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Promoting Faculty Involvement in Student Retention Presented by Joe

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Promoting Faculty Involvement in Student Retention Presented by Joe Powered By Docstoc
					Promoting Faculty Involvement
    in Student Retention
        Presented by Joe Cuseo
Introduction


 Dr. Joe Cuseo
   Professor of Psychology
   Marymount College
        Three Key Questions

1. The Why of It
    * Why is faculty involvement in retention important?
    * Why is faculty involvement in retention lacking?

2. The What of It
   * What forms of faculty involvement are likely to have the
    greatest impact on student retention?

3. The How of It
   * How can faculty be educated and motivated to become
    involved in student retention initiatives?
         The Why of It


 Why is Faculty Involvement
  Important?

 Why is Faculty Involvement
  Lacking?
 Potential Positive Outcomes of
     Faculty Involvement

*   Student retention/persistence to graduation
*   Academic achievement/performance
*   Critical thinking
*   Personal and intellectual development
*   Educational aspirations
*   Satisfaction with faculty
*   College satisfaction
*   Perceptions of college quality
(Sources: Astin, 1977, 1993; Kuh, 1991, 1995; Kuh et al., 1991, 1994; Pascarella & Terenzini, 1991,
      2005; Tinto, 1993).
   Probable Causes for Lack of
      Faculty Involvement

* Lack of Preparation in Graduate School
* Lack of Orientation upon Entering the
   Professoriate
* Lack of Professional Development
* Lack of Professional Recognition & Reward
            The What of It


 What forms of faculty involvement
  have the greatest impact on
  student retention?

   Faculty Use of Active & Interactive Pedagogy
    in the Classroom
   Faculty Use of Success-Promoting Teaching
    & Grading Practices
       Faculty-Student Contact
        Outside the Classroom
Examples

* Student-centered academic advising (versus
   perfunctory course scheduling)

* Faculty participation in new-student orientation by
   leading small-group discussions relating to summer
   reading or short reading given during orientation.

* Faculty interaction with students at a reception
   following new-student convocation to provide students
   with information about their disciplines and careers
   related to their disciplines.

* Faculty mentors or coaches for first-year students.
                    Examples
* Faculty sponsors/moderators of student clubs or
   organizations.

* Faculty sponsors of departmental clubs for new
   students interested in or majoring in their field.

* Faculty sponsor service-learning experiences for
   students in areas relating to their academic discipline.

* Faculty members visit student residences to conduct
   small-group discussions relating to course content,
   test-review sessions, tutoring, or academic advising.
                     Examples
* Faculty make themselves available as interviewees for new
    students. For example, students interview a faculty member
    in their major or a potential field of interest as an
    assignment in their first-year experience course.

* Faculty-student contact on college committees, taskforces, or
    councils (e.g., student retention committee, student
    retention advisory council, or student involvement
    taskforce).

* Faculty-student research teams (e.g., student research
    assistants whose work culminates in a product for use as a
    senior honors thesis; joint conference presentation with a
    faculty member, or professional publication co-authored
    with a faculty member).
           The How of It:



How can faculty be educated and motivated
  to become involved in student retention
                 initiatives?
   Involvement & Support of
   High-Level Administrators


* Public Comments & Communiqués
* Visible Presence at Retention-Related
  Meetings & Events
* Provision of Retention-Related
  Resources
     Formal Organizational
     Structures & Functions


* Designated Retention Task Force or
  Standing Committee
* Designated Retention Director or
  Coordinator
          Intentional
      Faculty-Involvement
      Programs & Policies

* Faculty Recognition & Awards
* Faculty Incentives & Rewards
             Next Steps
 Faculty Recruitment & Selection

 New-Faculty Orientation

 Faculty Development

 Faculty Evaluation

 Faculty Recognition & Reward
                               Resources
   Boyer, E. L. (1991). Scholarship reconsidered: Priorities of the professoriate. Princeton, NJ:
    Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching.

   Cuseo J. (2007). Promoting faculty involvement in first-year experience programs and student
    success initiatives. Unpublished document, available by request. (Contact Joe Cuseo:
    jcuseo@earthlink.net)

   Cuseo, J. (2008). Got faculty? Promoting faculty involvement in FYE programs and initiatives.
    ESource for College Transitions (electronic newsletter published by the National Resource
    Center for the First-Year Experience), 6 (2), pp. 3-5.

   Cuseo, J. (2009). Got faculty? Promoting faculty involvement in FYE programs and initiatives,
    Part II.. ESource for College Transitions (electronic newsletter published by the National
    Resource Center for the First-Year Experience), 6 (3), pp. 3-4, 6.

   Cuseo, J. (2009). The faculty portfolio: A vehicle for stimulating student-centered, mission-
    driven faculty behavior. Unpublished document, available by request. (Contact Joe Cuseo:
    jcuseo@earthlink.net)

   O'Meara, K., & Rice, R. E. (2006). Faculty priorities reconsidered: Rewarding multiple forms of

    scholarship. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
     Contact Information

 Thank you
 jcuseo@earthlink.net

				
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