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					 Program Review Report
6 Year for Health Sciences



       Spring 2012




            1
Health Sciences Department Program Review

Nursing Program Report
Prepared by: Eve Adler, Vini Angel, Ida Danzey, Georgia Farber,
            Carole McCaskill, Holly Thiercof, Eric Williams

Respiratory Program Report
Prepared by: Salvador Santana




                                       2
             SANTA MONICA COLLEGE PROGRAM REVIEW; April 2012

                                           NURSING PROGRAM


Contents

Introduction: .................................................................................................................... 4

Program Description and Goals: ..................................................................................... 6

Curriculum: Course and Program Content: ................................................................... 21

Instructional Improvement: ............................................................................................ 26

Instructional Environment: ............................................................................................ 31

Program Effectiveness: ................................................................................................. 35

Advisory Board:............................................................................................................. 50

Conclusions & Recommendations: ............................................................................... 51

Appendices: .................................................................................................................. 54




                                                            3
                           Health Sciences Introduction

   There are two programs in the Health Sciences department which prepare

students to become licensed health care practitioners as registered nurses or

respiratory therapists. In addition, Health 61 (Medical Terminology) and

Occupational Therapy 1 (Introduction to Occupational Therapy) are two

additional courses offered by the Health Sciences department. Introduction to

Occupational Therapy was only offered in the fall semester and recently has not

been offered for the past two years.

  The nursing program is approved by the California Board of Registered

Nursing (BRN) and accredited by the National League for Nursing Accrediting

Commission (NLNAC). As a consortium the Santa Monica College-East Los

Angeles (ELAC) respiratory therapy program is approved and accredited by the

Commission on Accreditation for Respiratory Care (CoARC). The respiratory

therapy program is scheduled for a continuing accreditation visit for April 12-13,

2012. This 6 year Health Sciences program review report is submitted as two

reports since the nursing and respiratory therapy programs have separate and

distinct criteria for approval and accreditation.

   The labor market data show both the nursing and respiratory therapy

programs prepare career-technical graduates to assume high paying jobs upon

licensure in their respective fields. The hourly mean wage for registered nurses

in California during the first quarter of 2011 was $42.65, and ranged from $34.43

(25th percentile) to $50.33 (75th percentile) (State of California, EDD). The

employment outlook remains strong for registered nurses with a projected 25.7




                                           4
percent increase during 2008-2018. California has 25% fewer registered nurses

per 100,000 than the U.S. average according to a study recently report by the

California Institute for Nursing and Health Care (2012). This study supports the

need to maintain capacity in nursing schools as a high priority since California

lags behind most states in registered nurse utilization. For respiratory care

therapists, the hourly mean wage in California as reported during the first quarter

of 2011 was $33.14, and ranged from $28.44 (25th percentile) to $37.80 (75th

percentile) (State of California, EDD). The employment outlook for respiratory

therapists remains strong with a projected 26.6% increase during 2008-2018. At

the same time, this report highlights the challenges experienced by graduates in

obtaining entry-level positions in less than 6 months following completion of their

program and licensure due to the impact of the downturn in the economy.

    Faculty from the nursing program and the department’s one full-time

respiratory therapy program faculty meet monthly for Health Sciences meetings

to receive reports from representatives of the Academic Senate, Faculty

Association, Dean’s Meetings, Chairs and Coordinators, Instructional Chairs,

Career Technical Education Committee, Respiratory Therapy program and to

collaborate on college initiatives such as student learning outcomes.

   The Nursing, and Respiratory Therapy websites are sources of an immense

amount of information about our programs for both faculty and students. The

Health Sciences department is appreciative of Ellen Cutler’s review of these

websites in order to make them accessible for people with disabilities and

Michelle Aragon’s assistance in updating the websites.




                                         5
Nursing Program

Program Description and Goals

       The Associate Degree nursing program at Santa Monica College was

established in 1965. It was first approved by the California Board of Registered

Nursing (BRN) in 1965 with the last full approval in 2006. An interim visit by the

BRN was in 2010. The next full visit by the BRN, requires a Self-Study Report, is

scheduled for spring 2014. The nursing program was first accredited by the

National League for Nursing (NLN) for eight years in 1989 and was last

accredited in fall 2006 by the National League for Nursing Accrediting

Commission (NLNAC). The next visit by the NLNAC is scheduled for fall 2014.

The nursing program currently admits forty generic (beginning) nursing students

each semester. The maximum potential nursing program student population

equals 160 students.

       The nursing program is four semesters in length. The focus in the first

semester is on some of the core concepts in nursing practice and on individual’s

ability for self-care. The second semester focuses on common physiologic and

psychiatric health deviations, and community assessment. The third semester

focus is on more complex multi-system health deviations. The fourth semester

focus is developmental and maturational concepts involved in the nursing care of

children and the childbearing family. The capstone course of the nursing

program allows the student to work closely with a professional staff nurse

(preceptor) in a clinical setting.




                                         6
   Mission and goals. The overall goal of the Santa Monica College nursing

program is to prepare Associate Degree nurses to function as caring, competent,

and compassionate practitioners at an entry level of professional nursing and

across a variety of care settings. The nursing program is designed to provide

the student with learning experiences to acquire the knowledge, skills, and

competencies to practice professional nursing.

       At the completion of the nursing program the graduate is prepared to take

the national licensing exam for nurses (NCLEX-RN) in order to be granted a

Registered Nurse license. Successful completion of the licensing exam allows

the graduate to practice as a Registered Nurse in a health care setting. The

graduate of this program will be able to work with and provide care for patients of

diverse groups in a global community.

      The mission and vision of the college and the philosophy of the nursing

program is congruent (see Table 1). The program objectives and program

student learning outcomes are congruent with the institutional learning outcomes

(see Table 2). All of the program students learning outcomes are currently

aligned with the institutional learning outcome, “obtain the knowledge and

academic skills necessary to access, evaluate, and interpret ideas, images, and

information critically in order to communicate effectively, reach conclusions, and

solve problems.” However, program objectives are congruent with all of the

institutional learning outcomes.




                                         7
Table 1
Comparison of Mission Statement of Santa Monica College and the Philosophy
of Nursing Program

Mission Statement of Santa Monica            Santa Monica College Nursing
College                                      Program Philosophy

Santa Monica College strives to create       The faculty believes that support
a learning environment that both             services should be available and
challenges our students and supports         accessible to students.
them in achieving their educational
goals.
Students learn to contribute to the          Faculty accepts the responsibility for
global community as they develop an          establishing and maintaining a learning
understanding of their personal              environment that will broaden the
relationship to the world’s social,          students’ awareness and appreciation
cultural, political, economic,               of the uniqueness of others.
technological, and natural
environments.
To fulfill this mission, the College         The nursing program at Santa Monica
provides open and affordable access to       College is designed to produce an
excellent associate degree and               Associate Degree Nurse who is caring,
occupational certificate programs            competent and compassionate.
These programs prepare students for          Faculty upholds and promotes the
successful careers, develop college-         belief that learning is a process that
level skills, enable transfer to             continues throughout the lifespan. The
universities, and foster a personal          student learner is given the
commitment to lifelong learning.             responsibility for actively participating
                                             in the educational experiences
                                             provided.
Santa Monica College serves the              Students enter the Santa Monica
world’s diverse communities that             College Program from diverse
embrace the exchange of ideas in an          backgrounds. They are recognized as
open, caring community of learners,          unique in their culture, experiences,
and that recognize the critical              values, sexual orientation, economic
importance of each individual’s              status, attitudes, motivation, learning
contribution to the achievement of the       styles and learning potential.
college’s vision.                            The nursing program at Santa Monica
                                             College is designed to produce an
                                             Associate Degree Nurse who is caring,
                                             competent and compassionate.
                                             Inherent components of the caring
                                             environment include support of both
                                             the Nurses’ Code of Ethics, National
                                             League for Nursing (NLN Core
                                             competencies, and the Patient’s Bill of


                                         8
Mission Statement of Santa Monica               Santa Monica College Nursing
College                                         Program Philosophy

                                                Rights). Nursing has the capacity to
                                                create caring environments and render
                                                compassionate care that acknowledges
                                                the uniqueness of each individual.
Vision and Core Values of SMC                   NLN competencies for graduates of
                                                Associate Degree Programs
SMC will be a leader and innovator in           Human Flourishing
student learning and achievement and            Advocate for patients and families
will prepare and empower students to            in ways that promote their self-
excel in their academic and                     determination, integrity, and
professional success in an evolving             ongoing growth as human beings.
global environment.
As a community committed to open                Nursing Judgment
inquiry that encourages dialog and the          Make judgments in practice,
free exchange of ideas, SMC will serve          substantiated with evidence, that
as a model of students in the practice          integrate nursing science in the
of its core values: intellectual inquiry,       provision of safe, quality care and
research-based planning and                     promote the health of patients within a
evaluation, democratic processes,               family and community context.
communication and collegiality, global
awareness, and sustainability.
                                                Professional Identity
                                                Implement one’s role as a nurse in
                                                ways that reflect integrity,
                                                responsibility, ethical practices, and an
                                                evolving identity as a nurse committed
                                                to evidenced-based practice, caring,
                                                advocacy, and safe, quality care for
                                                diverse patients within a family and
                                                community context.
                                                Spirit of Inquiry
                                                Examine the evidence that underlies
                                                clinical nursing practice to challenge
                                                the status quo, question underlying
                                                assumptions, and offer new insights to
                                                improve the quality of care for patients,
                                                families, and communities.




                                            9
Supporting Goals
Innovative and Responsive Academic        Contemporary trends have been
Environment                               included in the program such as QSEN
                                          (Quality and Safety Education for
Continuously develop curricular           Nurses) competencies for pre-licensure
programs, learning strategies, and        nursing students. Use of mid to high
services to meet the evolving needs of    fidelity simulators to provide instruction,
students and the community.               and iclickers.

Supportive Learning Environment
Provide access to comprehensive           A Readiness and Retention Policy was
student learning resources such as        formulated and implemented to prepare
library, tutoring, and technology; and    students to enter and remain in the
                                          program. Supervised Tutoring classes
 Provide access to comprehensive and      are offered for each medical-surgical
innovative student support services       nursing course. Remediation seminars
such as admissions, counseling,
assessment, outreach, and financial       Financial support is provided in the
aid.                                      form of an emergency fund was also
                                          for students in the program which
                                          began in 2006. Scholarship for
                                          Disadvantage Students (HRSA) in the
                                          amount of $41,200 was also acquired
                                          for 2011-2012.
Stable Fiscal Environment                       Total Funding: 2005-2012=
                                                          4,370,133
Respond to dynamic fiscal conditions
                                                           Funding Source
through ongoing evaluation and                ADN Enrollment Growth (State
reallocation of existing resources and        Chancellor’s Office)                      $1,
the development of new resources.             ADN to MSN Grant (State
                                              Chancellor’s Office)                      $15
                                              Community Based Job Training Grant
                                              (DOL/ETA)                                 $1,
                                              Fostering Student Success Grant
                                              (Governor’s 15% WIA)                      $1,
                                              Nursing Equipment Grant (State
                                              Chancellor’s Office)                      $73
                                              Readiness Activities, Referral, and
                                              Counseling for two Career Technical
                                              Education Programs (SMC Basic
                                              Skills Initiative/State BSI funding)      $37
                                              RN Specialty Grant (Governor’s 15%
                                              WIA)                                      $22
                                              Scholarship for Disadvantage


                                         10
Supporting Goals
                                                Students (HRSA)                       $33
                                                VTEA/CTEA Allocations (SMC CTE
                                                Committee/State VTEA funds)           ?

Sustainable Physical Environment

 Apply sustainable practices to             Students are expected to conserve
                                            resources and supplies in the clinical
maintain and enhance the College’s          setting.
facilities and infrastructure, including
grounds, buildings, and technology.



Supportive Collegial Environment

Improve and enhance decision making         Cultural competency is a thread in the
and communication processes in order        nursing curriculum. Students attend
to respect the diverse needs and goals      annual multi-cultural workshops
                                            sponsored by several of the ethnic
of the entire College community.
                                            nursing organizations: i.e., Council of
                                            Black Nurses and the Hispanic Nurses
                                            associations.

Table 2
 Alignment of Institutional Learning Outcomes and Program Objectives
Institutional Student        Program Objectives/Goals Program Student
Learning Outcomes                                        Learning Outcome
Personal Attributes
Acquire the self-            Maintain accountability for
confidence and self-         own nursing practice
discipline to pursue their within the profession’s
intellectual curiosities     ethical and legal
with integrity in both their framework.
personal and
professional lives;          Serve as a role model to
                             members of the nursing
                             team by fostering high
                             standards of nursing
                             practice.


                              Assume responsibility for
                              self-development and
                              continual learning.


                                           11
Institutional Student       Program Objectives/Goals Program Student
Learning Outcomes                                    Learning Outcome

Analytic &
Communication Skills
Obtain the knowledge        Utilize critical thinking and   Have entry level nursing
and academic skills         the nursing process to          knowledge to provide
necessary to access,        formulate and maintain          care to clients across the
evaluate, and interpret     individualized,                 developmental life span
ideas, images, and          compassionate care for a        as assessed by
information critically in   group of patients.              successful completion of
order to communicate                                        the nursing curriculum;
effectively, reach          Collaborate with members
conclusions, and solve      of the health team to           Be able to perform
problems;                   provide a caring and            therapeutic nursing
                            compassionate                   interventions when
                            environment conducive to        providing nursing care
                            assisting in the fulfillment    as assessed by
                            of health care needs.           satisfactory performance
                                                            in the clinical practice
                            Utilize therapeutic             setting in the
                            communication to assist         Professional Role
                            patients, families, and/or      Transition course;
                            significant others in
                            adapting or coping with
                            life experiences.
                                                            Have the knowledge
                                                            they need to pass the
                            Communicate changes in          NCLEX Board exam as
                            health status that interfere    assessed meeting or
                            with the patient’s ability to   exceeding the national
                            maintain or achieve             mean on the licensure
                            optimal health.                 exam on the first
                                                            attempt.
                            Acknowledge the
                            influence of nursing
                            research on nursing
                            practice.

                            Utilize appropriate
                            channels of
                            communication to
                            accomplish goals related
                            to delivery of patient care.

                            Coordinate and establish


                                         12
Institutional Student         Program Objectives/Goals Program Student
Learning Outcomes                                      Learning Outcome
                              nursing care priorities

Applied Social
Knowledge and Values
Respect the inter-            Advocate for individual
relatedness of the global     patient needs and for
human environment,            system changes to
engage with diverse           improve health care
peoples, and                  delivery.
acknowledge the
significance of their daily   Assist nursing personnel
actions relative to           to develop and enhance
broader issues and            nursing care skills.
events;
                              Develop and implement
                              an individualized teaching
                              plan that will promote
                              and/or maintain optimal
                              health
Applied Knowledge &
Valuation of the Physical
World
Take responsibility for       Assume responsibility for
their own impact on the       self-development and
earth by living a             continual learning.
sustainable and ethical
life style.

       The operation of the nursing program is influenced by external and

internal standards. The external standards include state regulations and

legislative requirements of the BRN (revised in 2010); the 2008 standards of the

NLNAC (currently being revised); National League for Nursing (NLN) core

competencies for graduates of associate degree nursing programs; California

Community College Chancellor’s Office (CCCCO) mandates directed at nursing

programs; state legislations; and the national call for changes in nursing practice

and nursing education by national nursing groups and by the Institute of



                                         13
Medicine. The internal standards are set by the governing institution (SMC) and

the nursing faculty. State legislation such as AB1295 and SB 1440 are driving the

need to revise the curriculum and systematic evaluation plan. With these

changes, the department recognizes more reassigned time is needed for the

Assistant Nursing Program Director/Faculty Leader Health Sciences to

collaborate with the Director/Associate Dean of Health Sciences to trend and

analyze data and improve the instructional environment in order to achieve

program goals.

      CCCCO associate degree nursing programs have established admission

requirements by performing a Prerequisite Validation Study, or following the

recommended CCCCO admission requirements for nursing programs, or use the

multi-criteria established by AB 1559. Nursing programs were also allowed to use

a readiness assessment test (SB 1309 and SB 139) to admit students to nursing

programs. The Chancellor’s Office determined the cut score for each of the

approved tests. The legislation also included a remediation component for all of

the students who did not meet the cut score. Admission criteria to the nursing

program at SMC include the following: Anatomy 1, Physiology 3, Microbiology 3,

English 1, cumulative GPA of 2.5 in the sciences with only one repeat or

withdrawal; and an overall GPA of 2.5.

   A Readiness and Retention Plan has been developed and formalized to assist

students in being successful in the nursing program. Legislation (SB 1309 2006

and SB 139 in 2007) allows nursing programs to establish an assessment test as

a condition of admission. Nursing is one of the few disciplines in a community




                                         14
college in which students need to meet a cut score determined by a formula

created by the Chancellor’s office. If students perform poorly in the pre-

assessment testing they will be provided with remediation while remaining on the

wait list.

   In addition to remediation, each of the medical-surgical courses now includes

a Supervised Tutorial component which was approved by the Curriculum

Committee in 2005. Students who have identified themselves as at-risk or have

been identified as being at-risk by their instructor are strongly recommended to

participate in the Supervised Tutorials. When a student is identified as being at

risk they meet with a nursing counselor to create a remediation plan.

   Remediation activities are provided to students in the winter and summer

sessions for students who exited the program due to poor academic

performance. The remediation courses are currently being paid for by a grant

that ends in June 2012.

   Characteristics of students in the nursing program. Students enrolled in

the program, include generic, advanced placement, readmitted, LVN to ADN,

transfer and 30-unit option (see Appendix A for definitions). The faculty reviewed

the data regarding the characteristics of students enrolled in the program from

the Chancellor’s Office and found the numbers to be higher compared to the

internal program data. The difference in enrollments/numbers are probably

related to two courses offered each semester, Nursing 17 (3 sections) and

Nursing 36 (2 sections). Nursing 17 and Nursing 36 can be taken without being

enrolled in the nursing program. Therefore, the faculty selected to use the



                                        15
internal data to describe the students enrolled in the program for this component

of the report.

    The students enrolled in the program are more apt to have a Bachelor’s

degree or higher or completed an associate degree and all have earned a high

school diploma or its equivalent. Approximately 3% of the students are identified

as having a basic skill deficiency which is much lower than the 21% of students

with basic skills deficiency college-wide. This is not an unusual situation

considering the admission requirements for entry into the program. The diversity

in the nursing program is reflective of the college-wide student population but the

percent for Black/African American, Hispanic ethnic groups are noticeably lower.

The students in the program are older than the college-wide student population.

The age group is usually in the 31 to 40 year category, non-traditional and the

Caucasian ethnic group is in the majority (average 37%). There is consistency in

the majority of the students being female since traditionally nursing has been a

female-dominated profession. The percent of male students range from 13% to

18%. Currently, 4.6 per cent of the students enrolled in the nursing program are

international students (F-1 visa) compared to 10% college-wide in 2010 (see

Table 3).

    There was also an increase in the number of LVN to ADN from students,

from April 2007 to June 2009, due to the implementation of a Department of

Labor grant referred to as Community Based Job Training (CBJT). This grant

offered nursing courses for the LVN in a hybrid format and was implemented in

spring 2007. All of the LVN to ADN graduates, who were part of the CBJT grant,



                                         16
completed the program on time and all but one passed the NCLEX RN the first

time.

Table 3
Census Day Student Enrollment in Nursing Program
Student type
               10/15/2011    10/15/2010     10/15/2009   10/15/2008   10/15/2007
Generic        110           139            129          112          101
Advanced       3             2              6            5            7
Placement
(AP)
Readmitted*    23            15             14           20           24
AP Online                                   10           7            10
Transfer                                    1            0            0

Foreign                                                  1
Nurse
Total          136           156             160         145          142
*includes readmitted AP, generic, and transfer
Ethnicity
              College    10/15/2011     10/15/2010   10/15/2009   10/15/2008   10/15/2007
              Wide
              2010
African       9.8%       3 (2.2%)       11 (7%)      10 (6.25%)   11 (7.59%)   7 (4.9%)
American

American      0.3%       0              1 (0.64%)    3 (1.875%)   2 (1.38%)    3 (2.1%)
Indian

Filipino                 27 (19.9%)     32 (20.5%)   30           22 (15.2%)   23 (16.2%)
                                                     (18.75%)
Non-          18.8%      16 (11.8%)     18 (11.5%)   19           30 (20.7%)   19 (13.4%)
Filipino                                             (11.87%)
Asian or
Pacific
Islander

Caucasian     31.2%      52 (38%)       57 (36.5%)   65 (40.6%)   48 (33%)     53 (37.3%)

Hispanic      31.8%      19 (14%)       22 (14%)     26           17 (11.7%)   28 (19.7%)
                                                     (16.25%)
Other                    4 (2.9%)       3 (2%)       4 (2.5%)     5 (3.4%)     9 (6.3%)

Unknown       5.3%       15 (11%)       12 (7.7%)    2 (1.25%)    10 (6.9%)    0




                                          17
Gender
           College   10/15/2011    10/15/2010   10/15/2009   10/15/2008   10/15/2007
           Wide
           2010
Female     54.9%     118           134          134          118          118
                     (86.76%)      (85.9%)      (83.75%)                  (83.1%)
Male       45.1%     18            22 (14.1%)   26           27           24 (16.9%)
                     (13.23%)                   (16.25%)
Age
           College    10/15/2011 10/15/2010 10/15/2009 10/15/2008 10/15/2007
           Wide
           2010
≤ 25       69.6%      32 (23.5%)   41 (26.3%)   45 (28%)     38 (26.2%)   39
years                                                                     (27.46%)
26-30      12.9%      24 (17.6%)   39 (25%)     41 (25.6%)   40 (27.6%)   33
years                                                                     (23.23%)
31-40      10%        31 (22.8%)   48 (30.8%)   48 (30%)     41 (28.3%)   36
years                                                                     (25.35%)
41-50      4.4%       11 (8%)      15 (9.6%)    21 (13%)     23 (15.9%)   28 (19.7%)
years
51-60      3%         3 (2.2%)     6 (3.85%)    2 (1.25%)    3(2.07%)     5 (3.5%)
Years
≥ 61                  1 (0.74%)    0            1 (0.625%)   0            0
years
Unknown               35 (25.7%)   7 (4.48%)    2 (1.25%)    0            1 (0.70%)


   Reports published by the Institute of Medicine and Nursing of the Future,

documented the need to transform nursing curriculum. The National League for

Nursing has also changed the competencies needed for graduates of associate

degree programs specifying less role-focused. The Quality and Safety Education

for Nurses (QSEN) competencies for nursing students in pre-licensure programs

have been established and needs to be incorporated throughout the nursing

program.

       In response to this, the nursing faculty aligned the pre-licensure nursing

knowledge, skills, and attitudes with the nursing curriculum and established

activities and tools to assist the students in acquisition of and practices and

contemporary competencies. Course assignments have been revised to reflect


                                         18
some of these changes, including new objectives to include some of the new

competencies identified. Teaching methodologies that are more student-focused

have been adopted as part of the nursing curriculum along with a focus on

concept based curriculum. The classroom is now more interactive stressing

collaboration between students and faculty.

   Responses to program review executive summary. SLOs have been

established for courses offered in the Health Sciences Department and are

assessed on-line each semester since spring 2011 for the nursing program. The

respiratory therapy began assessing SLOS online for courses offered in fall 2011

with the exception of RT 29. The SLOs were mapped to the ILOs. The Health

Sciences department now assesses course SLOs every semester online.

Changes made as a result of the nursing program SLO spring 2011data are

discussed in the Instructional Improvement section of the report. The data

collected in the nursing program’s systematic evaluation reports are analyzed

and trended. Based on the findings, decisions are made to revise, develop or

maintain the curriculum.

   The attendance at Advisory Board committee meetings has been limited even

though ample notice has been given. Reasons for the decreased attendance

include: the Advisory Board participants also have their own meetings (which the

Associate Dean and faculty attend), and not as many new graduates have been

hired due the downturn in the economy.

   Many of the areas of commendation from the previous Program Review are

being continued in a limited scope due to decreased grant funding.




                                       19
   Notable achievements since the last program review report was submitted

include:


    Most of the nursing courses have incorporated simulation activities and

       the Quality and Safety Education for Nursing (QSEN) competencies.

    Hiring a half-time Administrative Secretary for Health Sciences through

       grant funding in August 2010

    Positive feedback was received in an interim visit by the California Board

       of Registered Nursing. There was a concern with the limited number of

       full-time nursing faculty.

    A full-time Health Sciences counselor was hired for the first time in Fall

       2011.

    Doctor of Nursing Practice degrees were earned by two full-time members

       of the nursing faculty and the Associate Dean. Three part-time members

       of the nursing faculty have earned a master’s degree.

    Successful completion of the Fostering Student Success Grant and

       Department of Labor Grant.

There has been an acquisition of a number of grants to achieve the goals of the

department (see Appendix B):

     ADN to MSN Collaborative with California State University Dominguez

       Hills

    Specialty Grant to facilitate students obtaining employment.

    Allied Health Grant which increased enrollment in the Respiratory Therapy

       program


                                       20
     The database that facilitates retrieving information about nursing students

       has been operationalized.

     Supervised Tutorials have been operationalized.

     Community based Job Training Act for an on-line LVN to ADN program.

     Fostering Student Success Grant

Curriculum – Course and Program Content

  The content of the nursing program curriculum is guided by the criteria set

forth by the California Board of Registered Nursing (BRN) and the National

League for Nursing Accrediting Commission (NLNAC). The nursing program

curriculum is reflective of current trends in society and the philosophical

assumptions regarding the provision of care to individuals across the life span.

All full time faculty are integral members of the monthly curriculum committee

meetings. A calendar and a master plan serve as a base for discussions at

various committee meetings including the curriculum committee, systematic

evaluation committee, and nursing faculty meetings. The curriculum is the view

of the faculty and changes reflect current contemporary nursing practice along

with standards set by the regulatory and accrediting agencies. Data used from

internal sources to prompt changes within the curriculum are based upon findings

from student evaluations, graduate surveys, faculty recommendations and the

systematic evaluation plan results. Data retrieved from external sources include

student performance on standardized tests such as mid -curricular and HESI exit

exams, the licensure exam (NCLEX-RN) and employment agencies that serve on

our advisory board. The last curriculum revision was in 2001 and implemented in



                                         21
2002. The current curriculum will be under revision this spring with preparation

for the upcoming California Board of Registered Nursing and National League of

Nursing Accrediting Commission (NLNAC) site visits scheduled in 2014. Items of

discussion often include best teaching practices including use of technology,

national patient standards and Quality Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN)

competencies. The use of technology consists of campus lab simulations using

high tech fidelity patient simulators, computer software scenarios, virtual

Intravenous simulation i- clickers, internet, and library electronic resources.

   The current organizing frameworks are simple to complex and Orem’s Self

care model. Courses are sequenced based upon these models. During the first

semester, nursing students are introduced to normal physiological processes

associated with aging and universal self care requisites. The second semester

consists of common physical and psychological health deviations. Students

enrolled in the third semester focus on intermediate and advanced medical –

surgical nursing. Fourth semesters focus on developmental and maturational

needs of clients experiencing childbearing and childrearing. Also, the culmination

of fourth semester consists of a course to facilitate professional role transition.

Students focus on health promotion, wellness, illness prevention and health

maintenance throughout the curriculum.

   Specific concepts that increase in depth and complexity are listed as

horizontal and vertical threads throughout the curriculum exist in each course.

Horizontal threads provide the breadth needed and embrace the concept of

geriatrics, nutrition, and the nursing process. Vertical threads increase in




                                          22
complexity and include communication, health promotion and leadership.

Nursing courses are taken in a sequential manner and build upon previous

content. To facilitate student success each theory course has a clinical practice

component. Entrance and exit skills have been identified for each course. Each

course is a prerequisite for the next course. The nursing program objectives are

listed as terminal objectives and are consistent with overall goals of the

governing institution.

    Curriculum. (a) Currently, twelve nursing courses are required for the

Associate of Arts degree in nursing. Each of these courses is compressed into

short term courses ranging from 5 to 8 weeks in length. Nursing courses are

offered in a sequential manner with a clinical component. Thus, content in each

course facilitates acquisition of knowledge required to meet the program student

learning outcomes. The nursing program objectives are listed as terminal

objectives and are consistent with overall goals of the governing institution.

(b) The current organizing frameworks are simple to complex and Orem’s Self

care model. Courses are sequenced based upon these models. During the first

semester, nursing students are introduced to normal physiological processes

associated with aging and universal self care requisites. The second semester

consists of common physical and psychological health deviations. Students

enrolled in the third semester focus on intermediate and advanced medical –

surgical nursing. Fourth semesters focus on developmental and maturational

needs of clients experiencing childbearing and childrearing. Also, the culmination

of fourth semester consists of a course to facilitate professional role transition.




                                          23
Students focus on health promotion, wellness, illness prevention and health

maintenance throughout the curriculum.

   Specific concepts that increase in depth and complexity are listed as

horizontal and vertical threads throughout the curriculum exist in each course.

Horizontal threads provide the breadth needed and embrace the concept of

geriatrics, nutrition, and the nursing process. Vertical threads increase in

complexity and include communication, health promotion and leadership.

   Nursing courses are taken in a sequential manner and build upon previous

content. To facilitate student success each theory course has a clinical practice

component. Entrance and exit skills have been identified for each course. Each

nursing course is a prerequisite for the next course.

(c) Prerequisites courses consist of sixteen units to enter the nursing program.

These courses assist the student to acquire the skills and knowledge essential to

successfully complete the nursing program. These courses are: English 1,

Anatomy 1, Physiology 3, and Microbiology 1. The nursing program brochure

located in Appendix C shows the required prerequisites and course progression.

(d) The Santa Monica College nursing program has an articulation agreement

with California State University Dominguez for students to secure advanced

college degrees. This dual enrollment allows the student to pursue a Bachelors

of Science Degree and progress to obtain the Masters of Science Degree in

Nursing. This program would allow the student to ultimately secure the Masters

of Science degree over a four year period once entering the Santa Monica




                                         24
College program. This allows the nursing students to have a competitive edge in

today’s labor market.

(e) Upon completion of the nursing program, graduates receive their Associate

in Arts Degree – Nursing Major and are eligible to take the National Council

Licensure Examination (NCLEX) to become a Registered Nurse.

(f) Nursing 60/Health 60, Multicultural Health and Healing Practices fulfills the

A.A. degree global citizenship requirement of the college. This course is open to

all students. The nursing program maximizes utilization of its resources by

sharing simulation equipment and laboratory space with the respiratory therapy

program.

(g) Forty students are admitted to the beginning of the nursing program each

semester. In fall 2008 and spring 2009, fifty students were admitted to the

nursing program. This increase was due to the acquisition of the Enrollment

Growth and Retention Grant. Upon completion of the grant, the nursing program

returned to admitting forty students each semester due lack of adequate space

and clinical facilities. Typically, there is one section for each theory course with

several sections for the co-requisite clinical laboratory course. The instructor to

student ratio in theory courses is 1:40 and the clinical laboratory ratio is 1:10. The

majority of classes and clinical labs are offered during the day. Two clinical lab

sections are scheduled in the evening due to impacted scheduling at the

affiliating clinical facilities. Between fall 2007-fall 2009, the percentage of online

course offerings peaked at 7.4-12.7% due to the LVN-ADN hybrid online nursing




                                           25
program DOL grant. Most of the nursing classes are currently offered on-ground

with the exception of Nursing 17.

Instructional Improvement

   Activities to improve the teaching and learning environment. The

nursing program has engaged in new activities designed to improve the teaching

and learning environment, motivated in part by the Carnegie National Nursing

Education Study which called for a radical transformation of nursing education

(Benner et al.). The study examined three dimensions of nursing education and

formation: 1) the learning of theory and scientific methods; 2) the mastery of

skillful practice; and 3) the formation of professional identity and agency. While

the study recommendations have not been fully implemented at a state or

national level, the four key recommendations from the Carnegie study have

served as evidence-based guidelines for improving teaching and learning in the

Santa Monica College nursing program:


1) From a focus on covering decontextualized knowledge to an emphasis on
  teaching for a sense of salience, situated cognition and action in particular
  situations.

2) From a sharp separation of clinical and classroom teaching to an integration of
  the two.

3) From an emphasis on critical thinking to an emphasis on clinical reasoning
   and multiple ways of thinking.

4) From an emphasis on socialization and role-taking to an emphasis on
   formation.




                                         26
To this end, a major emphasis has focused on incorporating high-fidelity human

patient simulators to actively engage students in their learning and to provide a

student-centered learning environment. Five high-fidelity human patient

simulators have been purchased with Perkins funds and these simulators are

utilized in most of the core nursing courses in the curriculum that have theory and

clinical components. The simulation environment is a controlled environment,

free from distraction and interruption, where students can practice clinical

judgment, problem solving and multiple ways of thinking, without fear of harming

a real patient. Students work in small groups of 4-5 students assuming different

roles, promoting the type teamwork and collaboration expected in the clinical

setting. Each simulation session is followed by a period of debriefing and

reflection which is considered a best practice in simulation. The benefits of

simulated patients using high-fidelity simulation scenarios as a teaching

methodology include curriculum consistency, integration of theory and clinical,

and integration of advanced technologies in the educational process as

recommended by the National League for Nursing. Student evaluations of

simulation have been positive with the following data obtained from student

surveys: Student evaluations for simulations performed in 2010 indicate that

85% of student responses on the 14 evaluative statements were positive (49% -

strongly agree; 36% - somewhat agree). Only 5% of student responses to the

14 evaluative statements were negative (2% - strongly disagree; 3% - somewhat

disagree). The three statements with the most positive responses were: 1) “I

feel better prepared to care for real patients.” 2) “I was challenged in my thinking




                                         27
and decision making skills.” 3) “The instructor’s questions help me to think

critically”.

    A second major focus on improving the teaching and learning environment is

the ongoing integration of pre-licensure quality and safety competencies across

the nursing curriculum. The overall goal for the Quality and Safety Education for

Nurses (QSEN) national project is to meet the challenge of preparing future

nurses who will have the knowledge, skills and attitudes (KSAs) necessary to

continuously improve the quality and safety of the healthcare systems within

which they work. The six competencies are patient-centered care, teamwork and

collaboration, evidence-based practice, quality improvement, safety, and

informatics. The nursing faculty, in collaboration with Kaiser Permanente in a

service-academia partnership, created clinical activity templates (CATS) which

provide focused learning activities that address the desired KSAs. The CAT on

prevention of catheter associated urinary tract infection was presented at a

national QSEN conference in May of 2011 and was subsequently published on

the QSEN website (see Appendix D). The CAT also provides an opportunity for

students to develop the complex skills of clinical judgment and clinical reasoning

through guided reflective journaling assignments (based on the work of Christine

Tanner) with the goal of helping students to “think like a nurse”. The reflective

journaling assignments are submitted to the clinical instructor and returned with

written feedback and encouragement.

    Future plans to integrate informatics into the nursing curriculum for utilization

the skills lab and high-fidelity simulations have been made possible through the




                                          28
purchase of two mobile computing carts with laptop computers, allowing the

student integrate the electronic health record at the “patient’s” bedside and

administer medications using scanners for barcoded medication administration.

The purchase of this industry-standard technology was made possible through

Perkins IV grants, the SMC Margin of Excellence grant, and the Specialty Grant.

Most of the equipment in the skills lab has been purchased with grant funds.

Unfortunately, funding is not available to maintain equipment due to the criteria

for the permissible use of grant funds. This is problematic because the

equipment needs to be maintained or repaired.

   Student learning outcomes. The nursing program course SLOs (see

Appendix E) have been assessed online since spring 2011 and are assessed

each semester (see Appendices F & G). Some strategies the nursing program

uses to ensure the SLOs are assessed consistently across different sections of

the same course include the use of skills checklists, grading rubrics, pre-course

level meetings with clinical faculty teaching different sections of the same clinical

laboratory course and mentoring by the designated course lead instructor. In

addition, all core nursing theory courses that have a theory and clinical

companion course are currently taught mostly by full-time faculty, ensuring

consistency in assessing the SLOs.

   In general, most of the SLOs for nursing course have been met. Changes

have been made based upon the results of the assessed nursing course SLOs.

During fall 2011, the full-time nursing faculty analyzed SLO results from spring

2011and revised the SLOs as needed. The current Health Sciences SLOs are




                                         29
found in Appendix E. One major change in SLO assessment was a passing

grade of 75% on the comprehensive final examination for some of the medical-

surgical nursing courses with higher attrition rates (Nursing 15, 20 and 30).

Seventy-five percent was selected as the benchmark for these SLOs since this is

the minimum score required for a C grade in nursing courses. Beginning in spring

2012, students who score less than 75% on the comprehensive final exam will be

identified as at risk and referred to the Health Sciences nursing counselor to

develop a retention plan as described in retention policy and algorithm in the

Nursing Student Handbook. This retention plan includes mandatory attendance

at Nursing 900 supervised tutorials.

   Course outlines and course syllabi. Most core nursing theory courses that

have a theory and clinical companion course are currently taught by full-time

faculty, ensuring consistency between course outlines and course syllabi and

utilize e-companion for course syllabi materials. The full-time nursing faculty also

serves as Lead Instructors for the clinical component of the course, promoting

consistency among clinical faculty. Nursing courses such as Nursing 17 and

Nursing 36 have been taught by the same faculty for many years and are

consistent with implementing the course outlines of record.

   Professional development and scholarly activities. Faculty meets or

exceeds the continuing education hour/activities mandated by the BRN. Faculty

participates in conferences related to nursing practice, research and education.

Faculty has also participated in online and on ground training in simulation and

simulator technology. A Perkins funded curriculum workshop with a nationally




                                        30
recognized nursing curriculum consultant, Dr. Linda Caputi, and was attended by

full-time and several adjunct nursing faculty in winter 2012. The curriculum

workshops provided the structure and information needed to begin work on a

major curriculum revision for contemporary nursing practice.

   Since the last program review, nursing faculty has been recognized with a

number of professional awards which include:

Chair of Excellence—Eve Adler, Holly Thiercof, Ida Danzey

SMC Foundation Margin of Excellence—Vini Angel

National Black Nurses Association Trailblazer’s Award—Eric Williams

Sigma Theta Tau Odyssey Award—Joycelyn McDonald

Certificate of Congressional Recognition/Hispanic Nurses Association—Gloria

Lopez

Pilipino Nurses Association Award—Dinah Penaflorida

Certified Nurse Educator Certification – Anntippia Short, Vini Angel, Ida Danzey

Instructional Environment

   The full-time nursing faculty is six in number and is utilized in all the nursing

theory courses in the program as well as the clinical (laboratory) courses. Of

these 6 full-time (FT) nursing faculty, one faculty holds a split assignment

between the nursing program and Disabled Students Services and one is

currently working a reduced load assignment. The current nursing full-time

faculty FTE is 5.55 with 5 FT nursing faculty working overload assignments.

There are currently 23 part-time (PT) faculty employed in the nursing program

with most teaching in the clinical (lab) component of the course. The high




                                          31
percentage of PT faculty teaching in the clinical setting is needed since the ratio

of students to instructor in most clinical facilities cannot exceed 10:1. There are

currently 10 PT faculty with Associate Health Sciences Faculty status teaching in

the nursing program with one additional part-time Health Sciences faculty who is

eligible, The number of full-time FTEs and part-time FTEs from spring 2008-

spring 2011 is listed in Table 4:

Table 4
Comparison of FT and Hourly FTE
               Spring       Fall      Spring       Fall     Spring   Fall      Spring
               2008         2008      2009         2009     2010     2010      2011
Full-time
FTE*                6.49      6.99         5.96     5.925      5.825  6.206        6.18
Hourly FTE          7.95     8.436         9.44       9.5        7.6   7.92       7.116
Total FTE          14.44    15.426         15.4    15.425     13.425 14.126      13.296

*exceeds 5.55 FTEs due to FT faculty overload assignments

State regulations (CCR Sections 1424(g) and 1425.1) mandates the majority of

the nursing faculty be full-time. Nursing faculty, as defined by the BRN includes

full-time; part-time; hourly; long-term substitutes and joint-appointment (BRN

Statement on Faculty, August 2010). The nursing program is not in compliance

with this regulation.

   Full-time faculty have Lead Instructor and content expert responsibilities for

orienting, mentoring, and collaborating with the part-time faculty member on a

weekly basis to facilitate consistency of expectations and a unified approach to

teaching and learning. Part-time faculty are encouraged to attend and participate

in departmental activities such as weekly nursing department curriculum,

systematic evaluation, self- study, health sciences and nursing meetings. Part-

time faculty are provided with course syllabi and access to required textbooks,


                                            32
computers and teaching materials to ensure that program outcomes are

achieved. The faculty also has several full day workshops to evaluate program

goal achievement and address specific program needs such as faculty

development. Each full-time faculty has one vote in departmental and curriculum

decisions. Students and part-time faculty are encouraged to attend and

participate in developing policies and procedures during faculty meetings but do

not vote. Minutes of the meetings are recorded and distributed electronically to

all faculty.

      All full-time faculty have a minimum of a master’s degree while two have a

doctor of nursing practice degree. The Associate Dean of Health Sciences also

has a doctor of nursing practice degree. Full-time and part-time faculty

credentials meet regulatory and accrediting agency requirements (BRN and

NLNAC). Credentials of all personnel are commensurate with their teaching

assignments and course responsibilities. All faculties have attended workshops

and seminars to become current in the use of simulation in the field of nursing

education. Informatics and information technologies are integrated into each

course and are evaluated periodically to ensure support of program goals.

Non-nurse faculty and staff performance is regularly reviewed in accordance with

the policies of the governing organization. The load of full-time faculty currently

ranges from 15-16.625. The load factor for theory is 1.0 and clinical lab is 0.75.

   The nursing program is accountable not only to the institution but to the Board

of Registered Nursing and the National League for Nursing Accreditation. To

meet these obligations faculty engage in continuous systematic evaluation of




                                         33
program standards. In addition to customary responsibilities faculty work

independently to gather data and prepare reports. Two hour faculty meetings are

held weekly to work on accreditation standards.

   Full and part-time faculty and the administrator are active participants in the

governance of SMC including institutional efforts and activities such as college

committee participation. Faculty committee service and shared governance

participation includes: Department Chairs and Coordinators, Instructional Chairs,

Academic Senate, Faculty Association, Career Technical Education and Global

Citizenship. The administrator is an active member of the Academic Deans and

Personnel Policy committees.

   Partnerships with community agencies are developed and maintained to

promote excellence in nursing education. The health care requirements for

students and faculty have increased in complexity and have become more

stringent. Regulatory requirements such as criminal background checks, drug

testing, drug screening, healthcare requirements, and orientation to facilities and

clinical assessment of faculty annually, are all related to the increased

responsibilities of all Health Sciences Department personnel. Colleagues from

other disciplines in the college have been consulted and their input utilized during

curriculum development and informational meetings.

   The registered nursing program is located at the Bundy Campus. The

classrooms assigned to nursing faculty are equipped with multimedia technology.

Wireless and computer access for students is available in each classroom and in

the Skills and Simulation Labs. The Skills and Simulation Labs are large areas




                                         34
with low and high fidelity simulators, computers and other technologies that allow

students to practice in a safe environment and to learn to use patient electronic

health records. It contains informatics hardware, software and supplies for

patient care activities consistent with current professional knowledge.

Program Effectiveness

   Program outcomes/Program student learning outcomes. Prior to

establishing Program Student Learning Outcomes, the nursing program

identified program outcomes based on the standards/criteria of the accrediting

and approval agencies, National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission

and the California Board of Registered Nursing, respectively. The program

outcomes identified by the approving and accrediting agencies are job

placement, performance on licensure exam, program completion, and program

satisfaction (NLNAC). Criteria for SMC Program Review also include program

completion, job placement, performance on the licensure exam (inferred), course

success rates, and course retention rates. The program outcomes are part of the

ongoing systematic evaluation.

   Program outcome: Program completion. Nursing students completing the

program usually receive the Associate of Arts (AA) degree. However, students

who do not receive the AA can still be eligible to take the licensure exam

provided they have completed the courses that are part of the Total Curriculum

Plan on file with the BRN. The number of degrees awarded from fall 2007 to

spring 2011 range from 61-80 per year (see Table 5). Only two students have

opted not to receive the AA degree since 2007. The graduates of the nursing




                                        35
program are diverse and are representative of the students enrolled in Santa

Monica College. The highest percent of the graduates completing the program

between 2007 and 2011 were Caucasian, female, and completed the program

on-time. The age range has varied with each cohort of graduates (see Table 6).

For example, the graduates in 2007-2008 were in the 25 years or younger, in

2008-2009 most of the graduates were 26 to 30 year age range. Although the

majority of the graduates are female, the male graduates completing the nursing

program exceed the national average. According to data obtained from the

California Community College Chancellor’s Office (CCCCO), the award count

was 63 for 2007-2008. Two graduates completed the program in summer 2008.


Table 5
Number of AA Degrees Awarded
                   8/1/2010 -      8/1/2009 –       8/1/2008 -    8/1/2007 – 7/31/2008
                   7/31/2011       7/31/2010        7/31/2009
 # of Graduates    62              80               66            65
 # of AA Degrees 61                79               66            65
 # of Certificates 1               1                0             0
 Generic On time 53                60               34            34
 Advanced          0               13               10            15
 Placement
 30 Unit option*   1               0                0             0
 Readmitted        8               7                22            16


Table 6 Characteristics of Graduates
Ethnicity
                  8/1/2010 -      8/1/2009 –        8/1/2008 -     8/1/2007 –
                  7/31/2011       7/31/2010         7/31/2009      7/31/2008
 African American 3 (4.8%)        7 (8.75%)         6 (9.09%)      2 (3.07%)
 American Indian 1 (1.6%)         2 (2.5%)          1 (1.5%)       2 (3.07%)
 Filipino         7 (11.3%)       7 (8.75%)         10 (15.15%)    10 (15.38%)
 Non-Filipino     12 (19.4%)      17 (21.25%)       11 (16.66%)    7 (10.76%)
 Asian or Pacific
 Islander
 Caucasian        27* (43.5%)     32 (40%)          24 (36.36%)    23 (35.38%)


                                       36
                     8/1/2010 -      8/1/2009 –        8/1/2008 -      8/1/2007 –
                     7/31/2011       7/31/2010         7/31/2009       7/31/2008
 Hispanic            12 (19.4%)      10 (12.5%)        9 (13.63%)      18 (27.69%)
 Other                               3 (3.75%)         5 (7.57%)       3 (4.61%)
 Unknown                             2 (2.5%)                          0
 Total # of          62              80                66              65
 Graduates
*certificate awarded

Gender
                     8/1/2010 -      8/1/2009 –        8/1/2008 -      8/1/2007 –
                     7/31/2011       7/31/2010         7/31/2009       7/31/2008
 Female              52 (83.87%)     67 (83.75%        53 (80.30%)     54 (83%)
 Male                10 (16.13%)     13 (16.25%)       13 (19.7%)      11 (17%)

Age
                     8/1/2010 -      8/1/2009 –        8/1/2008 -      8/1/2007 –
                     7/31/2011       7/31/2010         7/31/2009       7/31/2008
 ≤ 25 yrs            16 (25.8%)      22 (27.5%)        15 (22.72%)     19 (29.2%)
 26 yrs to 30        18 (29          18 (22.5%)        22 (33.3%)      17 (26.2%)
 years
 31 yrs to 40 yrs    21 (33.87%)     25 (31.25%)       16 (24.2%)      18 (27.7%)
 41 yrs to 50 yrs    6 (9.67%)       15 (18.75%)       12 (18.18%)     9 (13.8%)
 51 yrs to 60 yrs    1 (1.6%)        0                 1 (1.5%)        2 (3.1%)
 ≥ 61 yrs            0               0                 0               0

   The retention and attrition of the nursing students are areas of concern for the nursing

faculty (see Table 7). The support services for the students have increased significantly for the

students enrolled in the program. Services such as intrusive counseling, identifying at-risk

students, remediation and tutorial course/activities, anxiety and stress reduction strategies, test-

taking strategies for nursing students, creation of a Counseling 20 for students interested in

nursing and respiratory therapy, etc. There has been an increase in the number of students

withdrawing for financial reasons and a number have changed their mind about pursuing

nursing because it was not what they expected. The characteristics of the students who are not

being successful are being examined. A retrospective study was done by Dr. Nathan Durdella

to identify the predictors of success for students who entered the nursing program in Nursing 10



                                         37
between fall 2004 to fall 2006 (n=118). The findings indicated that the best predictor of success

in the nursing program was performance on the assessment test. The assessment test for the

cohort reviewed was done after the students were accepted in the program and did not impact

their admission to the nursing program.

Table 7
Retention
                       8/1/2010 -       8/1/2009 –          8/1/2008 -       8/1/2007 –
                       7/31/2011        7/31/2010           7/31/2009        7/31/2008
 Scheduled on          89               89                  68               77
 admission to
 complete*
 Completed on          53               60                  42               35
 schedule
 Dropped out or        26               18                  21               27
 disqualified
 Still enrolled        8                11                  5                0
 Completed the         2                4                   0                15
 program but
 behind schedule
*number of students who should have completed the program within the timeframe in the header

  The completion rate for LVNs is higher than that of the generic student (see Table 8) and

is reflective of the motivation of these students to achieve their professional goals for

advancement of their education in their chosen career.

Table 8
Completion of LVNs from Fall 2006 to Fall 2010
 Semester           Semester             # of LVNs                     # & % of LVNs
 Admitted to        Graduated            Admitted                      Completing on
 Program                                                               Time
 Fall 2009          Fall 2010            0
 Spring 2009        Spring 2010          1                             1 = 100%
 Fall 2008          Fall 2009            12                            12 = 100%
 Spring 2008        Spring 2009          1                             1
 Fall 2007          Fall 2008            12                            9 =75%
 Spring 2007        Spring 2008          12                            11=91.9%
 Fall 2006          Fall 2007            4                             4= 100%
 Spring 2006        Spring 2007          0
                                         42                            38 = 90.4%



                                             38
   Program outcome/ program student learning outcome: Performance on licensure

exam. The graduates have the knowledge they need to pass the NCLEX Board exam as

assessed by meeting or exceeding the national mean on the licensure exam on the first

attempt.

   One of the 2008 standards for graduates of NLNAC accredited nursing programs is that the

licensure pass rate must be at or above the national mean for each graduating cohort for first-

time takers. It is significant to note that the state approval agency, California Board of

Registered Nursing (BRN), changed the minimum requirement for nursing programs to maintain

pass rate of seventy-five percent (75%) for first time licensing examination candidates pass rate

on the licensure exam in 2010. Prior to October 2010, the standard for nursing programs to

maintain was seventy percent (70%).

   The licensure (NCLEX) pass rate for graduates of the nursing program exceeded the level of

achievement set by the NLNAC that the pass rate is equal to or greater than the national

NCLEX mean for 8 out of 9 graduating cohorts since fall 2006. The NLNAC standard set for

NCLEX passage rate being at or above the national mean occurred in 2008. The SMC nursing

program has met or exceeded the national NCLEX mean for all graduating cohorts since fall

2007. The results of the licensure pass rate are identified in Table 9. The BRN minimum

standard has been greater than the minimum pass rate on the licensure exam for all graduating

cohorts. Although the pass rate for the spring 2007 cohort was 72. 20%, the minimum standard

was 70%. The variance for the NCLEX-RN pass rate in spring 2007 was related to a high

percentage of students failing in the third semester. As a result, Nursing 30 and Nursing 35

received special approval to offer these courses during the summer and winter sessions.

Based on the lack of success of these students, it confirmed the need to be consistent in the




                                         39
scheduling of core classes in the curriculum. Successful completion of the licensure exam

(NCLEX-RN) indicates that the graduate has met the minimum standards required to practice

safely as an entry level nurse. This program outcome/ program student learning outcome has

been met.

Table 9
Licensure Exam Rates for Cohorts
 Graduation     # of      Passed Failed   %                  %       National    National
    Cohort   Graduates                  Passed             Failed    Mean on     Mean on
                                                                     NCLEX *    NCLEX for
                                                                                  ADN*
 Spring       26          25      0            100%                 Not         Not
 2011                                                               Available   Available
 Fall 2010    36          34      1            97.14% 2.86%         87.41%      86.44%
 Spring       34          32      2            94.12% 5.88%
 2010
 Fall 2009    46          44      2            95.65% 4.35%         88.42%      87.61%
 Spring       31          31      0            100%
 2009
 Fall 2008    34          32      0            100%                 86.7%       86.2%
 Spring       27          23      2            92%        8%
 2008
 Fall 2007    39          33      5            86.84% 13.15%        85.5%       84.8%
 Spring       36          26      10           72.20% 27.77%
 2007
 Fall 2006    36          32      3            91.42% 8.57%
*Represents January 1 to December 31

   Program outcome/program student learning outcome: Be able to perform therapeutic

nursing interventions when providing nursing care as assessed by satisfactory performance in

the clinical practice setting in the Professional Role Transition course.

   Students have been successful in the Professional Role Transition course and there have

been only two failures, one in spring 2007 and one in spring 2008. This program student

learning outcome has been met.

    Program outcome/program student learning outcome: Have entry level nursing

 knowledge to provide care to clients across the developmental life span as assessed by


                                         40
successful completion of the nursing curriculum.

   The nursing faculty utilizes the findings from two external measures to determine whether

the graduates have the entry level knowledge to function as entry level staff nurses, NCLEX

Program Reports and reports from the HESI Exit Exam. The HESI Exit exam has a

recommended score of ≥ 900 and an acceptable performance score of 850 to 899. The mean

score for the HESI Exit has ranged from 804 to 848 for the pass five semesters (see Tables

10 & 11). The mean score has increased since a percentage of the course grade is based on

the performance of the student. The exam identifies students who will probably pass the

NCLEX exam without additional preparation. The students who were not successful on the

NCLEX exam scored poorly on the HESI Exit. In fall of 2010 the student who failed the

NCLEX licensure exam earned a score of 482, in spring 2010 the students who failed the

NCLEX licensure exam scored 564 and 542, and in fall 2009 the students who failed the

NCLEX licensure exam scored 673 and 773. See Appendix H for additional data from the

HESI Exit exam utilized by faculty to evaluate student performance and identify areas of the

curriculum that may need strengthening.

Table 10
Mean Score for HESI Exit Exam
 Semester        Number of            Mean Score of     National Mean
                 Students             Class             Score
 Spring 2011     26                   827               840
 Fall 2010       36                   824               840
 Spring 2010     34                   830               823
 Fall 2009       46                   848               823
 Spring 2009     31                   804               Not available
 Fall 2008       32                   769               Not available
 Spring 2008     27                   764               Not available
 Fall 2007       39                   741               Not available
 Spring 2007     38                   691               Not available
 Fall 2006       36                   765               Not available




                                      41
Table 11
Performance of Students on HESI Exit Exam

                                               HESI Exit Score

Semester Number           >900        850 -899     750-849     650-749     ≤ 649     NCLEX
          of                                                                         Pass Rate
          Students                                                                   for Cohort
Fall 2011 32              10 (32%)    3 (9%)       10 (32%) 6 (19%)        3 (9%)    Data not
                                                                                     available
Spring      26            6 (23%)     7 (27%)      4 (16%)     9 (35%)     0         100%
2011
Fall 2010   36*           7 (19%)     13 (35%)     7 (18%)     6 (16%)     3(8%)     97.14%

Spring      34            11 (33%)    5 (15%)      7 ( 1%)     8 (24%)     3 (9%)    94.12%
2010
Fall 2009   46            12 (26%)    10 (22%)     28 (39%) 4 (9%)         2 (4%)    95.65%



                                            HESI Exit Score
                  Number of      ≥ 850    750-849 650-749          ≤ 649       NCLEX Pass
                  Students                                                       Rate for
                                                                                  Cohort
Spring 2009          31       13(42%)    7(23%)      5(16%)      6(19%)        100%
Fall 2008             3       6          12          9 (28%)     5 (16%)       100%
                              (18%       (38%)
Spring 2008          27       4 (15%)    10          11 (41%)    2 (7%)        92%
                                         (37%)
Fall 2007            39       6 (16%)    12          10 (26%)    11            86.84%
                                         (31%)                   (28%)
Spring 2007          38       6 (16%)    10          4 (10%)     18            72.20%
                                         (26%)                   (47%)
Fall 2006            36       10         9 (25%)     8 (22%)     9 (25%)       91.42%
                              (28%)




                                         42
   Course success rates. A review of the data sent by Institutional Research and retrieved

from Cal-Pass assisted in examining the course success rates and retention rates. The

successful course completion rate for nursing has ranged from 82.3% (fall 2006) to 83.8% (fall

2010) with the highest completion rate of 88.1% (fall 2009). The department successful

completion rate range was 79.9% for fall 2006 and fall 2010, with the highest range of 82.9%

in fall 2008. The nursing program and department have consistently exceeded the highest

successful completion rate college-wide of 68.2% in 2010.

   The data in Cal-Pass allowed us to review the success rate by course (see Appendix I).

There were several courses that we reviewed, however the course that concerned the faculty

the most was Nursing 17-Pharmaocology. The range of the success for Nursing 17 is 56.05%

(2010) to 65.94% (2006). The faculty discussed having anatomy and physiology as

prerequisites to this class. A recommendation will be made to the Curriculum Committee to

have anatomy and physiology become prerequisites for this class. This change needs to

occur as soon as possible with the implementation of the new repeat policy in summer 2012.

   The success rate of Nursing 36 Calculations of Solutions was also discussed by faculty.

The success rate in Nursing 36 has ranged from 70.13% (2007-2008) to 80.75% (2006-2007).

The most recent date in Cal-Pass is 2009-2010 and the success rate is 75.88%. Perhaps a

prerequisite of an intermediate algebra level needs to be considered. A decision was not

made by the faculty regarding moving this recommendation forward.

 The review of the success rate by gender, time of day class offered, online/on ground, age

group, and ethnicity was also discussed. It was observed that the data regarding the 19 or

younger age group was probably not representative of students enrolled in the nursing

program. The success range for this age group was less than 50%. The 50 or older age group




                                      43
had a success rate of 66.7% (fall 2010) to 85.7% (fall 2008). The differences in success rates

by ethnicity and gender do not seem to be consistent. For example the success rate for

Blacks was 62.7% in fall 2007 but 86.1% in fall 2010 and for Hispanics the success rate was

75.3% for Hispanics in fall 2010 with the highest success rate of 85.8% and 85.2% in fall 2009

and 2006, respectively. The lowest success rate for nursing was in the area of

online/onground and time of day. The online successful course completion is 42.3% for fall

2010. The only course offered online at this time is Nursing 17- Pharmacology. However, the

nursing program offered Nursing classes online (hybrids) from fall spring 2007 to fall 2009,

and the range was 75% (fall 2006) to 81.9% (fall 2009).

   The retention rates of students enrolled in nursing courses range from 90.4% (fall 2006 to

91.8% (fall 2010), with the highest rate of 92.8% in fall 2008. The retention rate exceeds the

college-wide retention rate of 83.3%. The course with the lowest retention rate is Nursing 17 –

Pharmacology. The range is 70.49% in 2006-2007 to a high of 76.42% in 2008-2009. The

most recent retention rate is 71.75% in 2009-2010.

   Program outcome: Job placement. Job placement is a component of the ongoing

systematic evaluation for the nursing program. Prior to 2008 most of the graduates of the

program actually had jobs or job offers prior to their graduation date. Graduates in spring

2008 reported that they were having a hard time finding jobs and the facility liaisons were

reporting that the number of job opportunities was decreasing for new graduates. A number of

the affiliating hospitals were also pursuing Magnet status and were interested in hiring new

graduates with a Bachelor’s in Nursing. It was also noted that fewer recruiters came to the

recruitment workshops. Some of the factors impacting the hiring of new graduates are

decreased nurse vacancy rate of the facilities, decreased hospital bed capacity, fewer nurses




                                       44
retiring, nurses who were working part-time are now working full-time, the number of health

insured have declined and the number of under insured people have increased.

   In spring 2011 a survey link to Survey Monkey was sent to SMC graduates who

completed the program from 2006 to spring 2010 via email. The purpose of the survey was to

determine whether the graduates were able to get jobs as registered nurses and how long it

was taking to become employed. Ninety-three SMC graduates responded to the survey,

representing classes from spring 2006 to spring 2010 (see table12). The findings from the

survey in spring 2011 indicated that graduates are getting jobs but it is taking them a longer

time. Fifty-four percent of the graduates had jobs within 3 months of graduation, seventy-three

percent had a job within six months, and eighty-six percent had a job within 9 months.

Table 12
Job Placement Survey of SMC Graduates in March 2011

              Spring     Fall      Spring Fall       Spring Fall       Spring Fall       Spring
              2010       2009      2009   2008       2008   2007       2007   2006       2006
 # of         34         46        31     34         27     39         36     36         22
 Graduates
 # of      18      24      13               4      9      5      6      9      5
 Graduate  (19.4%) (25.8%) (14%)            (4.3%) (9.7%) (5.4%) (6.5%) (9.7%) (5.4%)
 Responses

             How many months after Graduation employed as an RN
 Employed <4       1-2      2-3        3-6      6-9       9                    Total
 as an RN Weeks    Months Months months Months Months
                                                          to a
                                                          year
 Yes      21.1%    14.5%    18.4%      19.7%    9.2%      2.6%                 65
 85.5%    N= 16    N= 11    N=14       N= 15    N= 7      N=2
 N= 65


   A survey via Survey Monkey was also done in February 2012 to determine the job

placement rate for the graduates in fall 2010 and spring 2011. The link to the survey was sent

to the graduates via email. A total of 36 responded to the survey with 24 of the respondents


                                       45
answered the question regarding employment as a Registered Nurse. Forty-one percent of

the graduates had a job as a Registered Nurse within 3 months, 48% within 6 months, 59%

percent within 9 months and 86% percent within one year (see Table 13).

Table 13
Job Placement Survey Responses of SMC Graduates in March 2012
                Spring     Fall 2010   Spring       Fall 2009               Spring
                2011                   2010                                 2009
 # of
 Graduates
 # of Graduate 33.3%       13.9 %      13.9%        33.3%                   5.6%
 Responses      N=12       N= 5        N=5          N=12                    N=2

             How many months after Graduation Employed as an RN
 Employed <4       1-2      2-3        3-6      6-9       9                      Total
 as an RN Weeks    Months Months months Months Months
                                                          to a
                                                          year
 Yes 24    17.2%   3.4      20.7%      6.9%     10.3%     27.6%                  82.8%
           N=5     N=1      N=6        N=2      N =3      N=8                    N=24
 No 5                                                                            17.2%
 7 skipped
 question


   The trend toward new graduates taking longer to get a job is a state and national issue.

The factors for the decline in the hiring of new graduates are similar, but the impact is slightly

different by regions. Three organizations have conducted surveys to determine the job

placement rate of new graduates. One of the organizations is National Student Nurse

Association (NSNA); the second organization is California Institute of Nursing and Health

Care (CINHC), a state organization; and the third is the California Organization of Associate

Degree Nursing Organization. NSNA has conducted a national survey of new graduates since

spring 2008 to spring 2012 and CINHC and COADN have conducted a statewide survey for

the past two years. The results for the survey by COADN are not available because the

survey is still in progress.


                                        46
   The surveys conducted nationally were done three to four months after spring graduations.

The findings indicated that 64% (n=2331) of the new graduates were employed within four

months of graduation, a 10% increase from the 2010 survey. The findings also indicated that

there was a slightly higher percent of baccalaureate graduates, 68%, acquiring jobs compared

to the associate degree nurse graduates, 61%. Tables 14-16 are used with the permission of

Dr. Diane Mancino given via email on February 9, 2012 and were retrieved on March 15,

2012 from http://www.ajj.com/services/publishing/deansnotes/nov11.pdf .

   The findings from the CINHC survey indicated that 57% of new graduates had employment

as a Registered Nurse with 70% and 71% receiving employment within 3 months of

graduation. However, the percent of new graduates from baccalaureate programs being

employed as Registered Nurses was 62% compared to the associate degree of 58%

employed as Registered Nurses. The results of the surveys conducted in California by

California Institute of Nursing and Health Care (CINHC) are in Table 15.

   The survey data from COADN for spring 2011 indicated that 88.9% of the graduates had

jobs. This percent is probably higher because 79 of the graduates who responded to the

survey were from the classes of fall 2007 and other. The survey data for COADN is found in

Table 16.




Table 14
Percentage of 2011 New RN Graduates Employed by Type of Nursing Program*
 Employed       Associates    Diploma        Baccalaureate Baccalaureate Total
 as an RN       Degree                       Generic         Accelerated
 Yes            61% (864)     69% (117)      68% (1,150)     54% (200)        64% (2,331)
 No             39% (543)     31% (52)       32% (531)       47% (177)        36% (1,303
 Total          1,407         169            1,681           377              3,634
*Does not include small percentage of generic master’s and generic doctorate graduates.


                                      47
Percentage of Spring 2011 New RN Graduates Employed by Type of Nursing Program*
 Employed       Associates    Diploma        Baccalaureate Baccalaureate
 as an RN       Degree                       Generic         Accelerated
 Yes            61% (737)     76% (69)       68% (1,034)     63% (107)
 No             33% (371)     24% (22)       28% (395)       37% (63)
 Total          1,108         91             1,429           170
*Does not include small percentage of generic master’s and generic doctorate graduates.

Percentage of   New RN Graduates Employed by Region, 3-4 Months Post-Graduation (2009-
2011)
 Year           South         West           Northeast     Central
 2009           69%           41%            50%           60%
 2010           64%           41%            50%           60%
 2011           70%           55%            61%           72%


Table 15
Results of CINHC Surveys
 Newly licensed RNs in CA from April 2010 to August 2011
 # of possible   # of              ADN Graduates Bachelors             Masters
 respondents     respondents                                           Prepared
 7,890           1492 (19%)        57%               40%               3%
                 58% graduated
                 in 2010 and
                 42% in 2011
 Newly licensed RNs in CA from January 2009 to March 2010
 7,000           973 (14%)         61%               36%               1%
                  44% graduated
                 in December
                 2009 and 37%
                 graduated in
                 May/June 2009


Percent of New Graduates Employed as Registered Nurses
                 Overall         ADN Graduates Bachelors               Masters
                                                                       Prepared
 2010-2011         57%               54% N=458       62% N= 364        60% N = 22
 2009-2010         57%               No data         No data           No data


How long did it take to secure employment?


                                      48
              < 3 months    3 to 6          6 to 9        9 to 12      >12
                            months          months        months       months
 2010-2011     40%          30%             15%           10%          6%
 2009-2010     45%          26%             Not asked     Not asked    Not asked
Employment Rate as a New Graduate RN by Region
 San Francisco   Los               Orange/Riverside San Diego Area    San Joaquin
 Bay Area        Angeles/Ventura & San                                Valley
                 Area              Bernardino
                                   Counties
 27%             24%               15%                10%             7%
 25%             25%               12%                12%             No Data

Greater          Other Areas
Sacramento
Area
6%
No Data


Table 16
Results of COADN (Statewide) ADN Graduate Employment Survey April 2011
             Spring Fall      Spring Fall    Spring Fall     Other       Total
             2010    2009     2009   2008    2008    2007
 # of        40.5% 23.6% 21.6% 3.1%          2%      2.7%    6.4%        846
 Graduate    N=      N=       N=183 N =26 N = 17 N =23 N = 54            15
 Responses 343       200                                                 skipped
                                                                         question


861 graduates responded to survey
                    How many months after Graduation employed as an RN
 Employed      <4        1-2      2-3         3-6       6-9        9 Months      Other
 as an RN      Weeks     Months   Months      months    Months     to a year
 Yes 88.9% 21%           13%      12.6%       24.1%     10.8%      4%            1%
 N = 591       N = 140   N = 87   N= 84       N = 161   N = 72     N = 40        N=7
 No
 11.1%
 N=74

Total # of
Responses
665 (196
respondents
omitted
question



                                   49
Advisory Boards

   The Nursing Program Advisory Board consists of the affiliated programs

(medical centers, clinics, and community programs) at which SMC nursing

students’ complete clinical lab experiences, and other interested community

agencies. In addition, all Nursing Program faculty and administrators are

encouraged to attend. Advisory Board meetings are held each semester.

Meeting dates are established by the Associate Dean and invitations are sent to

all parties.

   The meetings typically include updates to the affiliates about current status

and changes in contracts/grants, skills lab improvements, NCLEX-RN licensing

exam pass rates, and results of the graduate student surveys. The affiliating

programs provide news of changes in policies, safety goals, hiring practices, and

other needs. The attendees discuss timely issues regarding nursing practice,

industry trends, and how the nursing program can address the needs of the

affiliated programs and the industry in general. For example, in the fall 2010

meeting the affiliated programs discussed changes in hiring practices and the

necessity for graduates to demonstrate “soft skills” during interviews. They also

shared that faculty letters of recommendation with specific details of the

graduates’ abilities are important to the selection process. In response to this

information, the nursing program established new guidelines for letters of

recommendation. The Student Nursing Association provided a seminar on

resume preparation and interview skills and this content is also included in the

capstone course (Nursing 50). The affiliated programs were pleased with the




                                        50
news that the nursing program emphasizes QSEN competencies, which reflect

the most recent concerns and trends of industry.

  Attendance by the affiliated programs has declined, as noted in past Program

Review reports. Faculty and the Associate Dean have speculated on possible

reasons for this trend including: 1) the hospitals are hiring fewer new graduates

due to the current economic climate and therefore are less focused on nursing

training programs; and 2) affiliate programs are meeting the traditional advisory

committee function through other activities such as instituting mandatory

meetings for affiliating faculty. Faculty is required to attend meetings each

semester at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center and yearly at Cedars Sinai Medical

Center. The information previously disseminated and discussed at the Advisory

Board meetings, is now shared with the nursing program at these meetings held

by each affiliated program.

   The SMC nursing program shares a strong, reciprocal relationship with the

affiliated programs. We continue to evaluate information received from the

affiliates and assess the necessity to alter and expand aspects of the nursing

program as needed. We will maintain our efforts to increase industry attendance

at our Advisory Board Meetings. Minutes from the Advisory Meetings are found

in Appendix J.

Conclusions & Recommendations

Based upon the findings of the program review, the Health Sciences faculty

makes the following recommendations:




                                         51
   Submit a letter of intent to the Board of Registered Nursing to begin a
    major nursing curriculum revision during spring 2012.

   Continue to request two additional full-time nursing faculty positions in
    order to comply with the BRN Statement on Faculty which requires the
    majority of nursing faculty a full-time.

   Continue to request additional reassigned time for the Assistant
    Director Nursing Program/Faculty Leader Health Sciences.

   Health Sciences Faculty Leader needs to provide input to the proposed
    Load Factor Study committee with the recommendation of increasing
    the load factor from 0.75 to 1.0 due to the increased complexity and
    responsibility of the clinical laboratory courses.

   Nursing Curriculum Committee needs to examine if Anatomy 1 and
    Physiology 3 should be to pre-requisite courses for Nursing 17
    (Pharmacology) in order to promote student retention and success in
    this course. In addition, a prerequisite math course of needs to be
    considered in consultation with the Math department to determine the
    appropriate pre-requisite course for Nursing 36 (Drug Dosage
    Calculations). Further data needs to be collected regarding the
    characteristics of the students enrolled in Health 61.

   Revise the nursing program outcomes to better align with each ILOs.
    Revise the program student learning outcomes to better reflect the
    assessment measure being used.

   Need to assess SLOs for RT courses offered at SMC that were not
    previously assessed.

   District planning needs to consider funding for equipment maintenance
    and repair.

   The nursing program received a Specialty Grant in the amount of
    $222,015 from the Chancellor’s office. The focus of the grant was to
    provide courses that would increase the chances of employment for
    the new graduate nurse. Additional classes were provided through
    continuing education beyond the pre-licensure program in
    electrocardiogram (EKG) interpretation and Advanced Cardiac Life
    Support (ACLS). An attempt was made to offer cultural competency,
    geriatrics, and physical assessment, but these classes did not fill.

   Students are encouraged to apply for acceptance to BSN programs
    prior to completing the nursing program.



                                  52
   Students are encouraged to volunteer at selected clinical facilities prior
    to graduation to increase the likelihood of obtaining a nursing position.

   Students are encouraged to pursue non-traditional employers such as
    skilled nursing facilities, behavioral treatment facilities, and clinics and
    to take per diem jobs a registered nurse.

   Currently efforts are being made to acquire funding to create
    transitional programs in partnership with the nursing program’s
    affiliating agencies.




                                   53
                                    Appendix A



      California Board of Registered
                 Nursing
            2010-2011 Annual School Survey


Definition List
The following definitions apply throughout the survey whenever the word or
phrase being defined appears unless otherwise noted.

• Accelerated Program: An Accelerated Program's curriculum extends over a
shorter time-period than a traditional program. The curriculum itself may be the
same as a generic curriculum or it may be designed to meet the unique learning
needs of the student population.

• Active Faculty: Faculty who teach students and have a teaching assignment
during the time period specified. Include deans/directors, professors, associate
professors, assistant professors, adjunct professors, instructors, assistant
instructors, clinical teaching assistants, and any other faculty who have a current
teaching assignment.

• Adjunct Faculty: Faculty employed to teach a course in a part-time and
temporary capacity.

• Advanced Placement Students: Pre-licensure students who entered the
program after the first semester/quarter. These students include LVNs,
paramedics, military corpsmen, and other health care providers, but do not
include students who transferred or were readmitted.

• Assembly Bill 1559 Criteria: Requires California Community College (CCC)
districts to adopt and implement merit-based admissions policies for nursing
programs if, for any academic term, there are more applicants seeking
enrollment in that program than may reasonably be accommodated. Criteria
include (1) academic degrees, diplomas, or relevant certificates held by an
applicant, (2) GPA in relevant course work, (3) any relevant work or volunteer
experience, (4) life experiences or special circumstances including but not limited
to: disabilities, low family income, 1st generation of family to attend college, need
to work, disadvantaged social or educational environment, difficult personal and


                                         54
family situations or circumstances, refugee or veteran status, and (5) additional
criteria such as personal interview, a personal statement, letter of
recommendation, or the number of repetitions of prerequisite classes or other
criteria, as approved by the chancellor.

• Attrition Rate: The total number of generic students dropped or disqualified
who were scheduled to complete the program between August 1, 2010 and July
31, 2011, divided by the total number of generic students enrolled who were
scheduled to complete during the same time period.

• Census Data: Number of students enrolled or faculty present on October 15,
2011.

• Clinical Placement: A cohort of students placed in a clinical facility or
community setting as part of the clinical education component of their nursing
education. If you have multiple cohorts of students at one clinical facility or
community setting, you should count each cohort as a clinical placement.

• Clinical Simulation: Clinical simulation provides a simulated real-time nursing
care experience using clinical scenarios and low to hi-fidelity mannequins, which
allow students to integrate, apply, and refine specific skills and abilities that are
based on theoretical concepts and scientific knowledge. It may include
videotaping, de-briefing and dialogue as part of the learning process.

• Collaborative/Shared Education: A written agreement between two or more
nursing programs specifying the nursing courses at their respective institutions
that are equivalent and acceptable for transfer credit to partner nursing
programs. These partnerships may be between nursing programs offering the
same degree or between an entry degree nursing program(s) and a higher
degree nursing program(s). These later arrangements allow students to progress
from one level of nursing education to a higher level without the repetition of
nursing courses.

• Completed on Schedule Students: Students scheduled on admission to
complete the program between August 1, 2010 and July 31, 2011.

• Contract Education: A written agreement between a nursing program and a
health care organization in which the nursing program agrees to provide a
nursing degree program for the organizations' employees for a fee.

• Distance Education: Any method of presenting a course where the student
and teacher are not present in the same room (e.g. internet web based,
teleconferencing, etc.).

• Donor Partners: Hospitals or other entities that fund student spaces within your
nursing program, including contract education arrangements.



                                         55
• Entry-level Master's (ELM): A master's degree program in nursing for students
who have earned a bachelor's degree in a discipline other than nursing and do
not have prior schooling in nursing. This program consists of pre-licensure
nursing courses and master's level nursing courses.

• Evening Program: A program that offers all program activities in the evening
i.e. lectures, etc. This does not include a traditional program that offers evening
clinical rotations.

• Full-time Faculty: Faculty that work 1.0 FTE, as defined by the school.

• Generic Pre-Licensure Students: Students who entered the program in the
first nursing course.

• Hi-Fidelity Mannequin: A portable, realistic human patient simulator designed
to teach and test students’ clinical and decision-making skills.

• LVN 30 Unit Option Students: LVNs enrolled in the curriculum for the 30-unit
option.

• LVN to BSN Program: A program that exclusively admits LVN to BSN
students. If the school also has a generic BSN program, the LVN to BSN
program is offered separately or differs significantly from the generic program.

• Part-time Faculty: Faculty that work less than 1.0 FTE and do not carry a full-
time load, as defined by school policy. This includes annualized and non-
annualized faculty.

• Readmitted Students: Returning students who were previously enrolled in
your program.

• Retention Rate: The total number of generic students who completed the
program between August 1, 2010 and July 31, 2011 divided by the total number
of generic students enrolled who were scheduled to complete during the same
time period.

• Shared Faculty: A faculty member is shared by more than one school, e.g. one
faculty member teaches a course in pediatrics to three different schools in one
region.

• Students Dropped or Disqualified: Students who have left the program prior
to their scheduled completion date occurring between August 1, 2010 and July
31, 2011.

• Time Period for the Survey: August 1, 2010 - July 31, 2011. For those schools



                                         56
that admit multiple times a year, combine all student cohorts.

• Traditional Program: A program that offers most courses and other required
program activities on weekdays during business hours. Clinical rotations for this
program may be offered on evenings and weekends.

• Transfer Students: Students in your programs who have transferred nursing
credits from another pre-licensure program. This excludes RN to BSN students.

• Validated Prerequisites: The nursing program uses one of the options
provided by the California Community College Chancellor's Office for validating
prerequisite courses.

• Waiting List: A waiting list identifies students who qualified for the program,
were not admitted in the enrollment cycle for which they applied, and will be
considered for a subsequent enrollment cycle without needing to reapply.

• Weekend Program: A program that offers all program activities on weekends,
i.e. lectures, clinical rotations, etc. This does not include a traditional program
that offers clinical rotations on weekends.




                                         57
                                           Appendix B


Grants and Categorical Awarded to Nursing Program from 2005 to 2012

  1. ADN Enrollment Growth (State Chancellor’s Office)
Year 1      Year 2             Year 3        Year 4        Year 5        Year 6         Total

2005-2006   2006-2007          2007-2008     2008-2009     2009-2010     2010-2012      2005-2012

$57,868     57,142             $157,529      $280,634      $357,463      $321,874       $1,232,510

  2. ADN to MSN Grant (State Chancellor’s Office)
Year 1       Year 2            Total
2008-2009    2009-2010         2007-2010
$58,521      $91,479           $150,000

  3. Community Based Job Training Grant (DOL/ETA)
Year 1        Year 2             Year 3         Year 4        Year 5        Total
2005-2006     2006-2007          2007-2008      2008-2009     2009-2010     2005-2009
14,505        514,443            323,770        245,589       295,135       1,393,442

  4. Fostering Student Success Grant (Governor’s 15% WIA)
Year 1       Year 2            Year 3          Year 4         Year 5         Total
2005-2006    2006-2007         2007-2008       2008-2009      2009-2010      2005-2010
$219,702     $217,990          $219,209        $217,051       $217,990       $1,091,942

  5. Nursing Equipment Grant (State Chancellor’s Office)
Year                   Total
2008-2009              2008-2009
$73,795                $73,795

  6. Readiness Activities, Referral, and Counseling for two Career Technical
     Education Programs (SMC Basic Skills Initiative/State BSI funding)
Year 1                 Total
2009-2010              2009-2010
$37,550                $37,550

  7. RN Specialty Grant (Governor’s 15% WIA)
Year 1                 Year                      Total
2009-2011                                        2009-2011
$222,015                                         $222,015




                                                58
     8. Scholarship for Disadvantage Students (HRSA)
Year             Year           Year                              Year          Total
2007-2008        2008-2009      2009-2010      2010-2011          2011-2012     2007-2012
$27,000          $0             $6,000         $0                 $41,674       $74,674



     9. VTEA Allocations (SMC CTE Committee/State VTEA funds)
Year 1         Year 2        Year 3         Year 4          Year 5          Year 6

2005-2006      2006-2007     2007-2008      2008-2009       2009-2010       2010-2011      2011-2012
Not            Not           Not
Available      Available     Available      $25,267         $48,051.11      $3,000         $17,887



Total External Funding 2005-2012
                                                                            Total Funding
Funding Source                                                                2005-2012
1.    ADN Enrollment Growth (State Chancellor’s Office)                       $1,232,510
2. ADN to MSN Grant (State Chancellor’s Office)                               $150,000
3. Community Based Job Training Grant (DOL/ETA)                               $1,393,442
4. Fostering Student Success Grant (Governor’s 15% WIA)                       $1,091,942
5. Nursing Equipment Grant (State Chancellor’s Office)                         $73,795
6. Readiness Activities, Referral, and Counseling for two
   Career Technical Education Programs (SMC Basic
   Skills Initiative/State BSI funding)                                        $37,550
7. RN Specialty Grant (Governor’s 15% WIA)                                    $222,015
8. Scholarship for Disadvantage Students (HRSA)                                $74,674
9. VTEA Allocations (SMC CTE Committee/State VTEA
   funds)                                                                      $94,205
                                                          Total               $4,370,133




                                              59
                                                             Appendix C
                                                      Required Nursing Courses
                                                                        3rd Term/Semester (10 units)
1 st Term/Semester (8 units)                                            First 8 weeks
First 8 weeks                                                           Prerequisites: Nursing 25/25L, Nursing 16,
Nursing 10, Nursing Skills (2)                                          Nursing 28, Nursing 17
Nursing 10L, Nursing Skills Laboratory (2)                              Nursing 30, Intermediate Med/Surgical
Nursing 36, Dosage Calculations
                                                                        Nursing (2.5)
Second 8 weeks                                                          Nursing 30L, Intermediate Med/Surgical
Prerequisites: Nursing 10/10L, Nursing 36                               Nursing Laboratory (2.5)
Nursing 15, Nursing Fundamentals (2)                                    Second 8 weeks
Nursing 15L, Nursing Fundamentals Laboratory (2)                        Prerequisites: Nursing 30, Nursing 30L
                                                                        Nursing 35, Advanced Medical/Surgical Nursing
2nd Term/Semester (9 units)                                             (2.5)
First 8 weeks                                                           Nursing 35L, Advanced Medical/Surgical
Prerequisites: Nursing 20/20L                                           Nursing Laboratory (2.5)
Nursing 25, Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing (1.5)
Nursing 25L, Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing                          4th Term/Semester (9 units)
 Laboratory (1.5)                                                       Prerequisites: Psychology 19, Nursing 35/35L
Nursing 28, Community-Based Nursing (1) Concurrent                      Nursing 40, Nursing of Children/ Pediatrics (1.5)
 with N25/25L +                                                         Nursing 40L, Nursing of Children/Pediatrics
Nursing 16, Physical Assessment (1) Concurrent with
     N25/25L +                                                          Laboratory (1.5)
                                                                        Nursing 45, Maternal/ Infant Nursing (1.5)
                                                                        Nursing 45L, Maternal/Infant Nursing
                                                                        Laboratory (1.5)
                                                                        Prerequisites: All other coursework in approved
                                                                        nursing curriculum
                                                                        Nursing 50, Professional Role Transition (1)
                                                                        Nursing 50L, Professional Role Transition
                                                                        Laboratory (2)
                                                                        71 TOTAL UNITS
                                                                        •
                                                                        All courses in the approved nursing
                                                                        curriculum must be passed with a
                                                                        minimum “C” grade to remain in the
                                                                        program, progress to the next course,
                                                                        graduate and apply for licensure.
                                                                        Prerequisites to a nursing course must be
                                                                        completed prior to entry into designated
                                                                        class. Some courses can be taken prior to
                                                                        entry into designated class.
                                                                        SMC ADN requirements must be taken prior
                                                                        to graduation.
                                                                        Visit SMC Counseling Department’s website
                                                                        for detailed articulation information:
                                                                        www.smc.edu/transfer/articulation
                                                                60
                                                                                               Appendix D

 Class Title: Intermediate Medical Surgical Nursing
 QSEN Category: Evidence-Based Practice
 Definition: Integrate best current evidence with clinical expertise and patient/family preferences and values for delivery of optimal
health care.
 Course/Clinical Objectives:
        Act as a patient advocate by recognizing and reporting concerns regarding quality of care, and ethical or legal dilemmas encountered in
         practice.
        Predict nursing assistance required for the patient with selected health deviations using an analytical approach.
     
 KNOWLEDGE Competency:                                                       SKILL Competency:                              ATTITUDE Competency:
 Describe reliable sources for locating                                      Participate in structuring the work            Appreciate strengths and weaknesses of
 evidence reports and clinical practice                                      environment to facilitate integration of new   scientific bases for practice
 guidelines                                                                  evidence into standards of practice




                                                    Clinical Expectations:
 Associated QSEN Activity:                                                   Associated QSEN Activity:                      Associated QSEN Activity:
 Go to the CDC website and review the                                        Select a client for patient care that has an   In seminar/post-conference, be prepared to
 summary recommendations for                                                 indwelling catheter.                           discuss why EBP nursing interventions are
 "Prevention & Control of Catheter-                                                                                         bundled together.
 Associated Urinary Tract Infections                                         Locate hospital-specific policy &
 (UTI)".                                                                     procedures for care of a patient with an       In post-conference, explain
                                                                             indwelling catheter.                           the rationale for implementing the CAUTI
 Bring a list of the CAUTI prevention                                                                                       prevention bundle.
 bundle to the clinical site to compare with                                 Perform the EBP bundle of interventions at
 local policy & procedures.                                                  the start of shift and at regular intervals    What are the legal or financial implications
                                                                             throughout the day.                            of poor outcomes in this area?

                                                                             Document your interventions per hospital       Submit a self-reflective journal entry to your
                                                                             policy.                                        clinical instructor describing a situation
                                                                                                                            where you applied evidence-based practice in
                                                                                                                            the care of your patients this week.


                                                                                        61
                                  Appendix E
                  Health Sciences Student Learning Outcomes

HEALTH       Structurally analyze medical terms by dividing words into their component parts
61       1   and discuss the words used for physiology and pathophysiology as related to          20112   99999
             each body system. As assessed by: Quizzes, midterm and final exams.
             Choose correctly among a group of given terms to describe common medical
HEALTH       procedures, diseases, treatments, diagnoses, prognoses or tests. As assessed
         2                                                                                        20112   99999
61           by: Take home real patient case studies which require dictionary research,
             spelling, pronunciation, and the evaluation of medical data contained therein.
             Compose a short written essay about a chosen body system, disease,
HEALTH       procedure, or test. As assessed by: Classroom small group activities to create
         3                                                                                        20112   99999
61           short case studies with presentation to the class with correct pronunciation and
             use of terms.
HEALTH       Correctly evaluate, explain and analyze the medical terms. Interpret and
         4                                                                                        20112   99999
61           explain a sample medical record. As assessed by: Case study.
HEALTH       Correctly spell and pronounce common medical words and phrases. As
         5                                                                                        20112   99999
61           assessed by: Quizzes and case studies
HEALTH       Recognize and effectively use common medical abbreviations and medical
         6                                                                                        20112   99999
61           jargon. As assessed by: Quizzes and exams
HEALTH       Analyze, construct and pronounce medical terms specific to the body
         7                                                                                        20112   99999
61           systems/organs. As assessed by: Quizzes and small group activities
HEALTH       Effectively utilize a medical dictionary and analyze material found in a medical
         8                                                                                        20112   99999
61           text or journal. As assessed by: Case studies
NURSNG       Apply theoretical concepts of nursing skills essential to providing care to the
         1                                                                                        20111   99999
10           geriatric client. As assessed by: Items on unit exams
NURSNG       Utilize the nursing process as a basis for critical thinking in providing nursing
         2                                                                                        20111   99999
10           care As assessed by: Group Activity
             Demonstrate psychomotor skills essential to providing safe and effective
NURSNG
         1   nursing care in the Health Sciences Laboratory setting As assessed by; Skills        20111   99999
10L
             Checklist
NURSNG       Provide basic nursing care to older adults in a non acute (Geriatric) setting. As
         2                                                                                        20111   99999
10L          assessed by: Care Plans
             Utilizing Orem’s self-care model students will calculate the therapeutic self-care
NURSNG       demand for patients requiring surgical intervention, experiencing deviations of
         1                                                                                        20111   99999
15           fluid balance, genito-urinary dysfunction, and oxygenation needs. As assessed
             by: Score of 75% or greater on the comprehensive final exam, case scenarios.
             Utilizing the five step nursing process, students will be able to apply critical
NURSNG       thinking skills to care for the chronically ill and diverse populations. As
         2                                                                                        20111   99999
15           assessed by: Score of 75% or greater on the comprehensive final exam , case
             scenarios.
             Utilizing Orem’s self-care model students will develop a plan of care for a
NURSNG
         1   patient in the clinical setting in order to promote self care/ and or maintenance.   20111   99999
15L
             As assessed by: long-form written care plan, clinical evaluation tool.
             Utilizing the five step nursing process, students will be able to apply critical
NURSNG       thinking principles and utilize psychomotor skills when delivering care to a
         2                                                                                        20111   99999
15L          patient. As assessed by: observation of patient care assignments,
             communication, evaluation criteria.
             Describe fundamental physical assessment techniques, including
NURSNG
         1   measurement of vital signs. As assessed by: Return demonstration of physical         20111   99999
16
             assessment techniques learned.
             Discuss gerontological considerations for each body system, with a focus on
NURSNG
         2   identifying normal-age related variations for each body system. As assessed          20111   99999
16
             by: A cumulative score of 75% or greater on the weekly quizzes.
             Enable the student to recognize the various classes of drugs used in modern
NURSNG
         1   medicine. Assessed by: Score of 75% or greater on the objective exams and            20111   99999
17
             quizzes
             Review anatomy and physiology, how drugs exert their effects, the major
NURSNG       indication for drug use, routes of administration, expected and adverse drug
         2                                                                                        20111   99999
17           effects, precautions and contraindications. As assessed by: Score of 75% or
             greater on the objective exams and quizzes.
             Utilize Orems self care-model, the nursing process and Quality Safety
NURSNG       Education for Nurses competencies in the development of a plan of care for a
         1                                                                                        20121   99999
19           client with selected health deviations. As asessed by: Exam , Nursing Care
             Plan , Reflective Journaling
NURSNG       Utilize principles of critical thinking and the nursing process in analyzing
         2                                                                                        20121   99999
19           communication data and acid -base imbalances in desiging plans of care for




                                               62
             case study clients. As Assessed by: Exam and Nursing Care Plan, Reflective
             Journaling
             Utilizing Orem's Self-Care Model and the Nursing Process, students will assess
             the therapeutic self-care requisites of adults and older adults with acid-base
NURSNG
         1   and electrolyte imbalances, and endocrine, peripheral vascular,                      20111   99999
20
             musculoskeletal and sensory disorders. As assessed by:Score of 75% or
             greater on the comprehensive final exam.
NURSNG       Utilizing principles of critical thinking and communication, students will analyze
         2                                                                                        20111   99999
20           a patient care dilemma. As assessed by: Group Paper
             Utilizing Orem's Self-Care Model and the nursing process, students will design
             a plan of care that will promote the optimal health for a patient with acid-base
NURSNG
         1   and electrolytes imbalances, or endocrine, peripheral vascular, musculoskeletal      20111   99999
20L
             and sensory disorders. As assessed by: Nursing Grand Rounds Nursing Care
             Plan
             Apply the principles of asepsis and safe medication administration when
NURSNG
         2   administering intravenous piggyback (IVPB) medications via a peripheral vein.        20111   99999
20L
             As assessed by: Completion of IVPB Skills Competency Checklist
             Demonstrate competency in establishing and maintaining a therapeutic nurse-
NURSNG       patient relationship through use of effective communication techniques with
         1                                                                                        20111   99999
25           patients experiencing mental health problems. As assessed by: Score of 75%
             or greater on the comprehensive final exam. Case studies.
             Meet the self-care deficits of patients who demonstrate symptoms related to
             ineffective coping patterns, anxiety, personality disorders, substance abuse
NURSNG
         2   disorders, mood disorders, psychotic disorders, and issues related to abuse          20111   99999
25
             and crisis. As assessed by: Score of 75% or greater on the comprehensive
             final exam. Case studies.
             Demonstrate use of critical thinking strategies and appropriate communication
NURSNG       skills in response to common patient behaviors associated with emotional
         1                                                                                        20111   99999
25L          distress and psychiatric disorders. As assessed by: Process Recordings,
             Clinical evaluation tool
             Utilize critical thinking strategies, principles of psychiatric-mental health
             nursing, and Orem's self-care model to promote self-care for patients with
NURSNG
         2   health care deviations related to psychiatric disorders. As assessed by: Nursing     20111   99999
25L
             History and Assessment papers, Medication Assessment papers, Nursing Care
             Plans, Clinical Evaluation tool
             Explore factors that affect health care delivery including epidemiology,
NURSNG       environmental health issues, cultural beliefs and practices that influence health
         1                                                                                        20111   99999
28           care. As assessed by: Score of 75% or greater on each exam. Community
             assessment
NURSNG       Validate concepts of community-based nursing as practiced in a variety of out
         2                                                                                        20113   99999
28           of hospital locations. As assessed by: Exams, Community asssessment
             Utilizing Orem's Self-Care Model, students will evaluate the health deviations of
NURSNG       the patient experiencing gastrointestinal, renal, oncological, hematological,
         1                                                                                        20111   99999
30           female reproductive, and immune system disorders. As assessed by: Score of
             75% or greater on the comprehensive final exam.
             Utilize the nursing process and the quality and safety education for nurses
NURSNG       competencies to develop plans of care for clients with health deviations
         2                                                                                        20112   99999
30           affecting various systems: Immune, hematologic, renal, gastrointestinal and
             female reproductive. As assessed by: Case Studies
             Utilizing critical thinking techniques students will develop a plan of care for
             adult's with deviations of the gastrointestinal tract, liver, biliary tract, and
NURSNG
         1   pancreas, immune system, hematological system, renal, oncological, and the           20111   99999
30L
             female reproductive system. As assessed by: written care plans, grand round
             presentation.
             Utilizing QSEN (Quality and Safety in Nursing Education) competencies,
NURSNG
         2   students will provide safe, comprehensive care to adults or older adults             20111   99999
30L
             experiencing health deviations. As assessed by: Reflective journaling
             Students will calculate the therapeutic self-care demand for adults with
NURSNG
         1   neurosensory, cardiovascular and respiratory disorders, or burn injuries. As         20111   99999
35
             assessed by: Score of 75% or greater on the comprehensive final exam.
             Students will apply the principles of delegation to design a plan of care that
NURSNG       promotes the optimal level of function of adults and older adults with complex
         2                                                                                        20111   99999
35           health problems. As assessed by: Score of 75% or greater on the
             comprehensive final exam.
NURSNG       Utilizing Orem’s Self-Care Model and the nursing process, students will
         1                                                                                        20111   99999
35L          analyze and discuss the care of a patient with multi-system failure. As




                                              63
               assessed by: Nursing Grand Rounds Presentation, Clinical Pathway
               In the role of team leader, delegate activities to the team member utilizing the 5
NURSNG
           2   rights of delegation. As assessed by: Performance of team leader/team                   20111   99999
35L
               member roles in the clinical setting, reflective journaling
NURSNG         Review the mathematics used in medical calculation. As assessed by: Score of
           1                                                                                           20111   99999
36             75% or greater on the comprehensive final exam.
               Investigate the systems of measurements and methods of computing safe and
NURSNG
           2   accurate medical dosages. As assessed by: Classroom exercises in which                  20111   99999
36
               students compute safe and accurate dosages.
               By integrating scientific principles, knowledge of pathophysiology and
NURSNG
           1   pharmacology, students will gain knowledge of common health deviations                  20111   99999
40
               among children. As assessed by: Score of 75% or greater on each exam.
               Utilize critical thinking/problem solving skills, student will discuss how to modify
NURSNG         therapeutic nursing interventions and communication techniques based on the
           2                                                                                           20111   99999
40             developmental level of the child. As assessed by: Correctly answering 75% of
               iClicker questions.
               By integrating scientific principles, knowledge of pathophysiology and
NURSNG
           1   pharmacology, students will provide nursing care to the hospitalized child with         20111   99999
40L
               common health deviations. As assessed by: Clinical Evaluation tools
               Utilize critical thinking/problem solving skills, student will to modify therapeutic
NURSNG
           2   nursing interventions and communication techniques based on the                         20111   99999
40L
               developmental level of the child. As assessed by: Clinical pathways
               Identify and describe the potential health care needs of women across the life
NURSNG         span which may encompass concerns such as sexuality, family planning,
           1                                                                                           20111   99999
45             pregnancy, infertility, violence and menopausal health. As assessed by: Score
               of 75% or greater on the each exam.
               Utilize critical thinking and problem solving skills to predict nursing interventions
NURSNG         utilized during the normal and high risk processes of pregnancy, labor and
           2                                                                                           20111   99999
45             delivery, and post partum. As assessed by: Score of 75% or greater on each
               exam.
               Develop a nursing system design for the childbearing family during the
NURSNG
           1   antepartum, intrapartum or postpartum period. As assessed by: Clinical                  20111   99999
45L
               Evaluation, Journal
               Utilize critical thinking skills to develop and implement health promotion
NURSNG
           2   strategies with women across the life span. As assessed by: Clinical Evaluation         20111   99999
45L
               Tool
               Utilize theoretical concepts of leadership and management, students discuss
               how to administer care which integrates knowledge and skills pertinent to the
NURSNG
           1   role of manager of care of a group of patients and members of the health care           20111   99999
50
               team As assessed by: QSEN poster presentations, quizzes, inquiry-based
               learning discussions
               Utilizing delegation, priority setting skills, and knowledge of legal-ethical issues,
NURSNG
           2   and health care delivery systems, students design a plan of nursing care for a          20111   99999
50
               group of patients. As assessed by: quizzes, inquiry-based learning discussions
               Utilize theoretical concepts of leadership and management, students will
               design plans of care which integrate knowledge and skills pertinent to the role
NURSNG
           1   of manager of care of a group of patients and members of the health care team           20111   99999
50L
               As assessed by: Self-reflection journal, clinical performance evaluation,
               seminar debriefing
               Utilizing delegation, priority setting skills, and knowledge of legal-ethical issues
NURSNG         and health care delivery systems to coordinate the nursing care for a group of
           2                                                                                           20111   99999
50L            patients. As assessed by: Clinical Evaluation tools, direct observation and input
               from preceptor
               Describe how cultural phenomena have influenced healing practices among
NURSNG
           1   select cultural groups around the globe. As assessed by: Score of 75% or                20111   99999
60
               greater on the Report on a Cultural Group
               Examine how their personal beliefs about health and illness are similar to
NURSNG
           2   and/or from different from people from other cultural groups. As assessed by:           20111   99999
60
               Score of 75% or greater on the Personal Health Assessment
               The student will make an informed decision about pursuing a career in
               respiratory care. The student will analyze the information provided in the
               course about the scope of the respiratory care profession. The student will
RES TH 1   1                                                                                           20113   99999
               examine the Pro’s vs. the Con’s about the RT profession. The student will then
               will make informed decision about pursuing a career in respiratory care.
               Assessment method: End of course survey. The survey will contain 10




                                                 64
               questions about the respiratory therapy profession, the student will state the
               influence the course contributed in the decision to pursue a career in
               respiratory care. The assessment method will be evaluated using a standard
               rubrics scale to answer those questions. Assessment Method Category: Survey
               Benchmark: 75% of students will state that they have made an informed
               decision about pursuing a career in respiratory care on the assessment tool.
               The student will be able to describe the typical duties that fall within the scope
               of practice of the Respiratory Care Practitioner. Assessment method: On an
               exam or quiz, the student will be given questions where the student will identify
RES TH 1   2                                                                                          20113   99999
               or name the duties performed by the Respiratory Care Practitioner Assessment
               Method Category: Exam or quiz Benchmark: 75% of students will be able to
               name or identify the duties performed by the Respiratory Care Practitioner.
               Functioning as a neonatal or pediatric respiratory therapist the student will
               provide appropriate respiratory care interventions to patients they are assigned
RES TH
           1   to treat. Assessment method: Simulated Scenarios Assessment Method                     20121   99999
29
               Category: Exam or quiz. Benchmark: 70% of students score 70% or more on
               the assessment tool.
               Functioning as a neonatal or pediatric respiratory therapist the student will
               assess both neonatal & pediatric patients for respiratory problems and then
RES TH         prioritize the patients' care (relative to the other patients they are assigned to
           2                                                                                          20121   99999
29             take care of) as a result of this assessment. Assessment method: Simulated
               Scenarios Assessment Method Category: Exam or quiz Benchmark: 70% of
               students score 70% or more on the assessment tool.
               Functioning as a neonatal or pediatric respiratory therapist the student will
               perform an initial assessment of a patient and propose a respiratory care plan
RES TH
           3   based on this assessment. Assessment method: Simulated Scenarios                       20121   99999
29
               Assessment Method Category: Exam or quiz Benchmark: 70% of students
               score 70% or more on the assessment tool.
               Functioning as a respiratory therapist, the student will be able to analyze
               pulmonary function data and differentiate between a patient with chronic
               obstructive lung disease (emphysema, chronic bronchitis, asthma, cystic
               fibrosis or bronchiectasis) and a patient with restrictive lung disease
               (pulmonary fibrosis). Assessment method: On an exam or quiz, the student will
               be given short texts or scenario situation containing, patient history and
               pulmonary function data; the student will analyze the data and interpret the
RES TH
           1   results to differentiate between a patient with chronic obstructive lung disease       20113   99999
30
               (emphysema, chronic bronchitis, asthma, cystic fibrosis or bronchiectasis) and
               restrictive lung disease patient (pulmonary fibrosis) patient. The format of the
               question will be similar to questions given by national board for respiratory care
               (NBRC, credentialing body) for the entry level exam (Certified Respiratory
               Therapist, CRT), advance level exam (Registered Respiratory Therapist, RRT)
               and/or a case study. Assessment Method Category: Exam or quiz Benchmark:
               70% of students score 70% or more on the assessment tool.
               Functioning as a critical care respiratory therapist the student will analyze the
               patient’s electocardiographic and hemodynamic data and interpret the results.
               The student will use that information to formulate a treatment plan for the
               patient based on the findings. Assessment method: On an exam or quiz, the
               student will be given short texts or scenario situation containing, patient history,
RES TH         electocardiographic and hemodynamic data; the student will analyze the data
           2                                                                                          20113   99999
30             and interpret the results formulate treatment plan for the patient. The format of
               the question will be similar to questions given by national board for respiratory
               care (NBRC, credentialing body) for the entry level exam (Certified Respiratory
               Therapist, CRT), advance level exam (Registered Respiratory Therapist, RRT)
               and/or a case study. Assessment Method Category: Exam or quiz Benchmark:
               70% of students score 70% or more on the assessment tool.
               Functioning as a critical care respiratory therapist and as a member for the
               multidisciplinary healthcare team, the student will be provided data on a patient
               that requires Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS), the student will analyze
               the data to determine the most appropriate treatment for the patient in
               accordance with the established, American Heart Association (AHA), ACLS
               guidelines. Assessment method: On an exam or quiz, the student will be given
RES TH
           3   short texts or scenario situation about a patient that requires ACLS; the student      20113   99999
30
               will analyze the data and interpret the results formulate the most appropriate
               treatment for the patient. The format of the question will be similar to questions
               given by national board for respiratory care (NBRC, credentialing body) for the
               entry level exam (Certified Respiratory Therapist, CRT), advance level exam
               (Registered Respiratory Therapist, RRT) and/or a case study. Assessment
               Method Category: Exam or quiz
RES TH         Functioning as respiratory care practitioner, from data provided, the student will
           1                                                                                          20113   99999
60             differentiate between a patient suffering from oxygenation problems from that




                                                 65
             of a patient suffering from ventilation problems or both. Assessment method:
             On an exam or quiz, the student will be given short texts containing, patient
             history and arterial blood gas, shunt indicators, dead space fraction, etc... The
             student will analyze the data and interpret the results to differentiate between a
             patient with oxygenation problems from that of a patient with ventilation
             problems. The format of the question will be similar to questions given by
             national board for respiratory care (NBRC, credentialing body) for the entry
             level exam (Certified Respiratory Therapist, CRT), advance level exam
             (Registered Respiratory Therapist, RRT) and/or a case study. Assessment
             Method Category: Exam or quiz Benchmark: 70% of students score 70% or
             more on the assessment tool.
             Functioning as respiratory care practitioner, the student will be able to assess
             hemodynamic data to differentiate between a patient suffering left heart failure
             (cardiogenic pulmonary edema) from a patient suffering from right heart failure
             (cor pulmonale) Assessment method: On an exam or quiz, the student will be
             given short texts containing, patient history and hemodynamic data (PAP,
             PRVR, SVR, CVP, PCWP, etc...). The student will analyze the data and
RES TH       interpret the results to differentiate between patient left heart failure
         2                                                                                        20113   99999
60           (cardiopulmonary edema) and patient with right heart failure (Cor Pulmonale).
             The format of the question will be similar to questions given by national board
             for respiratory care (NBRC, credentialing body) for the entry level exam
             (Certified Respiratory Therapist, CRT), advance level exam (Registered
             Respiratory Therapist, RRT) and/or a case study. Assessment Method
             Category: Exam or quiz Benchmark: 70% of students score 70% or more on
             the assessment tool.
             Functioning as respiratory care practitioner, the student will be able to analyze
             arterial blood gas data and interpret the acid-base status and oxygenation
             status of the patient and treat the underlying acid-base and/or oxygenation
             abnormality, if any. Assessment method: On an exam or quiz, the student will
             be given short texts containing, patient history and arterial blood gas data; the
RES TH       student will analyze the data and interpret the results to find the underlying
         3                                                                                        20113   99999
60           acid-base and/or oxygenation abnormality, if any. The student will use that
             information to treat the patient. The format of the question will be similar to
             questions given by national board for respiratory care (NBRC, credentialing
             body) for the entry level exam (CRT), advance level exam (RRT) and/or a case
             study. Assessment Method Category: Exam or quiz Benchmark: 70% of
             students score 70% or more on the assessment tool.
             The student will be able to within the scope of practice of a respiratory care
             practitioner; differentiate the anatomical alterations, pathophysiological
             mechanisms, clinical manifestations and treatments for the cardiopulmonary
             diseases presented. Assessment method: On an exam or quiz, the student will
             be given short texts containing some or all of the following: The patient’s,
             physical examination, history, present illness, labs (ABG, electrolytes, PFT,
             etc.), imaging (chest x –ray, CT scans, etc), oxygenation/ventilation parameters
RES TH
         1   such as shunt indicators and dead space fraction respectively... The student         20113   99999
70
             will analyze the data and interpret the results to help diagnose the patient’s
             condition and come up the most appropriate treatment plan. The format of the
             question will be similar to questions given by national board for respiratory care
             (NBRC, credentialing body) for the entry level exam (Certified Respiratory
             Therapist, CRT), advance level exam (Registered Respiratory Therapist, RRT)
             and/or a case study. Assessment Method Category: Exam or quiz Benchmark:
             70% of students score 70% or more on the assessment tool.
             The student will be able to within the scope of practice of a respiratory care
             practitioner; differentiate the anatomical alterations, pathophysiological
             mechanisms, clinical manifestations and treatments for restrictive lung
             diseases. Assessment method: On an exam or quiz, the student will be given
             short texts containing some or all of the following: The patient’s, physical
             examination, history, present illness, labs (ABG, electrolytes, PFT, etc.),
RES TH       imaging (chest x –ray, CT scans, etc), oxygenation/ventilation parameters such
         2                                                                                        20113   99999
70           as shunt indicators and dead space fraction respectively... The student will
             analyze the data and interpret the results to help diagnose the patient’s
             condition and come up the most appropriate treatment plan. The format of the
             question will be similar to questions given by national board for respiratory care
             (NBRC, credentialing body) for the entry level exam (Certified Respiratory
             Therapist, CRT), advanced level exam (Registered Respiratory Therapist,
             RRT) and/or a case study.
             The student will be able to within the scope of practice of a respiratory care
             practitioner; differentiate the anatomical alterations, pathophysiological
RES TH       mechanisms, clinical manifestations and treatments for cardiovascular
         3                                                                                        20113   99999
70           diseases. On an exam or quiz, the student will be given short texts containing
             some or all of the following: The patient’s, physical examination, history,
             present illness, labs (ABG, electrolytes, PFT, etc.), imaging (chest x –ray, CT




                                              66
scans, etc), oxygenation/ventilation parameters such as shunt indicators and
dead space fraction respectively... The student will analyze the data and
interpret the results to help diagnose the patient’s condition and come up the
most appropriate treatment plan. The format of the question will be similar to
questions given by national board for respiratory care (NBRC, credentialing
body) for the entry level exam (Certified Respiratory Therapist, CRT),
advanced level exam (Registered Respiratory Therapist, RRT) and/or a case
study.




                                67
                                                   Appendix F
                                 Health Sciences Student Learning Outcomes Data
                                                    Fall 2011



                   Course               SLO      Total         Mastered      Not      Total     %          %
 Department                  Section
                                       Number Enrollment         SLO       Mastered Assessed Assessed   Mastered
Health Science   NURSNG 10    2710       1        40              38          0        38     95.0%      95.0%
                                         2        40              38          0        38     95.0%      95.0%
                 NURSNG 10 Total                  80              76          0        76     95.0%      95.0%
                 NURSNG 10L    2711      1        10              9           0         9     90.0%      90.0%
                                         2        10              9           0         9     90.0%      90.0%
                              2712       1        10              9           0         9     90.0%      90.0%
                                         2        10              8           0         8     80.0%      80.0%
                              2713       1        12              10          0        10     83.3%      83.3%
                                         2        12              10          0        10     83.3%      83.3%
                              2714       1        12              10          0        10     83.3%      83.3%
                                         2        12              10          0        10     83.3%      83.3%
                 NURSNG 10L Total                 88              75          0        75     85.2%      85.2%
                 NURSNG 15     2715      1        40              38          2        40     100.0%     95.0%
                                         2        40              38          2        40     100.0%     95.0%
                 NURSNG 15 Total                  80              76          4        80     100.0%     95.0%
                 NURSNG 15L    2716      1        10              9           1        10     100.0%     90.0%
                                         2        10              9           1        10     100.0%     90.0%
                              2717       1        10              8           0         8     80.0%      80.0%
                                         2        10              8           0         8     80.0%      80.0%
                              2718       1        10              10          0        10     100.0%     100.0%
                                         2        10              10          0        10     100.0%     100.0%
                              2719       1        10              10          0        10     100.0%     100.0%
                                         2        10              10          0        10     100.0%     100.0%
                 NURSNG 15L Total                 80              74          2        76     95.0%      92.5%
                 NURSNG 16     2720      1        25              25          0        25     100.0%     100.0%
                                         2        25              25          0        25     100.0%     100.0%




                                                          68
                                               Appendix F
                             Health Sciences Student Learning Outcomes Data
                                                Fall 2011



               Course               SLO      Total         Mastered      Not      Total     %          %
Department               Section
                                   Number Enrollment         SLO       Mastered Assessed Assessed   Mastered


             NURSNG 16 Total                     50           50              0    50     100.0%     100.0%
             NURSNG 20     2723      1           32           25              7    32     100.0%     78.1%
                                     2           32           32              0    32     100.0%     100.0%
             NURSNG 20 Total                     64           57              7    64     100.0%     89.1%
             NURSNG 20L    2724      1           9            8               0    8      88.9%      88.9%
                                     2           9            8               0    8      88.9%      88.9%
                          2725       1           6            6               0    6      100.0%     100.0%
                                     2           6            6               0    6      100.0%     100.0%
                          2726       1           8            8               0    8      100.0%     100.0%
                                     2           8            7               0    7      87.5%      87.5%
                          2727       1           9            8               0    8      88.9%      88.9%
                                     2           9            8               0    8      88.9%      88.9%
             NURSNG 20L Total                    64           59              0    59     92.2%      92.2%
             NURSNG 25     2728      1           26           26              0    26     100.0%     100.0%
                                     2           26           26              0    26     100.0%     100.0%
             NURSNG 25 Total                     52           52              0    52     100.0%     100.0%
             NURSNG 25L    2729      1           7            7               0    7      100.0%     100.0%
                                     2           7            7               0    7      100.0%     100.0%
                          2731       1           6            6               0    6      100.0%     100.0%
                                     2           6            6               0    6      100.0%     100.0%
                          2732       1           6            6               0    6      100.0%     100.0%
                                     2           6            6               0    6      100.0%     100.0%
             NURSNG 25L Total                    38           38              0    38     100.0%     100.0%
             NURSNG 28     2733      1           26           26              0    26     100.0%     100.0%




                                                      69
                                               Appendix F
                             Health Sciences Student Learning Outcomes Data
                                                Fall 2011



               Course               SLO      Total         Mastered      Not      Total     %          %
Department               Section
                                   Number Enrollment         SLO       Mastered Assessed Assessed   Mastered
                                     2        26              26          0        26     100.0%     100.0%
             NURSNG 28 Total                  52              52          0        52     100.0%     100.0%
             NURSNG 30     2734      1        35              32          3        35     100.0%     91.4%
                                     2        35              32          3        35     100.0%     91.4%
             NURSNG 30 Total                  70              64          6        70     100.0%     91.4%
             NURSNG 30L    2735      1         9              9           0         9     100.0%     100.0%
                                     2         9              9           0         9     100.0%     100.0%
                          2736       1         8              7           0         7     87.5%      87.5%
                                     2         8              8           0         8     100.0%     100.0%
                          2738       1         9              9           0         9     100.0%     100.0%
                                     2         9              9           0         9     100.0%     100.0%
             NURSNG 30L Total                 52              51          0        51     98.1%      98.1%
             NURSNG 35     2739      1        31              31          0        31     100.0%     100.0%
                                     2        31              30          1        31     100.0%     96.8%
             NURSNG 35 Total                  62              61          1        62     100.0%     98.4%
             NURSNG 35L    2740      1         9              9           0         9     100.0%     100.0%
                                     2         9              9           0         9     100.0%     100.0%
                          2741       1         9              9           0         9     100.0%     100.0%
                                     2         9              9           0         9     100.0%     100.0%
                          2742       1         7              7           0         7     100.0%     100.0%
                                     2         7              7           0         7     100.0%     100.0%
             NURSNG 35L Total                 50              50          0        50     100.0%     100.0%
             NURSNG 36     2743      1        41              26          3        29     70.7%      63.4%
                                     2        41              26          3        29     70.7%      63.4%
                          2744       1        42              31          5        36     85.7%      73.8%
                                     2        42              35          1        36     85.7%      83.3%




                                                      70
                                               Appendix F
                             Health Sciences Student Learning Outcomes Data
                                                Fall 2011



               Course               SLO      Total         Mastered      Not      Total     %          %
Department               Section
                                   Number Enrollment         SLO       Mastered Assessed Assessed   Mastered
             NURSNG 36 Total                  166            118         12        130    78.3%      71.1%
             NURSNG 40L    2749      1         8              8           0         8     100.0%     100.0%
                                     2         8              8           0         8     100.0%     100.0%
                          2750       1         8              8           0         8     100.0%     100.0%
                                     2         8              8           0         8     100.0%     100.0%
             NURSNG 40L Total                  32             32          0         32    100.0%     100.0%
             NURSNG 45     2751      1         16             16          0         16    100.0%     100.0%
                                     2         16             16          0         16    100.0%     100.0%
                          2752       1         16             16          0         16    100.0%     100.0%
                                     2         16             15          0         15    93.8%      93.8%
             NURSNG 45 Total                   64             63          0         63    98.4%      98.4%
             NURSNG 45L    2753      1         8              8           0         8     100.0%     100.0%
                                     2         8              8           0         8     100.0%     100.0%
                          2755       1         8              8           0         8     100.0%     100.0%
                                     2         8              8           0         8     100.0%     100.0%
                          2756       1         8              8           0         8     100.0%     100.0%
                                     2         8              8           0         8     100.0%     100.0%
             NURSNG 45L Total                  48             48          0         48    100.0%     100.0%
             NURSNG 50L    2760      1         18             16          0         16    88.9%      88.9%
                                     2         18             16          0         16    88.9%      88.9%
             NURSNG 50L Total                  36             32          0         32    88.9%      88.9%
             RES TH 1      2997      1         42             30          1         31    73.8%      71.4%
                                     2         42             30          1         31    73.8%      71.4%
             RES TH 1
                                                                                          73.8%      71.4%
             Total                               84           60              2    62
             RES TH 30    4422       1           57           52              4    56     98.2%      91.2%




                                                      71
                                                  Appendix F
                                Health Sciences Student Learning Outcomes Data
                                                   Fall 2011



                  Course               SLO      Total          Mastered     Not      Total     %          %
 Department                 Section
                                      Number Enrollment          SLO      Mastered Assessed Assessed   Mastered
                                        2        57               56         0        56     98.2%      98.2%
                                        3        57               50         6        56     98.2%      87.7%
                RES TH 30
                                                                                              98.2%     92.4%
                Total                              171           158             10   168
Department
                                                                                              93.7%     90.8%
Total                                             1483          1346         44       1390
College Total                                     82714         56051       10152     66203   80.0%     67.8%




                                                          72
                                                          Appendix G
                                        Health Sciences Student Learning Outcomes Data
                                                          Spring 2011


  Department
                                               SLO      Total       Mastered      Not       Total        %          %
                     Course         Section
                                              Number Enrollment       SLO       Mastered   Assessed   Assessed   Mastered
Health Science   NURSNG 10           2686       1         40           36           3        39        97.5%      92.3%
                                                2         40           38           0        38        95.0%     100.0%
                 NURSNG 10
                 Total                                                 74           3        77                   96.1%
                 NURSNG 10L          2687       1         10           10           0        10       100.0%     100.0%
                                                2         10           10           0        10       100.0%     100.0%
                                     2688       1         10            9           0         9        90.0%     100.0%
                                                2         10            9           0         9        90.0%     100.0%
                                     2689       1         10            9           0         9        90.0%     100.0%
                                                2         10            9           0         9        90.0%     100.0%
                                     2690       1         10           10           0        10       100.0%     100.0%
                                                2         10           10           0        10       100.0%     100.0%
                 NURSNG 10L Total                                      76           0        76                  100.0%
                 NURSNG 15        2691          1         37           33           3        36        97.3%      91.7%
                                                2         37           33           3        36        97.3%      91.7%
                 NURSNG 15
                 Total                                                 66           6        72                   91.7%
                 NURSNG 15L          2692       1         10            8           1         9        90.0%      88.9%
                                                2         10            8           1         9        90.0%      88.9%
                                     2693       1          9            9           0         9       100.0%     100.0%
                                                2          9            9           0         9       100.0%     100.0%
                                     2694       1         10           10           0        10       100.0%     100.0%
                                                2         10           10           0        10       100.0%     100.0%
                                     2695       1          8            8           0         8       100.0%     100.0%
                                                2          8            8           0         8       100.0%     100.0%
                 NURSNG 15L Total                                      70           2        72                   97.2%




                                                               73
             NURSNG 16       2696       1        14          12          0         12        85.7%     100.0%
                                        2        14          12          0         12        85.7%     100.0%
             NURSNG 16
             Total                                           24          0         24                  100.0%
             NURSNG 20       2699       1        33          24          6         30        90.9%      80.0%
                                        2        33          30          1         31        93.9%      96.8%
             NURSNG 20
             Total                                           54          7         61                   88.5%
             NURSNG 20L      2700       1        10          10          0         10       100.0%     100.0%
                                        2        10          10          0         10       100.0%     100.0%

                                       SLO      Total      Mastered     Not       Total        %          %
Department      Course      Section
                                      Number Enrollment      SLO      Mastered   Assessed   Assessed   Mastered

             NURSNG 20L      2701       1         9           9          0          9       100.0%     100.0%
                             2702       1         9           8          0          8        88.9%     100.0%
                                        2         9           7          1          8        88.9%      87.5%
             NURSNG 20L Total                                44          1         45                   97.8%
             NURSNG 25        2704      1        29          28          0         28        96.6%     100.0%
                                        2        29          27          0         27        93.1%     100.0%
             NURSNG 25
             Total                                           55          0         55                  100.0%
             NURSNG 25L      2706       1         7           7          0          7       100.0%     100.0%
                                        2         7           7          0          7       100.0%     100.0%
                             2707       1         6           6          0          6       100.0%     100.0%
                                        2         6           6          0          6       100.0%     100.0%
                             2708       1         7           7          0          7       100.0%     100.0%
                                        2         7           7          0          7       100.0%     100.0%
             NURSNG 25L Total                                40          0         40                  100.0%
             NURSNG 28        2709      1        28          28          0         28       100.0%     100.0%




                                                      74
             NURSNG 28
             Total                                           28          0         28                  100.0%
             NURSNG 30       2710       1        40          32          8         40       100.0%      80.0%
             NURSNG 30
             Total                                           32          8         40                   80.0%
             NURSNG 30L      2711       1        10          10          0         10       100.0%     100.0%
                                        2        10          10          0         10       100.0%     100.0%
                             2712       1        10          10          0         10       100.0%     100.0%
                                        2        10          10          0         10       100.0%     100.0%
                             2713       1        10          10          0         10       100.0%     100.0%
                                        2        10          10          0         10       100.0%     100.0%
                             2714       1        10           8          2         10       100.0%      80.0%
                                        2        10           8          2         10       100.0%      80.0%
             NURSNG 30L Total                                76          4         80                   95.0%
             NURSNG 35        2715      1        35          32          0         32        91.4%     100.0%
                                        2        35          32          0         32        91.4%     100.0%
             NURSNG 35
             Total                                           64          0         64                  100.0%
             NURSNG 35L      2716       1         8           8          0          8       100.0%     100.0%

                                       SLO      Total      Mastered     Not       Total        %          %
Department      Course      Section
                                      Number Enrollment      SLO      Mastered   Assessed   Assessed   Mastered

             NURSNG 35L      2716       2         8           8          0          8       100.0%     100.0%
                             2718       1         8           8          0          8       100.0%     100.0%
                                        2         8           8          0          8       100.0%     100.0%
                             2719       1         8           8          0          8       100.0%     100.0%
                                        2         8           8          0          8       100.0%     100.0%
             NURSNG 35L Total                                48          0         48                  100.0%
             NURSNG 36        2720      1        39          27          3         30        76.9%      90.0%




                                                      75
                          2   39        27   3   30   76.9%    90.0%
NURSNG 36
Total                                   54   6   60             90.0%
NURSNG 40          2722   1    7         7   0    7   100.0%   100.0%
                          2    7         7   0    7   100.0%   100.0%
                   2723   1   18        18   0   18   100.0%   100.0%
                          2   18        18   0   18   100.0%   100.0%
NURSNG 40
Total                                   50   0   50            100.0%
NURSNG 40L         2725   1   9          9   0    9   100.0%   100.0%
                          2   9          9   0    9   100.0%   100.0%
                   2726   1   9          9   0    9   100.0%   100.0%
                          2   9          9   0    9   100.0%   100.0%
NURSNG 40L Total                        36   0   36            100.0%
NURSNG 45        2728     1    7         7   0    7   100.0%   100.0%
                          2    7         7   0    7   100.0%   100.0%
                   2729   1   19        19   0   19   100.0%   100.0%
                          2   19        17   0   17    89.5%   100.0%
NURSNG 45
Total                                   50   0   50            100.0%
NURSNG 45L         2730   1    9         9   0    9   100.0%   100.0%
                          2    9         9   0    9   100.0%   100.0%
                   2732   1   10        10   0   10   100.0%   100.0%
                          2   10        10   0   10   100.0%   100.0%
                   2733   1    7         7   0    7   100.0%   100.0%
                          2    7         7   0    7   100.0%   100.0%
NURSNG 45L Total                        52   0   52            100.0%




                                   76
                                           SLO      Total      Mastered     Not       Total        %          %
  Department        Course      Section
                                          Number Enrollment      SLO      Mastered   Assessed   Assessed   Mastered

                 NURSNG 50       2734       1        26          26          0         26       100.0%     100.0%
                                            2        26          26          0         26       100.0%     100.0%
                 NURSNG 50
                 Total                                           52          0         52                  100.0%
                 NURSNG 50L      2735       1        20          15          0         15        75.0%     100.0%
                                            2        20          15          0         15        75.0%     100.0%
                                 2737       1        14          12          0         12        85.7%     100.0%
                                            2        14          12          0         12        85.7%     100.0%
                 NURSNG 50L Total                                54          0         54                  100.0%
                 NURSNG 60        2738      1        18          14          1         15        83.3%      93.3%
                                            2        18          14          1         15        83.3%      93.3%
                 NURSNG 60
                 Total                                           28          2         30                   93.3%
Health Science
Total                                                           1127        39        1166                  96.7%




                                                          77
Appendix H
                                              Appendix I



          Success Rate by Course from Fall 2005 to Spring 2010 from Cal Pass
                             2005-    2006-     2007-     2008-     2009-
                             2006     2007      2008      2009      2010
NURSNG 10 - NURSING SKILLS    91.25% 79.22% 96.05% 92.93% 93.75%
NURSNG 10L - NRSNG SKLLS LAB  92.41% 78.57% 96.05% 92.00% 91.36%
NURSNG 15 - NURSNG
FUNDMTLS                      83.95% 70.42% 90.00% 84.78% 93.59%
NURSNG 15L - NRS FUND LAB     85.19% 77.27% 92.31% 87.91% 89.87%
NURSNG 16 - PHYSICAL ASSMNT   97.18% 91.86% 93.33% 94.74% 97.26%
NURSNG 17 - PHARMACOLOGY      58.92% 60.99% 60.25% 65.94% 56.05%
NURSNG 19 - 2ND YEAR RN       34.78% 52.17% 67.65% 52.17%
NURSNG 20 - INTR MED SURG     94.81% 87.18% 82.26% 89.41% 93.75%
NURSNG 20L - MED-SURG LAB     91.25% 88.41% 80.95% 90.59% 92.59%
NURSNG 25 - PSY MNTL HLTH     93.98% 97.50% 92.73% 97.73% 100.00%
NURSNG 25L - PSY-MENTL LAB    98.73% 98.72% 100.00% 96.59% 100.00%
NURSNG 28 - COMNTY
PRACTICE                      97.47% 97.50% 98.36% 95.56% 100.00%
NURSNG 30 - INTRMD MED
SURG                          69.51% 85.11% 77.14% 97.47% 87.65%
NURSNG 30L - INT MED SRG LAB  80.49% 87.10% 86.49% 95.83% 87.80%
NURSNG 35 - ADV MED SURG      93.33% 87.36% 94.64% 97.44% 95.95%
NURSNG 35L - ADV MED SRG
LAB                           93.33% 87.36% 94.03% 96.15% 95.95%
NURSNG 36 - CALC SOLUTIONS    76.67% 80.75% 70.13% 73.84% 75.88%
NURSNG 40 - NRSNG CHLDRN      96.23% 100.00% 100.00% 95.65% 91.95%
NURSNG 40L - NRSNG CHLDR
LAB                           91.07% 95.59% 94.29% 98.48% 96.39%
NURSNG 45 - WMN HLTH CARE 100.00% 100.00% 98.51% 100.00% 100.00%
NURSNG 45L - WMN HLTH LAB    100.00% 100.00% 100.00% 94.29% 98.77%
NURSNG 50 - PROF ROLE TRANS   96.23% 92.31% 98.48% 95.59% 100.00%
NURSNG 50L - PROF ROLE LAB   100.00% 77.46% 82.28% 82.28% 82.47%
NURSNG 89B - WORK
EXPERIENCE                   100.00% 88.89%
NURSNG 90A - INTRN-NURSING             84.62% 64.29% 77.78% 100.00%
NURSNG 90B - INTRN-NURSING                        87.50% 100.00% 100.00%
     Retention Rate by Course from Fall 2005 to Spring 2010 from Cal Pass

                               2005-     2006-     2007-     2008-     2009-
                               2006      2007      2008      2009      2010

NURSNG 10 - NURSING SKILLS      98.75%    93.51%    97.37%    97.98%    97.50%
NURSNG 10L - NRSNG SKLLS LAB   100.00%    90.00%    97.37%    97.00%    95.06%
NURSNG 15 - NURSNG
FUNDMTLS                        96.30%    87.32%    96.25%    94.57%    98.72%
NURSNG 15L - NRS FUND LAB       97.53%    93.94%    98.72%    95.60%    96.20%
NURSNG 16 - PHYSICAL ASSMNT     97.18%    95.35%    97.33%    94.74%    97.26%

NURSNG 17 - PHARMACOLOGY        71.78%    74.89%    70.49%    76.42%    71.75%

NURSNG 19 - 2ND YEAR RN         76.09%    69.57%    73.53%    65.22%
NURSNG 20 - INTR MED SURG       98.70%    97.44%    98.39%    96.47% 98.75%
NURSNG 20L - MED-SURG LAB       95.00%    97.10%    96.83%    98.82% 98.77%
NURSNG 25 - PSY MNTL HLTH       95.18%    97.50%    94.55%    97.73% 100.00%

NURSNG 25L - PSY-MENTL LAB     100.00%    98.72% 100.00%      97.73% 100.00%

NURSNG 28 - COMNTY PRACTICE     98.73%    97.50%    98.36% 96.67% 100.00%
NURSNG 30 - INTRMD MED SURG     95.12%    94.68%    94.29% 100.00% 93.83%
NURSNG 30L - INT MED SRG LAB    95.12%    95.70%    94.59% 98.61% 93.90%
NURSNG 35 - ADV MED SURG        98.33%    93.10%    98.21% 100.00% 98.65%
NURSNG 35L - ADV MED SRG LAB    98.33%    94.25%    97.01% 98.72% 98.65%

NURSNG 36 - CALC SOLUTIONS      85.83% 91.30% 82.47% 79.65% 82.35%
NURSNG 40 - NRSNG CHLDRN        96.23% 100.00% 100.00%  95.65
NURSNG 40L - NRSNG CHLDR LAB    91.07% 95.59% 94.29% 98.48% 96.39%
NURSNG 45 - WMN HLTH CARE      100.00% 100.00% 98.51% 100.00% 100.00%
NURSNG 45L - WMN HLTH LAB      100.00% 100.00% 100.00% 94.29% 98.77%
NURSNG 50 - PROF ROLE TRANS     98.11% 93.59% 98.48% 98.53% 100.00%

NURSNG 50L - PROF ROLE LAB   100.00% 78.87%         83.54%    82.28%    82.47%
NURSNG 89B - WORK EXPERIENCE 100.00% 100.00%
NURSNG 90A - INTRN-NURSING            84.62%        71.43%    92.59% 100.00%
NURSNG 90B - INTRN-NURSING                          93.75%       100 100.00%
                                     Appendix J



                 Santa Monica College
              Health Sciences Department
     Nursing Program- Advisory Committee Meeting
      Minutes of May 30, 2006 – 1:00pm -3:00 p.m.




Chair:       Ida Danzey
Recorder:    Eve Adler

Attendees:
Names                     Affiliations
Ida Danzey                SMC Assistant Dean
Eve Adler                 SMC Nursing
Sheryl Abelew             Century City Doctors Hospital
Connie Zandate            Marina del Rey Work Source
Hazel Peters              SMC Project Manager
Holly Thiercof            SMC Faculty
Rita Hand                 SMC Faculty
Dawn Murphy               SMC
Lois Risinger             SMC
Georgia Farber            SMC
Vini Angel                SMC
Rita Soshnik              SMC
Margaret Ecker
Maya Bedi                 St. John’s Med. Ctr.
Shirley Edwards           St. John’s Med. Ctr.
Ishara Bailis             SM-UCLA Med. Ctr.
Deborah Sanchez           Kaiser Permanente
Candace Lee               LAUSD – Adult & Career Education
Lynne Orlins              SM-UCLA Med. Ctr.
Susan Gritt               SM-UCLA Med. Ctr.
Louana George             SMC Nursing
Lenore Banders            SMC Health Services
Gloria M. Lopez           SMC Health Services
Marvin Friedman           SMC Nursing
Eric J. Williams          SMC Nursing
Carole J. McCaskill       SMC Nursing
Jo Ann Whitaker           Cedars-Sinai Med. Ctr.

                                                             85
Laurie McQuay-Peringer         SMC


       Topic                    Discussion                         Disposition
Introductions
Minutes of 10/25/05                                       Minutes accepted & approved
mtg
Announcements       NLNAC Accrediting visit from Nov. After this visit there will be no
                    7-9, 2006                             further accreditation visits for
                                                          8 years.
                    Thanks to all who participated in
                    the Environmental Scan Survey.
                    Last day for participation is May 31,
                    2006.


Nursing Program       Clinical      Placements/Anticipated
Updates               changes      in requirements for
                      students:

                             No changes reported in
                              clinical placements
                           01/05         started     criminal
                              background checks
                           Questions rose re: drug
                              screening. In the past,            If drug screening is required,
                              college felt it was a violation    SMC would like to be notified
                              of students’ privacy. This         in advance.
                              policy may differ if the
                              screening is random or
                              required.
                      Grants:
                      Mentoring Program:                         SMC would like to initiate this
                      St. John’s provided mentoring              type of program in the
                      during the Winter Session.                 summer.
                      Students found it increased their
                      knowledge of the role of the nurse.
                      At St. John’s, students performed
                      role as unlicensed nurse.

                      An incentive to the RN is to offer         Mentoring should be two-fold:
                      CEUs. The hardship for the RN is           a help to the RN, and
                      the hectic schedule at the bedside.        exposure to the realistic role
                      A benefit to the RN would be active        of the RN by the student.
                      student participation vs. it being
                      viewed as an observational

                                                                                           86
Topic              Discussion                            Disposition
        experience by students.


        Summer program is 54 hrs,                Ida will send out an e-mail
        preferably 8 hr days. The student        asking participation from
        is not paid for the experience, but      interested RNs starting June
        will receive 2 units credit. Ida met     26, 2006.
        with the students weekly to discuss
        the experience.       Students also
        requested to meet            with a
        counselor.

        Match (in-kind services):
          Facilities can do clinical
             competency checks in the
             nursing skills lab utilizing
             SMC technology as a match.
          RN mentoring students in
             Mentoring Program can also
             be used as a match.

        Issues:
            Could SMC provide the
             faculty in the Skills Lab for
             the RNs?
            Coordinating the time for the
             new hire to come to the SMC
             campus when the lab would
             be available.

        Group was most interested in Ida will send information
        NCLEX review provided by SMC about this opportunity to the
        through the grant.      Review is facilities.
        accessible via computer from
        home. 40 hours required for first-
        time takers. 100 hours required for
        second-time takers.


        Distance Education Program LVN-
        ADN:
                                                 Industry members asked to
        To begin in Spring 2007. Initial         refer interested LVNs.
        pilot will be from 15-20 students. All
        clinicals on ground. Testing at

                                                                         87
      Topic                Discussion                 Disposition
               secure testing sites. Theory on-
               line.


Updates from      St. John’s did well with
Affiliating        JCAHO visit. Pt safety was the
Agencies           focus. It had been 3 years
                   since last visit.

                  Kaiser also had a drop-in visit
                   by JCAHO. Pt safety was also
                   focus and facility did well. Has
                   partnership with Mount Saint
                   Mary for preceptorship. Ten
                   applicants from SMC for work-
                   study program. Retention rate
                   high (80%) for hires from
                   student internship program.
                   New facility ready in 2007.

                  Cedars has 91% retention rate.
                   They only hire RNs from
                   student internship program.
                   Can start working for Cedars
                   as a nursing student as a
                   student assistant. Past last
                   JCAHU survey in 10/05. Has
                   on-site BSN and Master’s
                   program. Received a state
                   grant in conjunction with El
                   Camino and Trade Tech for an
                   LVN-RN program. Mentor
                   hours being used as matching
                   hours.

                SM-UCLA:
               Kathleen Hunt is new Director of
               Nursing. Still going through
               rebuilding. In 1/07 the new ER will
               be operational. Is the community
               service of UCLA. Also has
               orthopedic service. Utilizing
               carbohydrate exchange model with
               a corrective insulin algorithm.


                                                                    88
         Topic              Discussion                    Disposition
                     Century City: No report



Grants                SMC
                     Need to raise $40,000 to assist
                      students.
                     LAUSD is partnering with SMC
                      to attract LVNs. Applicants go
                      through a stringent assessment
                      process for admission to their
                      program.




Meet with BRN        Changed to a 4-year schedule
NEC Grace Ardnt       for accreditation visits. In next
                      4 years will visit to meet with
                      faculty and students (interim
                      visit).
                     Board can always visit if school
                      is out of compliance.
                     Instead of visiting clinical
                      facility, G. Ardnt chose to meet
                      with the Nursing Advisory
                      Committee.
                     Encourages facilities not to
                      discontinue clinical placements
                      with established schools when
                      new clinical requests are made.
                     Concerns rose about
                      competency of RNs graduating
                      from accelerated programs.




                                                                        89
                         Santa Monica College
                 Health Sciences Department
        Nursing Program- Advisory Committee Meeting
       Minutes of September 19, 2007 11:00am – 1:00pm




Chair:      Ida Danzey
Recorder:   Bronwyn Webber-Gregg

Attendees:
Names                      Affiliations
Ida Danzey                 SMC Assistant Dean
Eve Adler                  SMC Nursing
Sheryl Abelew              Century City Doctors Hospital
Connie Zandate             Marina del Rey Work Source
Hazel Peters               SMC Project Manager
Holly Thiercof             SMC Faculty
Rita Hand                  SMC Faculty
Dawn Murphy                SMC
Lois Risinger              SMC
Georgia Farber             SMC
Vini Angel                 SMC
Rita Soshnik               SMC
Margaret Ecker
Maya Bedi                  St. John’s Med. Ctr.
Shirley Edwards            St. John’s Med. Ctr.
Ishara Bailis              SM-UCLA Med. Ctr.
Deborah Sanchez            Kaiser Permanente
Candace Lee                LAUSD – Adult & Career Education
Lynne Orlins               SM-UCLA Med. Ctr.
Susan Gritt                SM-UCLA Med. Ctr.
Louana George              SMC Nursing
Lenore Banders             SMC Health Services
Gloria M. Lopez            SMC Health Services
Marvin Friedman            SMC Nursing
Eric J. Williams           SMC Nursing
Carole J. McCaskill        SMC Nursing
Jo Ann Whitaker            Cedars-Sinai Med. Ctr.
Laurie McQuay-Peringer     SMC



                                                              90
       Topic                 Discussion                         Disposition
Introductions
Minutes of 05/06                                       Minutes accepted & approved
mtg.
Announcements    NLNAC Accrediting visit from Nov. After this visit there will be no
                 7-9, 2006                             further accreditation visits for
                                                       8 years.
                 Thanks to all who participated in
                 the Environmental Scan Survey.
                 Last day for participation is May 31,
                 2006.


Nursing Program              NLNAC accrediting outcome
Updates                      NCLEX scores for 2006-
                              2007
                             Legislation impacting
                              nursing programs

                         AB 1559                          Merit base
                         SB1309                           Passed 2005, pass readiness
                                                          test
                             California Institute of
                              Nursing and Healthcare      Rep: Pat Chambers
                              (CINHC)
                                                         October 2007, Oregon Model
                              White Paper on Redesign of Nov. 2007
                              Nursing Education

                             Clinical Placement System    State funded $90k – Little
                             (Demonstration on            Company of Mary - Torrance
                             September 24 and 25 in the
                             Los Angeles area)
                      Current Contracts/Grants:
                      Fostering Student Success           R/R Policy
                      Community Based Job Training        LVN online
                      Grant
                      Enrollment Grant from Chancellor

                             Skills Lab Update           Purchased Scenarios
                                                          Virtual IV Computer Software

                                                                                  91
       Topic                    Discussion                             Disposition
                                                             Geriatric Manikin
                                                             Aging Population (JCAHO)
                                                             Human Patient Simulators:
                                                             Noelle, Sim Man, 3 Adult Vital
                                                             Sims, 1 Child, 1 Infant
                                                             (BP/RR heart, lungs, bowel
                                                             signs)
                          Completion   of      Graduate
                           Survey Form.

Affiliates Update         Changes in requirements for
                           affiliation
                          Policies/protocols          Core Measures Cap, AMI,
                                                       CHF – 2nd/3rd Tears

                                                             Coming:
                                                             Side rails, (4) rails, restrains
                                                               1. DVT
                                                                2. Reimbursement for bed
                                                             sores (pressure must report
                                                             ulcer 3rd&4th)

                                                             National color code:
                                                             Red – Allergies
                                                             Purple – DNR’s, Falls

                          Expectations of graduates         Critical Thinking
                           /what can we do better?           Mentor/buddy (always needs
                          Needs of Hospitals                help)
                          Your news                         Trained for a year then they
                                                             leave (disappointing)
                                                             no loyalty
                                                             institute salary program
                                                             (steps) for new grads.

                    To begin in Spring 2007. Initial
Student Nurse       pilot will be from 15-20 students. All
Association         clinicals on ground. Testing at
comments from       secure testing sites. Theory on-
representatives     line.

                       -   2 step TBC
                       -   drug testing                      Are required (last 4 to 5
                       -   Social Security numbers           digits) for some hospitals.


                                                                                       92
Topic                Discussion              Disposition
        IV Course – do they get a   Nsg. 20 - theory
        certificate?                Nsg. 30 – insertion (90% start
                                    on patient)




                                                            93
               Santa Monica College
            Health Sciences Department
   Nursing Program – Advisory Committee Meeting
 Minutes – Thursday, April 7, 2009 – 1:00pm – 3:00pm



Chair:      Ida Danzey
Recorder:   Bronwyn Webber-Gregg

Attendees:
Names                     Affiliations
Ida Danzey                SMC Assistant Dean
Eve Adler                 SMC Nursing
Sheryl Abelew             Century City Doctors Hospital
Connie Zandate            Marina del Rey Work Source
Hazel Peters              SMC Project Manager
Holly Thiercof            SMC Faculty
Rita Hand                 SMC Faculty
Dawn Murphy               SMC
Lois Risinger             SMC
Georgia Farber            SMC
Vini Angel                SMC
Rita Soshnik              SMC
Margaret Ecker
Maya Bedi                 St. John’s Med. Ctr.
Shirley Edwards           St. John’s Med. Ctr.
Ishara Bailis             SM-UCLA Med. Ctr.
Deborah Sanchez           Kaiser Permanente
Candace Lee               LAUSD – Adult & Career Education
Lynne Orlins              SM-UCLA Med. Ctr.
Susan Gritt               SM-UCLA Med. Ctr.
Louana George             SMC Nursing
Lenore Banders            SMC Health Services
Gloria M. Lopez           SMC Health Services
Marvin Friedman           SMC Nursing
Eric J. Williams          SMC Nursing
Carole J. McCaskill       SMC Nursing
Jo Ann Whitaker           Cedars-Sinai Med. Ctr.
Laurie McQuay-Peringer    SMC



                                                             94
       Topic                    Discussion                         Disposition
Introductions
Minutes of 04/07/09                                       Minutes accepted & approved
mtg.
Announcements       NLNAC Accrediting visit from Nov. After this visit there will be no
                    7-9, 2006                             further accreditation visits for
                                                          8 years.
                    Thanks to all who participated in
                    the Environmental Scan Survey.
                    Last day for participation is May 31,
                    2006.


Nursing Program              NLNAC accrediting outcome
Updates                      NCLEX scores for 2006-
                              2007
                             Legislation impacting
                              nursing programs

                          AB 1559                           Merit base
                          SB1309                            Passed 2005, pass readiness
                                                            test
                             California Institute of
                              Nursing and Healthcare        Rep: Pat Chambers
                              (CINHC)
                                                         October 2007, Oregon Model
                              White Paper on Redesign of Nov. 2007
                              Nursing Education

                             Clinical Placement System      State funded $90k – Little
                             (Demonstration on              Company of Mary - Torrance
                             September 24 and 25 in the
                             Los Angeles area)
                      Current Contracts/Grants:
                      Fostering Student Success             R/R Policy
                      Community Based Job Training          LVN online
                      Grant
                      Enrollment Grant from Chancellor

                             Skills Lab Update             Purchased Scenarios
                                                            Virtual IV Computer Software

                                                                                     95
       Topic                    Discussion                             Disposition
                                                             Geriatric Manikin
                                                             Aging Population (JCAHO)
                                                             Human Patient Simulators:
                                                             Noelle, Sim Man, 3 Adult Vital
                                                             Sims, 1 Child, 1 Infant
                                                             (BP/RR heart, lungs, bowel
                                                             signs)
                          Completion   of      Graduate
                           Survey Form.

Affiliates Update         Changes in requirements for
                           affiliation
                          Policies/protocols          Core Measures Cap, AMI,
                                                       CHF – 2nd/3rd Tears

                                                             Coming:
                                                             Side rails, (4) rails, restrains
                                                               1. DVT
                                                                2. Reimbursement for bed
                                                             sores (pressure must report
                                                             ulcer 3rd&4th)

                                                             National color code:
                                                             Red – Allergies
                                                             Purple – DNR’s, Falls

                          Expectations of graduates         Critical Thinking
                           /what can we do better?           Mentor/buddy (always needs
                          Needs of Hospitals                help)
                          Your news                         Trained for a year then they
                                                             leave (disappointing)
                                                             no loyalty
                                                             institute salary program
                                                             (steps) for new grads.

                    To begin in Spring 2007. Initial
Student Nurse       pilot will be from 15-20 students. All
Association         clinicals on ground. Testing at
comments from       secure testing sites. Theory on-
representatives     line.

                       -   2 step TBC
                       -   drug testing                      Are required (last 4 to 5
                       -   Social Security numbers           digits) for some hospitals.


                                                                                       96
Topic                Discussion              Disposition
        IV Course – do they get a   Nsg. 20 - theory
        certificate?                Nsg. 30 – insertion (90% start
                                    on patient)




                                                            97
                Santa Monica College
             Health Sciences Department
    Nursing Program – Advisory Committee Meeting
      Minutes of April 7, 2010 – 1:00pm – 3:00pm


Chair:      Ida Danzey
Recorder:   Bronwyn Webber-Gregg


Attendees:
Names                     Affiliations
Ida Danzey                SMC Associate Dean
Eve Adler                 SMC Nursing
Hazel Peters              SMC Project Manager
Dawn Murphy               SMC Project Manager
Lisa Battaglia            SMC Nursing Counselor
Kathleen Hunt             Santa Monica UCLA
Evangelina Jimenez        Wise and Healthy Aging
Eric J. Williams          SMC Nursing
Kathy Chai                Cal State University Dominquez Hills
Carole Shea               Cal State University Dominquez Hills
Rose A. Welch             Cal State University Dominquez Hills
Deborah Sanchez           Kaiser Permanente
Ruth Zimmerman            Kaiser Permanente
Susan Gritt               SM-UCLA Med. Ctr.
Laurie McQuay Peninger    SMC Project Manager
Angie Cooper              Marina Del Rey One Stop
Dr. Tori Camillas-Dufau   Los Angeles Unified School District
Laurie McQuay-Peringer    SMC
Gloria Lopez              SMC Health Services
Sheri Monsein             SM-UCLA Med. Ctr.
Annette Hester            Step Up on Second




                                                                 98
            Topic                            Discussion                    Disposition
Introductions
Minutes of 04/07/2010 mtg.                                     Minutes       accepted        &
                                                               approved
Announcements                                                  After this visit there will be
NLNAC accrediting outcome         NLNAC Accrediting visit from no further accreditation
                                  Nov. 7-9, 2006               visits for 8 years.

                                  Thanks to all who participated in
                                  the Environmental Scan Survey.


NCLEX scores for 2006-2007        NCLEX scores were 93%
Legislation impacting nursing
programs

   AB 1559
   SB1309                         Merit base
                                  Passed 2005, pass readiness
California Institute of Nursing   test
and Healthcare (CINHC)
                                  Rep: Pat Chambers
White Paper on Redesign of
Nursing Education

Clinical Placement System         October 2007, Oregon Model
(Demonstration on                 Nov. 2007
September 24 and 25 in the
Los Angeles area)
                                  State funded $90k – Little
                                  Company of Mary - Torrance
Current Contracts/Grants:
Fostering Student Success
                                  Readiness/Remediation Policy
Community Based Job
Training Grant                    LVN online started in Spring
                                  2007. Initial pilot has 9 students,
                                  capacity is15-20 students. All
                                  clinicals on ground. Testing at
Enrollment Grant from             secure testing sites. Theory on-
Chancellor                        line.
Skills Lab Update

                                                                                         99
            Topic                        Discussion                     Disposition

                              Purchased Scenarios
                              Virtual IV Computer Software
                              Geriatric Manikin
                              Aging Population (JCAHO)
                              Human Patient Simulators:
                              Noelle, Sim Man, 3 Adult Vital
                              Sims, 1 Child, 1 Infant
Completion of Graduate        (BP/RR heart, lungs, bowel
Survey Form.                  signs)

Affiliates Update             Complete graduate survey and
                              submit as soon as possible
     Changes in
      requirements for
      affiliation

                              Several of the agencies are
                              requiring 2 step TB test, drug
                              testing, and the students’ Social
     Policies/protocols      Security number are required or
                              the last 4 to 5 digits for some
                              hospitals.

                              Core Measures have been
                              implemented for CAP, AMI, CHF,
                              2nd/3rd Tears

                              Coming:
                              Side rails, (4) rails, restrains
                                1. DVT
                                 2. No reimbursement for bed
                              sores acquired in hospitals
                              (pressure must report ulcer
                              3rd&4th)

     Expectations of        National color code:
      graduates /what can we Red – Allergies
      do better?             Purple – DNR’s, Falls
     Needs of Hospitals

                              Critical Thinking                  Determine a realistic level
                              Mentor/buddy (always needs of competence for the new
                              help)                              graduate
                              Trained for a year then they leave

                                                                                      100
         Topic               Discussion               Disposition
                 (disappointing)
                 no loyalty
                 Institute salary program (steps)
                 for new grads. Discussion
                 followed regarding realistic
   Your news    expectations, support, and longer
                 orientation periods.

                 A representative asked whether
                 the students take an IV Course –
                 do they get a certificate?
                 Faculty indicated that Nsg. 20 –
                 theory and in Nsg. 30 insertion of
                 IVs is taught (90% start on
                 patient). We do not offer an IV
                 Course.




                                                                    101
                         Santa Monica College

                  Health Sciences Department
         Nursing Program - Advisory Committee Meeting
             Tuesday, Minutes of December 6, 2011


Chair:       Ida Danzey
Recorder:    Bronwyn Webber-Gregg


Attendees:

          Names                        Affiliations
Ida Danzey               SMC Associate Dean
Vini Angel               SMC Nursing
Rose Welch               California State Dominquez Hills
Kathy Chai               California State Dominquez Hills
Alicia Puppione          St. John’s Medical Center
Laurie McQuay-Peringer   SMC
Estelita Galaraga        SMC
Dinah Penaflorida        SMC
Lisa Battaglia           SMC
Eric Williams            SMC
Janet Robinson           SMC
Deborah Sanchez          Kaiser Permanente West Los Angeles
Holly Thiercof           SMC
Eve Adler                SMC
Anntippia Short          SMC
Marcy Bregman            SMC




                                                              102
        Topic                      Discussion                            Disposition
Introductions
Minutes of mtg.                                                     Minutes accepted &
October 2010                                                        approved
Announcements     Completion of Survey of New Graduates.            This survey is sent out
                                                                    to all of the facilities
                                                                    that we use.
                  The returns on those have been limited. If we
                  cannot receive information from the Director      This tool is very
                  of Education, perhaps the Nurse Managers          important to us and I
                  or those who mentor, or precept the new           know that some of the
                  graduates; who could also complete the            hospitals      cannot
                  survey and note that it is coming from that       identify.
                  facility. I think it gives us a more realistic
                  view of what our graduate’s looks like,
                  because we might think that they are
                  wonderful and we might find that they have
                  some short falls that we are not familiar with.

                  Our graduates do have quite a bit of
                  competition, from the baccalaureate and out
                  of state. Locally, a lot of graduates from
                  Northern California are coming to Southern
                  California looking for jobs as well. The
                  graduates are having a difficult time, we did
                  have one of our partners California Institute
                  of Nursing and Healthcare (CINH), come out
                  and suggest the hospitals pursue a Magnet
                  status that they not limit themselves to hiring
                  baccalaureate degrees and up; even with the
                  IOM, everyone has a role to play in
                  healthcare. This was the first time that a
                  group has spoken out saying that they felt
                  that this was not in the best interest of
                  nursing for that to happen.

Nursing Program   Question – do you know what percentages of More were employed
Updates           your graduates are actually employed as      in heath care and not
                  RNs?                                         in a position that
                                                               required the use of the
                  From the last graduating class, 73.7% of the title of ‘registered
                  new grads were employed in six months; that nurse’, and they are
                  was 56-76 responds and 83.0% which was not all in acute care
                  63 out of 76 were employed in nine months; settings. We have
                  and 85.5% in the end there were 65 out of 76 encouraged them to
                  were employed within a year.                 look at alternative

                                                                                     103
                                                          sites, clinics, skilled
                                                          care facilities, and
                                                          there is some working
                                                          at skilled care facilities
                                                          as registered nurses.

Grants   We have been able to offer to our graduates      So we’ve been trying
         through a ‘specialty grant’ from the             to do some things to
         Chancellor’s office we’ve been providing         help our graduates to
         some courses to facilitate them getting hired.   stand out more, they
         EKG interpretation, our next one that we are     are          developing
         planning is ACLS, and we plan to do so           portfolios, doing mock
         things with cultural competency, but those       interviews for quite
         classes did not fill; so they were cancelled.    some time.
         Some of the hospitals, Harbor UCLA in
         particular, have been very supportive in         One of our facilities is
         sending new graduates to the EKG                 doing that, as well as
         interpretation program.                          some of the hospitals
                                                          are    having       pre-
                                                          assessments as part
                                                          of   the    application
                                                          period

                                                          The emphasis seemly
                                                          is on ‘soft skills’ such
                                                          as,     communication,
                                                          the ability to work
                                                          collegially,         being
                                                          professional in your
                                                          demeanor; things that
                                                          we might talk about
                                                          and people assume
                                                          that it is from an old
                                                          generation, these are
         Our NCLEX results are between 94-100%,           some of the things that
         with the class that graduated in June 2011,      the     facilities     are
         we had twenty-six graduates and twenty-five      looking for now and
         to take boards, with twenty-five that have       they come to speak to
         passed; and one that has not taken boards        the students about the
         as of November 15th; but might have taken it     importance of some of
         since then. For the past four semesters, our     those ‘soft skills’.
         NCLEX results are between 93.93 to 100%.
         In all those instances, we are exceeding the     One of the areas that
         national means for NCLEX; which is floating      we are not so proud of
         between 85-87%                                   is    (and   we   are
                                                          collecting data on

                                                                             104
                                                                       this),    the    on-time
                                                                       completion rate for the
                                                                       program. That has
                                                                       been one of our
                                                                       struggles, but we’ve
                                                                       started     using     the
                                                                       assessment test, and
                                                                       when we get a cohort,
                                                                       there’s an appearance
                                                                       that when we have a
                                                                       cohort of students,
                                                                       who        pass       the
                                                                       assessment           test
                                                                       without     remediation,
                                                                       we have a higher
                                                                       completion rate. For
                                                                       example, the first class
                                                                       that graduated in June
                                                                       2008 that was the first
                                                                       class that everyone
                                                                       had taken and passed
                                                                       the assessment test
                                                                       on the first go round.

                                                                       The other factor that
                                                                       we thought might had
                                                                       contributed to this
                                                                       recent co-hort. A lot of
                                                                       the students withdrew,
                      We are now in the early stages of preparing      they were excellent
                      to do a curriculum revision.                     students but with
                                                                       husbands losing jobs,
                                                                       at risk of losing their
                                                                       homes, we had a
                                                                       number of students
                                                                       who dropped out of
                                                                       this particular class for
Enrollment Grant      We have incorporated the QSEN Core-              personal reasons; and
and Retention Grant   Competency for pre-licensure programs.           most of them being
from Chancellor’s     One of the grants that are available             financial. Most of the
Office                                                                 monies that we do
                                                                       have available are for
                      We have been attempting to do, at least from     one time or short term
                      our chancellor’s office, is identify with what   emergencies only.
                      the core pre-requisites are and what the core    That is one of the
                      nursing curriculum is and then how we can        areas that we are

                                                                                         105
         transition associate degree graduates into a     working on.
         bachelor’s degree with as little repetition as
         possible.                                        Another outcome is
                                                          program satisfaction.
AB1295     AB1295, is the legislation that stream lined   Right now we are in
         the process of students acquiring a BSN,         the first phase of that
         because right now, it could be anywhere          in terms of getting buy-
         from 2 to another 4 years as well as some of     in from the faculty that
         the units; and it involves some of the           the curriculum revision
         repetitions.                                     is necessary, because
                                                          we are going to need
         There are several grants that may be             their buy-in to effect
         appropriate for the nursing program:             this change in a
                                                          constructive manner.
         Health Innovation Grant, of HIT (Health
         Information Technology) Grant, NECQUA            There are no two cal-
         (HRSA) has two grants for ADN programs;          states or community
         ‘Jobs for Vets’ grant.                           colleges that have the
                                                          same curriculum.

                                                          The community
                                                          colleges and the cal-
                                                          state universities have
                                                          until July 31, 2012 to
                                                          have that done.

                                                          Many of the grants
                                                          involve healthcare and
                                                          it is still an area of
                                                          Workforce
                                                          Development.

         Teamwork and Collaboration                       Recently, we had Dr.
                                                          Skydell retired
                                                          physician and
                                                          instructor come and
                                                          speak to our nursing
                                                          students regarding
                                                          ‘team work and
                                                          collaboration’ which
                                                          involved what you
                                                          need to communicate
                                                          to doctors.




                                                                           106
Affiliates Update   At Cedars Sinai they pay a great deal of the
                    fees incurred in going for a BSN and they
                    even have the BSN classes at the hospitals.

                    The NLN national statistic, to every four
                    graduates of nursing, only one is from the
                    baccalaureate, three is from the non-
                    baccalaureate curriculum.

                    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) did not say
                    that the entry level to practice should be
                    baccalaureate, because the data does not
                    support that; but by 2020 they want to
                    increase the number of baccalaureate
                    graduates by 80%.

                    Kaiser’s new grad program has been so          This past year only
                    deleted compared to before.                    one Santa Monica
                                                                   student has been hired
                                                                   due to the hospital is
                                                                   just not hiring. Many
                                                                   of the nursing
                                                                   graduates from Santa
                                                                   Monica College that
                                                                   have been hired are
                                                                   working in the
                                                                   Emergency
                                                                   Department, with six of
                                                                   them still working
                                                                   there are strong.

                                                                   We currently have fifty
                                                                   applicants    for   the
                                                                   ‘student intern nursing
                                                                   program’, and the
                                                                   students are being
                                                                   hired now by the
                                                                   department
                                                                   administrators.




                                                                                   107
                   At St. Johns we are not having that much           Per my conversation
                   turnover at all for financial reasons. People      with   the    Advisory
                   are just not retiring, working one to two shifts   Board, one thing we
                   per diem per pay period making bear                keep forgetting is with
                   minimum, are now working three or four             the   shift   in    the
                   shifts per pay period or full time.                economy, a lot of new
                                                                      grad is not getting
                                                                      jobs.

                                                                      To deal with this on a
Changes in         At Kaiser ‘Health Connect’ our innovation is       curriculum level by
Requirements for   in technology as far as computerized               preparing the students
Affiliation        electronic lab corrector.                          to work in a non-
                                                                      hospital situation.
                    At St. Johns we are making sure there is
                   understanding that our organization goals          We are looking at
                   are being met.                                     becoming a ‘Stroke
                                                                      Center and Acute
                                                                      Stroke Education’.

                                                                      It is getting easier
                                                                      between our
                                                                      organization and
                                                                      Medicare Drug
                                                                      Commissioner coming
                                                                      down with what they
                                                                      are looking for as far
                                                                      as evidence based
                                                                      practice from our
                                                                      managers and no
                                                                      hospital required
                                                                      conditions.

Student Nurse      The nursing student’s involvement and              Last semester the
Association        concerns for the sponsoring of                     students held
Comments from      ‘disadvantaged persons ’ has been in the           fundraisers and
Representatives    form of Toy Drives, and food donations for         raised over $2,500.00
                   local Food Banks and has had an increased          for the Swaziland
                   sensibility for the importance of helping the      project. With projects
                   community prior to the holiday season. The         like these, the
                   last two classes had projects that have            students really see the
                   raised monies toward ‘Aids in Africa’ in           importance of being a
                   Swaziland.                                         member of the
                                                                      community and apply
                                                                      this towards the
                                                                      discipline of nursing.

                                                                                       108
Working with the
students through
leadership, 99% of the
students voiced the
importance of going
back to school and
many have realized
that we are in a state
of change, not being
resistant to the
progress of lifelong
learning that is
required in this
profession.




                109

				
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