%           60          40.3%           65          65.0%           95         76.0%         270          88.5%

Renter Households
  With 0% to 30% Housing Cost Burden                100      14.7%            55          36.9%            0           0.0%          20          16.0%           25           8.2%
  With 30% to 50% Housing Cost Burden                24       3.5%             4           2.7%           10          10.0%           0           0.0%           10           3.3%
  With 50% or Greater Housing Cost Burden            65       9.6%            30          20.1%           25          25.0%          10           8.0%            0           0.0%
Subtotal: Renter-Occupied Households                189      27.8%            89          59.7%           35          35.0%          30          24.0%           35          11.5%

Total Households                                    679       100%           149           100%         100            100%         125           100%         305            100%

Note:
(a) Figures reported above are based on the HUD-published CHAS 2000 data, which reports 1999 incomes. CHAS data reflect HUD-defined household income limits, for various
household sizes. Total household figures may vary from those reported in Table 2 due to different estimation methodologies. Figures may differ from those reported in Table 4 due
to variances between HUD-based data sets.

Sources: 2000 CHAS, huduser.org, 2008; Claritas Inc., 2008; BAE, 2008.
Table 28: Family and Non-Family Households by Size, 2000 and 2008
                                                 City of St. Helena                               Napa County                                         Bay Area
                                             2000              2008 (est.) (a)             2000             2008 (est.)                      2000                2008 (est.)
                                                Percent                Percent                Percent              Percent                      Percent                Percent
Household Type and Size                 Number   of Total    Number    of Total       Number   of Total  Number    of Total           Number     of Total    Number     of Total
Family Households (b)
  2-person Household                        652      27.4%         628      26.0%      13,309      29.3%      14,192      28.7%         593,764      24.1%        606,959      23.7%
  3-person Household                        281      11.8%         289      12.0%       6,323      13.9%       7,010      14.2%         362,953      14.7%        379,966      14.9%
  4-person Household                        294      12.4%         292      12.1%       5,785      12.7%       6,213      12.6%         335,693      13.6%        344,081      13.5%
  5+ -person Household                      255      10.7%         282      11.7%       5,277      11.6%       5,984      12.1%         302,060      12.2%        325,879      12.7%
Subtotal: Family Households               1,482        62%       1,491        62%      30,694        68%      33,399        68%       1,594,470        65%      1,656,885        65%

Non-Family Households (b)
  1-person Household                        752      31.6%         757      31.4%      11,733      25.8%      12,748      25.8%        637,575       25.9%        660,906      25.8%
  2-person Household                        126       5.3%         138       5.7%       2,384       5.3%       2,544       5.1%        179,385        7.3%        181,456       7.1%
  3-person Household                         17       0.7%          24       1.0%         373       0.8%         452       0.9%         34,379        1.4%         36,347       1.4%
  4-person Household                          2       0.1%           2       0.1%         105       0.2%         112       0.2%         12,364        0.5%         12,169       0.5%
  5+ -person Household                        1       0.0%           2       0.1%         113       0.2%         148       0.3%          7,846        0.3%          9,027       0.4%
Subtotal: Non-Family Households             898        38%         923        38%      14,708        32%      16,004        32%        871,549         35%        899,905        35%

Total Households                          2,380       100%       2,414       100%      45,402       100%      49,403       100%       2,466,019      100%       2,556,790       100%


Notes:
(a) 2008 figures for the City of St. Helena are based on total household estimates from the California Department of Finance and family type by size distribution estimates from Claritas.
(b) A “family” household is two or more related people living together. Non-family households are single people living alone, or two or more unrelated people living together.

Sources: Census 2000, 2008; California Department of Finance, 2008; Claritas, 2008; BAE, 2008.
Table 29: Large Family Households and Housing Cost Burden, City of St. Helena, 1999 (a)
                                                   All Income          Extremely Low-Income           Very Low-Income               Low-Income             Moderate and Above
                                                     Levels           (Less than 30% of AMFI)       (30% to 50% of AMFI)        (50% to 80% of AMFI)       (Over 80% of AMFI)
                                                           Percent                  Percent                     Percent                    Percent                    Percent
Owner Households                                Number     of Total    Number       of Total       Number       of Total       Number      of Total       Number      of Total
  With 0% to 30% Housing Cost Burden                83      34.3%             0          0.0%            0           0.0%           14         26.4%          69          46.3%
  With 30% to 50% Housing Cost Burden               35      14.5%           10          55.6%            0           0.0%            0          0.0%          25          16.8%
  With 50% or Greater Housing Cost Burden            0        0.0%            0          0.0%            0           0.0%            0          0.0%           0           0.0%
Subtotal: Owner-Occupied Households                118      48.8%           10          55.6%            0           0.0%           14         26.4%          94          63.1%

Renter Households
  With 0% to 30% Housing Cost Burden                106     43.8%             0           0.0%           12          54.5%          39           73.6%          55          36.9%
  With 30% to 50% Housing Cost Burden                10      4.1%             0           0.0%           10          45.5%           0            0.0%           0           0.0%
  With 50% or Greater Housing Cost Burden             8      3.3%             8          44.4%            0           0.0%           0            0.0%           0           0.0%
Subtotal: Renter-Occupied Households                124     51.2%             8          44.4%           22         100.0%          39           73.6%          55          36.9%

Total Households                                    242      100%            18           100%           22           100%          53           100%         149            100%

Note:
(a) Figures reported above are based on the HUD-published CHAS 2000 data, which reports 1999 incomes. CHAS data reflect HUD-defined household income limits, for various household
sizes. Total household figures may vary from those reported in Table 2 due to different estimation methodologies. Figures may differ from those reported in Table 4 due to variances between
HUD-based data sets.

Sources: 2000 CHAS, huduser.org, 2008; Claritas Inc., 2008; BAE, 2008.
Table 30: Single Female-Headed Households with Children, 2000 and 2008

                                                                        City of St. Helena                          Napa County                                  Bay Area
                                                                   2000 (a)          2008 (est.) (b)         2000 (a)       2008 (est.) (b)             2000 (a)           2008 (est.) (b)
                                                                        Percent              Percent              Percent           Percent                  Percent               Percent
Single Female-Headed Households with Children (c)              Number of Total Number of Total          Number of Total Number of Total           Number     of Total  Number      of Total
  Owner                                                            71       3.0%        72      3.0%        771     1.7%      839      1.7%         44,170      1.8%      45,796      1.8%
  Renter                                                           83       3.5%        84      3.5%      1,468     3.2%    1,597      3.2%         90,138      3.7%      93,456      3.7%
Total: Single Female-Headed Households with Children              154       6.5%       156      6.5%      2,239      4.9%   2,436      4.9%        134,308      5.4%     139,252      5.4%

Total Households                                                 2,380                2,414              45,402              49,403              2,466,019               2,556,790

Notes:
(a) 2000 figures were derived using Census 2000 Summary File 1 total households estimates and Summary File 3 single female-headed households by tenure distribution estimates.
(b) 2008 figures were derived using California Department of Finance and Claritas total households estimates and Census 2000 single female-headed households by tenure distribution estimates.
(c) Family household with a female head of household, no husband present, and one or more household members under the age of 18, as defined by the U.S. Census.

Sources: Census 2000, 2008; California Department of Finance, 2008; Claritas, 2008; BAE, 2008.
Table 31: Farm Employment, Napa County, 1993 - 2007 (a)
                                        Annual
                     Farm               Percent
     Year          Employment           Change
     1993            3,400                 n.a.
     1994            3,300               -2.9%
     1995            3,600                9.1%
     1996            3,800                5.6%
     1997            4,200               10.5%
     1998            4,400                4.8%
     1999            4,400                0.0%
     2000            4,900               11.4%
     2001            5,300                8.2%
     2002            5,300                0.0%
     2003            4,900               -7.5%
     2004            4,700               -4.1%
     2005            4,600               -2.1%
     2006            4,700                2.2%
     2007            5,100                8.5%

Total Change
1993 - 2007            1,700             50.0%

Note:
(a) EDD data are derived from Current Employment Statistics (CES) data and the CES defines employment as “the total number of
persons on establishment payrolls employed full or part-time who receive pay for any part of the pay period that includes the 12th
day of the month.”

Sources: EDD, 2008; Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2008; BAE, 2008.
Table 32: Farmworkers, Napa County, 2005 (a)
                                                                         Total Farmworker
Employment Period                                                            Estimates
Regular Workers (worked more than 7 months a year)                                  3,744
Seasonal Workers (worked between 3 and 6 months a year)                             1,258
Harvest Only Workers (worked less than 3 months a year)                             1,788
Total Farmworkers                                                                   6,790

Note:
(a) Research methods "included a survey of 158 agricultural employers in Napa County, face-to-face interviews with 200
farmworkers during wine grape harvest, key informant interview with 20 individuals familiar with the housing needs of
farmworkers in Napa County, focus groups with three sets of farmworkers, secondary data analysis and a review of relevant
documents."

Sources: An Assessment of the Demand for Farm Worker Housing in Napa County, California Institute for Rural Studies, March,
2007; BAE, 2008.
Table 33: Farmworker Rents and Incomes, Napa County, 2005 (a)
                                                    Surveyed          Farmworkers Residing
        Monthly Housing Costs (b)                  Farmworkers           in Napa County
Renters
Average Rent per Adult                                       $252                          n.a.
  Respondents with a spouse and/or children                  $319                         $345
  Respondents, unaccompanied                                 $218                         $254
Utilities (c)                                                 $66                          n.a.

Homeowners
Average Mortgage Payment                                   $2,167                          n.a.
Utilities                                                    $225                          n.a.


                                                    Surveyed             Reported Mean            Total Household
         Farmworker Occupations                    Farmworkers           Annual Earnings              Income
General Laborers                                           159                     $15,745                $19,122
Specialized Laborers                                         19                    $26,317                $33,268
Foreman or Supervisor                                        11                    $37,000                $50,294

Notes:
(a) The data reported above are from a farmworker survey of 189 respondents who worked in any part of Napa County between
September and November 2006. The interviewees were selected based on place of employment. A stratified random sample came
from registered farm labor contractors, vineyard properties with unique site identification assigned by the Napa County Agricultural
commissioner, and one large nursery farm. Three workers from each selected crew were interviewed.
(b) 87 percent of survey respondents rent, 11 percent own, and the remaining two percent report receiving free housing from their
employer.
(c) Only 55 percent of renter respondents reported paying for utilities, with $66 being the average reported by respondents who pay
rent.

Sources: An Assessment of the Demand for Farm Worker Housing in Napa County, California Institute for Rural Studies, March, 2007;
BAE, 2008.
Table 34: Emergency, Transitional, and Permanent Supportive Housing, Napa County, 2007
                               Emergency Shelter                     Transitional Housing          Permanent Supportive Housing
                         Individuals        Families            Individuals          Families       Individuals       Families      Total
Estimated Need                      84               45                    85                 50               91              75       430
Current Inventory                   74               32                    77                 35               46              10       274
Unmet Need/Gap                      10               13                     8                 15               45              65       156

Sources: Napa County Continuum of Care, Exhibit 1, 2007; BAE, 2008.
Non-governmental and Governmental
Constraints
Constraints on the development of housing are divided into non-governmental constraints and
governmental constraints. Non-governmental constraints include the price of land, cost of
construction, availability of financing, and overall housing production costs. Governmental
constraints include land use controls, codes and enforcements, on and off site improvements, fees
and exactions, processing and permit procedures, and regulations affecting housing for persons
with disabilities.

Non-governmental Constraints

Price of Land
According to Dataquick, a private data vendor, there were approximately six sales of vacant
residential land between January 2006 and October 2008. Of these, three have no reported sales
price. The remaining three sales records include one parcel on Hunt Avenue that sold for $525,000
in early 2006, and two parcels on College Avenue that sold for around $885,000 in early 2007 and
2008. On a per acre basis, using the existing sales records, the price range for vacant land in St.
Helena ranges between approximately $1.8 million and $2.5 million per acre.

Cost of Construction
The following section contains construction cost estimates for three projects in varying stages of
development within St. Helena: Vineland Station, Magnolia Oaks, and a proposed housing project
by Mercy Housing.

Market Rate Housing
Vineland Station is a mixed-use development on 8.5 acres in St. Helena being developed by the
Friedrich Company. To date, two commercial buildings have been completed with 63,000 square
feet of retail, office, and restaurant space. Another building containing 19,000 square feet is
currently under construction, with commercial space on the first level and ten one-bedroom
                                   38
apartments on the second floor. The apartments will each be about 700 square feet in size and
one unit will be affordable to a very low-income household and 1 unit will be affordable to a low-
                      39
income household. Rodney Friedrich of the Friedrich Company provided information on the
construction costs for the 19,000 square foot building containing both residential and commercial
uses. Since the project is not yet complete, Mr. Friedrich could only provide estimates of costs
based upon bids received, impact fees paid to the City, and his own experience. The estimated

    38
         Personal Communication with Rodney Friedrich, Friedrich Company, December 4, 2008.
    39
         Ibid.


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construction costs of the building, with no tenant improvement allowances and no contingencies,
will be about $3.2 million or $168 per square foot. Additional costs include $0.5 million in site
improvement costs, $860,000 in impact fees already charged by the City, construction loan fees,
and soft costs such as advertising, legal, and architecture and engineering fees. The estimated total
cost, excluding the costs of land and the time spent by Mr. Friedrich, amounts to around $6.05
million or $318 per square foot.

The cost of the land for this particular project is hard to factor in, considering it is a piece of a
larger 34-acre parcel purchased in 1981, although Mr. Friedrich estimates that the raw 8.5 acres
containing the Vineland Station development would sell for between $12 and $15 million, or
between $1.4 million and $1.8 million per acre.

[Additional information from Rossi Development will be included, pending the approval of the final
map for the Magnolia Oaks development.]

Affordable Housing
Mercy Housing has filed a pre-application and proposed to build a 112-unit mixed-income housing
development on a 10-acre parcel located on Pope Street in St. Helena. The preliminary plan, which
may change as the project progresses, includes:

           30 apartments
           20 small lot, single-family homes
           30 detached single-family homes
                           40
           47 townhomes

The 30 apartments will all be affordable to households with incomes of 30 to 60 percent of area
median income (AMI). Six for-sale units will be targeted for households at 80 percent of AMI; 11
for-sale units will be affordable for households at 100 percent of AMI; 14 at 120 percent of AMI; 9
                                                                                         41
at 150 percent of AMI; 8 at 180 percent of AMI; and, 34 units will be market rate units. These
unit counts mirror the income distribution in St. Helena. Paul Ainger, Senor Project Developer at
Mercy Housing, estimates that the site improvement costs, including bio swales and gray-water
piping will be about $10 per square foot, and that building construction cost will be around $100
per square foot. These site improvement costs are slightly below the site improvement costs of
other recently completed affordable housing projects in Napa County, including Vineyards
Crossing (about $12 per square foot), and the Magnolia Park Townhomes (around $14 per square



    40
         Pope Street Mixed Income Housing Concept. Received December, 16, 2008
    41
         Personal Communication. Paul Ainger, Senior Project Developer, Mercy Housing December 8, 2008


Public Review Draft Housing Element Needs Assessment                   City of St. Helena General Plan Update
2/25/2009                                                                                            Page 85
         42
foot). The construction cost estimates are significantly below the construction costs per square
foot for other projects, with Vineyards Crossing at about $150 per square foot, and the Magnolia
Park townhomes at around $166 per livable square foot.

Overall Housing Production Costs
[Section will be completed after factoring in the costs of the Magnolia Oaks Development.]

Availability of Financing
St. Helena is affected by the conditions in the national credit market. High national foreclosure
rates, climbing interest rates, and failing banks have tightened the credit market and made it hard
for developers to obtain construction and permanent loans to build units. The credit crisis has
seriously curtailed the availability of nontraditional mortgage products like adjustable rate
mortgages and subprime mortgages.

Quality credit scores, documentable income, and a significant down payment are now crucial to
obtaining a home loan, thereby limiting the number of households able to obtain financing to
purchase homes. This will exclude certain households who previously could have qualified to buy
homes forcing them into the rental market. The high overall production costs coupled with the
decrease in the availability of credit indicates that St. Helena may have to increase the number of
rental units available to provide these households displaced from the for-sale market households
with adequate rental housing options.

In addition, current market conditions make it difficult to obtain financing for new housing
developments. Capital availability is very limited and reserved only for projects that pose the least
risk and the highest chance of return. For example, the Vineland Station Development received
financing for about half of the project a year ago prior to the tightening of the credit market, but
                                                                                         43
there is concern about how to obtain the financing necessary to complete the project.

Napa River Flooding
The Napa River flooded lands along the northeast border of St. Helena in both 1986 and 1995,
damaging the Vineyard Valley Mobile Home Park and other single family homes along Pratt Ave.
                                                                                         44
In 1995 the Hunt’s Grove Apartments were also flooded. Floods cost the City $50 million. The
Comprehensive Flood Protection Study revealed that the lands between Pratt Street and the Pope



    42
      Personal communication with Napa Valley Community Housing, and Mid-Peninsula Housing Coalition,
    June 2008.
    43
         Personal Communication with Rodney, Friedrich Company, December 4, 2008.
    44
         St. Helena Comprehensive Flood Protection Project: 2006 Plan Project Description July, 2006. (Pg. 3)


Public Review Draft Housing Element Needs Assessment                      City of St. Helena General Plan Update
2/25/2009                                                                                               Page 86
                                                                        45
Street Bridge in St. Helena face the highest risk of flooding. Consequently, land in this section of
St. Helena is not available for new development until the Flood Protection Project is complete. St.
Helena is in the process of completing the Comprehensive Flood Protection Project to mitigate the
effects of the flooding on both current and future residential development in the flood plain.
Details regarding the City of St. Helena’s flood projects are included in the Governmental
constraints section of this report.

Governmental Constraints
Local government can directly influence housing production cost through land use controls,
building codes, on and off site improvement standards, fees and exactions, processing and permit
procedures, regulations affecting housing for persons with disabilities, and with government codes
and enforcement. This section discusses each of these topics and identifies the governmental
controls that may adversely effect housing production.

Preservation of Agricultural Land
One of the major thrusts of the City’s land use controls is to encourage in-fill development while
preserving land for agriculture. The agricultural soils of St. Helena are identified as Prime
Farmland by the California State Department of Conservation, Division of Land Resource
Protection, Farmland Mapping and Monitoring Program. The wines produced from the grapes in
this region achieve international recognition for their superb quality.

Roughly one-half of the 3,055 acres within the incorporated limits of the City are considered
urbanized area. This portion of the City of St. Helena is defined by an Urban Limit Line (ULL)
which denotes the area within which urban development is allowed. The intent of the ULL is to
discourage urban sprawl by containing urban development within a limited area.

There are approximately 1,500 acres of land outside of the Urban Limit Line, but inside the
incorporated limits of the City of St. Helena. Most of this land is farmed and planted to vineyards.

Land-Use Controls
The St. Helena Zoning Ordinance and General Plan can affect housing production because they
determine the location, amount of land, and also the density of housing.

Zoning Ordinance
Title 17 of the St. Helena Municipal Code outlines both the residential and nonresidential zoning
designations. Table 35 provides a list of all of the residential zoning districts as well as
information on the rights and requirements associated with each district. Residential uses are

    45
         St. Helena Comprehensive Flood Protection Project: 2006 Plan Project Description July, 2006.


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2/25/2009                                                                                                  Page 87
permitted by right in the following zones: Twenty-Acre Agriculture (A-20), Winery (W),
Woodland Watershed (WW), Agricultural Preserve (AP), Low Density Residential One Acre
Minimum (LR-1A), Low Density Residential (LR), Medium Density Residential (MR), and High
Density Residential (HR).

In terms of units per acre, the lowest allowable density is the AP district. The AP district only
permits, by right, one single-family unit per 40-acre lot. With a conditional use permit, farmworker
and seasonal farmworker camps can be built at higher densities in this zone. The A-20 and W
zones allow one single-family dwelling and one second unit by right on 20 acres of land. With a
conditional use permit, this zone can accommodate more than one second unit, as well as farm
labor housing above the initially permitted density.

Both the LR and LR-1A zones permit by right not only single-family dwellings, but also permanent
mobilehomes, and intermediate care, residential, developmentally disabled, and nursing facilities
for six or fewer persons. The LR-1A allows one unit per acre; however, the LR zone sets a
minimum of one unit per acre, and applies a maximum at five units per acre. In addition, both
zones permit as a conditional use single-family dwellings at less than one unit per acre and all of
the aforementioned types of facilities for seven or more persons.

The MR zone allows the same uses by right and with a conditional use permit as the LR district and
also allows small lot developments, condominium, or townhomes with a conditional use permit.
Minimum and maximum densities for the MR zone range from 5.1 to 16 DUA. Finally, the HR
zone, in addition to allowing the same residential uses by right as the LR and MR zones, permits
multifamily dwellings, apartments, and dwelling groups containing four units or less. The
allowable density for the HR zone is between 16.1 to 28 DUA. With a conditional use permit,
buildings with more than four units, multifamily dwellings, apartments, and dwelling groups are
permitted. The conditional use permit requirements for multifamily dwellings of more than four
units does not place an undue burden on development because the Magnolia Oaks and Vineland
Station development, which both contain apartments, were approved by the City of St. Helena in
2007 without creating unreasonable timeframes for approval and without imposing unreasonable
                         46
conditions of approval.

In addition to the residential zones described above, some overlay districts can affect the type and
amount of housing that can actually be built, including the Planned Development, Rural-
Residential, Specific Plan, Flood Plain, Historic Preservation, and Mobile Home Park overlay
district. An overlay district expands upon the regulations already set by the underlying zoning
district. For example, the Planned Development Overlay District (PD) allows for a wider variety of

    46
         City of St. Helena. City of St. Helena Annual Report for Compliance with Housing Element. June, 2008.


Public Review Draft Housing Element Needs Assessment                      City of St. Helena General Plan Update
2/25/2009                                                                                                Page 88
development, including mixed-use development not otherwise allowed in the zoning code. The PD
zone is often applied to large pieces of land and requires approval of a rezoning and a conditional
use permit application.

General Plan
While St. Helena is in the process of updating the City’s General Plan, the currently valid General
                                                                47
Plan was completed in 1993 and dictates land use through 2010. The City of St. Helena consists
of approximately 3,150 acres, and roughly 1,130 acres are already developed. Not all of the 3,150
                                                                  48
acres within the City of St. Helena are available for development, rather only about 1,500 acres
                                                                 49
within the Urban Limit Line (ULL) are eligible for development. The remaining acreage consists
of 1,300 acres of agricultural cropland and additional open space. Thirteen land use designations
                              50
cover the land in St. Helena.

The ULL contains land use designations including Low, Medium, and High Density Residential,
Central Business, Service Commercial, Industrial, Business and Professional Office, Parks and
Recreation, Public/Quasi-Public, Open Space and Agriculture. The Low, Medium, and High
Density Residential land use correspond to the zoning district of the same names presented in Table
35. Some land outside, yet contiguous to the ULL has a General Plan designation of Urban
Reserve (UR) indicating that it should be considered first if land outside the ULL is needed for
development. All lands with a UR land use designation are zoned A-20.

Residential Growth Management System
The residential growth management system (GMS) first went into effect in 1979, but has been
                                                                                        51
revised most recently in 2002 in conjunction with the 2002 Housing Element Update. The stated
purpose of the system is “to regulate the residential growth of the city to approximately two percent
                                                                               52
per year, while providing for both market rate and affordable housing units.” The current GMS
will not allow any more than 2,800 units by 2010. In 2008, DoF estimates the existence of 2,745
housing units in St. Helena. This is an increase of five units per year given that the 2000 Census

    47
         City of St. Helena. http://www.sthelena2030.com/global/pdf_files/2_lu.pdf. Accessed September 19, 2008.
    48
      City of St. Helena General Plan Update 2030 “Natural Environment Background Working Paper. (Page NE-
    21). http://www.sthelena2030.com. Accessed on September 19, 2008.
    49
      City of St. Helena Request for Qualifications and Proposal “Community Visioning Process, General Plan
    Update, and Environmental Impact Report. May 19, 2006. http://city.ci.st-
    helena.ca.us/images/city/Community%20Visioning%20Process/General%20Plan%20Update%20RFP.pdf
    50
       City of St. Helena General Plan, 1993. “Chapter 2.0 Land Use and Growth Management”
    http://www.sthelena2030.com/global/pdf_files/2_lu.pdf Accessed on September 19, 2008.
    51
     City of St. Helena Municipal Code. Chapter 17.152. http://www.codepublishing.com/CA/sthelena/.
    Accessed on September 25, 2008.
    52
     City of St. Helena Municipal Code. Chapter 17.152. http://www.codepublishing.com/CA/sthelena/.
    Accessed on September 25, 2008.


Public Review Draft Housing Element Needs Assessment                     City of St. Helena General Plan Update
2/25/2009                                                                                               Page 89
                                    53
housing count stood at 2,707. Not all new residential development is subject to this restriction of
nine permits per year. The relevant exemptions include affordable housing, and second dwelling
units. The City Council had the power to decide on the number of permits issued for affordable
housing units. The Growth Management System has not prevented housing development that
would have occurred otherwise. The City has not issued all nine permits each year and puts the
excess permits into a bank that “shall only be available for allocation for the construction of market
                                                                                                54
rate units in development projects that include a minimum of forty percent affordable units.”

Design Review
Chapter 17.164 of the St. Helena Municipal Code outlines the City’s Design Review policies. The
purpose of the policy is to go beyond the controls inherent in the land use controls and building
codes and examine individual project proposals for the “general form of the land before and after
development, the spatial relationships of the structures and open spaces to proximate land uses and
the appearances of building and open spaces as they contribute to an area as it is being
            55
developed.” The Municipal Code lists 17 specific design criteria considered by the Planning
Commission and a summary of these points follows:

           Compatibility with the general plan, current site, and surrounding properties.
           Physical characteristics of the buildings and surrounding landscaping
           Employment of green building practices into the design.

The Planning Commission examines all proposed new buildings and structures and exterior
additions in relation to the design criteria and arrives at one of three recommendations, approve,
                                                     56
approve with minor modifications, or disapprove. The City staff had noted that the complex and
subjective nature of the design review process can be cumbersome for the Planning Commission,
and therefore this process may need to be streamlined to facilitate housing development.

The limitations to the design review processes are expressly stated in the Municipal Code, and the
one limitation that directly impacts affordable housing states that “the commission is not to use
design review intentionally or inadvertently to exclude housing for minority groups or housing for
                                     57
low and moderate income persons.” Presumably, then, the Planning Commission would take the
17 design criteria into consideration when reviewing affordable housing projects, but not
disapprove a project strictly because it is a low cost structure.

    53
         City of St. Helena, Housing Element Update. 2002 (Pg. 39)
    54
         St. Helena Municipal Code. 17.152 Residential Growth Management System
    55
         St. Helena Municipal Code. 17.165 Design Review.
    56
         Ibid.
    57
         Ibid.


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Implementation of new Design Review guidelines could commence after the new General Plan is
adopted. Assuming that architecturally distinct neighborhoods are identified in the General Plan
Community Design element, a consultant would be hired to identify design themes and develop
design guidelines for new construction within each of the neighborhoods. The target adoption date
for the new General Plan is June 2010. Approximately one additional year (to June 2011) will be
required for budget adoption, consultant selection, and finalization of design guidelines.

Housing Trust Fund, Housing Impact Fee, and Inclusionary/In-Lieu Fee
Requirements
In September 2004, the City Council passed Ordinance 2004-7 adding Chapter 17.146 Housing
Trust Fund, Housing Impact Fee, and Inclusionary/In-Lieu Fee Requirements to the St. Helena
Municipal Code. The regulations are designed so that new non-residential developments and
additions are required to pay a housing impact fee and new residential developments containing
five units or more are required to include 20 percent of their units as affordable housing, and
developments with less than five units pay an in-lieu fee. The fees collected from the
nonresidential and residential development then go into a Housing Trust Fund. The use of Housing
Trust Fund monies is directed exclusively to “increase and improve the supply of housing
affordable to households of moderate, low and very low income” including costs such as land,
                                                          58
construction, financing, and reimbursements to the City. The monies are available for both
ownership and rental projects and services.

These affordable housing requirements do add additional cost to market rate residential
development in the process of creating additional affordable housing in St. Helena. To minimize
the impact on the price of market rate housing, the Municipal Code allows developers to submit an
                                                                                   59
“alternative equivalent proposal” and offers a series of concessions or incentives. An “alternative
equivalent proposal” enables developers to meet the affordable housing requirements through
alternative means like dedicating vacant land as long as the proposed alternative aligns with the
purpose of the Municipal Code and is approved by the City Council. Concessions and incentives
that are automatically available to residential developers who construct inclusionary units include
the opportunity to submit a preliminary development proposal, priority in the City application
process, and fee deferment. In addition, the City council can grant additional concessions and
incentives including extra density bonuses, changes to City standards, and monetary assistance.
The automatic and discretionary concessions and incentives help expedite the process of building
affordable housing and therefore minimize the cost to developers.



    58
         St. Helena Municipal Code. 17.146.030
    59
         St. Helena Municipal Code 17.146.050


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The City is currently considering changing the Municipal Code policies in relation to
nonresidential development housing impact fees. The City council is considering the option
because of the high number of jobs in St. Helena compared with the housing available and the fact
that between September 2005 and July 2007, the housing impact fee only generated $270,000 for
                         60
the Housing Trust Fund. The City will consider implementing one of three alternative options as
                                61
part of the General Plan update. These three options include 1) raising fees or requiring that
developers build housing units based upon building commercial square footage 2) a mixed-use or
residential overlay zone to encourage additional residential development, or 3) additional
                                                          62
incentives to encourage the construction of housing units.

On/Offsite Improvement Standards
The St. Helena Municipal Code lists requirements for new development related to sewer and water
connections, parking, curbs, gutters, sidewalks, fire hydrants, and street trees.

Sewer
While in the past the City of St. Helena has had limited sewer capacity and had to place a
                              63
moratorium on development, currently the daily dry-weather demand for sewer is approximately
0.48 million gallons. The permitted dry-weather capacity of the current sewer system is about 0.50
million gallons. In addition, the recently expanded capacity due to aeration should allow an
increase in the permitted capacity (pending approval of the Regional Water Quality Control Board)
                                                                                               64
to 0.62 million gallons, which will meet the needs of the additional development in St. Helena.
The City charges a sewer impact fee of $4.57 per square foot for single-family residential and
                                   65
$3.64 for multifamily residential.

Water
The 2002 Housing Element identified water capacity as a possible constraint to development after
2006, and consequently the City of St. Helena made a commitment back in 2002 that “if the
situation arises where the City of St. Helena is unable to provide sewer and water services to all
requested new development, the City will give highest priority to provision of services to the 87


    60
      City of St. Helena Staff Report. Re: Keyser Marston Analysis of Requiring Affordable Housing in Non-
    Residential Projects. July 24, 2007.
    61
         City of St. Helena City Council Minutes. January 8, 2008.
    62
         City of St. Helena City Council Minutes. July 24, 2007.
    63
      St. Helena Municipal Code. 3.32.080 Sewer Impact Fees.
    64
     Local Agency Formation Committee of Napa County. Final Report City of St. Helena Municipal Service
    Review. May, 2008. (Pg. 14)
    65
      City of St. Helena. Development Fees. July 2008. http://city.ci.st-helena.ca.us/images/city/Building/
    Building%20Development%20Fee%27s.pdf. Accessed September 29, 2008.


Public Review Draft Housing Element Needs Assessment                     City of St. Helena General Plan Update
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affordable housing units [needed for the City to meet the 1999-2006 RHNA].” [1] The total water
supply for St. Helena is 2,600 acre feet per year in a normal rainfall year. The total water demand
in 2006 was 2,126 acre feet, leaving an excess of 474 acre feet. The buildout of the Key Housing
Sites represents 335 – 1,015 housing units, depending upon the density range that is achieved.

One way to analyze the water demand is to project population growth and per capita demand. 335
housing units at an average of 2.5 persons per household yields 838 additional people; 1,015
housing units yields 2,538 people. Water use of 230 gallons per day per person for 838 people
would result in additional water demand of 215 acre feet per year; for 2,585 additional people,
water use demand would be 666 acre feet per year. The total RHNA of 121 units would require 78
acre feet of water per year.

These are very conservative numbers water use numbers that do not include any projected water
savings from conservation efforts or green building practices. 230 gallons per day per person (575
gallons per household) is the highest per capita water consumption of all of the incorporated areas
in Napa County.

During drought years the City of St. Helena enacts mandatory water conservation procedures
(Municipal Code Section 13.04). Phase IV water rationing goes into effect when the water in
storage is less than twenty percent (20%) of the storage capacity; or the water in storage and
available from other sources is less than one hundred fifty (150) days’ supply as determined by the
director of public works. No new water connections or expansions of existing uses are permitted
during Phase IV. Buildings under construction are considered a new water connection, regardless
of whether or not they have paid their fees.

With normal rainfall, the City of St. Helena has more than sufficient water supplies for the RHNA
number of 121 housing units. The City does not have sufficient water supplies to buildout all of
the Key Housing Sites to full density, but could supply 50% of the buildout without finding new
sources of water. Diminished water supplies resulting from drought will impact the construction of
housing and all other development.

Parking
Residential parking requirements vary according to the number of dwelling units, as follows:

         One to two dwelling units: Minimum of two spaces per unit, with one of the spaces in a
         garage or carport.
         Three or more dwelling units: Minimum of one space under cover per unit, plus either a




Public Review Draft Housing Element Needs Assessment          City of St. Helena General Plan Update
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           half space or one additional whole space depending the number of bedrooms in the units.
           Rooming, boarding, or lodging house: Minimum of one space per room, and two spaces
           for the owner-occupied unit.
                                                                                                 66
           Mobile home: Minimum of two spaces per unit plus centralized space for guest parking.

The one exception to these requirements is housing built for senior citizens, with funding from the
                                                                                             67
Federal or State government, which is affordable to low- and moderate-income households. For
all other uses not covered in the Municipal Code, the Planning Commission has the power to set
the parking requirements based upon the general parking guidelines of the City.

Other
Other miscellaneous improvements required by the City of St. Helena include curb, gutter and
sidewalk treatments, fire hydrants, and street trees. Whenever new development fronts a public
street, the developers are required to provide curb, gutter, and sidewalk treatments to the
                                                        68
specifications supplied by the Public Works director. If the Fire Chief or Public Works director
decides that there is not sufficient supply of fire hydrants nearby, new development would cover
                                              69
the cost of additional hydrants as necessary. Finally, if a new development fronts a planting strip,
then the owner must care for and maintain the trees and other vegetation in the strip.

The water, parking, and other miscellaneous on-and-off site improvements standards do not
constrain residential development in St. Helena. Although the City does not currently have
sufficient sewer treatment capacity to accommodate all of its RHNA housing units, wastewater
treatment plant upgrades scheduled for completion will accommodate the full RHNA; therefore,
wastewater treatment capacity will not be a constraint given the need to accommodate the RHNA
by June 30, 2014.

Building Codes and Enforcement
The current St. Helena Building code has been adapted from the 2007 California Building
Standards Code, also known as Title 24 of the California Code of Regulations. These regulations
include the 2007 California Fire Code, 2005 Energy Code, 2005 National Electrical Code, 2006
Uniform Mechanical Code, and 2006 Uniform Plumbing Code. The major local amendments
included the continuation of St. Helena’s program for the seismic retrofit of unreinforced buildings
and the requirement that all new construction install an approved automatic fire-suppression
sprinkler system. This includes all new residential structures with space for sleeping, and

    66
         Municipal Code 17.124.030 Minimum on-site parking requirements
    67
         Ibid.
    68
         Municipal Code 12.08.090 Plans and specifications.
    69
         Municipal Code 16.32.110 Fire protection.


Public Review Draft Housing Element Needs Assessment                  City of St. Helena General Plan Update
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structures that exceed 400 square feet of gross floor area. Existing residential structures that
undergo additions or repairs equal to at least 50 percent of the existing floor area, and units
experiencing a change in occupancy to a more hazardous use, also require the installation of an
                           70
approved sprinkler system. Otherwise, Title 15 of the St. Helena Municipal Code closely adheres
to the 2007 California Building Standards Code and places no greater constraints on housing
development than any other jurisdiction in the State that follows this model code.

The enforcement of building codes within the City of St. Helena is centered on the inspection of
new construction and remodels or renovations requiring building permits. The City has the power
to inspect and declare unsafe any structure or piece of equipment, be it existing or under-
construction that does not meet specific municipal code standards. These include, but are not
limited to, structures with insufficient modes of egress; structures that are unsafe or that have been
made structurally unsound due to fire, earthquake, or other natural disaster; buildings that are
deemed a public nuisance; and, buildings that have been constructed or maintained in violation of
local or state law. Once a building has been declared unsafe, the building official may issue notice
that the structure be repaired, vacated, or demolished within a reasonable amount of time and with
                         71
the appropriate permits.

Building and Development Impact Fees
The City’s building department fee schedule is designed to directly offset the costs incurred by the
City when processing and reviewing development applications, and to inspect new construction.
Fees are charged when a building permit is issued and are based on building plans and estimated
construction costs.

Development impact fees are charged to new projects in order to offset costs for the construction,
expansion, and maintenance of off-site improvements that either were built for the purposes of the
new project or were existing improvements from which the new developments will benefit. In the
case of St. Helena, impact fees are charged for public safety, civic improvements, water services,
and water meter installation, sewer services, storm drainage, traffic mitigation, housing impacts,
and schools. For the purpose of comparison with the 2002 Housing Element, the single-family fee
calculations are based on the same development prototype, a 2,300 square foot single-family
residence with three-bedrooms, two-bathrooms and a total inflation adjusted construction cost
                                     72
estimate of approximately $292,290. The fee calculations for the multifamily project use the
conceptual plan for the 112-unit mixed income project proposed by Mercy Housing.

    70
     City of St. Helena. St. Helena Municipal Code, Title 15. http://www.codepublishing.com/CA/sthelena/.
    Accessed September 29, 2008.
    71
         Ibid.
    72
      City of St. Helena. Development Fees. July 2008. http://city.ci.st-helena.ca.us/images/city/
    Building/Building%20Development%20Fee%27s.pdf. Accessed September 29, 2008.


Public Review Draft Housing Element Needs Assessment                     City of St. Helena General Plan Update
2/25/2009                                                                                              Page 95
Unadjusted for inflation, City of St. Helena single-family development fees have increased
approximately 84 percent, or over $25,000 dollars since 2002. Once adjusted for inflation, the
increase is approximately 59 percent or just under $21,000. When developing new residential
units, this increased cost for city fees is added on top of recent increases in the estimated costs for
residential construction.

Figure 1: Building Permit and Development Impact Fees, Single-Family Home, 2008

Building Department Fees:                 $3,860
Public Safety fee:                        $2,530
Civic Improvement Fee:                    $5,497
Water Impact Fee:                        $13,041
Water Meter Installation Fee:               $163
Sewer Impact Fee:                        $10,511
Storm Drainage Impact Fee:                   $23
Traffic Mitigation Impact Fee:            $8,303
School District Fee:                      $5,152
Housing Impact Fee:                       $7,307

Total:                                   $56,387

Sources: City of St. Helena, 2008; BAE, 2008.


To facilitate the comparison of existing single-family fees, the following figures refer to a
comparison between the 2002 development impact fees reported in the previous housing element
and the current City fee schedule as reported above. The largest change is the addition of a housing
impact fee that is calculated as 2.5 percent of the total estimated cost of construction. While not
controlled by the City, the school district fee shows a sizable increase of 36 percent, or nearly
$1,360. The largest increase is in the traffic mitigation impact fee that has risen by nearly 760
percent, or over $7,300. Increases in water impact fees (87 percent), sewer impact fees (71
percent), building development fees (81 percent), and civic improvement fees (14 percent)
contribute to the overall sum. The fee for water meter installation remains unchanged since 2002.
Fees for public safety have decreased by 50 percent. Storm drainage impact fees for the majority
of the community were significantly reduced from nearly $600 to only $23, representing a 96
percent drop.

The fees are different for a multifamily development. Using the 112-unit Mercy Housing
development as a prototype, the total development fee for all for phases of the project comes to
approximately $2.5 million. Of the $2.5 million, about $1.4 million is for the 78 units that are deed
restricted for affordability and $1.04 million would be for the 34 market rate units. The total $2.5
million in fees is divided across the four phases of development as shown below.


Public Review Draft Housing Element Needs Assessment            City of St. Helena General Plan Update
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Phase 1
Total Fees = $600,000
11 deed restricted (55 percent) = $330,000
9 market rate (45 percent) = $270,000

         20 single-family detached homes at 1,528 square feet (small lot homes) = 30,560 square
         feet.
         Assume 1.76 acres at 30 percent impermeable surface for building footprints and
         walkways = 23,000 square feet

Phase 2
Total Fees = $437,735
30 deed restricted (100%)

         30 apartments at 1,020 square feet = 30,600 square feet.
         Assume 1.19 acres at 30 percent impermeable = 15,551 square feet.

Phase 3
Total Fees = $590,000
15 market rate (100%)

         15 single family detached at 2,006 sq. ft. =30,090 square feet
         Assume 1.69 acres at 30 percent impermeable surface = 22,085 square feet

Phase 4
Total Fees = $856,575.
37 deed restricted (79 percent) = $676,695
10 market rate (21 percent) = $179,

         47 townhouses at 1,274 square feet = 59,878 square feet
         Assume 2.45 acres at 30 percent impermeable surface = 32,017 square feet


The single-family and multifamily fees have increased to reflect the costs of the improvements
necessary to serve residential development. Without the money collected through the fees, the City
could not afford to make the necessary improvements in infrastructure, and thus the fees to do not
represent an undue governmental constraint to housing development. In addition, fee reductions
and adjustments for affordable and other housing projects are permitted on a case by case basis, as
approved by City Council under Section 3, Chapter 3.32 of the St. Helena Municipal Code.



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Comprehensive Flood Protection Project
Given that some of the land in St. Helena is within the 100-year flood plain of the Napa River, the
City of Helena began planning a flood protection strategy in conjunction with the Napa County
Board of Supervisors and Napa County Flood Control District and after significant flooding
occurred in 1986 and 1995. In 1998 County residents approved Measure A placing a countywide
                                                                              73
sales tax of 0.5 cents therefore enabling the flood protection work to begin. After a series of
delays due to litigation, funding shortages, and archaeological excavation work, in July 2006 the
City released a 2006 Plan Project Description. The project involves flood control measures
ranging from “widening the floodplain and constructing new floodwalls and levee, to relocating
         74
homes.” As of June 18, 2008, the City had secured the necessary additional funding from the
                                                                   75
Flood Protection Corridor Program (FPCP) totaling $3.1 million. Construction, however, had not
yet begun due to the fact that an agreement between the City and the Vineyard Valley Mobile
Home Park owner for the City to purchase a portion of the mobilehome park land for use in the
                                                       76
flood protection project had not yet been completed. Construction will begin, pending the City’s
purchase of the necessary land in the mobilehome park. At that time, the City will remove 17
                                                                                  77
mobile homes and provide benefits to both owners and renter forced to relocate. Once the flood
protection project is complete, additional land in St. Helena will be safe for development.

Processing and Permit Procedures
The processing and permitting procedures in St. Helena are described below using examples of a
multifamily affordable housing development and a market rate single-family development. The
                                                                                               78
prototype multifamily housing project contains 60 units on land zoned high-density residential.
Since it is a multifamily dwelling, it requires a conditional use permit from the City. The
processing time for the development would amount to around 9 months, with an allowance of 60
days for application submittal, staff review and response to comments, an additional 90 to 135 days
for the CEQA review processing including the applicant hiring a consultant and the preparation of
an Initial Study and mitigation measures, 60 days for comments on the Mitigated Negative
Declaration, and, finally, about 30 days for Design Review. The process for a multifamily
affordable housing development would take longer than 9 months if a complete EIR is necessary.

In comparison, a 60-unit, market rate single-family development would take about 90 days, an


    73
         St. Helena Comprehensive Flood Protection Project: 2006 Plan Project Description July, 2006. (Pg. 3)
    74
         Ibid. (Pg. 1).
    75
      City of St. Helena. Flood Protection Project Update. June 18, 2008. http://city.ci.st-
    helena.ca.us/section.cfm?id=117. Accessed November 4, 2008.
    76
         Ibid.
    77
         St. Helena Comprehensive Flood Protection Project: 2006 Plan Project Description July, 2006. (Pg. 7)
    78
         Personal Communication with City staff, December 17, 2008 and December 22, 2008.


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2/25/2009                                                                                                Page 98
additional month for staff review and response to comments, since single-family developments are
not given priority processing. In addition, a market rate single-family development of around 60
units would actually take years to build since the Building Department only issues 9 building
permits per year under the Growth Management System.

Constraints to Housing for Persons with Disabilities
On January 1, 2002, SB 520 went into effect, requiring local jurisdictions to analyze potential
governmental constraints to the development, improvement, and maintenance of housing for
persons with disabilities as part of a jurisdictions housing element update. Under SB 520, housing
elements must also include one of the following 1) a program to remove constraints, or 2) provide
reasonable accommodations for, “housing designed for occupancy by, or with supportive services
for, persons with disabilities.” A jurisdiction can fulfill this second clause in a variety of ways
including establishing policies that facilitate the provision of housing that is physically accessible
to people with mobility impairments, residential care facilities for individuals with Alzheimer’s,
housing for persons with AIDS/HIV, and transitional housing that serves homeless with
disabilities.

Senate Bill 520 Analysis
The City of St. Helena does not have a formal process of granting reasonable accommodations to
persons with disabilities within the City’s zoning, permit processing or building codes. Overall,
although the City does not have a reasonable accommodations ordinance, the City does already
comply with certain zoning regulations for group homes, and has already established a local
process for retrofitting homes for the disabled. In addition, the City makes its zoning, permit
processing, and building laws easily accessible on the City website.

Zoning and Land Use
The zoning code and land use designations for the City of St. Helena have a mixed record of
accomplishments in regards to SB 520 regulations. The City of St. Helena allows an intermediate
care facility, and residential or developmentally disabled nursing facilities serving six or fewer
                                                                                   79
persons as a right in the LR-1A, LR, MR, and HR zones, as required by SB520. Therefore, small
group homes are permitted by right in the majority of residential zones in the City, and these same
districts allow larger group homes of more than six persons with a conditional use permit (CUP) as
required by SB 520. No other regulations in the zoning code or land use designations restrict the
siting of either group homes or housing for other special needs populations, including disabled
          80
persons.

    79
         City of St. Helena Municipal Code, Title 17.
    80
      Government Section Code 12926 defined physical disability as including, “but is not limited to, all of the
    following: (1) Having any physiological disease, disorder, condition, cosmetic disfigurement, or anatomical
    loss that does both of the following: (A) Affects one or more of the following body systems: neurological,


Public Review Draft Housing Element Needs Assessment                      City of St. Helena General Plan Update
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The City’s parking and loading requirements do not have specific provisions related to persons
with disabilities, but there is a provision stating that “rest homes, convalescent hospitals, residential
care and similar group care facilities” require only one space for each four beds, which is a reduced
requirement compared to the two parking spaces required for typical “one-and two-family dwelling
       81
units.” Consequently, the reduced parking requirements for group care facilities decrease the
parking requirements for some disabled persons, but parking requirements for residential
development need to serve all disabled persons. In addition, federally subsidized senior citizen
housing for low- and moderate-income residents is subject to reduced off-street parking
requirements.

The City appears to comply with Fair Housing Laws in respect to occupancy standards since the
                                                                                                82
City does not make a distinction between families and unrelated adults of less than six persons.

The remaining requirements under SB 520 may not have been met by the City of St. Helena
because the City of St. Helena has not conducted a complete review of the City’s compliance with
Fair Housing Law.

Permits and Processing
The majority of the City of St. Helena permitting and processing procedures do not appear to
negatively affect the ability to design or retrofit homes that will be accessible for the disabled, or,
to constrain the siting of group homes. The City, however, applies the same process required for
other renovations to retrofitting homes and the City does not have a special process for such
retrofits.

As discussed above, group homes with fewer than six persons are permitted by right, and group
homes with more than six persons are permitted with a CUP in the residential zones, and no
additional permits are required. This is consistent with the City’s requirements for other larger
group quarters such as condominiums, townhomes, apartments, and dwelling groups containing
more than four units, which also require a CUP.


    immunological, musculoskeletal, special sense organs, respiratory, including speech organs, cardiovascular,
    reproductive, digestive, genitourinary, hemic and lymphatic, skin, and endocrine.”
    81
         City of St. Helena Municipal Code, Chapter 17.124: Parking and Loading Requirements
    82
       City of St. Helena Municipal Code, Chapter 17.04 defines family as follows Family” means any of the
    following groups living together in the same dwelling unit as a single housekeeping unit:
              1. Any number of persons related by blood, marriage or legal adoption;
              2. A nuclear family identified by extended cohabitation;
              3. A group not exceeding five persons whose interpersonal relationships relating to shared
              household expenses, duties and private lives are indistinguishable from groups listed in subsections 1
              and 2 above.


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There are no additional requirements placed on group homes providing on-site services because
they fall under the definition of intermediate care and nursing facilities, which allow for on-site
      83
care.

Building Codes
The City of St. Helena adopted the California Uniform Building Code in January 2008, and the
changes made to this Code by the City, enumerated in the Governmental Constraints section of this
document, do not unfairly treat group homes differently than other residential uses. Nevertheless,
no specific exemptions to the Uniform Building Code exist for housing for disabled persons. The
City of St. Helena does not have local universal design requirements, and there are no established
City policies to grant reasonable accommodations related to building codes and the issuance of
building permits at this time.

Conclusion
The City of St. Helena will need to adopt a Reasonable Accommodations Ordinance in this
Housing Element Planning period in order to ensure that its zoning, land use procedures, building
codes, and occupancy standards comply with SB 520. In addition, the new Reasonable
Accommodations Ordinance must allow for parking exemption for all disabled persons.

Summary
The possible non-governmental constraints discussed above include the price of land, the cost of
construction, the availability of financing, and the flooding of the Napa River. Land costs
represent a significant component of the cost of housing development in St. Helena because the
price per acre of recent vacant residential land sales amounted to between $1.8 million to $2.5
million. The cost of construction in St. Helena does not appear to constrain development and is in
line with construction costs seen throughout the region. Obtaining financing for development
projects can be hard given that the availability of capital is decreasing nationwide, and once a
development is complete it is hard for potential residents to qualify for mortgages.

The governmental controls analyzed in this section were land use controls, codes and
enforcements, on-and off-site improvements, fees and exactions, processing and permit procedures,
and regulations affecting housing for persons with disabilities. The land use controls including
zoning and current General Plan land use designations do not constrain residential development;
however, some changes are necessary to streamline the Design Review process. The St. Helena
zoning code allows development of up to 20 dwelling units per acre in the HR zone and the density

    83
      The State of California Department of Developmental Services defines an intermediate care facility as “are
    health facilities licensed by the Licensing and Certification Division of the California Department of Public
    Health to provide 24-hour-per-day services.” http://www.dds.ca.gov/ICF/Home.cfm Accessed December 17,
    2008


Public Review Draft Housing Element Needs Assessment                     City of St. Helena General Plan Update
2/25/2009                                                                                                Page 101
can be even higher if a developer chooses to utilize the City’s density bonus. In addition, the
zoning code sets mandatory minimums on the densities so that land zoned MR, for example cannot
be built at less than five dwelling units per acre. The Growth Management System does not appear
to place an undue burden on market rate development, since there has never been a year when the
demand for residential building permits has exceed the number of available permits. Furthermore,
housing projects affordable to households at up to 120 percent of AMI are exempt from the GMS.
One General Plan policy that may need revision is the Design Review process, because the criteria
are subjective in nature and may add a significant amount of time to the development process.
Changes to the Design Review process are being explored as part of St. Helena’s current General
Plan update, scheduled for completion in 2010.

The on- and off- site improvement standards related to water, sewer, parking and other
miscellaneous regulations impact housing development in a variety of different ways. The sewer
capacity will be sufficient to support additional development pending the approval of a capacity
increase by the California Regional Water Quality Control Board. The water capacity during a
normal year is sufficient and is expected to remain sufficient through 2010, but there will always be
water shortages in dry years. The remaining parking and miscellaneous requirements do not place
an undue burden on housing development.

Neither the building codes nor the building fees represent a governmental constraint to
development. St. Helena adopted the 20007 California Building Codes Standards, and although
they have made some changes to the Code such as seismic control measures, these changes were
necessary for safety and so not unduly affect housing production. The fee structure for both single-
family and multifamily development reflects the costs of the development to the City, and therefore
facilitates development.

The fact that the Flood Protection project has not been completed as anticipated in the 2002
Housing Element has limited the housing development on some of the sites identified in the 2002
housing sites inventory. It is important for the City to continue to progress towards the completion
of the project to make development feasible along the Napa River.

The time it takes for a developer to complete the City’s permitting and processing procedures for
single-family detached subdivisions is manageable. In addition, the City’s estimation that it will
take eight months for the approval of the proposed Mercy Housing project is also reasonable,
however, in reality of the process may take longer and should be closely monitored.

Finally, the City will need to adopt a Reasonable Accommodations Ordinance to comply with SB
520 and provide a formal process through which a disabled person can request changes in City
policies to meet their housing needs.



Public Review Draft Housing Element Needs Assessment          City of St. Helena General Plan Update
2/25/2009                                                                                   Page 102
Table 35: St. Helena Residential Zoning Districts (Page 1 of 2)
                                                                                                                              Minimum            Minimum                                                       Maximum
      Zoning                 Residential Uses             Conditionally Permitted Uses           Minimum Lot Area           and Maximum             Lot          Setback (feet)       Yard (feet) (a)         Bldg. Height
      District            Permitted as of Right             or Special Requirements             Acres   Square Feet         Units per Acre       Width (feet)     Front Side          Rear     Side              (feet)      FAR (b)
Agricultural           One single-family dwelling        Farmworker housing and                  40          0                   0.03               n.a.           20     20            20      20                 35         n.a.
Preserve (AP)                                            seasonal farm labor camps


Twenty-Acre            One single-family dwelling;       More than one single-family              20                0             0.2                n.a.          50      50           20      20                30          n.a.
Agriculture (A-20)     one second unit                   dwelling and farm labor housing


Winery (W)             One single-family dwelling;       More than one single-family              20                0             0.2                300          100      50           75      50                45          n.a.
                       one second unit                   dwelling; owner and caretaker
                                                         dwellings; Farm labor housing
                                                         above allowed densities

Woodland               One single-family dwelling        One second unit under                 5 to 40         217,800 to   0.03 to 0.2              20           20 to   20 to (c)   20 to    20 to (c)          36
Watershed (WW)                                           certain environmental                                 1,742,400                                           50      50          50       50
                                                         conditions

Low Density            One single-family dwelling;       One single-family dwelling below          1     (d)        0              1                 70           20 to   20 to (e) 20 to      20 to    (e)       30          n.a.
Residential One        Intermediate care, residential    the minimum density;                                                                                      30      30        30         30
Acre Minimum           or developmentally disabled,      Intermediate care facility,
(LR-1A)                and nursing facilities serving    residential or developmentally
                       six or fewer persons;             disabled nursing facility serving
                       permanent mobile home; one        seven or more persons
                       second unit

Low Density            One single-family dwelling;       One single-family below the               1     (d)        0            1 to 5              70           20 to   20 to (e) 20 to      20 to    (e)       30          n.a.
Residential (LR)       Intermediate care,                minimum density; Intermediate                                                                             30      30        30         30
                       residential or                    care facility, residential or
                       developmentally disabled,         developmentally disabled nursing
                       and nursing facilities            facility serving seven or more
                       serving six or fewer              persons
                       persons; permanent mobile
                       home; one second unit

Notes:
(a) A yard is defined as open space inside the established interior lot lines.
(b) Floor Area Ratio.
(c) Setback and yard requirements in the Woodland Watershed (WW) district may vary and are dependent upon the effect of certain health and safety considerations.
(d) Parcels can be less than one acre if created as a result of lot line adjustments, so long as the number of parcels existing prior to the lot line adjustment does not increase and that no lots are less than 7,000
square feet.
(e) Setback and yard requirements in the Low Density Residential One Acre Minimum (LR-1A), Low Density Residential (LR) and Medium Density Residential (MR) districts vary and are dependent upon the height of
the structure.
(f) Floor area ratios (FARs) in the Medium Density Residential (MR) and High Density Residential (HD) districts vary and dependent upon the net parcel area.

Sources: City of St. Helena, Municipal Code Title 17, 2008; BAE, 2008.
Table 35: St. Helena Residential Zoning Districts (Page 2 of 2)
                                                                                                                              Minimum            Minimum                                           Maximum
     Zoning                   Residential Uses             Conditionally Permitted Uses          Minimum Lot Area           and Maximum             Lot          Setback (feet)   Yard (feet) (a) Bldg. Height
     District               Permitted as of Right             or Special Requirements           Acres   Square Feet         Units per Acre       Width (feet)     Front Side      Rear     Side      (feet)               FAR (b)
Medium Density         One single-family dwelling;       One single-family below the            0.16      7,000               5.1 to 16              70           20 to 20 to (e) 20 to 20 to (e)      30                  .21 to (f)
Residential (MR)       Intermediate care facility,       minimum density; Intermediate                                                                             30     30        30      30                            .36
                       residential or                    care facility, residential or
                       developmentally disabled          developmentally disabled nursing
                       nursing facility serving six      facility serving seven or more
                       or fewer persons;                 persons; small lot development;
                       permanent mobile home;            condominium or townhouse
                       one second unit

High Density           One single-family dwelling;       One single-family dwelling below        0.16          7,000          16.1 to 28             70            20      20         10      20           30 to 35       .21 to (f)
Residential            Intermediate care facility,       the minimum density;                                                                                                                                             .36
(HR)                   residential or                    Intermediate care facility,
                       developmentally disabled          residential or developmentally
                       nursing facility serving six      disabled nursing facility serving
                       or fewer persons;                 seven or more persons; small lot
                       permanent mobile home;            development; condominium or
                       one second unit                   townhouse; Multiple-family
                       Multiple-family dwellings,        dwellings, apartments and
                       apartments and dwelling           dwelling groups containing more
                       groups containing four units      than four units
                       or less

Notes:
(a) A yard is defined as open space inside the established interior lot lines.
(b) Floor Area Ratio.
(c) Setback and yard requirements in the Woodland Watershed (WW) district may vary and are dependent upon the effect of certain health and safety considerations.
(d) Parcels can be less than one acre if created as a result of lot line adjustments, so long as the number of parcels existing prior to the lot line adjustment does not increase and that no lots are less than 7,000
square feet.
(e) Setback and yard requirements in the Low Density Residential One Acre Minimum (LR-1A), Low Density Residential (LR) and Medium Density Residential (MR) districts vary and are dependent upon the height of
the structure.
(f) Floor area ratios (FARs) in the Medium Density Residential (MR) and High Density Residential (HD) districts vary and dependent upon the net parcel area.

Sources: City of St. Helena, Municipal Code Title 17, 2008; BAE, 2008.
Opportunities for Energy
Conservation
Government Code Section 65583(a)(7) requires the “analysis of opportunities for energy
                                                        84
conservation with respect to residential development.” This is important due to the key role
played by energy efficiency in determining the relative affordability of housing. As long as design,
installation, and equipment costs do not exceed potential energy savings, lower rates of energy
usage decrease utility costs for residents, making a housing unit more affordable. The discussion
that follows outlines current State policies and development standards along with local City
policies that promote energy conservation for new and existing development in the City of St.
Helena. Additionally, increasing attention is being paid to the role of the design and location of
residential development in addressing greenhouse gas emissions at the local and regional levels.

Instituted by legislative action in 1978 to reduce overall energy consumption statewide, the
California Building Energy Efficiency Standards set thresholds and guidelines for energy
efficiency for both residential and nonresidential construction. The revised standards for 2008 will
go into effect August 1, 2009 under Title 24, Part 6, of the California Code of Regulations. Title
24 is otherwise known as the California Building Standards Code. All construction initiated after
                                                                               85
this date will be required to comply with the new energy efficiency standards. At the current
time, the City of St. Helena implements the 2007 version of Title 24, the California Building
Standards Code, which includes the most recent version of the California Building Energy
Efficiency Standards.

In addition to the Building Energy Efficiency Standards, Part 11 of Title 24 outlines California’s
new Green Building Standards Code. Adopted by the California Building Standards Commission
on July 17, 2008, the Standards are currently voluntary but will become mandatory for all new
construction, both residential and nonresidential, in 2010. The 2010 grace period is intended to
allow local governments time to adopt the new building codes in a way that is appropriate for their
       86 87
needs.       St. Helena will need to adopt these Standards within this Housing Element planning
period (July 12009 through June 30, 2014).

    84
      HCD Building Blocks for Effective Housing Elements, “Opportunities for Energy Conservation.” Accessed
    September 24, 2008. http://www.hcd.ca.gov/hpd/housing_element/index.html.
    85
       California Energy Commission. “Title 24, Part 6, of the California Code of Regulations: California’s
    Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential and Nonresidential Buildings.” Accessed September 24, 2008.
    http://ww w.energy.ca.gov/title24/.
    86
      Associated Press. “California Adopts Statewide Green Building Code.” San Francisco Chronicle, July 17,
    2008. Accessed August 22, 2008. http://www.sfgate.com.
    87
     California Building Standards Commission. “California Green Building Standards Code, Part 11, Title 24.”
    Accessed September 24, 2008. http://www.bsc.ca.gov/prpsd_stds/approvedstandards07.htm.


Public Review Draft Housing Element Needs Assessment                   City of St. Helena General Plan Update
2/25/2009                                                                                            Page 105
On a local level, the 1993 City of St. Helena General Plan Land Use and Growth Management
Element addresses energy conservation for residential development by including goals and policies
geared toward compact urban development and increased residential densities which support
walkable communities and reduce energy usage and greenhouse gas emissions related to
transportation between residential areas and shopping or employment centers. These goals and
policies align well with the intent of recently enacted State legislation dealing with reduction of
greenhouse gas emissions, including AB 32 and SB 375. The typical reduction in the size of
individual residential units associated with higher density development also leads to reductions in
energy usage and costs for heating and cooling. Finally, an emphasis on providing housing for all
income levels increases the likelihood that persons employed in St. Helena will find the
opportunity to live in the City, and reduce costs and greenhouse gas emissions associated with
                88 89
transportation.

The 2002 City of St. Helena Housing Element, in accordance with State mandated guidelines, sets
goals for efficient land use, higher density and mixed-use development, and residential design
standards. In addition, the 2002 Housing Element established two specific policies that encourage
the use of solar and alternative energy technologies and encourage energy conservation. Policy 5A
                                                                                      90
promotes alternative energy use, suggests the adoption of a “solar access ordinance,” and requires
                                                                                         91
the City to provide information to the public regarding alternative energy technologies. Policy 5B
requires the City to promote energy conservation in new and rehabilitated housing, to require cost-
effective energy conservation techniques that promote long-term affordability for new housing, to
offer low-interest energy conservation loans, and to make information available to the public on
potential energy conservation measures.

As of January 2007, the City of St. Helena had begun implementation of 2002 Housing Element
Policy 5A by reducing building permit and inspection fees for photovoltaic system instillation. The
City also participated in the Climate Protection Task Force, initiated in 2006, and the Build It
Green Public Agency Council. By June 2008, the City had passed a fee waiver policy for
photovoltaic systems and was in the process of drafting a green building ordinance, expected to
reach public hearing by mid-2008. Policy 5B, from the 2002 Housing Element had yet to be
implemented beyond what was already required by the most recent adoption of the Building Code,

    88
      City of St. Helena. “General Plan: Land Use and Growth Management Element.” 1993. Accessed
    September 24, 2008. http://www.sthelena2030.com/global/pdf_files/2_lu.pdf.
    89
      City of St. Helena. “General Plan Update Working Paper: Sustainability.” October, 2007. Accessed
    September 24, 2008. http://www.sthelena2030.com/documents/.
    90
       City of St. Helena. “General Plan: Housing Element.” 2002. Accessed September 25, 2008.
    http://www.sthelena2030.com /documents/
    91
         Ibid.


Public Review Draft Housing Element Needs Assessment                  City of St. Helena General Plan Update
2/25/2009                                                                                           Page 106
however, a local Green Building Ordinance has been developed and will be presented to the Board
of Supervisors for adoption.

According to the October 2007 General Plan Update Working Paper on Sustainability, there are
four main issue areas under consideration for the current General Plan Update process relating to
how sustainability may impact the potential for energy conservation in residential developments.
Issue S-1 directly addresses issues of energy and energy usage by acknowledging that the City has
limited control over is energy sources. The City may decide to support local energy generation
through requirements to incorporate photovoltaic systems into new developments, provide
incentives for local solar and wind power generation, and continue to waive fees for installation of
photovoltaic power systems. In addition, the City may pursue incentives to increase the use of
                             92
energy efficient appliances.

Issues S-2 and S-4 pertain to development patterns, transportation, and the jobs/housing balance,
which generally correspond with the intent and direction of the previous General Plan and Housing
Element. Issue S-3 presents the possibility of a new City policy highlighting the potential to
increase use of green building practices for new residential and nonresidential development within
the City of St. Helena. In particular, the working paper suggests policies related to Issue S-3 that
mandate or encourage the use of Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) or
                              93
Energy Star design standards.

Overall, the City is in compliance with State standards and once the local Green Building
Ordinance is adopted St. Helena may even exceeding these minimum standards.




    92
      City of St. Helena. “General Plan Update Working Paper: Sustainability.” October, 2007. Accessed
    September 24, 2008. http://www.sthelena2030.com/global/pdf_files/working_paper_sustainability.pdf.
    93
         Ibid.


Public Review Draft Housing Element Needs Assessment                 City of St. Helena General Plan Update
2/25/2009                                                                                          Page 107
Sites Inventory and Analysis and
Zoning for a Variety of Housing Types
State law requires that a Housing Element include an inventory of available land that is
appropriately zoned and suitable for housing development to accommodate the City’s regional
housing needs allocation.

Regional Housing Needs Allocation
The Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD) identifies the supply of housing
necessary to meet the existing and projected growth in population and households in California.
Each of the 39 regional jurisdictions in the State, including the Councils of Governments (CoGs),
receives a RHNA from HCD that specifies the number of units, by affordability level, that the
regional jurisdiction must plan to accommodate during their Housing Element planning period.
Each regional jurisdiction then distributes the allocations throughout the cities and counties
pursuant to article 65584 of the California Government Code. The allocation must be consistent
with the following objectives:

           65584(d)(1) “Increasing the housing supply and the mix of housing types, tenure, and
           affordability in all cities and counties within the region in an equitable manner, which shall
           result in each jurisdiction receiving an allocation of units for low and very low-income
           households”
           65584(d)(2) “Promoting infill development and socioeconomic equity, the protection of
           environmental and agricultural resources, and the encouragement of efficient development
           patterns.”
           65584(d)(3) “Promoting an improved intraregional relationship between jobs and
           housing.”
           65584(d)(4) “Allocating a lower proportion of housing need to an income category when a
           jurisdiction already has a disproportionately high share of households in that income
           category, as compared to the countywide distribution of households in that category from
                                                              94
           the most recent decennial United States census.”

HCD determined the RHNA for the ABAG region, consistent with the objectives above.

Regional Housing Needs Allocation, 2007-2014
Table 36 shows that the City received a Regional Housing Needs Allocation of 121 units for the
compliance period of January 1, 2007 through June 30, 2014. From January 1, 2007 through
December 31, 2008 developers built or the City issued building permits for 21 units. The City also

    16
         California Government Code Section 65584.


Public Review Draft Housing Element Needs Assessment             City of St. Helena General Plan Update
2/25/2009                                                                                      Page 108
approved 45 additional units for development. This equates to 7 very low-income, 5 low-income,
15 moderate-income (including 6 second units), and 39 above moderate-income units in St. Helena
that have at least received City approvals and have been either completed or are expected to be
completed by June 30, 2014. The 7 very low-income units, 5 low-income units, and 9 of the 15
moderate-income units are regulated affordable units associated with the Magnolia Oaks, Vineland
Station, and Vintner’s Court developments.

Furthermore, the pending Mercy Housing application for 112 housing units on a ten-acre site will
address a considerable portion of the City’s RHNA. Mercy Housing’s current plans call for 30
rental units affordable primarily to very low- and low-income households, six for-sale units
targeted for low-income households, 25 for-sale units affordable to households with moderate
incomes, and 51 for-sale units affordable to various above moderate-income categories, including
34 market rate units. Consequently, once the Mercy Housing project is taken into account, to
accommodate its remaining unmet RHNA, the City must provide land suitably zoned, which could
be feasibly developed with an additional 10 low-income units by June 30, 2014. The pending
Mercy Housing project would result in no remaining unmet need for units serving the very low,
moderate, and above moderate income categories.

Zoning to Accommodate the Development of Affordable Housing to Lower Income
Households
Government Code Section 65583(2) sets default minimum allowable densities for zoning presumed
to accommodate housing affordable for lower-income households. The Government Code
classifies jurisdictions in four different categories. All cities in Napa County are categorized as
suburban jurisdictions, where the default minimum density necessary to provide affordable housing
                                        95
is at least 20 dwelling units per acre. The City of St. Helena Municipal Code already allows for
residential development of 20 dwelling units per acre in the High Density residential zone.
Additional density can be achieved by projects that include sufficient affordable units to qualify for
density bonuses. Thus, the City’s High Density Residential zoning category is presumed to be able
to accommodate development that can meet very low- and low-income housing needs.


Housing Sites Inventory
Tables 37 and 38 provide a list of housing opportunity sites and identify any potential constraints to
development on the site as well as a realistic unit capacity. Table 37 details the inventory of key
housing opportunity sites that was developed with significant public input, as described below. In
addition, Table 38 lists other sites in St. Helena that could potentially support additional residential
development, but due to other factors such as lack of property owner interest or small size, were

    95
      Department of Housing and Community Development, Division of Hosing Policy Development,
    “Amendment of State Housing Element Law – AB 2348” June 9, 2005.


Public Review Draft Housing Element Needs Assessment               City of St. Helena General Plan Update
2/25/2009                                                                                        Page 109
not identified as key housing opportunity sites.

Overall, there are 8 medium density key housing opportunity sites totaling 56 acres that are
estimated to have a realistic development capacity of 288 units. In addition, there are three high
density key housing opportunity sites totaling 2.93 acres that have a development capacity of 47
units. As discussed above, the High Density Residential zone can support affordable housing for
lower income households. The 47-unit high density development capacity represents a 20 percent
buffer above the 39 lower income units remaining in the City’s RHNA, without consideration of
the potential affordable units that are proposed as part of the Mercy Housing project. These
estimates of development capacity are based on a conservative assumption that the sites will
develop at the lowest permissible density for each category. Furthermore, a 1.75- acre site that
currently houses 15 rental and 4 single-family units has been identified as underutilized and is
recommended for rezoning to High Density Residential. If rezoned to high density and
redeveloped, this site could potentially support additional lower income units, with a conservative
redevelopment capacity of 28 total units, providing a further buffer to support the City’s lower
income RHNA. A description of each key housing opportunity site and any development
constraints is also included below.

Public Participation
Preliminary Sites Inventory Process
The initial step in developing a housing sites inventory for the Housing Element Update was to
start with the housing sites inventory in the 2002 Housing Element. The 2002 Housing Element
identified approximately 45 housing development sites. BAE and City staff reviewed that list of
sites and then, based on a review of zoning maps, aerial maps, and staff’s general knowledge of
sites within the City, developed an updated and expanded list of sites for consideration as possible
housing development sites for the updated Housing Element. In total, this inventory included
approximately 27 residential sites scattered throughout the City, and distributed among the various
residential zones. In addition, the inventory included approximately 11 sites that do not currently
have residential zoning, but which might be considered for re-zoning in order to accommodate
residential development during the 2007 to 2014 Housing Element planning period.

Housing Element Subcommittee Review of Sites
BAE and City staff reviewed the preliminary list of housing sites with Housing Element
Subcommittee (HESC) members at their second meeting, on November 20, 2008. Discussions
involved the practicability of developing the various sites for different types of housing. Sites that
were deemed to have a low likelihood of being developed for housing were removed, and other
sites with potential for housing development were added to the list. Based on input from the
HESC, BAE and City staff refined the list of potential sites. The HESC met again on January 8,
2009 to further discuss appropriate densities for key housing sites, providing further guidance for



Public Review Draft Housing Element Needs Assessment           City of St. Helena General Plan Update
2/25/2009                                                                                    Page 110
refining the Housing Sites Inventory.

Housing Sites Exercise at Housing Element Public Workshop #1
The first housing element public workshop on December 1, 2008 provided an opportunity to obtain
broad-based community input on potential housing sites. Housing sites were the topic of one work
station at the workshop, at which participants were provided with a large blow-up map of the
various housing sites, as well as a survey form that allowed them to provide input on the list of
preliminary sites. Participants were asked to provide comments on the suitability of sites on the list
for housing development and/or to provide suggestions for additional sites that should be
considered for housing development.

Review of Housing Sites at Joint GPUSC/HESC Meeting
On December 17, 2008, the General Plan Update Steering Committee (GPUSC) and the HESC
held a joint public meeting. One topic of the meeting was housing sites. This public discussion
provided further input from the full GPUSC as well as the HESC on the confirmation of the
inventory of housing development sites to include in the Draft Housing Element Update, as well as
confirmation of the specific types of housing development to target for the various sites.

The GPUSC and HESC held an additional meeting on January 12, 2009 to further discuss and
confirm the Housing Site Inventory for the Housing Element. BAE and City staff reviewed the
outcomes of these two meeting discussions on housing sites and prepared a final housing sites
inventory for inclusion in the Draft Housing Element Update.

BAE then conducted an analysis of the constraints to housing development, infrastructure
availability, likely housing unit carrying capacity, and suitability of the various sites to
accommodate housing that could be affordable to the different income categories. This analysis
also identified recommended Housing Element policies and/or programs that would ensure that the
City can fully accommodate its RHNA, either through existing sites that are zoned and available
for housing development, or through Housing Element implementation actions that can make
additional sites available for housing development to accommodate the RHNA needs by June 30,
2014.

Furthermore, input on the Sites Inventory was provided by both the Planning Commission and City
Council after public hearings were held during meetings held in January and February of 2009.

Housing Opportunity Sites
Site #1 – Hunter Property (Medium Density Residential /17.1 Ac) Unit range: 87-274
This site is currently planted to vineyards and is located between the Adams Street Property and the
city owned flood control parcel adjacent to the Napa River. The site is within the Napa River flood



Public Review Draft Housing Element Needs Assessment          City of St. Helena General Plan Update
2/25/2009                                                                                   Page 111
boundaries and development opportunities will increase as a result of the Flood Protection Project.
Development of the site will require improvements to traffic circulation with the extension of
Adams Street and Starr Avenue as shown on the General Plan. Water, sewer, and storm drain
services will be constructed within the new streets. The parcel will not need either a General Plan
Amendment or a rezoning to facilitate residential development.

Site #2 – Romero Property (Medium Density Residential /10 Ac) Unit range: 51-160
This site is located on Pope Street at the terminus of Starr Avenue. Future development will need
to plan for the extension of Starr Avenue. Water, sewer, and storm drain lines are available from
Pope Street. The site is currently occupied by a single residence, a stand of oaks, and a remnant
walnut orchard. In the 2002 Housing Element this site was identified as one that the city would
“encourage the property owner and a nonprofit housing developer to promote the development of
affordable housing with particular attention being given to meet workforce housing needs.” Mercy
Housing has submitted a pre-application plan for 112 units that may meet these criteria. The
property will not need either a General Plan Amendment or a rezoning to facilitate residential
development.

Site #3 – Particelli Property (Medium Density Residential /8 Ac) Unit range: 40-127
This parcel is directly south of the Romero Property and contains a residence and vineyards.
Development of the site will require improvements to traffic circulation with the extension of
McCorkle Avenue and Starr Avenue as shown on the General Plan. Water, sewer, and storm drain
are available from McCorkle Avenue. The future extension of Starr Avenue will provide
additional services to the site. The property will not need either a General Plan Amendment or a
rezoning to facilitate residential development.

Site #4 – Dickson Property (Medium Density Residential /1.5 Ac) Unit range: 8-24
This site is located on North Crane and is currently occupied by a barn and an oak grove. Water,
sewer, and storm drain are available to the site. The parcel will not need either a General Plan
Amendment or a rezoning to facilitate residential development.

Site #5 – Paladini Property (Medium Density Residential /5.3 Ac) Unit range: 27-85
This site is directly west of the Magnolia Oaks project and is currently planted to vineyards. It is a
split zoned lot with 5.3 acres zoned as Medium Density Residential and 10 acres zoned as
Agriculture. The agricultural portion of the site is not completely within the Urban Limit Line.
Development of the site will require improvements to traffic circulation with the extension of La
Quinta Way and a secondary connection to Sulphur Springs Avenue and/or South Crane Avenue.
Sewer lines need to be extended to the site. The property, zoned as Medium Density Residential,
will not need either a General Plan Amendment or a rezoning to facilitate residential development.




Public Review Draft Housing Element Needs Assessment           City of St. Helena General Plan Update
2/25/2009                                                                                    Page 112
Site #6 – Quaglia Property (Medium Density Residential /4.4 Ac) Unit range: 22-70
This site is located on Spring Street and is planted to vineyards. In 2007 the owners had expressed
interest in designating the property as a historic resource and establishing a small winery but a
formal application has not yet been filed. Water, sewer, and storm drain are available to this site.
The property will not need either a General Plan Amendment or a rezoning to facilitate residential
development.

Site #7 – Aves Property (Medium Density Residential /4.6 Ac) Unit range: 24-74
This site is located on the northeast corner of Starr Avenue and Pope Street and is currently
occupied by a barn and a vineyard. Water, sewer, and storm drain are available to this site. The
owner obtained a certificate of compliance in 2008 which verifies that the site actually contains 2
legal parcels. The owner may apply for a lot line adjustment to create one small parcel and one
large parcel from the current parcel configuration. The parcels will not need either a General Plan
Amendment or a rezoning to facilitate residential development.

Site # 8 – Ruston Property (Low Density Residential /5.6 Ac) Unit range: 29-90
This site is located at the western edge of town on Spring Street. The 14.3 acre parcel is currently
split zoned 8.7 acres as Woodlands and Watershed and 5.6 acres zoned as Low Density
Residential. Expansion of the residential zoning to include the two residences currently located on
the Woodlands and Watershed portion of the property will be explored. Access to the site is
available from Spring Street. Water, sewer, and storm drain are available to the site. The portion
of the site zoned as Low Density Residential is vacant and could be rezoned as Medium Density
Residential. A rezone to Medium Density Residential would allow a unit range of between 29 and
90 units.

Site #9 – Jatsek Property (High Density Residential /.54 Ac) Unit range: 9-15
This site is located on McCorkle Avenue and contains a single uninhabited residence. Water,
sewer, and storm drain are available to this site. The owner and his architect have met with
Planning Department staff and will be proposing a 9 unit project in the near future. The property
will require a Planned Development overlay but will not need either a General Plan Amendment or
a rezoning to facilitate residential development.

Sites # 10 & 11 – Aslanian Property (High Density /2.4 total Ac) Unit range: 38-67
These sites are adjacent to each other with each site containing one single-family residence. They
are located between the Wallis/Voorhees development and homes located on Spring Street with
access from Spring Street. Water, sewer, and storm drain are available to these sites. The
properties will not need either a General Plan Amendment or a rezoning to facilitate residential
development.




Public Review Draft Housing Element Needs Assessment          City of St. Helena General Plan Update
2/25/2009                                                                                   Page 113
Site # 12 – Peregoy Property (Medium Density Residential /1.75 total Ac) Unit range: 19-28
This site is located on the northeast corner of Main Street and Fulton Lane and contains 4 single
family residences and 15 rental units. The site is underutilized and its size and proximity to the
center of town make it a prime site for increased density. The site is served by existing water,
sewer and storm drains. The property will not need either a General Plan Amendment or a
rezoning to facilitate additional residential development. However, the City has identified this site
for a rezone or split-zoning to accommodate high density residential development. If this property
is redeveloped at a density of 16 units per acre, this would result in an additional 9 units on top of
the existing 19 units.

Site #13 – Adams St Property (CBD & AG /5.6 Ac) Unit range: 30+/-
The total site is 5.6 acres in size. 3.6 acres are designated Central Business. Two acres are outside
of the Urban Limit Line and designated Agriculture/Urban Reserve. Development of the site will
require improvements to traffic circulation with the extension of Adams Street to connect with
Starr Avenue as shown on the General Plan. Water, sewer, and storm drain are available from
Adams Street and Library Lane. The parcel is owned by the City of St. Helena. In the 2002
Housing Element it was the consensus of the City Council to amend the General Plan to move the
Urban Limit Line to encompass the entire site. This however, may not be the consensus of the
current City Council. The site will most likely be rezoned with a Planned Development overlay
zone to facilitate the mix of uses on the property.

Sites #14, 15, & 16 – Toogood Property (SC & Industrial /12.3 Total Ac) Unit range: Unknown
These sites are located immediately south of the Sulphur Creek Bridge on Main Street. The sites
contain the Taylors Refresher restaurant, the Creekside B&B, an office, a residence, and a carwash.
The owner is interested in mixed use development but the sites have significant issues related to
traffic/circulation and flooding. Sewer and storm drain are currently not available to the sites. A
buffer around the creek will be required of any future development. In addition, to facilitate
residential development, the sites would need both a General Plan Amendment and either a
rezoning to High Density Residential or changes to the Municipal Code to permit residential uses
in non-residential zones.

Zoning for a Variety of Housing Types
Multifamily Rental Housing
Zoning for multifamily housing has been updated as recommended by Policy 1C-2 of the 2002
Housing Element. Now the St. Helena Municipal Code permits multifamily dwellings, apartments,
and dwelling groups with fewer than five units, by right in the High Density Residential (HR)
zoning district. Projects permitted by right require only routine approvals and are subject to a
design review by the Planning Commission. Multifamily projects with five or more proposed units
require a conditional use permit and must undergo a public review process. In addition, the



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2/25/2009                                                                                    Page 114
Medium Density Residential (MR) district was also revised to permit the construction of attached
                                                      96 97
duplex or triplex units with a conditional use permit.      As discussed previously, the City of St.
Helena’s recent approval of two apartment complexes as part of the Magnolia Oaks and Vineland
Station developments demonstrates the City’s commitment to ensure that the conditional use
permit requirement does not represent an undue constraint on the development of multifamily
rental housing in St. Helena. As a result of the City’s careful application of its zoning regulations,
St. Helena boasts a number of examples of high-quality, attractive affordable housing
developments. These existing high density projects have impressed community members during
the Housing Element Update process and have effectively served as positive examples of high
density housing in St. Helena. These projects will pave the way for continued support for
affordable housing in the community.

Housing for Permanent and Seasonal Agricultural Employees
Sections 17021.5 and 17021.6 of the California Health and Safety Code establish specific
requirements for the permitting of agricultural employee housing in a jurisdictions’ zoning code.
Specifically, Section 17021.5 mandates that “employee housing providing accommodations for six
                                                                                             98
or fewer employees shall be deemed a single-family structure with a residential land use.”
Furthermore, designated employee housing, as defined above, cannot be subject to conditional use
permit requirements, zoning variance, fees, taxes, or any other requirement other than those
pertaining to a traditional single-family structure. Section 17021.6 pertains to larger employee
housing facilities featuring a maximum of 36 beds in group quarters, or 12 single-family units.
Under this legislation, such units are deemed an agricultural land use and cannot be subject to any
restrictions, conditional use requirements, zoning variance, fees, taxes, or other requirements not
imposed on other agricultural uses in the same zone.

At present, the City of St. Helena Municipal Code does not directly identify agricultural employee
housing as a use permitted by right under Sections 17021.5 or 17021.6 of the California Health and
Safety Code. However, the City of St. Helena Municipal Code does permit “farm labor housing for
                                                                                               99
transient labor or agricultural employees in excess of the density limitations of the district” as a
conditional use in the Twenty Acre Agriculture (A-20) and Winery (W) zoning districts. Thus,
farmworker housing constructed in compliance with the maximum density requirements for the
above zones (one unit per five acres) is assumed to be a permitted a use. Under the Agricultural
Preserve (AP) zone, farmworker housing and seasonal farm labor camps are again considered a

    96
         City of St. Helena. Annual Report of Compliance with Housing Element. June 2008.
    97
       City of St. Helena. St. Helena Municipal Code, Title 17. Accessed October 2, 2008.
    http://www.codepublishing.com/CA/sthelena/.
    98
         California Government Health and Safety Code 17021.5 (b)
    99
       City of St. Helena. St. Helena Municipal Code, Title 17. Accessed October 2, 2008.
    http://www.codepublishing.com/CA/sthelena/.


Public Review Draft Housing Element Needs Assessment                    City of St. Helena General Plan Update
2/25/2009                                                                                             Page 115
conditional use and are not clearly permitted as an agricultural use as required under Section
17021.6 of the Health and Safety Code. Therefore, the City may wish to consider amending the
Municipal Code to expressly state that agricultural employee housing for six or fewer employees is
permitted by right in all zones that allow single-family residential development by right, and permit
by right agricultural employee housing of up to 12 units in zones where agriculture is permitted by
right, in order to comply with the California Health and Safety Code.

Zoning for Emergency Shelters, Transitional Housing, and Supportive Housing
Government Code Section 65583(a)(4) requires that St. Helena identify one or more zoning
districts that permit the development of at least one, year-round, emergency shelter, without
conditional use permit, and with capacity to accommodate the jurisdictions homeless and
                            100 101
transitional housing needs.         In addition, recent amendments to state housing element law that
came into effect January 1, 2008 as part of SB2 require cities to designate zoning where emergency
shelters are permitted by right within one year of the adoption of the housing element or enter into
a multijurisdictional agreement with neighboring jurisdictions to for development an emergency
shelter to address the unmet needs within two years of the adoption of the housing element.

Currently, the Low Density Residential (LR), Low Density Residential One Acre Minimum (LR-
1A), Medium Density Residential (MR) and High Density Residential (HR) zoning districts permit
by right any residential facility serving six or fewer persons. Residential facilities serving more
than six persons are permitted with a conditional use permit. Under the City’s zoning code, a
residential facility is defined as “any family home, group-care facility, or similar facility
determined pursuant to state law, for 24-hour nonmedical care of persons in need of personal
service, supervision, or assistance essential for sustaining the activities of daily living or for the
                                102
protection of the individual.”      Thus, the City allows for supportive or transitional housing in the
form of residential facilities, but does not directly identify transitional housing as a permitted use in
any zoning district.

Policy 1E-1 of the 2002 Housing Element required the City to define “emergency shelters” and
“transitional housing facilities” as part of the zoning code in addition to permitting these uses with
conditional permit in the Central Business (CB), Service Commercial (SC), Business and
Professional Office (BPO), and Public/Quasi-Public (PQP) zoning districts. However, as of June


    100
      Building Block for Effective Housing Elements, “Adequate Sites Inventory and Analysis: Zoning for
    Emergency Shelters and Transitional Housing”. http://www.hcd.ca.gov/hpd/housing_element/index.html.
    Accessed on June 13, 2008.
    101
      Senate Bill 2, Chapter 633. Amendment to Acts 655582, 65583 and 65589.5. Approved by the Governor on
    October 13, 2007. Effective January 1, 2008.
    102
       City of St. Helena. St. Helena Municipal Code, Title 17. Accessed October 2, 2008.
    http://www.codepublishing.com/CA/sthelena/.


Public Review Draft Housing Element Needs Assessment                   City of St. Helena General Plan Update
2/25/2009                                                                                            Page 116
2008, no steps had been taken to implement this 2002 Housing Element policy, and the City has
                                                     103
not yet taken steps to comply with SB2 regulations. Since these four zones were identified in the
2002 Housing Element to permit emergency shelters as a conditional use, one or more of these
zoning districts would likely receive the greatest community support to allow emergency shelters
by right, should St. Helena chose to address the requirements of SB2 in this manner.

Single Room Occupancy (SRO)
Single-room occupancy residential units are a traditional form of affordable housing for low-
income individuals consisting of a single room, often between 80 and 250 square feet in size, with
or without cooking and sanitary facilities, that is rented out, often on a daily, weekly, or monthly
basis. The St. Helena Municipal Code currently permits single-room occupancy type units in the
form of Lodging Houses serving up to two paying occupants in an owner occupied dwelling, as an
accessory use in the Low Density Residential (LR), Medium Density Residential (MR) and High
Density Residential (HR) zoning districts. As defined under Chapter 17.04 of the Municipal Code,
lodging houses are buildings other than hotels, motels or bed and breakfast inns, where individuals
can pay a rent in exchange for accommodations, including room and board, or board alone.
Lodging houses serving more than two and up to five occupants require a use permit. Accessory
structures featuring cooking and sanitation facilities are required to meet design and building
standards similar to those of standard single-family and second units. Units without such facilities
are subject to significantly fewer requirements and are more likely to address low-income housing
       104
needs.

Factory Built Housing and Mobile Homes
Government Code Section 65852.3(a) requires that manufactured and mobile homes, including the
lots on which they are installed, meeting certain standards of construction and be subject to the
                                                                                           105
same development standards that apply to conventional, stick built, single-family homes. In
accordance with this legislation, the St. Helena Municipal Code, Title 17, defines a single-family
dwelling to include a “mobilehome constructed to meet 1976 HUD standards, when placed on a
permanent foundation, which is designed or used exclusively as a residence, including only one
                106
dwelling unit.”     Thus, mobile units meeting the above definition are permitted under single-
family site development standards in all zones that allow single-family housing units by right.


    103
          City of St. Helena. Annual Report of Compliance with Housing Element. June 2008.
    104
       City of St. Helena. St. Helena Municipal Code, Title 17. Accessed October 2, 2008.
    http://www.codepublishing.com/CA/sthelena/.
    105
       GCS 65852.3(a) standards include the constructed or purchased after October 1976, certified under the
    National Manufactured Housing Construction and Safety Standards Act of 1974, and installed on a foundation
    system pursuant to Section 18551 of the Health and Safety Code.
    106
       City of St. Helena. St. Helena Municipal Code, Title 17. Accessed October 2, 2008.
    http://www.codepublishing.com/CA/sthelena/.


Public Review Draft Housing Element Needs Assessment                    City of St. Helena General Plan Update
2/25/2009                                                                                             Page 117
In addition, the Low Density Residential (LR), Low Density Residential One Acre Minimum (LR-
1A), Medium Density Residential (MR) and High Density Residential (HR) districts specifically
permit as an allowed use, permanent mobile homes constructed in accordance with the 1974 safety
standards and installed on a permanent foundation. Chapter 17.100 of the Municipal Code sets
forth requirements for the Mobilehome Park Overlay (MHP) zoning district that applies the State
Mobilehome Parks Act to the establishment and operation of mobilehome parks within the
                                      107 108
boundaries of the City of St. Helena.         Under these provisions of the Municipal Code, St.
Helena fully adheres to the State standards regarding manufactured and mobile homes, and mobile
home parks. The City is considering updating this Chapter of the Municipal Code to cover all
manufactured housing and not just mobilehomes. This change should not affect adherence to State
standards regarding manufactured housing and mobilehome parks.

Second Units
The St. Helena Municipal Code defines a second unit as “an attached or detached residential
dwelling unit which provides complete independent living facilities for one or more persons,
including permanent provisions for living, sleeping, eating, cooking, and sanitation on the same
                                                 109
parcel as a single-family dwelling is situated.”     A second unit may also be an efficiency unit or
manufactured home, as defined by the California Health and Safety Code. In compliance with
State law, the St. Helena Municipal Code permits the construction of second units in all residential
zoning districts. Units within the Woodlands and Watershed (WW) district are held to a higher
standard due to potential environmental issues that would require mitigation. Second units meeting
specified standards are permitted and others require a conditional use permit. Second units are
exempt from the Growth Management System Municipal Code Section 17.152.040.

Since the previous housing element, the maximum size limit for second units increased from 600
square feet to 850 square feet. This amendment was intended to encourage full-time occupancy of
units while maintaining affordability to moderate-income households. Additional incentives have
been added, including increasing the potential floor area up to 400 square feet for primary dwelling
units that include a second unit.

Summary
St. Helena has already built, issued building permits for, or approved 66 housing units since

    107
       Building Blocks for Effective Housing Elements. Adequate Sites Inventory and Analysis: Zoning for a
    Variety of Housing Types. Accessed October 2, 2008. http://www.hcd.ca.gov/hpd/housing_element/index.
    html.
    108
      City of St. Helena. St. Helena Municipal Code, Title 17. http://www.codepublishing.com/CA/sthelena/.
    Accessed October 2, 2008.
    109
          Ibid.


Public Review Draft Housing Element Needs Assessment                  City of St. Helena General Plan Update
2/25/2009                                                                                           Page 118
January 1, 2007. In order to address its remaining RHNA, the City must demonstrate that it has
sufficient sites to accommodate an additional 23 very low-income, 16 low-income, 10 moderate-
income, and 6 above moderate-income housing units. The pending Mercy Housing project would
further address a significant portion of the City’s RHNA. Approval of the pending Mercy Housing
project would result in the City fully addressing the very low-, moderate-, and above moderate-
income RHNA, and only 10 units remaining in the low-income category.

With significant public input, the City has identified 12 medium and high density sites as well as
four non-residentially zoned sites as key housing opportunity sites, as detailed in Table 37. Using a
conservative approach of estimating housing development capacity with the minimum density
requirements for each residential zone, the medium density sites could support a total of 288 units
and the high density sites could support 47 units. The high density development capacity
represents a 20 percent buffer above the 39 lower income units remaining in the City’s RHNA.
Again, this analysis conservatively excludes the potential affordable units that are proposed as part
of the pending Mercy Housing project as well as the 9 net additional units that could be supported
on the Peregoy Property (Site #12) if it is rezoned to High Density Residential and redeveloped.
Moreover, Table 38 details additional sites in the City that could potentially support new housing
development. Due to other factors, including a lack of property owner interest or small size, these
additional sites were not identified as key housing opportunity sites.

St. Helena’s Zoning Ordinance allows for a variety of housing types in the City, including
multifamily units, transitional and supportive housing, single-room occupancy units, manufactured
and mobile homes, and second units. However, in order to comply with Section 17021.6 of the
California Health and Safety Code, St. Helena should amend the Municipal Code to allow
agricultural employee housing for six or fewer employees as a permitted use in all zones that allow
single-family residential development by right. In addition, St. Helena must address the
requirements established by SB2 pertaining to emergency shelters by either designating zoning
where emergency shelters are permitted by right within one year of the adoption of the housing
element, or entering into a multijurisdictional agreement with neighboring jurisdictions to for
development an emergency shelter to address the unmet needs within two years of the adoption of
the housing element. Moreover, based on community input during the Housing Element Update
process, the City is exploring permitting multifamily units by right in the Medium and High
Density Residential zones upon adoption of design guidelines, and expanding the Mobilehome
Park Overlay district to include all manufactured housing.




Public Review Draft Housing Element Needs Assessment          City of St. Helena General Plan Update
2/25/2009                                                                                   Page 119
Table 36: St. Helena Regional Housing Needs Allocation, 2007 - 2014

                                                             Very Low-       Low-                      Above
                                                              Income        Income         Moderate   Moderate   TOTAL
Original ABAG Allocation                                            30          21               25         45      121
Less Built or Building Permits Issued to Date (a)                    1           1                7        12        21
Less Units Approved to Date (a)                                      6           4                8        27        45
Remaining Balance                                                   23          16               10          6       55


Note:
(a) January 1, 2007 through December 2008.

Sources: ABAG, 2008; Carol Poole, City of St. Helena Planning Director, 2009; BAE, 2009.
Table 37: Available Land Inventory Summary, Key Housing Sites (Page 1 of 2) (DRAFT)
                                                                                              Allowable            Potential Unit
 Site                                             Current        Current                    Density (du/ac)          Capacity             Existing               Infrastructure              Environmental           Realistic
Number          APN             Address          Zoning (a)    Gen. Plan (b)    Acreage      Min.     Max.        Min.        Max.          Use                     Capacity                  Constraints        Unit Capacity (c)

            Medium Density
       1    009-030-020 No Address                   MR            MDR               17.1     5.1      16          87         274       Vineyard          Extend water, sewer, and           Requires                   87
                                                                                                                                                          storm drains from the              Completion of
                                                                                                                                                          proposed public street.            Flood Prot. Proj.
       2    009-070-002    567 Pope                  MR            MDR               10.0     5.1      16          51         160       Vacant            Part of the parcel needed for      None Currently             51
                                                                                                                                                          Starr Ave. extension.              identified
                                                                                                                                                          Water, sewer, and storm
                                                                                                                                                          drain available.
       3    009-070-003    591 McCorkle              MR            MDR                7.9     5.1      16          40         127       Ranch and         Water, sewer, and storm            None Currently             40
                                                                                                                                        Vineyard          drain available.                   identified
       4    009-322-009    1817 Spring Street        MR            MDR                1.5     5.1      16          8           24       Vacant            Water, sewer, and storm            None Currently             8
                                                                                                                                                          drain available.                   identified
       5    009-362-015    Sulphur Springs         MR/AG         MDR/AG          5.3/10.0     5.1      16          27          85       Vineyard          Extend sewer lines to site.        None Currently             27
                                                                                                                                                          Increase access with new           identified
                                                                                                                                                          road to Sulphur Springs
                                                                                                                                                          Ave. Not completely within
                                                                                                                                                          Urban Limit Line.
       6    009-441-023    Spring Street             MR            MDR                4.4     5.1      16          22          70       Vineyard          Water, sewer, and storm            None Currently             22
                                                                                                                                                          drain available.                   identified
       7    009-552-001    Pope Street               MR            MDR                4.6     5.1      16          24          74       Vineyard          Water, sewer and storm drain       None Currently             24
                                                                                                                                                          available.                         identified
       8    009-391-020    Spring Street         WW/LR-1A        WW/LDR           8.7/5.6     5.1      16          29          90       Vacant            Water, sewer and storm drain       None Currently             29
                                                                                                                                                          available. Rezone to MR.           identified

            High Density
       9    009-502-007    684 McCorkle Place        HR            HDR                0.5    16.1      28          9           15       Pre-application   Water, sewer and storm drain       None Currently             9
                                                                                                                                        for nine units    available.                         identified
      10    009-590-010    1515 Spring Street        HR            HDR                0.9    16.1      28          14          25       Single-family     Water, sewer and storm drain       None Currently             14
                                                                                                                                        residence         available.                         identified
      11    009-590-003    1447 Spring Street        HR            HDR                1.5    16.1      28          24          42       Single-family     Water, sewer and storm drain       None Currently             24
                                                                                                                                        residence         available.                         identified
      12    009-191-006    1600 Main Street          MR            MDR                1.8     5.1      16         n.a.        n.a.      15 apts and       Water, sewer and storm drain       None Currently            9 (d)
                                                                                                                                        4 single-family   available. Rezone or split- Zone   identified
                                                                                                                                        units             to high density.

Notes:
(a) AG = Agriculture, CB = Central Business, HR = High Density Residential, MR = Medium Density Residential, SC = Service Commercial, and WW = Woodlands and Watershed.
(b) AG = Agriculture, CB = Central Business, HDR = Higher Density Residential, I = Industrial, MDR = Medium Density Residential, SC = Service Commercial, and WW = Woodland and Watershed.
(c) Based on minimum density requirements where appropriate.
(d) Estimate of new units based on 16.1 minimum allowable density, less the existing 19 units.

Sources: City of St. Helena staff, February 2009; BAE, 2009.
Table 37: Available Land Inventory Summary, Key Housing Sites (Page 2 of 2) (DRAFT)
                                                                                              Allowable            Potential Unit
 Site                                             Current        Current                    Density (du/ac)          Capacity             Existing              Infrastructure             Environmental            Realistic
Number          APN             Address          Zoning (a)    Gen. Plan (b)    Acreage      Min.     Max.        Min.        Max.          Use                    Capacity                 Constraints         Unit Capacity (c)

             Other
        13   009-150-006   Library Ave./Adams      CB/AG          CB/AG           3.6/2.0     n.a.     20         n.a.         30       Vacant           Water, sewer, and storm           None Currently              30
                                                                                                                                                         drain available. Not completely   identified
                                                                                                                                                         within Urban Limit Line.
        14   009-180-036   931 Main/Toogood        SC/IND          SC/I               9.4     n.a.     n.a.    Unknown     Unknown      Underutilized    Sewer, storm drain not avail.     Within Flood Zone.      Unknown
        15   009-180-037   931 Main/Toogood        SC/IND          SC/I               2.2     n.a.     n.a.    Unknown     Unknown      Underutilized    Sewer, storm drain not avail.     100 foot setback        Unknown
        16   009-263-007   931 Main/Toogood         SC             SC                 0.6     n.a.     n.a.    Unknown     Unknown      Underutilized    Sewer, storm drain not avail.     required from the       Unknown
                                                                                                                                                                                           creek.
Total                                                                                                             335        1,015                                                                                    374

Notes:
(a) AG = Agriculture, CB = Central Business, HR = High Density Residential, MR = Medium Density Residential, SC = Service Commercial, and WW = Woodlands and Watershed.
(b) AG = Agriculture, CB = Central Business, HDR = Higher Density Residential, I = Industrial, MDR = Medium Density Residential, SC = Service Commercial, and WW = Woodland and Watershed.
(c) Based on minimum density requirements where appropriate.
(d) Estimate of new units based on 16.1 minimum allowable density, less the existing 19 units.

Sources: City of St. Helena staff, February 2009; BAE, 2009.
Table 38: Available Land Inventory Summary, Other Vacant/Underutilized Sites (DRAFT)
                                                                                             Allowable              Potential Unit
 Site                                          Current           Current                  Density (du/ac)             Capacity          Existing             Infrastructure              Environmental             Realistic
Number          APN            Address        Zoning (a)       Gen. Plan (b)   Acreage     Min.     Max.           Min.       Max.        Use                   Capacity                  Constraints          Unit Capacity (c)

             Medium Density
        17   009-030-005 No Address               MR               MDR            15.5     5.1       16             79        248     Vineyard        Extend water, sewer, and           Flood Protection             0
                                                                                                                                                      storm drains from the              Project - terracing
                                                                                                                                                      proposed public street.
        18   009-173-011    Stockton              MR               MDR             0.4     5.1       16              2         6      Vacant          All utilities available.           None identified              2
        19   009-222-003    1521 Oak Avenue       MR               MDR             0.2     5.1       16              1         3      Vacant          All utilities available.           None identified              1
        20   009-270-004    Kearney               MR               MDR             0.2     5.1       16              1         4      Underutilized   All utilities available.           None identified              1
        21   009-304-013    1405 Adams            MR               MDR             0.2     5.1       16              1         4      Vacant          All utilities available.           None identified              1
        22   009-305-046    Madrona               MR               MDR             0.2     5.1       16              1         3      Underutilized   All utilities available.           None identified              1
        23   009-305-047    Madrona               MR               MDR             0.2     5.1       16              1         2      Underutilized   All utilities available.           None identified              1
        24   009-311-005    Allyn                 MR               MDR             0.1     5.1       16              1         2      Underutilized   All utilities available.           None identified              1
        25   009-312-005    1623 Adams            MR               MDR             0.2     5.1       16              1         4      Underutilized   All utilities available.           None identified              1
        26   009-312-050    Stockton              MR               MDR             0.1     5.1       16              1         2      Underutilized   All utilities available.           None identified              1
        27   009-313-041    Spring                MR               MDR             0.4     5.1       16              2         7      Vacant          All utilities available.           None identified              2
        28   009-362-016    Sulphur Springs       MR               MDR             0.4     5.1       16              2         6      Vineyard        No public water, sewer, or         None identified              2
                                                                                                                                                      storm drain currently available.
        29   009-401-042    Crinella              MR               MDR             0.1     5.1       16              1         2      Underutilized   All utilities available.           None identified              1
        30   009-403-013    Park                  MR               MDR             0.1     5.1       16              1         2      Underutilized   All utilities available.           None identified              1
        31   009-431-019    Sulphur Springs       MR               MDR             0.2     5.1       16              1         2      Vacant          All utilities available.           None identified              1
        32   009-441-021    Olive                 MR               MDR             0.2     5.1       16              1         3      Vacant          All utilities available.           None identified              1
        33   009-710-006    Quail Court           MR               MDR             0.4     5.1       16              2         6      Vacant          All utilities available.           None identified              2

             High Density
        34   009-180-034    Vidovich              HR               HDR            13.4     16.1      28             216       376     Vineyard        No public water, sewer, or         Recommend                    0
                                                                                                                                                      storm drains. Improvements         rezone to
                                                                                                                                                      needed to surrounding              agriculture
                                                                                                                                                      streets.
        35   009-503-001    Pope                  HR               HDR             1.0     16.1      28             16        28      Underutilized   All utilities available.           None identified              0

             Woodlands Watershed
        36   009-131-002 Spring Mountain          WW               WW             32.2     n.a.      0.2    (d)     n.a.       6      Vacant          No public water or sewer.          Biological, slope            0
        37   009-131-043 Spring Mountain          WW               WW             29.3     n.a.      0.2    (d)     n.a.       6      Vacant          No public water or sewer.          Biological, slope            0
        38   009-131-039 Spring Mountain          WW               WW              5.0     n.a.      0.2    (d)     n.a.       1      Vacant          No public water or sewer.          Biological, slope            0

             Other
        39   009-070-033    1000 Mills          SC/AG             SC/AG         6.1/4.2    n.a.      10             n.a.      20      Vacant          No public water, sewer, or         None identified              20
                                                                                                                                                      storm drains. Improvements
                                                                                                                                                      needed to surrounding
                                                                                                                                                      streets. Not completely
                                                                                                                                                      within Urban Limit Line.
        40   009-180-008    905 Main               SC               SC             0.3     n.a.     n.a.          Unknown   Unknown   Vacant                                                                      Unknown
        41   009-580-009    Dowdell               IND                I             0.8     n.a.     n.a.          Unknown   Unknown   Underutilized                                                               Unknown
        42   009-580-026    Main/Vintage           SC               SC             0.9     n.a.     n.a.          Unknown   Unknown   Underutilized                                                               Unknown

Total                                                                                                               329       742                                                                                     38

Notes:
(a) AG = Agriculture, CB = Central Business, HR = High Density Residential, MR = Medium Density Residential, SC = Service Commercial, and WW = Woodlands and Watershed.
(b) AG = Agriculture, CB = Central Business, HDR = Higher Density Residential, I = Industrial, MDR = Medium Density Residential, SC = Service Commercial, and WW = Woodland and Watershed.
(c) Based on minimum density requirements where appropriate.
(d) Allowable density of one dwelling unit per five acres.

Sources: City of St. Helena staff, February 2009; BAE, 2009.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        Figure 2:
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             Legend
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                                                                                                             Key Opportunity Sites
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                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  To
                           Waterbodies                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           Napa


                N
                       0                      .25                             .5 Miles




Source: City of St. Helena; County of Napa
January 2009
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               Figure 3:
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             Legend
                           City Limits                                                1
                                                                                               Housing Element
                                                                                               Vacant/Underutilized Sites
                           Urban Limit Line
                           Parks & Open Space
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           To
                           Waterbodies                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    Napa


                N
                       0                      .25                             .5 Miles




Source: City of St. Helena; County of Napa
January 2009
Appendix A:                            Definitions
Terms Related to Geography
Bay Area: For the purpose of this Housing Element, the Bay Area is defined to include the
counties of Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Sonoma,
and Solano.

Terms Related to Households
Average Household Size: Average household size equals the number of people living in
households divided by the number of occupied housing units in a given area.

Disabled: “A long-lasting physical, mental, or emotional condition. This condition can make it
difficult for a person to do activities such as walking, climbing stairs, dressing, bathing, learning, or
remembering. This condition can also impede a person from being able to go outside the home
                                         110
alone or to work at a job or business.”

Elderly: Persons 65 years of age or older according to the 2000 Census. However, the
Comprehensive housing Affordability Strategy (CHAS) Data set, published by the Department of
Housing and Urban Development defines elderly as ages 62 and over.

Family Household: Two or more related persons occupying a dwelling unit.

Household: A person or group of persons occupying a single dwelling unit. This does not include
persons living in group quarters, such as dormitories, convalescent homes, or prisons.

Large Family: A family of five (5) or more persons.

Non-Family Household: A single person living alone, or two or more unrelated persons sharing a
dwelling unit.

Overcrowding: More than one person per room. Also see Room.

Terms Related to Income Levels
Extremely-Low Income Household: A household whose income, with adjustments for household
size, does not exceed 30 percent of the Area Median Family Income (AMFI), as published annually
by the State of California, Department of Housing and Community Development.


    110
      American Factfinder. http://factfinder.census.gov/servlet/DatasetMainPageServlet?_program=DEC&_su
    bmenuId=&_lang=en&_ts=. Accessed June 12, 2008.


Public Review Draft Housing Element Needs Assessment                City of St. Helena General Plan Update
2/25/2009                                                                                         Page 126
Very Low-Income Household: A household whose income, with adjustments for household size,
does not exceed 50 percent of the Area Median Family Income (AMFI), as published annually by
the State of California, Department of Housing and Community Development.

Low-Income Household: A household whose income, with adjustments for household size, does
not exceed 80 percent of the Area Median Family Income (AMFI), as published annually by the
State of California, Department of Housing and Community Development.

Moderate-Income Household: A household whose income, with adjustment for household size,
falls between 80 percent and 120 percent of the Area Median Family Income (AMFI), as published
annually by the State of California, Department of Housing and Community Development.

Above Moderate-Income Household: A household whose income, with adjustment for household
size, is greater than 120% of the Area Median Family Income (AMFI), as published annually by
the State of California, Department of Housing and Community Development.

Terms Related to Housing Units
Affordable Housing: As defined by federal guidelines, a housing unit is affordable if the household
spends less than 30 percent of its total gross income on the costs of housing, including rent or
mortgage payments.

Room: The 2000 Census defines a room as “whole rooms used for living purposes…including
living rooms, dining rooms, kitchens, bedrooms, finished recreation rooms, enclosed porches
suitable for year-round use, and lodgers' rooms. Excluded are strips or pullman kitchens,
bathrooms, open porches, balconies, halls or foyers, half-rooms, utility rooms, unfinished attics or
basements, or other unfinished space used for storage. A partially divided room is a separate room
only if there is a partition from floor to ceiling, but not if the partition consists solely of shelves or
cabinets.”

Transitional Housing: “A [housing] project that has as its purpose facilitating the movement of
homeless individuals to permanent housing within a reasonable amount of time (usually 24
months). Transitional housing includes housing primarily designed to serve deinstitutionalized
homeless individuals and other homeless individuals with mental or physical disabilities and
                                  111
homeless families with children.”



    111
      Department of Housing and Urban Development. http://www.hud.gov/offices/cpd/library/glossary/t/.
    Accessed June 12, 2008.


Public Review Draft Housing Element Needs Assessment                 City of St. Helena General Plan Update
2/25/2009                                                                                          Page 127
Terms Related to Employment
Employed Residents: Employed residents equals the number of local area residents who are
currently working. This is not the same as employment, as some residents may commute to work
outside the jurisdiction where they live.

Employment: Area employment equals the number of jobs in an area for which employers pay
workers wages or salaries. This is not the same as employed residents, since some workers may
commute from outside the jurisdiction in which they work.

Terms Related to Government
Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG): ABAG is the official comprehensive planning
agency for the San Francisco Bay Area region. ABAG’s mission is to strengthen cooperation and
coordination among local governments located in the nine Bay Area counties of Alameda, Contra
                                                                               112
Costa, Marin, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Solano, and Sonoma.

California Building Standards Code: Title 24 of the California Code of Regulations, contains the
regulations that govern the construction of buildings, residential or nonresidential, in the State of
California.

California Code of Regulations: The California Code of Regulations is the official publication of
regulations adopted, amended or repealed by California State agencies under the Administrative
Procedure Act (APA). Regulations that have been properly adopted and filed with the Secretary of
State are considered to have the force of law.

California Energy Code: Section 6 under Title 24 of the California Code of Regulations, the 2005
Edition of the California Energy Code (CEC), sometimes referred to as “Title 24”, contains energy
conservation standards applicable to all residential and nonresidential buildings in the State of
California.

Local Agency Formation Commission (LAFCo): LAFCos are responsible for administering
California Government Code Section 56000 et seq., also known as the Cortese-Knox-Hertzberg
Local Government Reorganization Act of 2000. LAFCos are charged with encouraging orderly
formation and development of local governmental agencies, promoting the efficient management
of municipal services, and preserving agricultural lands and open space through municipal service
reviews, annexations, and the establishment of spheres of influence. The Napa County LAFCO is
comprised of two members of the Board of Supervisors, two city council members, and one



    112
          Association of Bay Area Governments, 2008. http://www.abag.ca.gov/. Accessed June 6, 2008.


Public Review Draft Housing Element Needs Assessment                    City of St. Helena General Plan Update
2/25/2009                                                                                              Page 128
                           113
member of the public.

Napa County League of Governments (NCLOG): Established in early 2002, the purpose of the
NCLOG is to address of common concern, such as transportation, housing, economic development,
agricultural preservation, environmental protection, and social equity. The NCLOG consists of the
cities of American Canyon, Calistoga, Napa, St. Helena and the Town of Yountville, along with the
                       114
Unincorporated Area.

Senate Bill 1087: Effective January 1, 2006, this California State Senate Bill “requires local
governments to provide a copy of the adopted housing element to water and sewer providers. In
addition, water and sewer providers must grant priority for service allocations to proposed
                                                                                    115
developments that include housing units affordable to lower-income households.”

Senate Bills 221 and 610: These companion measures became effective January 1, 2002. “Under
SB 610, water assessments must be furnished to local governments for inclusion in any
environmental documentation for certain projects (as defined in Water Code 10912(a)) subject to
the California Environmental Quality Act. Under SB221, approval by a city or county of certain
                                                                                                  116
residential subdivisions requires an affirmative written verification of sufficient water supply.”

Title 24: See California Building Standards Code, and California Energy Code.




    113
          LAFCO of Napa County. 2008. http://www.napa.lafco.ca.gov/. Accessed June 6, 2008.
    114
          Napa County League of Governments, 2003. http://www.nclog.org/. Accessed June 6, 2008.
    115
      Cathy E. Creswell. “Memo to Planning Directors, Public Works Directors, Water and Sewer Service
    Providers, Interested Parties, Department of Housing and Community Development”, Sacramento, CA. May
    22, 2006. http://www.hcd.ca.gov/hpd/memo_sb1087.pdf. Accessed June 6, 2008.
    116
       Office of Water Use Efficiency. “Draft Guidebook for Implementation of Senate Bill 610 and Senate Bill
    221 of 2001 to assist water suppliers, cities, and counties in integrating water and land use planning, California
    Department of Water Resources”. September 25, 2002.


Public Review Draft Housing Element Needs Assessment                        City of St. Helena General Plan Update
2/25/2009                                                                                                   Page 129
Appendix B: Acquisition and Preservation Costs for Affordable Housing
Market Rate Value                                                Value Supported by Affordable Rents
Units                                                            Units
  1-bedroom                                             48         1-bedroom                                                 48
  2-bedroom                                              2         2-bedroom                                                  2

Median Market Rents for St. Helena Apartments                    Affordable Rents for St. Helena Apartments
 1-bedroom                                            $900         1-bedroom (a)                                          $728
 2-bedroom                                          $1,063 (b)     2-bedroom (a)                                          $806


Gross Potential Annual Leasing Revenue           $543,900        Gross Potential Annual Leasing Revenue               $438,816
  Less five percent vacancy                       $27,195          Less five percent vacancy                           $21,941
  Less operating expenses                        $163,170          Less operating expenses                            $163,170

NOI                                              $353,535        NOI                                                  $253,705

Cap Rate                                             4.8%        Amount Available for Monthly Payments                $21,142

Total Capitalized Value                         $7,442,842       Maximum Supportable Mortgage (c)                   $3,526,300

                                                                 Necessary Subsidy                                  $3,916,542

Notes:
(a) Assumes units are all affordable to very low-income households since Woodbridge is affordable to very-low income households.
(b) This figure is an estimate based on rents for existing 1-bedroom and 2-bedroom units in St. Helena.
(c) Interest Rate, Annual                                  6%
    Loan Period, Years                                      30

Sources: HCD Income limits for Napa County, 2008; Marcus & Millichap, 2nd Quarter 2008; HCD, 2008; Respective property owners and
managers, 2008; BAE, 2008.
Appendix C: Construction Costs, Recent Affordable Housing Projects
                                        Year                                                       Units                 Average                     Cost
   Affordable Housing Projects          Built          Address               Units                by Type                Unit Size    Total Cost    per unit
Vineyard Crossing Apartments            2007     202 Tapestry Ln.           145       24, 1-bedroom; 63, 2-bedroom; 55   957         $40,102,129   $276,566
                                                 American Canyon, CA                  3-bedroom; and 3, 4-bedroom

Magnolia Park Townhomes                 2005     2000 Imola Ave             29        4, studios; 4, 1-bedroom; 5        956         $9,141,931    $315,239
                                                 Napa, CA                             2-bedroom; 12, 3-bedroom; and 4
                                                                                      4-bedroom

Jefferson Street Senior Housing         2004     3400 Jefferson St.         78        77, 1-bedroom; and 1, 2-bedroom    554         $11,354,616   $145,572    (a)
                                                 Napa, CA

Palisades                               2008     40 and 42 Brannan St       23        14, 1-bedroom; and 9, 2-bedroom    Unknown     $7,549,715    $328,248
                                                 Calistoga, CA

Average Cost per unit                            $266,406

Median Cost per unit                             $295,903

Note:
(a) Note the land for this development was purchased back in 2000 for a relatively low pric e.

Sources: Personal communication with Napa Valley Community Housing, Mid-Peninsula Housing Coalition, and Calistoga Affordable Housing Inc., 2008; BAE, 2008.
Appendix D: Potential Rental Subsidy for Affordable housing
Rents for a 2-Person Households                                         1-bedroom           2-bedroom
Units in the Woodbridge Apartments                                                  48                  2

Affordable Rents (a)
  Very Low-Income                                                                $728               $806

Median Market Rent in St. Helena                                                 $900 (b)         $1,063 (c)

Monthly Difference
 Very Low-Income                                                                 $172               $257

Annual Subsidy Required for each Very Low-Income Unit                          $2,061             $3,078


Annual Subsidy for Woodbridge Apartments (d)                                  $98,928             $6,156

Notes:
(a) Based on HUD defined income limits for a 2-person household living in a 1-bedroom or 2-bedroom unit. See Table 23 for further details.
(b) Based on information from local apartment managers. See Table 22 for further details.
(c) This figure is an estimate based on rents for existing 1-bedroom and 2-bedroom units in St. Helena.
(d) Woodbridge features 50 total units including one and two bedroom apartments. Figures assume that units are all affordable to very-low
income households.

Sources: HCD, 2008; HUD, 2008; City of Napa Housing Division, 2008; Respective Property Owners and Managers, 2008; BAE, 2008.
Appendix E: List of Qualified Entities to Assist with Preservation of Affordable Housing

Organization (a)                                                      Date Added to List
Affordable Housing Foundation                                               12/24/98
BRIDGE Housing Corporation                                                  12/28/98
Christian Church Homes of Northern California, Inc.                          2/6/01
Housing Corporation of America                                               6/10/99
Nehemiah Progressive Housing Dev. Corp.                                     12/24/98
Petaluma Ecumenical Properties Inc.                                          8/19/03
Rural California Housing Corp                                               12/28/98
Senior Housing Foundation                                                   12/24/98
Solano Affordable Housing Foundation                                         1/21/99
Vallejo Neighborhood Housing Services, Inc.                                      1/13/99
Note:
(a) All listed entities have filed an application with HCD and have met all of the requirements pursuant to Government Code
Section 65863.11, thus establishing them as a qualified entity to purchase units at-risk of conversion.


Sources: HCD Building Blocks to an Effective Housing Element, 2008; BAE, 2008.
Appendix F
Appendix G:                            Salaries by Occupation




Public Review Draft Housing Element Needs Assessment   City of St. Helena General Plan Update
2/25/2009                                                                            Page 135
Table G1: Select City of St. Helena Public Employee Annual Salary Ranges, FY 2008-2009
Position                                                                             Salary Range
Accounting Assistant I, II, & III                                          $34,070        to            $50,192
Library Assistant I & II                                                   $34,070        to            $42,993
Office Assistant                                                           $34,070        to            $41,413
Maintenance Worker I & II                                                  $34,758        to            $51,461
Building Permit Technician I, II, & III                                    $38,504        to            $55,741
Senior Library Assistant                                                   $40,174        to            $48,346
Plant Operator I, II, & III - Water & Wastewater                           $40,780        to            $61,904
Librarian I & II                                                           $41,396        to            $54,912
Administrative Assistant                                                   $41,603        to            $50,569
Maintenance Lead Worke                                                     $43,191        to            $52,499
Recreation Superviso                                                       $46,203        to            $56,160
Accounting Technician                                                      $46,550        to            $56,582
Senior Librarian                                                           $47,018        to            $57,150
Equipment Mechanic                                                         $47,608        to            $57,868
Jr. Engineer                                                               $53,004        to            $64,427
Assistant Planner                                                          $53,004        to            $64,427
Public Works Supervisor                                                    $54,209        to            $65,891
Associate Planner                                                          $57,127        to            $69,438
Chief Plant Operator - Water & Wastewater                                  $59,159        to            $71,909
Project Coordinator                                                        $59,604        to            $72,449
Assistant Engineer                                                         $62,970        to            $76,540
Chief Building Official                                                    $66,360        to            $80,661
Associate Civil Engineer                                                   $69,410        to            $84,369
Senior Planner                                                             $78,053        to            $94,874
Assistant PW Director                                                      $80,427        to            $97,760
Sources: City of St. Helena Staff, 2009; BAE, 2009.


Table G2: Wages by Occupation, Napa County, First Quarter 2008
Occupation                                                           Average Annual Wage
Food Preparation and Serving-Related Occupations                       $22,851
Building and Grounds Cleaning and Maintenance Occupation               $27,492
Farming, Fishing, and Forestry Occupations                             $27,672
Personal Care and Service Occupations                                  $27,677
Healthcare Support Occupations                                         $31,130
Transportation and Material Moving Occupation                          $32,973
Office and Administrative Support Occupations (a                       $35,294
Sales and Related Occupations                                          $38,718
Production Occupations                                                 $41,180
Arts, Design, Entertainment, Sports, and Media Occupations             $45,551
Protective Service Occupations                                         $45,589
Community and Social Services Occupations                              $48,741
Installation, Maintenance, and Repair Occupations                      $49,228
Construction and Extraction Occupations                                $52,195
Education, Training, and Library Occupations                           $55,714
Healthcare Practitioners and Technical Occupations                     $60,759
Architecture and Engineering Occupations                               $63,446
Computer and Mathematical Occupations                                  $64,379
Business and Financial Operations Occupations                          $68,479
Life, Physical, and Social Science Occupations                         $73,834
Legal Occupations                                                      $85,155
Management Occupations                                                $104,713
Average all Occupations                                                $45,333

Note:
(a) A wage estimate for Napa County could not be provided. An estimate for the State of California is provided instea

Sources: California Employment Development Department, 2009; BAE, 2009
                  PUBLIC REVIEW DRAFT

                         City of St. Helena
                  Housing Element Update
Goals, Policies, and Five-Year Action Plan


                                Submitted to:
                                   Carol Poole
                             Planning Director
                             City of St. Helena




                            February 26, 2009
Housing Element Goals, Policies, and
Five-Year Action Plan
Purpose of the Element
Housing Elements are one of seven General Plan Elements required by section 65302(c) of the
California Government Code. Specific requirements for Housing Elements are set forth
beginning at section 65580 of the Government Code, with additional guidance provided by the
State Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD).

The purpose of the Housing Element is to establish a comprehensive plan to address housing
needs in St. Helena over the five-year planning period between July 1, 2009 and June 30, 2014.
The Housing Element sets the community goals, and policies surrounding the development,
rehabilitation, and preservation of housing units to meet the needs of St. Helena residents (present
and future), and every jurisdiction in the State of California is required to submit a Housing
Element to the Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD) for review and
certification. St. Helena is a member of the Association of Bay Area Association of Governments
and, therefore, must submit an updated Housing Element to HCD by June 30, 2009.

Element Specific Components
The 2009 St. Helena Housing Element Update consists of two parts; the Housing Needs
Assessment, and this Housing Element Policy Document. The Housing Needs Assessment
identifies and analyzes the existing and projected housing needs for St. Helena and also provides
a list of sites for housing development that are adequate to accommodate the City’s regional
housing needs allocation. The Housing Policy Document states goals, policies, quantified
objectives, and implementing actions for the development, rehabilitation, and preservation of
housing, based upon the findings of the Housing Needs Assessment and input received through
the public outreach that the City incorporated into the Housing Element Update process. Then,
throughout the five-year planning period, St. Helena will implement the actions specified in the
Policy Document to meet the community’s housing goals.

Key Findings and Recommendations
The following section summarizes the key findings in the Housing Needs Assessment and
outlines the resulting policy recommendations.

Review of Existing Housing Element
Since the City of St. Helena adopted the Housing Element Update in 2002, the City has
successfully removed many of the previously identified governmental constraints to housing
production, maintenance, and rehabilitation, and increased the funding for, and production of
affordable housing, with assistance from the private sector under Municipal Code Chapter 17.146
(Housing Trust Fund, Housing Impact Fee, and Inclusionary/In Lieu Fee Requirements). The
City could improve upon its policies, however, related to special needs populations including the
homeless, disabled, and senior citizens. Review of the City’s progress since adopting the 2002
Housing Element indicates that the City has not yet been able to fully meet these groups’ needs.


Public Review Draft Housing Element Policy Document           City of St. Helena General Plan Update
2/26/2009                                                                                  Page 1
Demographic and Economic Trends
Since 2000, the City of St. Helena experienced a slight population decline and an increase in the
number of households, causing the average household size in St. Helena to fall. The median age
of St. Helena residents decreased slightly, while the average age of Napa and Bay Area residents
continued to rise. The median household income in St. Helena ($79,200 in 2008) exceeded the
medians of both Napa County and the Bay Area. Many people travel into St. Helena from the
surrounding area for work, and that pattern will continue as local population and household
growth projections lag strong employment growth estimates for the next three decades.

Existing Housing and Market Conditions
Around 2,750 housing units existed in St. Helena in 2008, an increase of about 40 units since
2000. Almost all of the new homes are single-family units. There is a significant difference
between the income necessary to purchase the median priced single-family home in St. Helena
(nearly $210,000 a year) and St. Helena’s 2008 median household income of $79,200. Rental
units in St. Helena, while limited in supply, provide more affordable options for low- and
moderate-income households, but remain unaffordable to some very low-income households and
all extremely low-income households. This highlights the need for subsidized affordable
housing, to meet the needs of local households in these lower income categories. While only
about seven percent of households in St. Helena live in overcrowded conditions, most households
experiencing overcrowding are renters.

Special Housing Needs
Both St. Helena and Napa County have high concentrations of disabled persons compared to the
Bay Area, with residents ages 65 and over experiencing more than half of the total disabilities in
St. Helena. In addition, a disproportionately large number of St. Helena’s elderly households
have severe housing cost burdens compared to the overall population. The percentage of large
family households in St. Helena closely aligns with the rates in Napa County and the Bay Area,
but St. Helena has a higher percentage of single female-headed households. While the number of
farmworkers and homeless persons in need of permanent or transitional housing specifically
within the City of St. Helena is unknown, these two special needs populations have an unmet
need for housing in Napa County as a whole and St. Helena must work with surrounding
jurisdictions to meet that need.

Non-governmental and Governmental Constraints
The primary non-governmental constraints that restrict building in St. Helena are the price of
land, the availability of financing with the tightening of the national credit markets, and the
hazards from frequent flooding of the Napa River. The governmental constraints present in St.
Helena include sewer capacity, given that the City has yet to receive approval for increased
capacity from the California Regional Water Quality Resource Board, the incomplete Flood
Protection Project, uncertainty regarding the processing and permitting procedures for
multifamily projects, and failure to create and adopt a Reasonable Accommodations Ordinance in
accordance with Senate Bill 520. Other non-governmental and governmental conditions such as
construction costs, zoning code, General Plan land use designations, and impact fees do not

Public Review Draft Housing Element Policy Document          City of St. Helena General Plan Update
2/26/2009                                                                                 Page 2
unnecessarily inhibit housing production.

Sites Inventory and Analysis and Zoning for a Variety of Housing Types
The housing sites inventory analysis indicates that St. Helena has a sufficient number of housing
sites to meet the City’s 2007-2014 Regional Housing Needs Allocation (RHNA). St. Helena
received a RHNA of 121 total units distributed across very low-income (30 units), low-income
(21 units), moderate-income (25 units), and above moderate-income (45 units) categories. Given
the 66 units built or approved through December 2008, the City needs sites for at least 55 more
housing units. After accounting for possible site constraints, the City has the capacity to
accommodate between 374 and 1,024 housing units on 13 sites, which allows the City to fulfill its
RHNA obligations. In addition, although the current St. Helena Zoning Ordinance allows for a
variety of housing types, changes to the codes regarding agricultural employees and emergency
homeless shelters are necessary to comply with State law.

Housing Policies
Based upon the conclusions reached in the Housing Needs Assessment, and information gathered
in the public participation process, St. Helena has defined six overall goals for responding to
housing needs in the City. A goal is a general statement of values or aspirations held by the
community. It is the end towards which the City will direct its efforts. The goals of the St.
Helena Housing Element are:

Goal 1:     A Diversity of Housing to Meet Local Needs
Goal 2:     Efficient Land Use and High Quality Neighborhoods
Goal 3:     Conservation of Existing Housing
Goal 4:     Assistance to Support Affordable Housing
Goal 5:     Resource Conservation
Goal 6:     Equal Housing Opportunities

For each goal, one or more policies help define how the goal will be interpreted and
implemented. Policies are referenced by goal number. Policy 1.1 is the first policy supporting
Goal 1; Policy 1.2 is the second policy, and so on.

Each policy statement is followed by one or more implementing actions that define exactly what
is to be done to put the policies into practice, while working towards the goals. This might
include ongoing programs sponsored by the City; discrete time-specific actions; or further
planning actions. In accordance with requirements of State law, the agencies and/or officials
responsible for implementation are identified for each program in the Implementation Matrix at
the end of the document, along with the timeframe for taking action.

Quantified objectives are also identified for each group of implementing actions, and
summarized at the end of the document. These identify the number of units to be constructed,
rehabilitated or conserved, and the number of households to be assisted as the result of
implementing actions under each Housing Element goal. This provides a measure for gauging
the Housing Element’s success in meeting identified housing needs and achieving stated goals

Public Review Draft Housing Element Policy Document         City of St. Helena General Plan Update
2/26/2009                                                                                Page 3
through the planning period.

The City of St. Helena’s housing goals, policies, implementing actions and quantified objectives
for the July 1, 2009 to June 30, 2014 planning period are presented below, in response to the
housing needs, resources and constraints identified in the Housing Element Update Housing
Needs Assessment and building upon the achievements and experiences from the City’s previous
Housing Element.

Goal 1: A Diversity of Housing to Meet Local Needs
Facilitate development of a variety of housing types to meet the full range of housing needs in our
community, with particular emphasis on housing for our local workforce, people with special
housing needs, and people with very low, low and moderate incomes.

Policies
Policy 1.1 Ensure that the General Plan’s Growth Management Policies do not limit our ability
to meet regional housing needs.
Policy 1.2 Focus on key opportunity sites and work with property owners and developers to
facilitate development of new affordable housing.
Policy 1.3 Ensure that affordable housing gets built.
Policy 1.4 Address workforce housing needs by supporting an improved jobs/housing “match.”
Policy 1.5 Encourage innovative housing types and designs.
Policy 1.6 Address emergency shelter and transitional housing requirements.

Implementing Actions
Action 1A Continue to exempt permits for regulated affordable units as well as second units
from the Growth Management System. The objective is to accommodate production to meet the
Regional Housing Needs Allocation (RHNA) of 121 housing units (30 units for very low-income
households, 21 for low-income households, 25 for moderate-income households, and 45 for
above moderate income households). Developers shall be encouraged to propose projects that
meet this need.

Action 1B Review and possibly amend the Growth Management System to encourage the
production of regulated affordable and workforce housing units. Review the Growth
Management System (GMS) to make sure that it is not disproportionately affecting the
development of affordable housing. Exemptions for restricted “workforce” housing units should
be explored, in addition to current exemptions for affordable housing units. Continue to allow a
maximum of 9 market rate units per year and priority allocation of annual building permit
allocations and carryover permits to market rate units in development projects that include a
minimum of 40 percent affordable units.

Action 1C Amend the Residential Growth Management System section 17.152.030 to read:
“The 2000 Census found that the City had 2,708 total dwelling units. With a limitation of 9
building permits for market rate housing per year, issued over 15 years, the number of dwelling
units will be approximately 2,840 by the year 2015, not including regulated affordable units,
guest cottages, accessory dwelling units or second units. This number shall not be construed as a


Public Review Draft Housing Element Policy Document          City of St. Helena General Plan Update
2/26/2009                                                                                 Page 4
goal, but as a maximum number of units.”

Action 1D Give projects that include affordable housing units priority access to water and
sewer resources over other new projects should the capacity of the local water or sewer systems
become inadequate to meet the full demand for new connections

Action 1E Revise the permitting process to streamline the review of affordable housing and
market rate multifamily projects. The City would establish different design guidelines for
various neighborhoods in the City in order to provide appropriate guidelines for each
neighborhood’s character. The design guidelines could address parking, tree planting/
preservation, and vineyard views, among other design issues. The City will prioritize the
adoption of design guidelines for the Affordable Housing and Mixed-Use overlay zones, should
such zones be adopted. Upon adoption of design guidelines for multifamily projects, the City
will eliminate the current requirements for a use permit for certain multifamily projects in both
the medium and high density residential districts.

Action 1F Complete the community visioning process for the Adams Street property and
include in the General Plan Update. Update the Zoning Ordinance accordingly.

Action 1G Amend the General Plan to reconfigure the Urban Limit Line in accordance with
the adopted Adams Street property Preferred Alternative.

Action 1H Work with private property owners/developers to plan for road and utility
improvements necessary to support housing on key opportunity sites, in the event these sites are
developed. Funding shall be done on a fair share proportion of the cost.
        Extend Adams Street and Starr Avenue to intersect. Include water, sewer and storm drain
        extensions.
        Construct new road to Paladini property from Sulphur Springs Avenue (APN 009-362-
        015), including water, sewer and storm drain improvements.
        Extend Oak Ave., to the Toogood property. Extend city sewer and storm drain. (APN
        009-180-036, 009-180-037, and 009-263-007).

Action 1I Complete the Flood Protection Project.

Action 1J Fast-track housing developments that meet lower income and special housing
needs. Ensure that housing development proposals that meet the needs of lower income
households and special needs groups, such as seniors, people with disabilities, farmworkers, and
homeless families and individuals, receive the highest priority and quickest turn-around possible
in the development review process.

Action 1K Explore possibility of an affordable housing overlay zone. Identify potential sites
suitable for an affordable housing overlay zone. Review possible incentives and a review
process.




Public Review Draft Housing Element Policy Document           City of St. Helena General Plan Update
2/26/2009                                                                                  Page 5
Action 1L Improve and enhance the local preference policy to possibly include people needed
for work during city emergencies.

Action 1M Explore a program to address the housing needs of “workforce” households, which
have incomes above 120 percent of AMI, but are still unable to afford market rate housing.
Conduct further study and define the upper income limit of workforce households. Provide
incentives and assistance for new workforce housing developments. Such incentives may
include, but are not limited to, relaxing site development standards and extending priority for
water and sewer connections to such housing projects. Explore the feasibility of adding an above
moderate-income workforce housing component to the Inclusionary Housing Ordinance
requirements.

Action 1N Implement a program to provide financial assistance for the development of second
units in exchange for affordability restrictions that will provide workforce housing.

Action 1O Encourage development of co-housing, ecohousing, ‘green’ manufactured homes,
and other ‘nontraditional’ forms of housing.

Action 1P Identify and remove barriers to the permitting of ‘green’ manufactured housing
units.

Action 1Q Address unmet needs for emergency shelter. Explore the potential for partnering
with Napa County/ City of Napa to support a homeless shelter. If this is not feasible, amend the
St. Helena Municipal Code to allow emergency shelters as a permitted use by right in at least one
of the zoning districts within one year.

Quantified Objectives for the Implementing Actions of Goal 1:
Construct 15 units of housing affordable to Extremely Low-Income households; 15 units of
housing affordable to Very Low-Income households; 21 units for Low-Income households, 25
units for Moderate-Income households, and 45 units for Above Moderate-Income households.

Goal 2: Efficient Land Use and High Quality Neighborhoods
Make efficient use of land within the Urban Limit Line to protect agricultural lands, promoting
compact, well-designed developments that ‘fit in’ with existing neighborhoods and contribute to
the overall livability of our community. Encourage a balance of housing types throughout the
entire community.

Policies
Policy 2.1   Encourage higher density development where appropriate.
Policy 2.2   Ensure that higher density housing opportunity sites are not lost to lower density uses.
Policy 2.3   Be more aggressive in promoting mixed-use developments.
Policy 2.4   Promote second unit production more aggressively.
Policy 2.5   Allow conversion of single-family homes to multi-unit dwellings.
Policy 2.6   Promote a balance of types of housing throughout the whole community.

Public Review Draft Housing Element Policy Document            City of St. Helena General Plan Update
2/26/2009                                                                                   Page 6
Implementing Actions

Action 2A Provide incentives for higher density housing. Explore possible incentives for
building attached market rate housing units for rent and for sale.

Action 2B Study potential modifications to the Zoning Ordinance to facilitate higher density
housing [and discourage construction of oversize homes]. Modify the Zoning Ordinance to
encourage higher density developments [and restrict construction of large single-family units],
including current floor area ratios and yard and setback requirements.

Action 2C Amend regulations to discourage exemptions from the minimum density
requirements. The City shall discourage exemptions for minimum density requirements and
establish mitigation measures for exemptions in the Zoning Ordinance.

Action 2D Modify section 17.100 of the Zoning Ordinance to rename the Mobilehome Park
Overlay District to “Manufactured Housing Overlay District.” Develop policies to streamline
the review process for this overlay district on residential land for projects that create land-
ownership opportunities for residents. Support giving residents the right of first refusal if an
existing park is to be sold.

Action 2E Amend the “Subdivisions” section of the Municipal Code. The City will amend
Title 16 of the Municipal Code to prevent subdivision activity from effectively resulting in lower
densities and a loss of potential housing units on the site.

Action 2F Update the General Plan Land Use Element in consideration of the established
Housing Element land use goals and policies. Amend General Plan Elements concurrent with
adoption of the General Plan Update as needed to ensure internal consistency.

Action 2G Promote both ‘vertical’ and ‘horizontal’ mixed-use. Encourage mixed-use
developments that combine compatible uses on the same site, either in the same structure or
adjacent structures. Amend the Zoning Ordinance accordingly. Amendments to the Zoning
Ordinance include permitting the FAR for the residential component of a mixed-use development
to be ‘additive’ rather than within the established FAR for that zone, and allowing commercial
and residential users to ‘share’ their parking, resulting in a lower overall parking requirement.
Requirements for covered parking should also be reconsidered.

Action 2H Explore the possibility of allowing mixed use and live/work units in non-residential
zoning districts.
        Explore modifications to non-residential Zones that would permit, either as of right or as
        a conditional use, residential uses including integrated live/work units.
        Analyze requirements that commercial projects provide housing for a portion of the
        employment that will be generated on site. The City will study and determine what
        portion of employment generated will require housing, whether housing will be required
        on-site or allowed off-site, if pricing for the non-inclusionary units will be tied to


Public Review Draft Housing Element Policy Document          City of St. Helena General Plan Update
2/26/2009                                                                                 Page 7
         anticipated salaries for employees in the commercial portion of the project, and if in-lieu
         fees will be permitted for smaller sized projects.
         Explore development incentives such as higher density and height allowances, and a
         streamlined design review process.

Action 2I Review and revise development standards pertaining to second units. Ensure that the
development of second units is physically and financially feasible in targeted areas. Give
particular attention to parking standards, setbacks, and impact fees.

Action 2J Provide financial incentives for second unit development. Incentives might include
low interest loans or fee waivers.

Action 2K Target specific areas for second unit incentives. Create incentives to construct
second units in the medium density areas near downtown.

Action 2L Provide public information regarding second units. Develop a guide for
homeowners explaining the benefits and procedures for adding a second unit.

Action 2M Link financial incentives and development standard variances to affordability
requirements for second units. Require that either the main house or the second unit is used as a
rental unit that is affordable to households with moderate- or below- moderate incomes whenever
the City assists in development through financial incentives or by granting a variance.

Action 2N Respond to complaints regarding illegal units. The City will work with the property
owners to help bring illegal units up to code and to abate the use of non-habitable buildings as
living units.

Action 2O Identify appropriate ‘target’ areas for conversion of single-family homes to multi-
unit dwellings. Identify areas, zoning districts, or specific sites where conversion would be
appropriate or desirable.

Action 2P Develop criteria and standards and provide public information regarding
conversions of single-family homes to multi-unit dwellings. Identify criteria for reviewing
potential conversion opportunities and standards, including parking requirements, to ensure that
conversions are carried out in a manner consistent with the character and use of adjacent
properties. Develop a guide for property owners explaining the conversion program and
procedures.

Action 2Q: Develop a program to encourage affordable housing in clusters of 4-6 units on
infill parcels on west side of town.

Quantified Objectives for the Implementing Actions of Goal 2:
Same as the Quantified Objectives listed for Goal 1.



Public Review Draft Housing Element Policy Document            City of St. Helena General Plan Update
2/26/2009                                                                                   Page 8
Goal 3: Conservation of Existing Housing
Improve and conserve existing housing, with particular attention to the rehabilitation and
retention of existing affordable units.

Policies
Policy 3.1 Protect the existing stock of affordable and market rate housing.
Policy 3.2 Monitor housing conditions.

Implementing Actions
Action 3A Restrict the conversion of rental units to condominiums. Current policy allows
conversion to condominiums under certain circumstances when the vacancy rate is high. The
presence of second homes within the community results in an inflated vacancy rate. The policy
should be further studied and revised to reflect a general guiding principal of preserving the
affordable housing stock while eliminating the current linkage to vacancy rates.

Action 3B Charge an affordable housing impact fee whenever housing units are converted to
other uses. Exempt conversion projects that create affordable for-sale housing from this impact
fee.

Action 3C Address the potential loss of assisted units. Identify assisted properties at risk of
conversion to market rates and work with the property owners and/or other parties to ensure that
they are conserved as affordable housing. Monitor the Woodbridge Apartments and establish a
funding plan in anticipation of either preserving or replacing the 50 units of affordable housing in
2018 when the Section 8 contract for Woodbridge expires

Action 3D Continue to prohibit the conversion of market rate housing to vacation rentals.
Abate the use of illegal vacation rentals, including time shares and fractional interests.

Action 3E Review housing needs, conditions, achievements and challenges as part of the
City’s regular General Plan review.

Quantified Objectives for the Implementing Actions of Goal 3:
Conservation of all existing affordable housing units. Assist in the acquisition of low-interest
loans for rehabilitation of 10 moderate-, low-, or very low-income households by 2014.

Goal 4: Assistance to Support Affordable Housing
Provide technical and financial resources to support development of affordable housing in our
community, especially housing that meets the needs of our local workforce, people with special
housing needs, and people with moderate, low, and very low incomes.

Policies
Policy 4.1 Develop permanent local sources of funding to support affordable housing.
Policy 4.2 Aggressively pursue and ‘leverage’ State and Federal housing funds.
Policy 4.3 Address farmworker housing needs.

Public Review Draft Housing Element Policy Document           City of St. Helena General Plan Update
2/26/2009                                                                                  Page 9
Policy 4.4 Support housing that meets special needs, including senior citizens and persons with
disabilities.
Policy 4.5 Explore methods to increase Housing Trust Fund money.

Implementing Actions
Action 4A Review and possibly amend the inclusionary housing ordinance:
        Explore adjusting the inclusionary housing ordinance to require further distribution of
        affordable units within the various income categories. For example, a project required to
        provide two low-income units under the current inclusionary housing ordinance could be
        required to provide one unit affordable to households with incomes of up to 65 percent of
        area median income and one unit affordable to households with incomes of up to 80
        percent of area median income.
        Explore eliminating the linkage fee and requiring the construction of housing by larger
        commercial developments as well as increasing the linkage fees for small commercial
        development where requiring residential construction would not be feasible.
        Explore the possibility of increasing residential construction in-lieu fees and/or creating a
        sliding scale for larger houses.
        Explore the feasibility of adding an above moderate-income workforce housing
        component to the Inclusionary Housing Ordinance requirements.

Action 4B Generate Revenues for Affordable Housing through the Transient Occupancy Tax.
Either increase the Transient Occupancy Tax or increase the number of transient occupancy
rooms and apply the increased revenue to support affordable housing.

Action 4C Reduce, defer, or waive fees for affordable housing developments.

Action 4D Prioritize the use of Housing Trust Funds in support of the development and
preservation of regulated affordable units for extremely low-income households.

Action 4E Pursue mortgage revenue bonds and/or mortgage credit certificates. Promote
affordable homeownership opportunities for moderate- and lower-income households.

Action 4F Continue Section 8 rent subsidy certificates. Work with the City of Napa Housing
Authority to provide continued rental assistance to low- and very low-income households.

Action 4G Explore the possibility of establishing a full-time, shared Housing Coordinator for
the up-valley communities. The position would serve all of the up-valley communities.

Action 4H Collaborate with countywide efforts to address farmworker housing needs.

Action 4I Amend the Zoning Ordinance for farmworker housing. Amend the St. Helena
Municipal Code to clearly state that agricultural employee housing for six or fewer employees is
only subject to the regulations for other types of residential development and that agricultural
employee housing for more than six employees, with a maximum of 36 employees, shall be
subject only to the regulations for other agricultural uses in accordance with California Health


Public Review Draft Housing Element Policy Document            City of St. Helena General Plan Update
2/26/2009                                                                                   Page 10
and Safety Codes 17021.5 and 17021.6.

Action 4J Establish regulations requiring that a portion of units in all new developments meet
the special housing needs of seniors and persons with disabilities.

Action 4K Reasonable Accommodation. The City shall amend its Municipal Code to provide
individuals with disabilities reasonable accommodation in rules, policies, practices and
procedures that may be necessary to ensure equal access to housing. The purpose of this is to
provide a process for individuals with disabilities to make requests for reasonable accommodation
in regard to relief from the various land use, zoning, or building laws, rules, policies, practices
and/or procedures of the City.

Action 4L The City shall participate with mediation between property owners if needed to
facilitate affordable housing.

Action 4M Explore the potential of using Housing Trust Fund money to purchase existing
housing for conversion to restricted affordable housing.

Quantified Objectives for the Implementing Actions of Goal 4:
  Generate adequate funds to support achievement of the City’s new housing construction
  objectives, as defined in Policy 1A.
  Assist in the acquisition of low-interest loans to 10 first-time homebuyers through 2014.
  Facilitate the continuance of Section 8 rental assistance to all currently served households.
  20% of new units to meet senior housing needs; 10% accessible to persons with disabilities.

Goal 5: Resource Conservation
Promote resource conservation by encouraging housing types and designs that use fewer
resources (water, electricity, etc.) and therefore cost less to operate over time, supporting long-
term housing affordability.

Policies
Policy 5.1 Encourage alternative energy sources.
Policy 5.2 Encourage energy and resource conservation.

Implementing Actions
Action 5A Adopt a Green Building Ordinance. The City shall adopt building code standards
that meet or exceed the State’s Green Building Standards Code. The Planning and Building
Department shall coordinate this effort with the Climate Protection Task Force.

Action 5B Use alternative energy technologies. Create incentives for the use of solar and wind
energy in new and rehabilitated housing.

Action 5C Provide public information on alternative energy technologies for residential
developers, contractors, and property owners.

Public Review Draft Housing Element Policy Document             City of St. Helena General Plan Update
2/26/2009                                                                                    Page 11
Action 5D Require cost-effective energy conservation measures in all new and rehabilitated
housing to promote long-term affordability for occupants. The City will adopt the State’s new
Energy Efficiency Standards as part of the 2009 California Building Standards Code and ensure
that all new housing units constructed in the City meet or exceed these standards.

Action 5E Provide low-interest loans for implementation of energy conservation measures.
The City will identify a source of loan funds to provide energy conservation assistance to
homeowners and home builders.

Action 5F Provide public information on energy conservation measures for homeowners,
tenants, developers, contractors and property owners.

Action 5G Require bicycle and pedestrian amenities and connectivity to surrounding areas, in
all new housing developments. Support programs to develop more local and regional walking
and biking trails.

Action 5H Continue to apply Municipal Code provisions pertaining to water resources. The
City will continue to require water-efficient landscaping for new residential and commercial
construction, as well as implement the Water Use Efficiency and Use Guidelines.

Action 5I Promote passive natural heating and cooling opportunities in new development and
insure that solar access is protected for existing development.

Action 5J Explore feasibility of incorporating efficient on-site alternative wastewater facilities.

Action 5K The City shall explore policies that give local preference in the procurement process
when municipal funds may be used for housing.

Quantified Objectives for the Implementing Actions of Goal 5:
Assist in the acquisition of low-interest loans for rehabilitation, including energy conservation
provided to 10 moderate-, low-, or very low-income households by 2014.

Goal 6: Equal Housing Opportunities
Assure that housing programs maximize choice, avoid economic segregation and avoid
discrimination based upon age, sex, race, sexual orientation, religion and ethnic background.

Policies
Policy 6.1 Support equal housing opportunities for all residents of St. Helena.

Implementing Actions
Action 6A Provide educational materials at City Hall, through the press and directly to
interested parties to educate real estate professionals, property owners and tenants on their
rights and responsibilities and the resources available to address fair housing issues.

Public Review Draft Housing Element Policy Document            City of St. Helena General Plan Update
2/26/2009                                                                                   Page 12
Action 6B Continue to utilize and support Fair Housing Napa Valley for implementing fair
housing programs, receiving complaints, and providing referrals to available resources when
necessary.

Quantified Objectives for the Implementing Actions for Goal 6:
No specific objectives identified.




Public Review Draft Housing Element Policy Document        City of St. Helena General Plan Update
2/26/2009                                                                               Page 13
Summary of Quantified Objectives

New Construction Objectives
  15 units affordable to Extremely Low-Income households
  15 units affordable to Very Low-Income households
  21 units affordable to Low-Income households
  25 units affordable to Moderate-Income households
  45 units affordable to Above Moderate-Income households

Rehabilitation and Conservation Objectives
   Conservation of all existing affordable housing units.
   Assist in the acquisition of low-interest loans for rehabilitation and energy conservation to 10
   very low-, low- or moderate-income households

Assistance for Special Needs Households
   Assist in the acquisition of low-interest loans to 10 first-time homebuyers.
   20 percent of new units to meet senior needs.
   10 percent of new units accessible to persons with disabilities.




Public Review Draft Housing Element Policy Document           City of St. Helena General Plan Update
2/26/2009                                                                                  Page 14
Implementation Matrix

Goal 1
 Implementing
 Actions                    Lead Responsibility       Time Frame                Related Polices
 Action 1A                  Planning Department       Ongoing                   Policy 1.1
 Action 1B                  Planning Department       2011                      Policy 1.1, 1.3, 1.4
 Action 1C                  Planning Department       2010                      Policy 1.1
 Action 1D                  Planning Department       2012                      Policy 1.3
 Action 1E                  Planning Department       2012                      Policy 1.3
 Action 1F                  Planning Department       2010                      Policy 1.2
 Action 1G                  Planning Department       2010                      Policy 1.2
 Action 1H                  Planning Department       2013                      Policy 1.2
 Action 1I                  Planning Department       2012                      Policy 1.2
 Action 1J                  Planning Department       Ongoing                   Policy 1.3
 Action 1K                  Planning Department       2012                      Policy 1.3
 Action 1L                  Planning Department       2011                      Policy 1.4
 Action 1M                  Planning Department       2011                      Policy 1.4
 Action 1N                  Planning Department       2011                      Policy 1.4
 Action 1O                  Planning Department       Ongoing                   Policy 1.5
 Action 1P                  Planning Department       2012                      Policy 1.5
 Action 1Q                  Planning Department       June 30, 2010             Policy 1.6




Public Review Draft Housing Element Policy Document             City of St. Helena General Plan Update
2/26/2009                                                                                    Page 15
Goal 2
 Implementing
 Actions                    Lead Responsibility       Time Frame                 Related Polices
 Action 2A                  Planning Department       2013                       Policy 2.1
 Action 2B                  Planning Department       2012                       Policy 2.1
 Action 2C                  Planning Department       2010                       Policy 2.1
 Action 2D                  Planning Department       2012                       Policy 2.1
 Action 2E                  Planning Department       2010                       Policy 2.2
 Action 2F                  Planning Department       2010                       Policy 2.2
 Action 2G                  Planning Department       2011                       Policy 2.3
 Action 2H                  Planning Department       2011                       Policy 2.3
 Action 2I                  Planning Department       2010                       Policy 2.4
 Action 2J                  Planning Department       2012                       Policy 2.4
 Action 2K                  Planning Department       2012                       Policy 2.4
 Action 2L                  Planning Department       2012                       Policy 2.4
 Action 2M                  Planning Department       Ongoing                    Policy 2.4
 Action 2N                  Planning Department       Ongoing                    Policy 2.4
 Action 2O                  Planning Department       2013                       Policy 2.5
 Action 2P                  Planning Department       2013                       Policy 2.5
                            Planning Department
 Action 2Q                  & City Council            Ongoing                    Policy 2.6

Goal 3
 Implementing
 Actions                    Lead Responsibility       Time Frame                 Related Polices
 Action 3A                  Planning Department       2010                       Policy 3.1
 Action 3B                  Planning Department       2009 and Ongoing           Policy 3.1
 Action 3C                  Planning Department       2009 and Ongoing           Policy 3.1
 Action 3D                  Planning Department       Ongoing                    Policy 3.1
 Action 3E                  Planning Department       Annually                   Policy 3.2




Public Review Draft Housing Element Policy Document              City of St. Helena General Plan Update
2/26/2009                                                                                     Page 16
Goal 4
 Implementing
 Actions                    Lead Responsibility       Time Frame                Related Polices
 Action 4A                  Planning Department       2012                      Policy 4.1, 4.5
 Action 4B                  Planning Department       2012                      Policy 4.1, 4.5
 Action 4C                  Planning Department       Ongoing                   Policy 4.1
 Action 4D                  Planning Department       Ongoing                   Policy 4.1
 Action 4E                  Planning Department       2009 and Ongoing          Policy 4.2
 Action 4F                  Planning Department       Ongoing                   Policy 4.2
 Action 4G                  Planning Department       2009                      Policy 4.2
 Action 4H                  Planning Department       Ongoing                   Policy 4.3
 Action 4I                  Planning Department       2009                      Policy 4.3
 Action 4J                  Planning Department       2012                      Policy 4.4
 Action 4K                  Planning Department       2009                      Policy 4.4
 Action 4L                  Planning Department       Ongoing                   Policy 4.1, 4.4
 Action 4M                  Planning Department       2013                      Policy 4.1

Goal 5
 Implementing
 Actions                    Lead Responsibility       Time Frame                Related Polices
 Action 5A                  Planning Department       2010                      Policy 5.1
 Action 5B                  Planning Department       Ongoing                   Policy 5.1
 Action 5C                  Planning Department       Ongoing                   Policy 5.1
 Action 5D                  Planning Department       August 2009               Policy 5.2
 Action 5E                  Planning Department       Ongoing                   Policy 5.2
 Action 5F                  Planning Department       Ongoing                   Policy 5.2
 Action 5G                  Planning Department       2012 and Ongoing          Policy 5.2
 Action 5H                  Planning Department       Ongoing                   Policy 5.2
 Action 5I                  Planning Department       Ongoing                   Policy 5.2
 Action 5J                  Planning Department       2011                      Policy 5.2
 Action 5K                  Planning Department       2010                      Policy 5.2

Goal 6
 Implementing
 Actions                    Lead Responsibility       Time Frame                Related Polices
 Action 6A                  Planning Department       Ongoing                   Policy 6.1
 Action 6B                  City Manager              2009 and Ongoing          Policy 6.1




Public Review Draft Housing Element Policy Document             City of St. Helena General Plan Update
2/26/2009                                                                                    Page 17

				
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