VISUAL & PERFORMING ARTS by 1SteDC9k

VIEWS: 0 PAGES: 8

									                     VISUAL & PERFORMING ARTS
MLR Information
The arts include dance, music, theater and visual art. In an increasingly technological world, the arts help
all students to develop multiple capabilities for creating, understanding, deciphering, and appreciating an
image- and symbol-laden world. The arts are concerned with intellectual, emotional, and physical faculties
and, in combination, can be used to present issues and ideas, teach or persuade, entertain, plan, beautify,
and design both functional and expressive works. Experiencing and creating art brings lifelong enjoyment
to students and an array of expressive, analytical, and developmental tools to use in their daily lives.

The arts play a valued role in creating cultures and developing and documenting civilizations. Students of
the arts gain powerful tools for:
      communicating through creative expression;
      understanding human experiences, past and present;
      adapting to and respecting the ways others think, work, and express themselves;
      using artistic modes of problem solving, which, in turn, bring an array of expressive, analytical,
          and development tools to every human situation;
      understanding the power of the arts to create and reflect cultures;
      understanding the impact of design on virtually all we use in daily life;
      understanding the interdependence of work in the arts and the worlds of ideas and events;
      making decisions in situations where there are no standard answers;
      analyzing nonverbal communication and making informed judgments about cultural products and
          issues;
      communicating thoughts and feelings in a variety of modes, thereby providing a more powerful
          repertoire of self-expression.
Because each arts discipline appeals to different senses and expresses itself through different media, each
adds a special richness to the learning environment. Arts education helps students learn to identify,
appreciate, and participate in the traditional and non-traditional art forms of their own communities and the
communities of others. As students imagine, create, and reflect, they are developing the verbal and non-
verbal abilities necessary for life-long learning. The intellectual demands of the arts help students develop
problem-solving abilities and such powerful thinking skills as analyzing, synthesizing, and evaluating.
Numerous studies point toward a consistent and positive correlation between substantive education in the
arts and student achievement in other subjects. A comprehensive, well-designed arts education program
also engages students in a process that helps them develop the self-esteem, self-discipline, cooperation, and
self-motivation necessary for success in life. Most importantly, the arts should be experienced and studied
for their own intrinsic value.

A. CREATIVE EXPRESSION. Students will create and/or perform to express ideas and feelings.
Students communicate through their works, revise and problem-solve, use a variety of processes, and
integrate their works with other disciplines.
      Each art form has specific vocabulary, elements, principles, and structures that allow for
          communication of ideas, feelings, and moods.
      Problem-solving skills, reflection, self-evaluation, revising, and refinement are part of the process
          used in the creation and development of art works.
      The development and creation of work in the arts use a variety of approaches, styles, media, and
          performance modes, including electronic technology.
      Students will understand that the roles, skills, relationships, and differences among the arts are
          transferable from one arts discipline to another as well as to other disciplines.
B. CULTURAL HERITAGE. Students will understand the cultural contributions (social, ethical,
political, religious dimensions) of the arts, how the arts shape and are shaped by prevailing cultural
and social beliefs and values, and recognize exemplary works from a variety of cultures and
historical periods. The arts are the record of our diverse world cultures and provide understanding of who
we are, where we've been, and possible directions for our future.
C. CRITICISM AND AESTHETICS. Students will reflect upon and assess the characteristics and
merits of art works. An understanding of how the senses are used to make artistic choices in daily life,
together with an understanding of how these choices affect feelings, moods, and emotions, helps us to make
judgments about the merits and meaning of work in the arts. The elements, principles, and structures of art
forms can be composed in ways which enrich, persuade, and influence society, either directly, through
performances, original works and exhibits or indirectly, through electronic and printed media..

A. CREATIVE EXPRESSION
Students will create and/or perform to express ideas and feelings. Students will be able to:
    1. Create a visual or performance piece to communicate an idea, feeling, or meaning using:
              a distinct style;
              imagination and technical skill; and
              the creative process, reflection, and self-evaluation (problem-solving skills).
    2. Compare various classical and contemporary visual and/or performing arts techniques and
        methods and demonstrate the use of these in their own works.
    3. Create a piece in one art form which complements one of the other art forms (e.g., music to
        complement poetry).
    4. Use the elements and principles of design to demonstrate multiple solutions to specific visual or
        performing arts problems.
    5. Create a portfolio of work that communicates new ideas, feelings, and moods using different
        media, techniques, and processes.
    6. Demonstrate an understanding that the arts are a means of renewal and recreation, as well as an
        occupational opportunity.
    7. Identify the value of participating in the arts and summarize possible involvement in personal and
        community arts.
    8. Use arts knowledge and vocabulary to critique their own work.
    9. Use skills and knowledge of arts elements and principles, whenever applicable, to solve problems
        or enhance meaning in other disciplines.
EXAMPLES
     Create a number of art works that represent their best work in a range of media they select.
              Create a character in a number of different acting styles and videotape the performances.
              Choreograph dances that interpret various other media such as poetry or visual art.
              Create a musical composition in their choice of media which may include the computer.
              Intern or apprentice with a professional in field of choice for a specific project.
              Use knowledge of color and design to create mathematical patterns.
B. CULTURAL HERITAGE
Students will understand the cultural contributions (social, ethical, political, religious dimensions) of
the arts, how the arts shape and are shaped by prevailing cultural and social beliefs and values, and
recognize exemplary works from a variety of cultures and historical periods. Students will be able to:
    1. Compare two or more visual and/or performing arts by identifying the genre, style, historical
         period and conditions, probable artist, and cultural source.
    2. Compare and contrast characteristics of visual and/or performing arts within a particular historical
         period or style with concepts about the period or style from other content areas.
    3. Analyze common characteristics and purposes of various visual and/or performing art works
         across time and among cultural and social groups, and explain how these characteristics and
         purposes fulfill social, religious, or ceremonial functions in a particular cultural and historical
         context.
    4. Create works that reflect concepts, theories, approaches, and styles from their own and other
         cultures.
    5. Develop visual and/or performing art work in response to a historical, social or cultural condition
         using a variety of forms.
EXAMPLES
    Create and explain a time and theme line using several chosen works from different cultures.
          Create visual or performing art in the style of a particular artist.
          Create a musical fanfare that will be used during the lighting of the Olympic flame.
          Explain the relationship between the social climate of the 1960's and the social dances of
              the time.

C. CRITICISM AND AESTHETICS
Students will reflect upon and assess the characteristics and merits of art works. Students will be able
to:
    1. Explain and justify personal aesthetic criteria for critiquing works of visual and performing art,
        texts, and events.
    2. Research the work of critics, historians, aestheticians, and artists to analyze and interpret works
        and compare differing critiques of the same visual and performing art works.
    3. Analyze, interpret, and evaluate subtle and complex meaning in visual and/or performing arts
        intended to persuade and influence (as in electronic media, theater, commercial, and political
        advertising).
    4. Create visual and/or performing art work that is used to influence and persuade and explain how
        the design accomplishes its purpose.
EXAMPLES
     Write a review of an artistic performance and compare it to one written by a professional critic.
     Interpret meanings in works by political artists in several cultures and/or historical periods.
     Research and use the written works of critics and historians to analyze works by a particular
        composer, artist, choreographer, or playwright.
     Create a public service announcement opposing the use of illegal drugs and explain why you think
        it is successful or unsuccessful.

#420
Art Fundamentals—An Introductory Visual Arts Survey (Formerly Art 1)
An introduction to the visual arts. The course is 80% studio artwork in design, painting, drawing, and
sculpture, focusing on the elements and principles of design. The remaining 20 percent is comprised of art
history, art criticism, and aesthetic valuing (analysis of beauty). The course component requires student
discussion, research and written components. The students will construct and keep art portfolios and
sketchbooks. The final assessment is an alternative assessment or a written exam, based on student’s
individual choice.
Content Standards: A B C
1 credit - 1 semester
Meets Fine Arts Graduation Requirement

#421
Studio Art (Formerly Art 2)
A continuation of Art Fundamentals. The goal of this course is the pursuit of perceptual refinement
through creative studio work in a variety of media; evaluative sophistication is encouraged in a dynamic
and combinative manner which uses art history and, especially, the students' own sketchbook journals, art
notebooks and art portfolios as prime resource material. The final assessment is a public exhibit of student
work.
Content Standards: A B C
1 credit - 1 semester
Prerequisite - successful completion of Art Fundamentals
Meets Fine Arts Graduation Requirement

#422
Intermediate Studio Art (Formerly Art 3)
This course is designed to develop students' personal styles of artistic expression by means of project work
(ie. the production of many art works which are related by thematic, technical and design continuities);
through aesthetic self-criticism; thematic reexamination of the content of our visual heritage. Students
should have their sketchbooks, art journals, notebooks, and portfolios from previous art courses, which they
will continue to build upon. From these, students will make a selection of their work to exhibit, self-assess
and reflect upon for their final assessment exhibit at the Fine and Performing Arts Evening at the end of the
semester. Student sketchbooks, journals, art notebooks and art portfolios are prime resource material for
studio artwork. From these, students will make a selection of their work to exhibit, self-assess and reflect
upon for exhibit at the end of the semester.
Content Standards: A B C
1 credit - 1 semester
Prerequisite - successful completion of Art Fundamentals and Studio Art
Meets Fine Arts Graduation Requirement

#423
Advanced Studio Art (Formerly Art 4)
Advanced Studio Art is a studio course enhanced through the inclusion of perceptual, historical, and
evaluative components. The student will be able to study in depth through individualized projects in two-
dimensional and three-dimensional media. This course is especially designed for the art student intending
to apply to an art school or college. Students are expected to keep sketchbook journals, art notebooks and
art portfolios and use them as prime resource material for their own work. The course will provide the
student with a step by step approach to the organization and presentation of their resume, art portfolio and
slide portfolio of art work.
Content Standards: A B C
1 credit - 1 semester
Prerequisite: successful completion of Art Fundamentals, Studio Art and Intermediate Studio Art
Meets Fine Arts Graduation Requirement

#424
AP Studio Art
Advanced Placement Studio Art is designed to help students prepare a portfolio of their work for
submission to a College. The portfolio work will include slides and matted work. AP Studio Art is not
assessed by a written examination; instead, candidates submit a portfolio of work for evaluation to a board
of judges at the College Board in Princeton, New Jersey. Advanced placement work involves significantly
more time, commitment and money than most high school courses. Therefore, the program is intended for
students seriously committed to studying art. Students who are interested in building an AP portfolio must
be willing to devote the whole year to creating a portfolio. All students completing this course are required
to complete the AP Portfolio and exam in the spring.
Content Standards: A B C
1 credits - 1 semester
Meets Fine Arts Graduation Requirement
Prerequisites:
(1) Art Fundamentals, Studio Art, & Intermediate Studio Art (must have a grade of B or better in all of these courses)
(2)) Submission of an art portfolio of 10-15 works of art and a sketchbook journal for art department review prior
     to taking the course

#425
Computer Art
This is a course in electronic imaging. It furthers the study of the elements and principles of art and their
application to computer and multi-media technology. Students will engage in Drawing, Painting and 3
Dimensional Design and integrate these efforts with their use of the computer. They will learn the use of
the digital camera, the scanner, video equipment and software for drawing, painting, graphics and multi-
media/video production. In conjunction with the production of their own art, they will compile a portfolio
of all their work on a diskette, design and illustrate a publication and produce a short animated video.
Content Standards: A B C
1 credit - 1 semester
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Computer Literacy, Art Fundamentals and Studio Art
Meets Fine Arts Graduation Requirement

#429
Introduction to Photography
This course provides an introductory overview of photographic techniques, history, theory, criticism and
production of black and white photography. It is both a studio and a classroom course designed to meet the
needs of students desiring to acquire basic photographic facility; to understand photography as a craft and
an art form; and to enhance their ability to produce, understand and interpret photographs, and appreciate
photography in its historical, cultural, technological, commercial and aesthetic contexts. Students will study
basic principles and practice of black and white photography, and explore photography from the
mechanical creation of the image, with camera and film, to enlarging the photograph for display. Students
must have a 35-millimeter camera and required lab fee of $35. Parental approval form must be completed
and returned with course of study card.
Content Standards: A B C
1 credit - 1 semester
Prerequisite - Successful completion of Art Fundamentals
Meets Fine Arts Graduation Requirements
Open to grades 10, 11, and 12

#416
Sculpture/Claymation
Sculpture will provide students with the opportunity to work in a variety of sculptural media: fond objects,
cardboard, plaster, paris-craft, wood, and clay. Both additive processes and subtractive processes in the
making of environmental sculpture, name totem, assemblage, relief making, mobile making and sculpture
will be used. Students will be engaged in the creation of four to six works of three-dimensional
construction, form relief to full sculpture, culminating in an exhibition. The studio work will provide time
to study structural principles, material characteristics and techniques, visual language, and design elements
and principles. Complementing the studio work will be academic study of past and present artists and their
artworks. The course will require students to engage in academic research, use sketchbooks, and produce a
specified body of sculptural art work for final review and exhibition. Claymation will engage students in
the latest form of puppetry. Students will construct claymation characters, sets, scores and scripts for the
production of claymation movies. In addition to the drawing, painting, sculptural and other production
aspects of this art form, students will be introduced to the video and editing technology essential to this
type of production. Students will work as a team in all disciplines listed above to produce a claymation
movie.
Content Standards: A B C
Prerequisite-successful completion of Art Fundamentals
1 credit - 1 semester
Meets Fine Arts Graduation Requirement
Note: This course runs for one semester; students will attend the sculpture mini-course with one instructor for nine
weeks and then switch to the claymation mini-course with another instructor for the remaining nine weeks, or vice-
versa.

#443
Ceramics Studio
This course is designed to provide students with an in-depth experience of the technical and design
processes of the ceramics studio. Students will study the uses of ceramics from pre-history to the present
day and the impact the highly versatile medium has had on civilization. The student’s personal style of
expression will be developed through a series of projects. Students will create functional objects; bowls,
pitchers, etc. as well as a series of projects exploring the limits of the medium; ie. jewelry, slip-casting
processes, wheel throwing, and sculpture. Ceramicware and ceramics in concert with other media is
experiencing a resurgence in modern art, and the newest trends in the field will be explored. Students will
also learn how modern ceramic artists are marketing their work through galleries and retail outlets.
Students will have a hands-on role in the function of the studio including processing clays, creating glaze
combinations and understanding the use and care of the kiln.
Content Standards: A B C
1 credit - 1 semester
Prerequisite--Successful completion of Art Fundamentals
Meets Fine Arts Graduation Requirement

#444
Continuing Photography
In this course, students will apply skills and techniques acquired in Introduction to Photography as they
begin to fine-tune and refine their craft and develop their own personal style. Students will continue to
study the history of photography and look at master photos from the past through contemporary works.
More advanced techniques will be introduced and students will experiment with a variety of papers, toners,
hand coloring, and historical, and alternative processes. Genres of photography will be explored as students
build a portfolio. (Lab Fee $35)
Content Standards: A B C
1 credit - 1 semester
Prerequisite—Successful completion of Introduction to Photography
Meets Fine Arts Graduation Requirement

#447
Beginning Guitar
A study of the fundamentals of guitar skills, including chords, melody, rhythm and basic theory concepts.
Students will develop basic accompaniment skills as well as melodic an basic ensemble playing. No prior
musical experience is necessary. Written and performance quizzes will be given regularly.
Lab Fee: $15.00
Content Standards: AB C
1 credit - 1 semester
Note: Maximum Class size – 10
Meets Fine Arts Requirement

#430 Semester 1
#438 Semester 2
Concert Band
Class work consists of developing skills and techniques necessary for the performance of concert and
ensemble music. An improved level of musicianship and musical understanding will also be pursued
through daily practice, assigned rehearsal objectives and occasional written assignments. Quarterly
performance evaluations will be given. The band performs at concerts, athletic events, parades, and
community events. Attendance at these events is required for credit. Occasional rehearsals and
performances are scheduled outside of the school day. The student is expected to make every effort to
attend. Students may elect Concert Band for both semesters; however, the second semester of band must
be the eighth block.
Content Standards: A B C
1 credit - 1 semester
Meets Fine Arts Requirement

#442
Jazz Lab (Block 5)
This course develops the skills and techniques necessary for the performance of jazz music. Rock, Swing
and Latin style music will be explored as well as beginning improvisational techniques. Playing and
written tests as well as quarterly evaluations will be given to monitor student progress and to check for
understanding of the subject matter. Jazz Lab is open to all students wishing to improve their performance
skills in this uniquely American art form. Attendance at all rehearsals and performances is required for
credit.
Content Standards: ABC
.5 credit = 1 semester
Meets Fine Arts Requirement
This course is offered after school two times a week.

#431 Semester 1
#437 Semester 2
Chorus
Classroom activities are designed to increase each student's level of musical and choral awareness.
Included will be vocal techniques, development of notation and interpretation skills, and preparing music
for performances. Special emphasis will be placed on increasing the student's ability to sight read choral
music. Also included will be basic music theory and the fundamentals of music. Theory will include note
value, note placement on the staff, scale structure, key signatures, intervals, and rhythmic exercises. Daily
participation is mandatory, as well as attendance at all performances and special rehearsals. Students
wishing to elect Chorus for both semesters may do so.
Content Standards: A B C
1 credit - 1 semester
Meets Fine Arts Requirement

#433
History of American Musical Theater
Musical Theater is one of the most popular and lasting art forms ever created. We will explore a wide
variety of productions from the 1940’s through the 1990’s. Shows will be viewed in their entirety and a
study of how the musical came to be (origin of story, composer, lyricist, cast, setting) will be studied. A
variety of written and alternative assessments will be used based upon student input.
Content Standards: A B C
1 credit – 1 semester

#434
Music Keyboarding—Beginning
A study of the fundamentals of keyboard skills, including scales, chords, rhythms, and other basic theory
concepts. Students will explore playing keyboard instruments including piano and electric keyboards.
Written and performance quizzes will be given regularly.
Designed for 10-11-12 grades only
Content Standards: A,B, C
1 credit - 1 semester
Meets Fine Arts Requirement
Note: Maximum Class size – 10

#417
Music Keyboarding—Continuing
A continued study of keyboard skills, including scales, chords, rhythms, and other theory concepts. The
curriculum will be tailored to each student’s individual performance level. Written and performance
quizzes will be given regularly. This course has the option of being continued beyond one semester,
building on the knowledge and skills of previous, and becoming more personalized to the student’s interest.
Designed for 10-11-12 grades only
Content Standards: A B C
1 credit - 1 semester
Meets Fine Arts Requirement
Note: Maximum Class size – 10

#436 Semester 1
#439 Semester 2
Music Performance
This course is designed for those students who wish to participate in both vocal and instrumental
performing groups. Students will alternate days between chorus and band. Participation in all concerts and
public performances is required. Those students signing up for this class should try to schedule it for the
entire year, if at all possible.
Content Standards: A B C
1 credit - 1 semester
Meets Fine Arts Requirement
#446
Chamber Singers
Chamber Singers is a select group of no more than 25 voices. This course is designed to meet the needs of
advanced choral students wishing to perform at an upper level. Auditions will be held in the spring of the
year and entrance is based on the director’s approval. The objectives are as follows:
1. To increase the performing ability of each individual
2. To increase music reading ability through the use of sight singing and listening
3. To increase appreciation and knowledge of performing repertoire
4. To perform various styles of quality choral literature
5. To assist students in the preparation process to perform and compete at district and state levels
This course is designed to instruct male and female students who wish to explore more difficult choral
literature in a small group setting. This ensemble will have the opportunity to perform outside the high
school throughout the year. Content Standards: A B C
1 credit – 1 semester
Prerequisite - Concert Choir members must also be members of the Chorus
Prerequisite – 1 semester of chorus is required prior to audition
Meets Fine Arts Requirement

#455
AP Music Theory
AP Music Theory covers the material traditionally found in a full-year introductory college course.
Students will cover composition exercises, melody, singing performance and harmonic dictation. All
students completing this course are required to take the AP music theory exam in the spring.
Content Standards: A B C
1 credit – 1semester
(Offered every other year)

Marching Band
The marching band meets two evenings per week during the marching season. It consists of learning and
perfecting basic marching skills, drill designs and music for a half time show performance. The Sanford
High School Marching Band performs at football games, parades, and marching band competitions. All
marching band members must attend a pre-season band camp held in August and attend all scheduled
rehearsals and performances.
No credit

								
To top