Examination Schedule by 87bn1yX0

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									                                        ELPA
                                  Examination Schedule

The four parts of the examinations will be written during the week of November 27th.
The prescribed length of time for each part must be honored and all students within a
school must write each of the components at the same time.

Monday, November 27th: READING COMPREHENSION 90 minutes
                        -continuous text (poems, essays, short articles)
                        -non-continuous text (maps, charts, diagrams)
                        -responses should indicate understanding, interpretation,
                         and reflection

Tuesday, November 28th: WRITING I (A & B) 90 minutes
                         -task writing (letter/newspaper piece/directions for a recipe)
                         -60 minutes: 30 minutes brainstorm/write draft
                                        20 minutes edit
                                        10 minutes write good copy
                         -revision and editing (grammar exercise)
                         -30 minutes to complete task

Wednesday, November 29th: WRITING II 60 minutes
                         -narrative 200-250 words
                         -a topic of the student’s choice or one from the suggestions
                          offered on the assessment
                         -60 minutes: 30 minutes brainstorm/write draft
                                        20 minutes edit
                                        10 minutes write good copy

Thursday, November 30th: WRITING III 60 minutes
                         -demand writing (200-250 words)
                         -given a situation to talk about ex: school uniforms
                         -usually an opinion piece
                         -students need to acknowledge the other side of the opinion
                         -60 minutes: 30 minutes brainstorm/write draft
                                       20 minutes edit
                                       10 minutes write good copy

The following exercises are designed to better prepare you for the ELPA. Please take the
time to read the information at the beginning of this booklet. There is a wealth of
information that will be very useful to you in regards to preparing not only for the ELPA,
but also for other tests in school. This booklet contains tips for reading, writing, and test
taking. Also, there are some frequently asked questions that have been answered for you
in hops of lowering your anxiety level. We understand that the ELPA can be a very
stressful event on a student, but with proper preparation, and knowledge, it doesn’t have
to be so stressful.
                                 Be Informed
                                  Be Ready

      Getting Ready Guide for the English Language Proficiency Assessment

Table of Contents

Questions and Answers………………………………………………………...……page 3
Tips for Reading……………………………………………………………………..page 4
Reading Strategies…………………………………………………………….……..page 5
Tips for Writing…………………………………………………………….………..page 7
Test Instructions………………………………………………………….………….page 8
Reading Exercises………………………………………………………………..page 9-28
Mechanics of Writing……………………………………..…………………….page 29-36
Writing Exercises…………………………………………………………….…page 37-50
Evaluation Procedures……………………………………………………….….page 51-56
Sample Student Responses……………………………………………….……..page 57-67




             THE OVER-ARCHING GOAL
          • “Achieving full proficiency in English
             includes far more than mere fluency in
             conversation. It means that students
             know English well enough to be “fully
             competitive in academic uses of
             English and their age equivalent
             speaking peers.” (Hakuta, 2000)
                                Questions and Answers

Why do I need to write the ELPA?
You need to make sure that you have all the reading and writing skills you should have
acquired by the end of your grade 8 year as outlined by the Province of New Brunswick.
These skills are the basis for learning in all subject areas in both elementary and
secondary school.

Do I have to write the ELPA?
If you are working to obtain a New Brunswick Secondary School Diploma, you must
write and pass the ELPA. The ELPA is just ONE of the requirements you must complete
to obtain your High School Diploma. This applies to all students in the Province of New
Brunswick.

Why am I writing the ELPA in grade 9 instead of closer to graduation?
Writing now gives you time to get help if you need to improve your reading and writing
skills. If you do not successfully complete the ELPA, you will have opportunities to
retake it and pass it in future years.

Will university and colleges see my ELPA results?
No. Universities and colleges will not be able to see your ELPA results. They require a
High School diploma, and in order to obtain this diploma, you need to pass your ELPA.

Is the EPLA hard to pass?
The ELPA is based on the reading and writing skills that you have learned up until the
end of grade 8. The reading questions and writing tasks are pilot and field tested with
students and teachers across the province before the test is finalized. It has been
designed to be a fair test of literacy skills for the end of grade 8.

If I do not pass, can I take the ELPA again?
Yes. If you do not pass, you will be able to take the ELPA again the following year.

Can I get an accommodation?
If you have an Individual Education (IEP), you may be able to get an accommodation.
For more information, please see your Resource Teacher.

Can I get an exemption?
To be eligible for an exemption, you must have an IEP that includes documentation to
support the exemption. Again, for more information, please see your Resource Teacher.

How do I know what to study for the ELPA?
This package is designed to give you all the tools you need to prepare for the ELPA.
Your English teacher also is familiar with the ELPA and is more than happy to assist you
in any way possible.
                                   Tips for Reading

Questions about the reading selections are intended to allow you to demonstrate your
understanding of what you have read. It is important to try to answer ALL of the
questions. You will not be penalized for trying. Questions not answered are considered
incorrect. ALL answers must relate to the information and ideas in the selections.

      Many questions ask about facts and information that are clearly and directly stated
       in the selection.
      Other questions ask you to make inferences (draw conclusions or make
       judgments) about information and ideas in the selection.
      Some questions ask you to make connections between your personal knowledge
       and experiences and the ideas and information in the selection.
      Some questions ask how graphic features, meanings of words or phrases, sentence
       construction or the organization of information help you to understand what you
       have read.
      When you are asked to provide the “beat meaning” of a word or phrase “as used
       in” the reading selection, refer to the selection to determine the way the word is
       used in that specific sentence.
      Some questions refer you to a place (sentence, paragraph, section, page) in the
       reading selection to help you locate information; however, that specific place may
       not contain all the information you need to answer the question.

On the ELPA, there are two types of reading questions: multiple choice and short answer
questions.

Multiple Choice:
   Read the question and the four options carefully. Underline or highlight key
       words.
   If you can’t find the correct answer easily, start by eliminating the wrong or least
       correct answers.
   Since more than one option may appear to be correct, circle the one that is the
       most correct.
   Circle only one answer.
   If you wish to change your answer, but an X through your first choice and circle
       your final choice. If you circle more than one answer and you do not put and X
       through one of the circles, the questions will be scored incorrect.

Short Answer Questions:
    Read each question carefully. Underline or highlight key words.
    The space provided indicates the approximate length of the answer expected.
       Always be sure to write enough information to demonstrate your understanding of
       the reading selection.
    Sometimes you are asked to explain the reason for your answer. Be sure your
       reasons are based on the reading selection.
    When a question requires you to give a reason or explain your answer, consider
       including the word “because” in your answer.
Reading Strategies

You must manage your time in order to complete all the reading questions on the ELPA.
The selections vary in length from a single paragraph to three pages. Here are some
strategies that may help you understand the test selections and answer their
accompanying questions

General Strategies:
    Reading the questions first may help you predict what the selection is going to be
      about.
    Skim through the selection and then reread for meaning.
    Look for links between what you are reading and any experiences you have had.
    As you read, think about what you are reading and ask yourself questions about it.
    Try to “see” what you are reading; some readers say it is like running a video or
      movie in their heads.
    Underline or highlight important information and ideas as you read.
    If you are having trouble understanding an idea, either read on until the meaning
      becomes clearer, or stop and reread.
    If you read a word you don’t understand, look for a root word that you know
      inside the larger word; look for prefixes or suffixes.
    If you read a word you don’t understand, read to the end of the sentence and look
      for clues to its meaning. Try reading the sentences before and after the sentence
      to see if you can find the meaning from the context.
    If a very long sentence has you confused, reread that sentence and try to put it in
      your own words.

Strategies for selections with graphic features (e.g., graph, schedule, instructions):
    Look at the titles, pictures, charts and/or graphs to predict what the selection is
       going to be about.
    Think about the purpose and audience of the selection.
    Look at the overall layout and consider why the selection is organized as it is.
    Look at the particular graphic features and consider how they make the selection
       more interesting or make the information more clear.

Strategies for narrative selections (e.g., story, dialogue):
    As you read, predict what will happen.
    Think about the characters, setting, conflict, plot, and main idea of the selection.

Strategies for informational selections (e.g., explanation, opinion):
    Read the title (if there is one) and the opening sentence to predict what the
       selection is going to be about.
    As you read, ask yourself what class you might read this selection in.
    Notice the organization of the selection.
       >Is it in chronological order (first one thing happened, and then the next?)
       >Does the writer start with an observation and then tell you how he or she came to
       that conclusion?
    >Does the title or the topic sentence give you the main point?
    >Is the main point supported or proven by the rest of the selection?
    >Has the writer divided the information into chunks for you?
   Ask yourself, “What is the main point the writer is trying to make?”
   Identify what information is more important and what is less important.
                                    Tips for Writing

The writing tasks are intended to allow you to demonstrate your writing skills. You will
have 3 days devoted to writing. The four tasks are of different types that represent the
range of writing required in school and daily life: a summary, a series of paragraphs,
expressing an opinion, a news report, a letter, and an information paragraph, are all
possibilities.

      All writing tasks must be written in complete sentences.
      The purpose and audience for your writing tasks must be kept in mind when
       completing your writing tasks. Your word choice will be much different if you
       were asked to write a letter to a friend, than it would if you were asked to write a
       letter to your school principal. Normally, the audience is an adult, however. This
       means that the language in your writing should be standard Canadian English and
       your ideas should be appropriate for an adult audience. Offensive or
       inappropriate language and ideas are not acceptable.
      Each writing task is different. It is important to follow the instructions for each
       task. For example, the information paragraph must be written in a single
       paragraph. The series of paragraphs expressing an opinion asks for a minimum of
       three paragraphs. You may write more than three, but do not write fewer than
       three paragraphs.
      Be sure to write on the given topic in the form required by the task instructions.
      Writing that is off-topic or not in the specified form will receive a failing mark.
       Note: The series of paragraphs expressing an opinion the only writing task that
       focuses on your opinion.
      To help your reader follow and understand your written work, organize your ideas
       clearly. Use transitions to link your ideas. SEEEC and SRRRC paragraphs are
       excellent methods of writing.
      The space provided for your written work indicated the approximate length of the
       writing required. Your writing skills cannot be assessed if you have not written
       enough.
      Make sure your handwriting is clear. Make changes to your writing as neatly and
       clearly as you can. Illegible handwriting cannot be marked.
      Use correct spelling, grammar and punctuation, so that your ideas are
       communicated clearly.

								
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