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					“A-B-C-1-2-3 Healthy Kids in Tennessee:
      Let’s Be Aware Every Day”

            Awareness




               Revised 1/2012
                 About This Module

o   The Awareness module of the A-B-C-1-2-3
    Healthy Kids in Tennessee: Let’s Eat Well,
    Play, and Be Aware Every Day program
    focuses on three components:
    o   Being aware of how we treat ourselves and others,
        through compassion and respect, and treating
        ourselves and others well
    o   Childhood cancer – awareness of signs and symptoms*
    o   Tobacco use and avoidance of secondhand smoke

*Parents and caregivers participate in the childhood cancer
component, but not children.
                 Objectives
o   To promote awareness of other components
    of healthy living which includes childhood
    cancer awareness (parents and caregivers),
    compassion, respect, and treating others
    well (children), and avoidance of tobacco
    and secondhand smoke (parents and
    caregivers and children).
       Objectives for each participant
o   For children, to learn about compassion and respect for
    people who appear different from themselves, and to treat
    themselves and others well, by listening to the Zink the
    Zebra story and participating in selected activities; to learn
    about the dangers of tobacco and secondhand smoke by
    participating in selected activities.
o   For parents, to explore Zink the Zebra activities that can
    be done with children at home; to learn about the dangers of
    tobacco and secondhand smoke.
o   For parents and teachers, to increase awareness of
    childhood cancer and possible signs for which they should be
    alert and provide resources to communicate this information
    to parents and caregivers; to learn about the dangers of
    tobacco and secondhand smoke.
“Zink the Zebra” –
Compassion, Respect,
Treating Ourselves and
Others Well
     Zink’s Overall Message?




“Together, we need to help produce
  generations of students, parents,
  and adults who will have respect
  for themselves and for other people
  who are perceived as different.”
                        -   Zink The Zebra Foundation Inc. 2000
         Zink’s Message to
  Parents and Childcare Providers

All of us face cancer in our communities.
Raising awareness of adult and childhood
       cancers will help to save lives.
      Zink’s Message to Children

We all may be different on the outside, but we
 are the same on the inside. We should treat
      ourselves and others well and with
           compassion and respect!
                Classroom Activities

o   Teacher reads Zink the Zebra and completes several
    lesson plans from the curriculum (see next slide). The
    program is best completed within one week.

o   The story communicates a powerful message of
    “differences,” whether due to illness, handicaps, size,
    beliefs, or any other defining characteristic.

o   The Zink story and activities will teach compassion
    and understanding and to treat oneself and others
    well.
Lessons with Zink the Zebra
Four lesson plans are included:
o   Lesson 1: Meeting Zink the Zebra
o   Lesson 2: Kindness Comes from Within
o   Lesson 3: The Zebra In Me
o   Lesson 4: Re-enact the Story
    from Zink the Zebra
           Parent/Child Activities

o   Expand on Zink lessons at home with
    take-home activities provided
o   Enjoy other suggested stories with similar
    themes (such as The Little Engine That
    Could)
Childhood Cancer –
Signs and Symptoms
How Does Zink the Zebra relate to Childhood Cancer?

o   Kelly Weil wrote Zink the Zebra when she
    was 11 years old and undergoing treatment
    for cancer.
o   Kelly wanted to tell others how it feels to be
    different and emphasized the importance of
    kindness and sensitivity.
    Sharing with Parents, Caregivers,
         and Childcare Providers
o   Kelly’s message leads us to a discussion among
    adults regarding cancer in our community.
o   The following handouts are included that may be
    shared with parents and caregivers:
    o   Differences in Adult and Childhood Cancers
    o   Possible Signs of Childhood Cancer
    o   Important Points
    o   Did You Know?
    o   Did You Know You Can Help?
  Differences between Adult and Childhood Cancers

                                 Adult                     Childhood
Prevention/Early Detection       No tobacco use;          None–causes of childhood
                                 Diet/exercise;           cancer are unknown.
                                 Sun safety; and          However, good habits to
                                 Screening tests          prevent adult cancers start
                                 (mammogram,              at birth.
                                 colonoscopy, etc.)
Frequent Types                   Lung, Breast, Colon,     Leukemia, Lymphoma,
                                 Prostate, Skin           Brain, Bone
Incidence Per Year               1,000,000                12,500
~ 5-Year Survival Rate           68%                      81%
% of Patients in Clinical Trials 3%                       70%
~ Length of Treatment            6 months to 1 year       Up to three years
Long Term Effects of             Typically less severe;   70% of survivors suffer
Treatment                        varies based on          serious long-term effects
                                 treatment                (heart failure, learning
                                                          disabilities, increased risk
                                                          of other cancers)
      Citations listed on next slide.
Differences in Adult and Childhood Cancers
               (citations)
Possible Signs of Childhood Cancer
     Continued weight loss
     Headaches
     Increased swelling or pain in bones, joints, etc.
     Lump in abdomen, neck, chest, pelvis, or armpits
     Development of excessive bruising, bleeding, or rash


     Constant infections
     A whitish color in the pupil (middle, dark area of the eye)
     Nausea/vomiting
     Constant tiredness or paleness
     Eye or vision changes
     Recurrent or persistent fevers
Source: Ped-Onc Resource Center. Available at www.acor.org/ped-onc/diseases/SOCC.html (accessed June 28, 2011).
Important Points:
o    Childhood cancer is rare.1,2
o    It is unlikely that a child will develop
     cancer.2
o    As a parent or teacher, being aware of
     possible signs can result in a faster
     diagnosis.
o    Children need regularly scheduled well-
     baby/well-child check ups.

1 University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Newswise. Parents Update: Pediatric Cancer Myths and Facts. Available
  at www.newswise.com/articles/parents-update-pediatric-cancer-myths-facts (accessed June 28, 2011).
2 Ped-Onc Resource Center. Available at http://www.acor.org/ped-onc/diseases/SOCC.html (accessed June 28, 2011).
Did You Know That. . .
o    … childhood cancer is the number one cause of
     death by disease in children and causes more
     deaths than cystic fibrosis, muscular dystrophy,
     diabetes, asthma, and AIDS, combined?1
o    … 46 children (equal to two classrooms) per day
     are diagnosed with childhood cancer.2
o    … 40,000 thousand children are currently being
     treated for cancer.2
o    … over the past 20 years, increasing numbers of
     children have been diagnosed with cancer.3 The
     causes are still unknown.
1 University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Newswise. Parents Update: Pediatric Cancer Myths and Facts.
 Available at www.newswise.com/articles/parents-update-pediatric-cancer-myths-facts (accessed June 28, 2011   ).
2 Cure Search/Children’s Oncology Group (COG). Fact Sheet. Available at www.cursearch.org (accessed June 2782011).
3 National Cancer Institute Fact Sheet. Available at www.cancer.gov(accessed July 6, 2011).
Did You Know You Can Help?

o   By being aware, you could be
    the person who identifies a
    child in need.
o   You can be a leader in your
    community for cancer issues
    and information.
o   You can help neighbors and
    families facing cancer.
o   You can promote
    understanding and
    compassion, as illustrated in
    Zink the Zebra.
Tobacco and
Secondhand Smoke
Objectives for the Tobacco and Secondhand
Smoke section of the Awareness module:

 Tounderstand the health risks of tobacco
 use and secondhand smoke
 Tobe able to implement learning
 activities for preschool children about the
 dangers of tobacco and secondhand smoke
 Tobe prepared to share information to
 educate parents, caregivers, and childcare
 teachers and staff about the dangers of
 tobacco use and of secondhand smoke
Why Focus on Tobacco Use
and Secondhand Smoke?
     Improving the health of children ages 3–5 enrolled
      in child care facilities in Tennessee and their
      families is a goal of the A-B-C-1-2-3 Healthy Kids
      in Tennessee: Let’s Eat Well, Play, and Be Aware
      Every Day program.
     Cigarette smoking is the leading preventable cause
      of death in the U.S.1
     Tobacco smoke contains chemicals that are
      harmful to both smokers and nonsmokers.
      Breathing even a little tobacco smoke can be
      harmful.1

 Source:   1 National   Cancer Institute, Harms of Smoking and Health Benefits of Quitting. Accessed 6/30/2011
Why Focus on Tobacco Use
and Secondhand Smoke?
    There are over 7,000 chemicals in tobacco smoke,
     and at least 69 have been known to cause cancer.1
    Children aren’t able to make the decision to not
     breathe in smoke—it’s up to the parents and
     caregivers to maintain a smoke-free environment.
     When YOU smoke, your child smokes, too!
    The U.S. Surgeon General estimates that living with
     a smoker increases a nonsmoker’s chances of
     developing lung cancer by 20 to 30 percent. Keep a
     smoke-free environment for the health of everyone!1
Source: 1National Cancer Institute, Harms of Smoking and Health Benefits of Quitting. Accessed 6/30/2011
Terms You May Hear

Secondhand Smoke:

“Secondhand smoke is the combination of smoke from
the burning end of the cigarette and the smoke breathed
out by smokers.”

“When you breathe secondhand smoke, it is like you are
smoking.”
                                                         “It hurts you.
                                                         It doesn’t take much.
                                                         It doesn’t take long.”

Source: The Health Consequences of Involuntary Exposure to Tobacco Smoke: A R e p o r t o f t h e S u r g e o n G e n e r a l, 2006. youwww.surgeongeneral.gov; accessed
June 30, 2011.
Terms You May Hear

Thirdhand Smoke:

o   Particles from secondhand tobacco smoke that may
    settle onto hair, clothing, and other surfaces and
    remain there long after the smoke is gone.

o   Researchers have proven that these particles can form
    more cancer-causing compounds.

o   This is a concern for everyone, but particularly for
    children who are on the floor playing, crawling, etc.
Health Risks of Tobacco Use
 Smoking harms nearly every organ of the body and
  diminishes a person’s overall health.
 Smoking is a leading cause of cancer and death from
  cancer. It causes cancers of the lung, esophagus,
  larynx, mouth, throat, kidney, bladder, pancreas,
  stomach, and cervix, as well as acute myeloid
  leukemia.
 Smoking causes heart disease, stroke, aortic
  aneurysm (a balloon-like bulge in an artery in the
  chest), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)
  (chronic bronchitis and emphysema), asthma, hip
  fractures, and cataracts.
 Smokers are at higher risk of developing pneumonia
  and other airway infections.
    Source: National Cancer Institute, Harms of Smoking and Health Benefits of Quitting. Accessed 6/30/2011
    Benefits of Quitting Smoking

    20 minutes after quitting your heart rate drops to a
     more normal state.
    12 hours after quitting the carbon monoxide level in
     your blood drops to normal.
    2 weeks to 3 months after quitting your heart attack
     rate begins to drop. Your lung function begins a
     series of changes to improve.
    1 to 9 months after quitting your cough and
     shortness of breath decrease.

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Surgeon General’s Report: Within 20 Minutes of Quitting, 2004. www.cdc/.gov. Accessed June 30, 2011.
Benefits of Quitting Smoking

   1 year after quitting your added risk of coronary
    heart disease is half that of a smoker’s.
   5 to 15 years after quitting your stroke risk is
    reduced to that of a nonsmoker.
   10 years after quitting your lung cancer death
    rate is half that of a smoker’s. Your risk of
    cancers of the mouth, throat, esophagus, bladder,
    kidney and pancreas decreases.
   15 years after quitting your risk of coronary
    heart disease is back to that of a nonsmoker’s.
                                 Secondhand Smoke

             In 2006, Surgeon General Richard Carmona
             stated that, at ANY amount, secondhand smoke
             is dangerous.
                       “There is no safe amount
                          of secondhand smoke.”




Source: The Health Consequences of Involuntary Exposure to Tobacco Smoke: A R e p o r t o f t h e S u r g e o n G e n e r a l, 2006. youwww.surgeongeneral.gov; accessed June 30, 2011
Secondhand Smoke—
Children are Especially Vulnerable

    The main place young children breathe
     secondhand smoke is in their homes. Almost
     three million children in the United States under
     the age of six years old breathe secondhand
     smoke at home at least four days per week.
     Breathing secondhand smoke is a known cause
     of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).
     Children are more likely to have lung problems,
     ear infections, and severe asthma from being
     around smoke.
Secondhand Smoke—
Children are Especially Vulnerable (continued)
   Secondhand smoke contains more than 250 chemicals
    known to be toxic or carcinogenic.

   Because their bodies are still developing, infants and young
    children are especially vulnerable to the poisons in
    secondhand smoke.




        Source: Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids: Facts & Information.www.tobaccofreekids.org. Retrieved June 23, 2011.
How Can Childcare Centers Make a Difference by
Addressing Tobacco Use and Secondhand Smoke?

Child care programs have the opportunity to contribute
dramatically to the improvement of the health of families they
serve by

   providing education on the effects of secondhand smoke
    on infants and children;
   providing education on the effects of thirdhand smoke
    on infants and children;
   providing information on tobacco cessation and referral
    services in the community; and
   protecting children from the long term harmful effects
    of secondhand and thirdhand smoke.
                Classroom Activities
   Hands-on activities are included in the A-B-C-1-2-3
    Healthy Kids in Tennessee: Let’s Eat Well, Play, and
    Be Aware Every Day curriculum package that teach
    children about the dangers of tobacco use and
    secondhand smoke.
   Include these and others in your classroom activities
    as part of this program.
       Songs
       “Is Your Heart in the Right Place”
       Science Project/”My Little Heart”
       Smoke-free pledge take-home activity
                Reach Out to Enhance
            Your Tobacco Education Efforts

   Partner with agencies and organizations who work
    with tobacco control and prevention and/or other
    health-related concerns to come and do classroom
    activities with the children (local health departments,
    hospitals, American Lung Association, American Heart
    Association, American Cancer Society, and others).
   Provide information on programs and resources to
    staff and families.
   See resources that follow for additional sources of
    information.
   Incorporate classroom activities included in this
    curriculum into your planned activities.
    Resources for Parents, Caregivers,
    and Childcare Teachers and Staff



          Breathe Free Tennessee
           www.breathefreetn.com

strives to eliminate children's exposure to
secondhand smoke by promoting the adoption
of voluntary smoke-free home and car policies
in communities across Tennessee.
     Resources for Parents, Caregivers, and
      Childcare Teachers and Staff (continued)

              Tennessee Tobacco Quitline
                1-800- QUIT NOW
o   It’s free.
o   Callers are assigned a personal “quit coach.”
o   It is a wonderful resource to share with parents,
    caregivers, and childcare teachers and staff.

    Please share available handouts with parents
    and caregivers with information on the
    Tennessee Tobacco Quitline!
            Cessation Resources

   Tennessee Tobacco QUITLINE:
    1-800-QUIT-NOW or 1-800-784-8669
    (funded by the Tennessee Department of Health)
   EX, interactive website by the American Legacy
    Foundation to help smokers quit.
    www.BecomeAnEX.org
   National Cancer Institute Smoking Quitline
    1-877-44U-Quit            www.smokefree.gov
           Tobacco-Free Resources
   Breathe Free Tennessee www.breathefreetn.com
   American Lung Association, www.lungusa.org
    1-800-586-4872
   American Cancer Society, www.cancer.org
    1-800-227-2345
   Nicotine Anonymous World Services,
    www.nicotine-anonymous.org
    1-877-TRY-NICA
   Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids
    http://www.tobaccofreekids.org/
Want to Take It to the Next Level?
   Want to take A-B-C-1-2-3 Healthy Kids in
    Tennessee: Let’s Eat Well, Play, and Be Aware
    Every Day to the next level?
   Now that you have the tools to implement
    healthy living education in your classrooms and
    with parents and families, what’s next?
   Consider participating in the “Gold Sneakers”
    program, which helps you develop policy
    guidelines for your facility. Both programs
    complement each other extremely well, providing
    your facility with a well-rounded approach to
    good health!
Want to Take It to the Next Level? (continued)


   To learn more about Gold Sneakers contact:

           Tennessee Department of Health
               Gold Sneaker Initiative
                    615-532-7538
          For more information or questions, please contact:

                   Cynthia Chafin, M.Ed., CHES
    The MTSU Adams Chair of Excellence in Health Care Services
             and Center for Health and Human Services
              Tennessee Cancer Coalition coordinator
                            615-898-5493
        cindychafin@comcast.net or cynthia.chafin@mtsu.edu


       Phase III of the A-B-C-1-2-3 Healthy Kids in Tennessee: Let’s Eat Well, Play,
               and Be Aware Every Day project supported in part by funding
from the MTSU Center for Physical Activity and Health in Youth and the Tennessee Cancer
       Coalition, with support of the MTSU Center for Health and Human Services.

				
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