30 Youth Fact Sheet

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					Fact Sheet
Youth and Tobacco Use: Current Estimates
(updated December 2006)

Cigarette Smoking

      Twenty-three percent of high school students in the United States are current
       cigarette smokers—23% of females and 22.9% of males.1
      Approximately 26% of whites, 22% of Hispanics, and 13% of African Americans
       in high school are current cigarette smokers.1
      Eight percent of middle school students in this country are current cigarette
       smokers,2 with estimates slightly higher for females (9%) than males (8%).2
      Nine percent of whites, 10% of Hispanics, 8% of African Americans, and 3% of
       Asian Americans in middle school are current cigarette smokers.2
      Each day in the United States, approximately 4,000 young people between the
       ages of 12 and 17 years initiate cigarette smoking, and an estimated 1,140 young
       people become daily cigarette smokers.3

Other Tobacco Use

      Thirteen percent of high school students are current cigar smokers, with estimates
       higher for males (18%) than for females (8%).2 Nationally, an estimated 5% of all
       middle school students are current cigar smokers, with estimates of 7% for males
       and 4% for females.2
      An estimated 10% of males in high school are current smokeless tobacco users,2
       as are an estimated 4% of males in middle school.2
      An estimated 3% of high school students are current users of bidis; bidi use is
       more common among males (4%) than females (2%).2 An estimated 2% of
       middle school students are bidi users, with estimates of 3% for males and 2% for
       females.2

Factors Associated with Tobacco Use among Youth

      Factors associated with youth tobacco use include low socioeconomic status, use
       and approval of tobacco use by peers or siblings, smoking by parents or
       guardians, accessibility, availability and price of tobacco products, a perception
       that tobacco use is normative, lack of parental support or involvement, low levels
       of academic achievement, lack of skills to resist influences to tobacco use, lower
       self-image or self-esteem, belief in functional benefits of tobacco use, and lack of
       self-efficacy to refuse offers of tobacco.4,5
      Tobacco use in adolescence is associated with many other health risk behaviors,
       including higher risk sexual behavior and use of alcohol or other drugs.4
References

   1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Cigarette Use Among High School
      Students—United States, 1991–2005. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report
      [serial online]. 2006: 55(26);724–726 [cited 2006 Dec 5]. Available from:
      http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5526a2.htm.
   2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Tobacco Use, Access, and Exposure
      To Tobacco in Media Among Middle and High School Students—United States,
      2004. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report [serial online]. 2005: 4(12);297–
      301 [cited 2006 Dec 5]. Available from:
      http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5412a1.htm.
   3. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. (2005). Results
      From the 2005 National Survey on Drug Use and Health. (PDF–1.41MB) (Office
      of Applied Studies, NSDUH Series H-27, DHHS Publication No. SMA 05–4061)
      [cited 2006 Dec 5]. Rockville, MD. Available from:
      http://oas.samhsa.gov/nsduh/2k5nsduh/2k5results.pdf.
   4. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Preventing Tobacco Use Among
      Young People: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department
      of Health and Human Services, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention
      and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Office on
      Smoking and Health, 1994 [cited 2006 Dec 5]. Available from:
      http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/data_statistics/sgr/sgr_1994/index.htm.
   5. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Reducing Tobacco Use: A
      Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and
      Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for
      Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and
      Health, 2000 [cited 2006 Dec 5]. Available from:
      http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/data_statistics/sgr/sgr_2000/index.htm.

For Further Information

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion
Office on Smoking and Health
E-mail: tobaccoinfo@cdc.gov
Phone: 1-800-CDC-INFO

Media Inquiries: Contact CDC's Office on Smoking and Health press line at 770-488-
5493.

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Page last updated 03/19/2007

				
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