Program Summary by 3YMS37H8

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									                          Fall Creek Falls Environmental EducationIntroduction
         Fall Creek Falls State Park offers many opportunities for nature studies and environmental
education. For years, school groups, church groups and senior citizen groups have been coming to Fall
Creek and visiting its numerous vistas and waterfalls, and hiking its cool mountain paths. Since the park’s
creation in 1935, millions of people have been touched by the park’s beauty and have gone home richer for
their experiences. The park has also provided guided hikes, tours, and slide shows to better help the visitor
to understand the area’s rich cultural history and stunning natural diversity. The park offers an
Environmental Education Center that will provide a two and a half day, or five-day overnight experience.
This handbook is designed to guide a group leader through the process of scheduling and bringing a group
through the Environmental Education Program at Fall Creek Falls State Park.

         The information in this guide covers the period roughly concurrent with the nine-month school
year (Labor Day through Memorial Day). The special school rates for the Group Lodges are not available
through the summer months, nor are the many special arrangement programs. During the summer vacation
months, the park is near full occupancy and therefore continuous recreational and interpretive programs are
offered seven days a week for general park visitors.


                                             Background Information About
                                        Fall Creek Falls State Park

         In 1935, the National Park Service proposed the creation of Fall Creek Falls State Park situated in
both Van Buren and Bledsoe Counties. The original plans were to include the entire Cane Creek Gulf
watershed, but only 15,777 acres of land were purchased from local farmers centering on the upper portion
of the Cane Creek and Fall Creek watersheds. Workers from the Works Progress Administration began
construction of the park in 1936, and by 1944 the management of the park was turned over to the fledgling
Tennessee Department of Conservation. In the early stages of the park, development was kept to a
minimum. The rustic park was a destination for hikers, hunters, swimmers, and other nature lovers.
Camping was in an open field; groups could also stay in Youth Camp One, which was built around 1938.

          An instrumental person in the development of Fall Creek Falls as a state park was James Taft, a
teacher, Boy Scout leader, and preacher, who lived in the area. Taft quickly recognized the value of the
area as a park and began his lobbying efforts to see it set aside for the public. Through his passionate
insistence about the possibilities for this land, James Taft helped get the area set aside as a state park.

                   In 1968, an 8.1 million dollar bond project was approved for the development of Fall
Creek Falls State Resort Park. Most of the park facilities you see today were built during that period: the
Inn and Restaurant, the eighteen-hole golf course, the Nature Center, and the Village Green Complex. With
the development of the resort park, visitation increased dramatically, especially during summer months.




Photo Courtesy of D. Curtis                            Photo Courtesy of D. Curtis
                                          Basic Program Summary

Cave Trip
This exciting hike takes you through many years of history and geology. A three-mile round trip hike is
involved that ventures deep into cave hollow gorge. The terrain is very steep for about ¼ mile. Old
clothes (and shoes in the cave) should be worn due to the fact that caves are muddy and you will get dirty.
The cave is around fifty-six degrees, so you may wish to wear a long sleeve shirt and pants inside the cave.
A flashlight is required for anyone entering the cave. A water bottle must be carried due to the difficulty of
the hike.

Reptiles & Amphibians
Explore the world of our native reptiles and amphibians. Learn how to identify some of our native snakes,
and become familiar with the habits and traits of many species. Also, learn about our amphibians’ and
reptiles’ ecological importance and life cycles.

Stream Survey
Introducing students to aquatic biology at an early age is sure to inspire curiosity! This program is
designed to teach students how to take a qualitative sample of aquatic invertebrates, identify them, and
make predictions about water quality from their samples. To reinforce the importance of data collection
and record keeping in science, we also record water temperature, stream flow, and the stream profile.

Night Hike
When the sun goes down the night comes alive! Many animals that sleep during the day come out to
forage at night. A quiet walk in the dark around the golf course is a great way to observe nightlife. The
golf course pond usually reveals a plethora of amphibian and reptile life. The groups frequently encounter
deer, raccoons, owls, etc.

Forest Ecology/Geology Hike to the base of Fall Creek Falls
Enjoy a three-mile hike from the Nature Center to Fall Creek Falls and back. While on the hike, one can
observe the two types of forest indigenous to the Cumberland Plateau, native herbs, and geological features
common to the area. We will discuss environmental problems facing the Cumberland Plateau today, as
well as the results of land usage in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. We will observe plant, animal, and
fungal communities on the plateau top; and witness the change in community structure as we descend into
the rich, moist environment of Fall Creek Gorge.

Native Americans and Pioneers
We will canoe to our Indian Rock House and find out about the Native Americans and Pioneers that used
this area. This program discusses how these settlers survived with the materials and resources of the
Cumberland Plateau. If the water level is too high for canoeing, we can hike along the creek bank to our
program site.

                 Alternate Night Activities (please check for availability well in advance)

Programs are:
Campfire – Myths of Native Americans, folklore of early Pioneers, and spook tales of the Fall Creek Falls
area. If raining, it may be done indoors at Group Lodge One.
Constellations – Looking up at the night sky to decipher and hear stories of the stars, if the night is cloudy,
then a slide show is shown with discussion.
Reptiles, and Amphibians – The reptile program may be used as a night program if you wish.

                                             Tennessee Curriculum
Our programs emphasize many of Tennessee’s Science Curriculum Standards “Accomplishments” for
grade levels 4 – 8. We will adapt our programs to your school’s specific needs if we are given prior notice.
A list is provided that shows a few examples of the topics we cover that relate directly to the Tennessee
Curriculum for your grade level. Because some grade levels have more life science and ecology scheduled
into their curriculum (5th and 6th grade), older groups may find it helpful to review topics from earlier years.
We try to present topics that build on the knowledge that students acquired in previous grade levels so that
all students will find their trip challenging and educational.
The bold face topics below correlate directly with the headings listed on the State of Tennessee’s education
website. If you need activities covering headings that are not listed here, contact the E. E. Coordinator for
assistance.

4th Grade
Interactions Between Living Things and Their Environment
4.2.1, 4.2.2 - Forest Ecology (mast production, and use by wildlife; process of decay; action of lichens)
            - Stream Survey (cycle of nutrients between terrestrial and aquatic systems; examples of
            organisms that transport those nutrients; food pyramid)
            - Amphibians and Reptiles (importance of amphibian life cycle as a vector for nutrient
            transportation from water to land; importance of reptiles in nutrient cycles and pest control)

Food Production and Energy for Life
4.3.1, 4.3.2 - Forest Ecology (mast production, and use by wildlife; process of decay; action of lichens)
            - Stream Survey (cycle of nutrients between terrestrial and aquatic systems; food pyramid; diet
            of aquatic insects; oxygen requirements and absorption methods of aquatic insects;
            photosynthesis compared to nutrient absorption by terrestrial and aquatic plants)
            - Amphibians and Reptiles (oxygen absorption by amphibians)

Heredity and Reproduction
4.4.1, 4.4.3 - Amphibians and Reptiles (yearly change in color of cricket frogs; amphibian life cycle vs.
             reptilian life cycle)

Diversity and Adaptation Among Living Things
4.5.1      - Amphibians and Reptiles (characteristics of different families of salamanders, frogs, lizards,
           snakes, etc.)

Biological Change
4.6.1, 4.6.2 - Cave Trip (examples of fossils found in limestone; discussion of fragile cave ecosystems
             and threatened cave life)

Earth Features
4.9.1    - Forest Ecology (rock layers and process of erosion)
         - Cave Trip (water erosion and its influence on cave
         formation)

Earth Resources
4.10.3   - Forest Ecology (presence of coal in rock layers;
         mining practices and hazards)


Photo Courtesy of D. Curtis

5th Grade

Interactions Between Living Things and Their Environment
5.2.1, 5.2.2 - Forest Ecology (mast production, and use by wildlife; process of decay; action of lichens)
            - Stream Survey (cycle of nutrients between terrestrial and aquatic systems; examples of
            organisms that transport those nutrients; food pyramid; sources and affects of pollution)
            - Amphibians and Reptiles (importance of amphibian life cycle as a vector for nutrient
            transportation from water to land; importance of reptiles in nutrient cycles and pest control)

Food Production and Energy for Life
5.3.1, 5.3.2 - Forest Ecology (mast production, and use by wildlife; process of decay; importance of
             producers and how they produce their food; action of lichens)
            - Stream Survey (cycle of nutrients between terrestrial and aquatic systems; food pyramid; diet
            of aquatic insects; oxygen requirements and absorption methods of aquatic insects;
            photosynthesis and nutrient absorption by terrestrial and aquatic plants)
            - Amphibians and Reptiles (oxygen absorption by amphibians)

Heredity and Reproduction
5.4.1, 5.4.2, 5.4.3 - Forest Ecology (requirements for growth of pine trees vs. deciduous trees; acorn
                   importance as food or future tree; observe various seasonal flowers and non-vascular
                   plants)
                   -Amphibians and Reptiles (yearly change in color of cricket frogs; amphibian life cycle
                   vs. reptilian life cycle)

Diversity and Adaptation Among Living Things
5.5.1, 5.5.2 - Forest Ecology (comparison of various oaks, heaths, etc.; comparison of environmental
              conditions necessary to support both hemlock and deciduous forests)
              -Amphibians and Reptiles (characteristics of different families of salamanders, frogs, lizards,
             snakes, etc.)

Biological Change
5.6.1      - Cave Trip (examples of fossils found in limestone)

Earth Features
5.9.1    - Forest Ecology (rock layers and process of erosion)
         - Cave Trip (water erosion and its influence on cave formation)

Earth Resources
5.10.1, 5.10.2, 5.10.3 - Forest Ecology (presence of coal in rock layers; mining practices and hazards; soil
                       formation by lichens)

6th Grade

Interactions Between Living Things and Their Environment
6.2.1, 6.2.2 - Forest Ecology (action of lichens; predators and prey in the forest; why we don’t have large
             predators; competition between bear, deer, turkey, and hogs)
            - Stream Survey (aquatic food pyramids; sources and affects of pollution)
            - Amphibians and Reptiles (importance of amphibian life cycle as a vector for nutrient
            transportation from water to land; importance of reptiles in nutrient cycles and pest control)

Food Production and Energy for Life
6.3.1     - Forest Ecology (mast production, and use by wildlife; process of decay; importance of
          producers and how they produce their food)
         - Stream Survey (cycle of nutrients between terrestrial and aquatic systems; food pyramid; diet
         of aquatic insects; photosynthesis and nutrient absorption by terrestrial and aquatic plants)

Diversity and Adaptation Among Living Things
6.5.1      - Forest Ecology (camouflage and warning coloration for defense)
            -Amphibians and Reptiles (characteristics of different families of salamanders, frogs, lizards,
           snakes, etc.; feeding adaptations of hognose snakes, pine snakes, and various venomous snakes)

Biological Change
6.6.1a, 6.6.2, 6.6.3 - Cave Trip (examples of fossils found in limestone)
                     - Stream Survey (indicator species; pollution sources)
                     -Amphibians and Reptiles (salamander similarities in the Appalachians)

7th Grade

Food Production and Energy for Life
7.3.2, 7.3.3 - Forest Ecology (use of oxygen by animals and carbon dioxide by plants)
            - Stream Survey (oxygen requirements and absorption methods of aquatic insects;
            photosynthesis and nutrient absorption by terrestrial and aquatic plants)
            - Amphibians and Reptiles (oxygen absorption by amphibians)

Heredity and Reproduction
7.4.1     - Forest Ecology (observe various seasonal flowers and non-vascular plants)
          - Amphibians and Reptiles (comparison of reptile and amphibian reproduction, and embryology)

8th Grade

Interactions Between Living Things and Their Environment
8.2.3     - Forest Ecology (boreal forest and temperate forest in one location)

Diversity and Adaptation Among Living Things
8.5.2     - Amphibians and Reptiles (key features used to identify various groups of amphibians and
          reptiles)
          - Forest Ecology (comparison of different groups of oaks; heaths; etc.)

Earth Features
8.9.2    - Forest Ecology (formation of Appalachians and Cumberland Plateau)
         - Cave Trip (formation of Appalachians and Cumberland Plateau)

Earth Resources
8.10.3, 8.10.4, 8.10.5 – Forest Ecology (coal mining and impact)How To Prepare your Group For Your
                                         Visit To Fall Creek Falls

          The success of your visit to Fall Creek Falls State Park may well be determined before you ever
arrive at the park. What you have led your group to expect has a big impact on what they will get from
their visit.

        The different programs that you will participate in at the park can be used to accentuate your
classroom studies. History, geology, and ecology are areas that will be covered in park programs to
enhance your classroom work. It is best for you to lay out study modules that integrate your trip to Fall
Creek Falls with your classroom work. For instance, you may wish to concentrate on the formation of the
Cumberland Plateau and the types of rock located here in your geology classes, or study the Native
Americans and early settlers of the area in your social studies classes.

         Physical conditioning is an aspect that also needs to be considered. Your group will be taking part
in strenuous hikes, so you may want them to try some day hikes in the school area. If no local park exists
in your area, then perhaps a spirited hike around the school, or some stamina building exercises in P.E.
would start them in the conditioning process. At least suggest to students that they participate in some sort
of physical activity during their free time. Also, suggest a balanced diet. Carbonated beverages inhibit the
body’s ability to absorb oxygen by dropping the pH of the blood. Please encourage your students to avoid
these during hikes and other physical activities. A great degree of attention is given to the safety and well
being of our participants, and education is the focus of the trip; therefore, a physically and mentally
prepared group will get the most out of their Fall Creek Falls experience. We understand that different
students will have different physical limitations, and do not expect every student to be able to participate in
every activity. We do our best to accommodate the needs of our participants and provide an educational
experience for all students.

           Most Educators prepare their students for a trip to Fall Creek Falls as a learning experience.
Some, however, use the trip as a reward for study at school, or time away from school. Groups will
probably have less interest in the educational programs presented if they are here just for fun. Sometimes
the lack of interest can present control problems. If you have geared your students up for a “just for fun”
trip, let us know so that we can adjust the programs accordingly. We plan our programs to be intellectual
and mentally challenging, so let us know if you wish to do team building, nature games, or other activities
that are less academic.
          For your trip to Fall Creek Falls to be successful, we hope you will start planning in advance. We
feel that the students will get the most out of their trip, if some of the subjects we cover have been
integrated into the classroom.

          Remember that the teachers/chaperones have an abundance of work ahead of them. The more
chaperones you bring, the easier it is to control the mass of students; however, any parents acting as
chaperones need to understand that their child will be treated equally to all other students. Sometimes
parents will give in to their own child’s complaints, and excuse them from programs. Although there are
circumstances where this is appropriate, this situation may spread rapidly through the group, which causes
many children miss out on programs. You will be responsible for one of the nightly activities, free time
between programs, serving food, caring for the students during the night, preparing them each day for
activities, and caring for the lodge during your stay. We also insist that at least one chaperone travels with
each group on every program. Our program staff functions as guides only; they do not normally engage in
disciplinary action.




                                     Are you prepared for Fall Creek?
                                         Pre-Departure Checklist

* Make Reservations at (423) 881-5708
* Send in a completed registration form
* Mail in your two hundred dollar deposit with your tax-exempt form from your school
* Develop schedule with environmental education coordinator.
* Read and Review the Ed. Center Guide with adults and students.
* Arrange transportation
* Collect appropriate forms from students: Fall Creek Health History form, permission slips, etc.
* Discuss with students about what to bring and not to bring – plan for the weather
*Appoint an adult in charge of distributing any medications
*Gather lesson material and supplies
*Bring your check and your bill sheet to settle payments with the Park

                                              Figure Your Bill

For a standard 2 ½ - day stay, your cost will be: $66 per student (includes meals, programs, and lodging)
                                                  $40 per teacher or chaperone (charged for meals only)
Double these figures for a 5 - day stay.

An itemized Bill Sheet can be e-mailed to you if you have Microsoft Excel. If your trip is customized in
any way, the cost can be changed and clearly explained with that sheet. We must receive payment in two
separate checks. One goes to Fall Creek Falls Inn for meals, the other goes to Fall Creek Falls E. E. Center
for programs and lodging.

*Note for Small Groups: You must have 30 students to meet the minimum cost of $150 per night for
Lodge 2, and 40 students to meet the minimum cost of $200 per night for Lodge 1. We welcome smaller
groups, but there will be an additional charge to cover lodging for these groups.
Example: A group of 35 students staying in Lodge 1 at $5.00 per student per night is $175 per night. The
minimum usage fee for that lodge is $200 per night. Therefore, this group will have to pay an additional
$50.

*Note for Large Groups: Any group over 70 total people will have transportation difficulties. We usually
have 2 vans that will carry 14 children at a time. We may only carry 14 passengers in a van at one time.
If you have a large group, please encourage your chaperones to come prepared to help with transportation
of students to the cave and to the Nature Center. If you cannot aid in transportation, we can shuttle students
with multiple van trips, but that will cut into program time. Transportation assistance is greatly
appreciated.

We understand that some students might become ill or have other obligations. Schools will be given a 5%
differential. We need an absolute accurate count two weeks before your arrival. It is your
responsibility to contact our E.E. Center Coordinator if your numbers change.




                                     Photo Courtesy of D. CurtisThe   Basic Two and a Half Day Schedule


                                                                         Your School
Day 1
11:00 AM       …………..         Check In

12:00 PM       …………..         Lunch

1:00 PM        …………..         Group 1          Stream Survey
                              Group 2          Forest Ecology
                              Group 3          Cave
                              Group 4          Native Americans

5:00 PM        …………..         Dinner

6:30 PM        …………..         Night Activity

Day 2
7:00 AM        …………..         Breakfast

8:00 AM        …………..         Group 1          Forest Ecology
                              Group 2          Cave
                              Group 3          Native Americans
                              Group 4          Stream Survey

12:00 PM       …………..         Lunch

1:00 PM        …………..         Group 1          Cave
                              Group 2          Native Americans
                              Group 3          Stream Survey
                              Group 4          Forest Ecology
5:00 PM          …………..         Dinner

Day 3
7:00 AM          …………..         Breakfast

8:00 AM          …………..         Group 1        Native Americans
                                Group 2        Stream Survey
                                Group 3        Forest Ecology
                                Group 4        Cave

12:00 PM         …………..         Check Out

                                              Substitutions:
 We are working on some new programs that can be substituted for the programs on the sample schedule.
These are our core programs, but please ask about the availability of other programs if you are not
interested in those listed.
                                Check In Procedure For Group Lodges

Proceed directly to your lodge where the park staff will greet you for check-in. In the event you are lost or
you have any other difficulties, phone the Headquarters or the Inn and a Park Ranger will assist you.

Headquarters: 1-800-250-8611
Fall Creek Falls Inn: (423) 881-5241
24 hour Emergency Number: (423) 881-5241

Checkout Procedures
And Clean Up Instructions
For Group Lodges

Kitchen:
           Clean all counter tops and shelves
           Check coolers and freezers for cleanliness
           Empty all trashcans
           Sweep and mop floors
           Clean ashes from fireplace (Lodge One)

Dormitories:
        Be sure all mattresses are on top bunk
        Be sure all floors are free of litter
        Sweep and vacuum floors and stairways

Restrooms:
        Remove all old soap from sinks and showers
        Check and clean all shower stalls
        Check and clean all commodes, urinals, and stall walls
        Clean and wipe dry all sinks and mirrors
        Sweep and mop floors
        Remove all trash and empty all containers

Outside:
           Remove all litter

Phone Numbers to Lodges:
       Group Lodge One – (423) 881-3098
       Group Lodge Two – (423) 881-3005
                                                 Photo Courtesy of D. CurtisWhat   To Bring

*Groups will be outside most of the time, so dress according to the weather!

Sleeping bag or blankets/sheets/pillow
Towels and washcloths
Soap, toothbrush, and other toiletries
Several pairs of long pants
One shirt per day
One long sleeve sweatshirt
Warm hat, coat, gloves, etc
One pair of pajamas
One set of underwear per day
One pair of tennis shoes
One old pair of shoes or sandals to get wet
One pair of sturdy shoes or boots for hiking
One daypack
One canteen/water bottle
Plastic bag for muddy clothes
Flashlight with new batteries
Raingear

Optional:
Camera
Bandannas
Spending money

                              What not to bring:
Radios
Electronic games
Tape players/CD players
Knives of any form or fashion
Fireworks or firearms (NO WEAPONS OF ANY KIND)
Tobacco, alcohol, drugs
Photo Courtesy of D. Curtis                                   Photo Courtesy of D. Curtis


               Health History (This document will be kept confidential and is not required for attendance)

Please Check – Give Approximate Dates

ALLERGIES
Hay Fever                               _______
Ivy Poisoning, etc.                     _______
Insect Stings                           _______
Penicillin                              _______
Asthma                                  _______
Other Drugs                             _______

Frequent Ear Infections                 _______
Heart Defect/Disease                    _______
Convulsion                              _______
Diabetes                                _______
Bleeding/Clotting Disorders             _______
Chicken Pox                             _______
Measles                                 _______
German Measles                          _______
Mumps                                   _______

Dates of operations or illness: _____________________________________

List of any chronic or recurring illness: _____________________________

Other illnesses or details from above: _______________________________

Name of dentist/orthodontist: ___________________ Phone: _____________

Name of family physicians: ____________________ Phone: ____________

Do you carry family or medical/hospital insurance: ____________________

Carrier: ______________ Policy or Group Number: ___________________
Any activities to be restricted or encouraged by physician’s advice? ____________________
_______________________________________________________________________
Any health related suggestions from parents/guardians? _____________________________
_______________________________________________________________________




                                          Parent/Guardian Authorization:
This health record is accurate so far as I know, and the person herein described has permission to engage in
all prescribed camp activities except as recognized above.

I hereby give permission to the physician selected by the state park ranger to order x-rays, routine tests, and
treatment for the health of my child, and in the event I cannot be reached in an emergency, I hereby give
permission to the physician selected by the state park ranger to hospitalize, secure proper treatment for, and
to order injection and/or surgery for my child as named above.

Signature of Parent/Guardian:


                                                  Directions




         Nashville:       Follow I-40 East to Cookeville. Go south on Hwy 111 through Sparta and
Spencer. Go east (left) on Hwy 284 until you enter the south entrance. Go straight for Lodge 2; turn right
for Lodge 1.

         Murfreesboro: Follow Hwy 70s through Woodbury to the Hwy 70s bypass in McMinnville, or
take I-24 east to Hwy 55 in Manchester and follow Hwy 55 to the Hwy 70s bypass in McMinnville.
Follow the bypass to Hwy 30 east. Travel about 10 miles and turn right on Baker Mountain Road. Follow
Baker Mountain Road until it crosses Hwy 111. Go straight onto Hwy 284 east and continue into the south
entrance. Go straight for Lodge 2; turn right for Lodge 1.
          Chattanooga: Follow Hwy 27 north toward Dayton to Hwy 111 north. Go north on Hwy 111
through Dunlap, and turn right onto Hwy 284 east at the Fall Creek Falls State Resort Park sign. When you
enter the south entrance of the park, go straight for Lodge 2; turn right for Lodge 1.

          Knoxville:       Follow I-40 west to Hwy 101 in Crossville. Exit at Hwy 101 south, and follow
it until you reach Hwy 30. Turn right onto Hwy 30 west and follow it to Hwy 284west. Turn left onto
Hwy 284 and continue through the north entrance of the park. When you reach the four way stop, go
straight for Lodge 2, or turn left for Lodge 1.




                          This is a legal document. Please read before signing.

                                            RELEASE OF LIABILITY
The State has done everything possible to assure that participants in the Fall Creek Falls State Park
Environmental Education Center will enjoy a fun experience. We wish to inform you that the
Environmental Education program is not risk free. The same elements that contribute to the unique
character and fun of the outdoor environmental education program such as hiking, and other outdoor
activities can also cause loss or damage to equipment, injury, illness, or in extreme cases, permanent
trauma or death. We do not want to heighten or reduce your enthusiasm for the experience, but we do want
you to know in advance what to expect, and to be informed of some of the possible risks. We ask that you
read this release, sign it, and return it to our office.

         In consideration of the services of the STATE, I hereby covenant with the State, its employees,
volunteers, and agents hereinafter referred to as "Releasees", and release and discharge those entities, on
behalf of myself, my child, heirs, assigns, personal representative(s) and estate(s) as follows:

                                  ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF RISKS
         I understand and acknowledge that my child is about to voluntarily engage in the Fall Creek Falls
State Park Environmental Education Program. The activities that are part of the program involve certain
known and unanticipated risks, which could result in property damage, injury, death, illness, disease,
physical or mental injury to my child or to other third parties. I understand and expressly acknowledge that
those risks may result in personal claims against Releasees or claims against me by other third parties.
Among the risks are the following:

          Activities may involve riding in vehicles, caving, crossing land where footing may be awkward
and hiking in areas with high bluffs. Participants may slip or fall. Exposure to natural elements can be
uncomfortable or harmful. Temperature and weather extremes may result in sunburn, dehydration, heat
exhaustion, heat stroke, or hypothermia. Poisonous or dangerous plants, insects, or animals may cause
injury or allergic reactions.

          I understand and acknowledge that the above list is not complete and that other risks, may also
result in injury, death, illness or disease, or damage to my child, to property or to other third parties. I
expressly understand and accept all of the risks involved with the Environmental Education Program. My
child’s participation in these activities is purely voluntary, and I elect to allow my child to participate in
spite of the risks.

RELEASE

        I HEREBY VOLUNTARILY RELEASE AND FOREVER DISCHARGE RELEASEES
FROM ANY AND ALL LIABILITY, CLAIMS, DEMANDS, ACTIONS OR RIGHTS OF ACTION,
which are related to, arise out of, or are in any way connected with my child’s participation in the activities
described above, including specifically but not limited to, the negligent acts or omissions of Releasees, for
any and all injury, death, illness or disease, and/or damage to my child, third parties or any property.

      I FURTHER AGREE TO HOLD HARMLESS AND INDEMNIFY RELEASEES AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS OR ENTITIES FOR ANY SUCH INJURY, DEATH, ILLNESS, DISEASE,
PROPERTY DAMAGE OR EXPENSES ARISING FROM OR CONNECTED WITH MY CHILD’S
PARTICIPATION IN THIS ACTIVITY.
      I FURTHER AGREE NOT TO SUE, ASSERT OR OTHERWISE MAINTAIN OR
ASSERT ANY CLAIM AGAINST RELEASEES AND ALL OTHER PERSONS OR ENTITIES,
FOR ANY INJURY, DEATH, ILLNESS OR DISEASE, OR DAMAGE TO MYSELF, MY CHILD
OR MY PROPERTY, ARISING FROM OR CONNECTED WITH PARTICIPATION IN THE
ABOVE ACTIVITIES.

      IN SIGNING THIS DOCUMENT, I FULLY RECOGNIZE THAT IF ANYONE IS HURT OR
PROPERTY IS DAMAGED WHILE MY CHILD IS ENGAGED IN THESE ACTIVITIES, I WILL
HAVE NO RIGHT TO MAKE A CLAIM OR FILE A LAWSUIT AGAINST RELEASEES, EVEN IF
THEY OR ANY OF THEM NEGLIGENTLY CAUSED THE BODILY INJURY OR PROPERTY
DAMAGE.

        I understand that this is the entire Agreement between Myself and Releasees and that it cannot be
modified or changed in any way by the representations or statements of any employee or agent of
Releasees, or by me.
        My signature below indicates that I HAVE READ THE ENTIRE DOCUMENT, THAT I
UNDERSTAND IT COMPLETELY and agree to be bound by its terms.


SIGNATURES OF PARENTS OR LEGAL GUARDIAN

________________________________________________ DATE:_________

________________________________________________

________________________________________________
PRINTED NAME OF PARENTS OR LEGAL GUARDIAN

                          This is a legal document. Please read before signing.

                                         RELEASE OF LIABILITY
The State has done everything possible so that your participation in the Fall Creek Falls State Park
Environmental Education Program will be a fun experience. You need to know that the program is not
risk free. The things that contribute to the unique character and fun of the outdoor environmental education
program such as hiking, and other outdoor activities can also cause loss or damage to equipment, injury,
illness, or in extreme cases, permanent trauma or death. We do not want to reduce your enthusiasm for the
experience, but we do want you to know in advance what to expect, and to be informed of some of the
possible risks. We ask that you read this release, sign it, and return it to our office.

         In consideration of the services of the STATE, I hereby covenant with the State, its employees,
volunteers, and agents hereinafter referred to as "Releasees", and release and discharge those entities, on
behalf of myself, heirs, assigns, personal representative(s) and estate(s) as follows:

ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF RISKS
         I understand and acknowledge that I am about to voluntarily engage in the Fall Creek Falls
State Park Environmental Education Program. The activities that are part of the program involve
certain known and unanticipated risks that could result in property damage, injury, death, illness,
disease, physical or mental injury to myself or to other third parties. I understand and expressly
acknowledge that those risks may result in personal claims against Releasees or claims against me by
other third parties. Among the risks are the following:

          Activities may involve riding in vehicles, caving, crossing land where footing may be awkward
and hiking in areas with high bluffs. Participants may slip or fall. Exposure to natural elements can be
uncomfortable or harmful. Temperature and weather extremes may result in sunburn, dehydration, heat
exhaustion, heat stroke, or hypothermia. Poisonous or dangerous plants, insects, or animals may cause
injury or allergic reactions.

         I understand and acknowledge that the above list is not complete and that other risks, may also
result in injury, death, illness or disease, or damage to property or to other third parties. I expressly
understand and accept all of the risks involved with the Environmental Education Program. My
participation in this activity is purely voluntary, and I elect to participate in spite of the risks.

RELEASE

         I HEREBY VOLUNTARILY RELEASE AND FOREVER DISCHARGE RELEASEES
FROM ANY AND ALL LIABILITY, CLAIMS, DEMANDS, ACTIONS OR RIGHTS OF ACTION,
which are related to, arise out of, or are in any way connected with my participation in the activities
described above, including specifically but not limited to, the negligent acts or omissions of Releasees, for
any and all injury, death, illness or disease, and/or damage to me or my property.

      I FURTHER AGREE TO HOLD HARMLESS AND INDEMNIFY RELEASEES AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS OR ENTITIES FOR ANY SUCH INJURY, DEATH, ILLNESS, DISEASE,
PROPERTY DAMAGE OR EXPENSES ARISING FROM OR CONNECTED WITH MY
PARTICIPATION IN THIS ACTIVITY.
      I FURTHER AGREE NOT TO SUE, ASSERT OR OTHERWISE MAINTAIN OR
ASSERT ANY CLAIM AGAINST RELEASEES AND ALL OTHER PERSONS OR ENTITIES,
FOR ANY INJURY, DEATH, ILLNESS OR DISEASE, OR DAMAGE TO MYSELF, OR MY
PROPERTY, ARISING FROM OR CONNECTED WITH PARTICIPATION IN THE ABOVE
ACTIVITIES.

      IN SIGNING THIS DOCUMENT, I FULLY RECOGNIZE THAT IF ANYONE IS HURT OR
PROPERTY IS DAMAGED WHILE I AM ENGAGED IN THESE ACTIVITIES, I WILL HAVE NO
RIGHT TO MAKE A CLAIM OR FILE A LAWSUIT AGAINST RELEASEES, EVEN IF THEY OR
ANY OF THEM NEGLIGENTLY CAUSED THE BODILY INJURY OR PROPERTY DAMAGE.

        I understand that this is the entire Agreement between Myself and Releasees and that it cannot be
modified or changed in any way by the representations or statements of any employee or agent of
Releasees, or by me.
        My signature below indicates that I HAVE READ THE ENTIRE DOCUMENT, THAT I
UNDERSTAND IT COMPLETELY and agree to be bound by its terms.


SIGNATURE OF CHILD PARTICIPANT (If over 14)

________________________________________________ DATE:_________

________________________________________________

________________________________________________
                       PRINTED NAMEFall Creek Falls E.E. Center
                                   Registration Form
We are very excited for the opportunity to share with your students many of the wonders of nature Fall
Creek Falls has to offer each of us. Call (423) 881-5708 for reservations, then complete this form and
return it along with your $200 deposit. If you register by e-mail, you will not need to return this form with
your deposit.

Send to:
Fall Creek Falls State Park
Environmental Education Center
Attn: E.E. Center Coordinator
2009 Village Camp Rd, Pikeville, TN 37367




Trip Date                          __________________________
School                             __________________________
Address                            __________________________
Phone #                            __________________________
Fax #                              __________________________
Tax ID                             __________________________
Trip Coordinator                   __________________________
email                              __________________________
Student #                          __________________________
Chaperone #                        __________________________
Total                              __________________________
Lodge #                            __________________________
# of meals                         __________________________
Special dietary requests           __________________________




The Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation is committed to principles of equal
opportunity, equal access and affirmative action. Contact the EEO/AA Coordinator at 1-888-867-7455 or
the ADA Coordinator at 1-866-253-5827 for further information. Hearing impaired callers may use the
Tennessee Relay Service 1-800-848-0298.

								
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