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01b - Learning to Read Music 1 Lesson 2

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					                                          Learning to Read Music 1: Lesson 2
                                          By Christopher Schlegel




Music notation shows what notes to play by placing a dot on a line or space of the staff. In order to know when to play those
notes & for how long we have to learn the musical notation symbols for rhythm. Because we will use tablature along with
standard notation the hardest part to learning to read music will be the rhythms. So letâ s start with rhythmic notation.

Essentially rhythmic notation is a matter of fractions. All the symbols represent divisions of smaller or larger relative lengths.
The largest value is the whole note, which gets 4 counts (1, 2, 3, 4). Then we divide it into two equal halves and get,
appropriately, half notes, which get 2 counts (1, 2). Here are the divisions:

Whole note: a whole measure of 4 beats or 4 counts
Half note: a half of a measure of 4 beats or 2 counts
Quarter note: a quarter of a measure of 4 beats or 1 count
Eighth note: an eighth of a measure of 4 beats or 1/2 of a count
Sixteenth note: a sixteenth of a measure of 4 beats or 1/4 of a count
Thirty-second note: a thirty-second of a measure of 4 beats or 1/8 of a count

And so on. We can keep on dividing these forever, but they really have no practical application probably past 1/128th notes.
Rarely will you see anything smaller than 1/16th notes. Hereâ s an image to illustrate these rhythmic divisions and how their
symbols look.




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Learning to Read Music 1: Lesson 2
By Christopher Schlegel




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                                        Learning to Read Music 1: Lesson 2
                                        By Christopher Schlegel




Note that an 1/8th note has a â flagâ on itâ s stem and if more than one 1/8th note occurs right after another, then their
â flagsâ can be drawn as a â beamâ connecting their stems. Similarly with 1/16th notes, except they have two â flagsâ ,
therefore two â beamsâ . For each smaller division add a â flagâ or a â beamâ to connect adjacent similarly rhythm
valued notes.

Here they are on the musical staff with their proper grouping amounts.




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Learning to Read Music 1: Lesson 2
By Christopher Schlegel




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