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Proposal for a Master of Fine Arts in Experimental and Documentary

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					                Proposal for a Master of Fine Arts in

                Experimental and Documentary Arts




                Submitted to the Graduate School of Duke University by

 Hans van Miegroet, Professor and Chair, Department of Art, Art History, and Visual Studies

Tom Rankin, Director, Center for Documentary Studies, and Associate Professor of the Practice
                of Art, Department of Art, Art History, and Visual Studies

  Stanley Abe, Director, Program in the Arts of the Moving Image, and Associate Professor,
                    Department of Art, Art History, and Visual Studies




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                                  TABLE OF CONTENTS

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS                                     3
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY                                              5
1: PROGRAM CONCEPT & RATIONALE                                 6
     1.1. Introduction                                         6
     1.2. Program Rationale                                    6
     1.3. Demonstration of Need                                7
     1.4. Building on Strengths                                8
2: ADMINISTRATIVE STRUCTURE                                   10
     2.1. Executive Committee                                 10
     2.2. MFA Planning Committee                              10
     2.3. Administrative Personnel                            10
3: PROGRAM CURRICULUM                                         11
     3.1. Curricular Goals                                    11
     3.2. Degree Requirements                                 11
     3.3. Sequence of Coursework                              12
     3.4. Advancement to Candidacy Process and Timeline       13
     3.5. Required Course                                     14
     3.6. Elective Courses                                    14
     3.7. Three-Year Schedule of Courses                      15
4: STUDENTS                                                   16
     4.1. Applicant Pool                                      16
     4.2. Admission Requirements and Selection                17
     4.3. Admissions Criteria                                 17
     4.4. Admissions Committee                                17
     4.5. Student Trajectory                                  18
     4.6. Academic and Career Advising                        18
5: STATEMENT OF RESOURCES                                     19
     5.1. Faculty for Core Courses                            19
     5.2. Faculty for Electives, Mentoring, & Advising        20
     5.3. Facilities                                          21
     5.4. Resources Needed                                    21
     5.5. Potential or Actual External Funding                21
     5.6. Budget Projections in Startup Period (five years)   22
6: RELATIONSHIP TO EXISTING PROGRAMS                          24
     6.1. Core Duke Programs                                  24
     6.2. Supportive Duke Programs                            24
     6.3. Local Community Programs & Resources                24
     6.4. Exchange Sites                                      24
     6.5. Programs at Peer Institutions                       25

APPENDIX A: REQUIRED COURSES                                  26
APPENDIX B: ELECTIVE COURSES                                  28
APPENDIX C: POST-GRADUATE EMPLOYMENT                          32
APPENDIX D: AVAILABLE FACILITIES                              33
APPENDIX E: FACULTY FOR CORE COURSES                          43
APPENDIX F: CORE DUKE PROGRAMS                                46
APPENDIX G: SUPPORTIVE DUKE PROGRAMS                          50
APPENDIX H: LOCAL COMMUNITY PROGRAMS & RESOURCES              56
APPENDIX I: EXCHANGE SITES                                    57
APPENDIX J: RELATED PROGRAMS AT PEER INSTITUTIONS             58
APPENDIX K: DUKE LETTERS OF SUPPORT                           61
APPENDIX L: EXTERNAL LETTERS OF SUPPORT                       62



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FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

What is the MFA in Experimental and Documentary Arts?

The MFA is the terminal degree in the fine arts. The MFA in Experimental and Documentary
Arts will be a two year degree program requiring 14 courses (36 units) over 4 semesters: 10
required courses in prescribed sequence and 4 electives. Each student’s culminating project will
be exhibited in a Spring MFA Exhibition. A written thesis on the project will also be required. 15
students per year are to be admitted. Students will create work that has impact within and
outside the academy—art that matters—including innovative hybrids of documentary
expression, experimental media, and new computational technologies.

Why will this program succeed?

There is a market for our program. The increased importance of various forms of media,
especially on the web, has produced a young population thoroughly engaged with the newest
forms of creative visual and audio production. Smart, talented, socially aware applicants are
looking for innovative MFA programs such as ours to express their involvement in the world.
In our program students will learn to produce hybrid forms of artistic expression which
embrace new approaches to history, memory, community, interactivity, and the archive. The
combination of the experimental and the documentary arts will result in a distinguished, much
sought-after MFA degree.

Who will apply for the program?

The MFA in Experimental and Documentary Arts will attract accomplished students and artists,
likely to range in age from their mid 20s to late 30s, who desire advanced experience in the
production of innovative photographic, spoken word, film, video, and computational digital
arts in conjunction with a challenging intellectual immersion in philosophy and critical theory.
Many will have completed a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree, while others will have degrees in the
History of Art and Visual Studies, Photography, Film, New Media, Music, Narrative Writing,
Theater, or Documentary Studies. Still others will have attained a Bachelor of Science in
Computer Science or Computer or Electrical Engineering. Despite the high cost, competition is
always keen for admission to the top MFA programs in the country.

What will this degree prepare students to do?

As a terminal degree, MFA students will be seeking a rigorous academic experience that
prepares them for careers in higher education—teaching in film, digital media, documentary
arts, and art departments, among others. Most graduates will pursue careers as creative artists
in combination with full or part-time teaching. Graduates of peer programs have become
teachers, documentary filmmakers, web developers, publishers, multimedia producers,
practicing artists, and entrepreneurs. Examples include film production management at a
nonprofit scientific research institute; producer and editor at a major television network’s
interactive division; faculty member in film and media studies; founder of a company creating
documentaries and other media for exhibitions and museums; executive producer of media for
nonprofits and non-governmental organizations; filmmaker and blogger for the Obama
campaign and presidential transition team in the new media department; and video developer
for the Facebook company’s new project on media production.

What is unique about this program?

There are many successful MFA programs in film/video, computational or new media,
documentary studies, and documentary film. No MFA in the country, however, offers
experimental film and computational art production and documentary studies. The foundation
of the program is the vital synergy of experimental and documentary practices, which has a

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seminal relationship stretching back to the early twentieth century. With its purposeful balance
of thinking and making, the MFA is distinctive and timely. Our program will attract artists and
intellectuals who recognize the potential of new and experimental forms of creativity to be a
powerful force in community life and the public realm.

Does Duke have sufficient course offerings to support an MFA in Experimental and
Documentary Arts?

Yes. Duke’s extensive background in documentary studies, film and video, visual studies,
computational and experimental media provides a solid foundation on which to build a
graduate program. There is a rich array of graduate courses in place as elective classes. The six
required core courses plus four thesis project courses will be developed specifically for the MFA
students.

Does Duke have enough faculty to teach in this program?

Yes. Eleven regular-rank faculty have agreed to implement the new required courses for the
MFA program. They are affiliated with the Department of Art, Art History, and Visual Studies;
the Center for Documentary Studies; the Program in the Arts of the Moving Image; the
Departments of Computer Science and Electrical and Computer Engineering; Information
Science + Information Studies (ISIS); and the Program in Literature. The MFA in Experimental
and Documentary Arts will continue to work with departments and schools across campus to
expand faculty involvement. The program will also enhance teaching and courses through
visiting artist/lecturer programs.

How will this impact undergraduate education?

Quite favorably. Faculty buy-outs will help insure that the sponsoring academic units will not
reduce the number of undergraduate courses offered. Students in the MFA program will
provide teaching assistance to undergraduate programs, at no additional cost to the units. From
varied backgrounds, these students also will provide fresh intellectual energy and ideas as they
engage in their studies, make and present their projects, and interact with the campus
community.

How will this program complement or differ from current and proposed Ph.D. programs in Art,
Art History, and Visual Studies or related graduate programs in other departments?

The MFA is a two-year terminal degree. It is structurally distinct from a Ph.D. program. At the
same time, the MFA will be complementary to the developing Ph.D. in Visual Studies
sponsored by the Literature Program and the Department of Art, Art History, and Visual
Studies. It is anticipated that the MFA and Ph.D. in Visual Studies will have overlapping
faculty, courses, and facilities as the programs develop. This approach reflects the university’s
strategic call for a new model of education that emphasizes collaboration and connection, and
encourages major efforts to strengthen the arts, including greater opportunities for students to
create their own works to heighten Duke’s visibility in the arts and society.

How will this program be funded?

The primary costs of this program are faculty salary, administration, infrastructure, and
technical resources. The three sponsoring units have agreed to provide the necessary faculty
and administrative support for the operation of the program. All program costs will be paid for
by tuition.




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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

The Master of Fine Arts in Experimental and Documentary Arts at Duke University
brings together two forms of artistic activity—the documentary approach and
experimental production in analog, digital, and computational media—in a unique
program that will foster collaborations across disciplines and media as it trains
sophisticated, creative art practitioners. The philosophy of the program is guided by a
belief in the intersection of personal artistic work with interpretive knowledge and of
the relevance of the individual documentary/experimental artist within the cultural
history and life of communities. A key component to the program is the notion of
creative engagement through the arts and the role of the artist in society. Graduates will
be expected to generate work that has an impact both within and outside the academy,
to have developed both a complex understanding of documentary practices and
traditions and creative skills in experimental media and new technologies.

The MFA in Experimental and Documentary Arts will attract accomplished students
and artists who desire to advance their skills in the production of innovative
photographic, spoken word, film, video, and computational digital arts in a challenging
intellectual context of historical, critical, and philosophic inquiry. Since the MFA is the
terminal degree in the studio arts, students in this program will be seeking a rigorous
academic program that prepares them for teaching careers in higher education.
Additionally, the program is designed for those artists and intellectuals who see
creativity as a powerful force in community life and the public realm.

The MFA requires fourteen courses over four semesters: ten required courses in
prescribed sequence and four elective courses. In order to build cohesion in the
program, all matriculating students will enroll in three required courses in the first
semester: two studio courses (Documentary Process and Experimental Film/Video) and
one seminar (Genealogies and Theories of the Experimental). In the second semester,
the cohort will enroll in one required studio course (Computational Media), one
seminar (Introduction to Documentary Arts), a Thesis Studio course, and one elective.
After a summer of individual thesis research, the second year will focus on studio
courses supporting production of the thesis project and seminars on research and
writing the thesis. The projects will be presented at an MFA Thesis Exhibition in the
fourth semester along with a written thesis paper.

The MFA program will matriculate fifteen students per year. Students will be guided by
first-year advisors and a faculty thesis committee to be formed no later than the
beginning of the second year. The program is designed to be intense and challenging,
with the expectation that projects and the written thesis will be of the highest level of
creative skill and critical acumen.

Graduates of the MFA program will pursue the creation of innovative arts projects as
they support themselves with employment in higher education, filmmaking, media
production, entertainment, journalism, the art world, and related fields. Their
experience in an intense graduate program that merges theory and practice will prepare
them for a variety of creative careers, including leadership positions in education and
the arts at all levels. Graduates of this MFA program at Duke will be leaders in
demonstrating the role of the experimental and documentary arts both in the academy
and in society at large.


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1:     PROGRAM CONCEPT AND RATIONALE

1.1.    Introduction

The productive tension between social documentary (bound originally to ideas of
innate truth and realism) and experimental artistic practice (pushing the boundaries of
the real and the imaginary)—which extends back to documentary pioneers such as the
photographer Jacob Riis as well as experimental filmmakers such as Dziga Vertov—is
more germane than ever. The intersection of the documentary and experimental
impulse has inspired the most profound questions about the nature of representation,
our engagement with the world, aesthetic articulation, and the relationship between the
real and the virtual.
While we have never been more awash in ceaseless flows of information, the credibility
and presentation of evidentiary documents has never been more suspect. The presumed
reliability of concepts such as truth and objectivity has been increasingly transformed
into the subject of “infotainment,” reality television, and spectacles of cinematic re-
creation. Fueled by computer technologies and their cultural dissemination, the creation
of the genres of alternate reality gaming and pervasive gaming, such as the 2001 game
The Beast, have intentionally blurred the lines between game and reality and raised
questions about the reliability of communications media and online information
sources. Abstractions of concrete documentary practice into high-dimension
computational spaces have prompted some contemporary artists and theorists, such as
Peter Weibel, to observe quite provocatively that the most relevant documentary
practices are no longer rooted in the previous aesthetic regimes of optical perception
but rather have shifted “from the ruins of representation to the practices of processing.”

Meanwhile, contemporary documentary practice confronts questions of objectivity,
subjectivity, insider/outsider dynamics, collaboration, politics, social values, power
relations, self-representation, the reliability of memory and autobiography, and the
relative status of high, low, and local cultures. Indeed, the concept of “documentary,”
Abigail Solomon-Godeau writes, leads quickly into “a morass of contradiction,
confusion, and ambiguity.” Within this confusion, she sees a new effort emerging that is
a “renewal, rather than revival, of documentary practice.”

The production and critique of the document—its nature, its creation, its
dissemination—has emerged as not only a spectacle of mass culture but as the defining
aesthetic impulse of our time. Under these circumstances, the very definition of a
documentary work or an experimental creation is being radically redefined.

1.2. Program Rationale

The MFA in Experimental and Documentary Arts will be an interdisciplinary program
of study which builds on the historical relationship between the genres of documentary
and experimental art as a means to explore hybrid approaches to new and not so new
forms of media production. Whether in large-format photography, writing, web data
mining, spoken word, nanoscale computing, audio, or 16mm film, the MFA will train
students to create art that matters—powerful new works that engage and interrogate
the world we live in.

The premise of the program is that the relationship between documentary practice and
experimental production including computational media is of great critical and
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aesthetic importance—raising matters of truth, credibility, authenticity, objectivity,
power, and control—and that a new generation of professional artists capable of
engaging rigorously with these matters is needed, both in the academy and in society at
large.
The new MFA draws together the unique strengths, distinctive visions, and individual
talents available in the three sponsoring units. The program will utilize what may
appear to be a disparate set of talent and resources at Duke—from documentary
photographers, essayists, and filmmakers to computational new media experimentalists
and theorists—to produce a new and unique MFA, with an emphasis on intellectual
critique, artistic output, and worldly engagement.
Computational new media production is an especially important element in the MFA. It
is anticipated that some MFA students will produce computer-generated experimental
images and installations, expanding documentary and experimental practices to include
the development of interactive databases, new forms of virtual environment with
documentary and/or experimental components, new forms of virtual mapping
including nested layers of digital documentation, and experimental documentary
archive projects. New code-based editing and searching strategies might be employed
in both documentary and experimental practices. Additionally, many experimental
forms are ephemeral in nature. The potential to frame these fleeting process-oriented
works through documentary means is rarely considered much less pursued.

The MFA will offer prospective students an open-ended program in which to pursue
hybrid expressive forms, some more closely in the documentary tradition, others more
experimental, and still others undefinable and new. A fundamental opposition between
the genres of the documentary and the experimental, while contradicted by the
intertwined history of the two, remains the dominant paradigm in most MFA
programs. The manner in which the historical and contemporary tensions between
documentary and experimental genres are made productive, even seminal, for our new
MFA is an exceptional aspect of the proposal.

The proposed MFA in Experimental and Documentary Arts is unique among MFA
programs in the United States. It has the potential to quickly establish itself as a singular
challenging and prestigious MFA for new experimental, documentary, and
computational arts.

1.3.   Demonstration of Need

The proposed MFA in Experimental and Documentary Arts builds on the enduring
themes of Duke University’s academic programs, as articulated in the current strategic
plan, Making a Difference: interdisciplinarity, knowledge in the service of society,
internationalization, and diversity—goals that share a commitment to reaching across
barriers and differences to forge new alliances of knowledge, problem-solving,
creativity, and leadership.

The philosophy of the MFA in Experimental and Documentary Arts program is guided
by a belief in the intersection of personal artistic expression with interpretive
knowledge, of the role of the individual experimental/documentary artist within the
cultural history and life of communities. A key component to the program is the notion
of creative engagement through the arts and the role of the artist in society.


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The MFA students will bring their creative energy and fresh ideas to undergraduate
classrooms as they provide teaching assistance and demonstrate their deep engagement
with the power of the arts as agents for change—in knowledge and understanding, in
social and cultural environments, in the fundamental character of human interactions.
The commitment of graduate students to produce original work and to share that with
the larger world through exhibition, screenings, publication, and/or installation will
offer the undergraduate community an experience in seeing new experimental and
documentary art as it engages audiences on and off campus.
The MFA students will be active participants and creators in the culture of the arts on
campus, enhancing programming, expanding curricular opportunities, supporting
cross-disciplinary research, and providing ongoing leadership as they pursue their
studies and produce public artwork projects. With the advent of this program we will
see dramatic changes on Duke’s campus in the arts, a result of the vital community of
MFA students in our midst.
Students with an MFA from Duke will be theoretically sophisticated producer/critics of
many forms of experimental and documentary art, prepared for professional careers in
genres of video, film, photography, audio, public ethnography, museum installation,
and new media, and, in many cases, careers that combine a number of those areas,
including work with nonprofit organizations, entrepreneurial businesses, and
governmental initiatives. Graduates will be qualified to teach at the university level and
will bring fresh, needed perspectives on the creative arts to diverse departments and
campuses. In addition, graduates will be expected to generate work that will have an
impact both within and outside the academy.

The MFA at Duke will position the University uniquely among arts graduate programs
across the country. Whereas most other MFA programs emphasize a particular medium
or situate documentary and experimental art in separate quarters, and fail to
consciously integrate theory and practice, Duke’s program seeks to fashion a trans-
disciplinary frame of reference, capable of integrating theory and practice across a
broad spectrum of mediums and disciplines. The MFA will embrace neglected areas in
computer sciences, such as human interface in computational media practices, critical
theory, and the social uses of visual production, among others, as well as a full array of
performing, studio, and experimental digital arts and new media.

The MFA will demonstrate the benefits of breaking down the academic barriers
between practice and theory, in keeping with the strategic objectives of Duke’s Visual
Studies Initiative. This connection is crucial because it further unifies areas in the Arts
and Sciences that traditionally have been divided, within academic units, into those
who research and teach critical analysis and/or theory and those whose primary role is
to experiment and/or produce cultural objects.

1.4.   Building on Strengths

For more than three decades, Duke has demonstrated leadership in documentary arts,
film and video, and visual studies, from the early efforts of the Center for Documentary
Photography as part of the then-nascent Public Policy Studies program in the 1970s to
the growth of the Center for Documentary Studies, founded in 1989 as an innovative
multidisciplinary program merging scholarly pursuits with community engagement
through fieldwork and creative expression, to the broadening of the Department of Art
and Art History to include Visual Studies and the recent evolution of the popular

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Program in Film/Video/Digital to the more expansive Program in the Arts of the
Moving Image.

Drawing upon these successful programs as well as the energy of the new Nasher
Museum of Art and the University’s strong commitment to the arts in its current
strategic plan, in 2006 Duke received a $2.5 million grant from the Andrew W. Mellon
Foundation to create and implement a Visual Studies Initiative, a broad-based effort to
improve how visual images are understood and to foster research and teaching in
visual studies. This initiative encourages collaboration within and across the arts and
humanities and with engineering and the computation sciences.

Building upon this solid foundation, and benefiting from the recent addition of new
faculty members in Visual Studies and in computational media as a result of the Visual
Studies Initiative, we propose to establish an interdisciplinary Master of Fine Arts in
Experimental and Documentary Arts. This proposal demonstrates Duke’s unique
achievements in these fields and explains the innovative nature of this new MFA; it also
shows the dynamic connections that make Duke singularly prepared to educate and
train graduate students in the experimental and documentary arts who will strengthen
the engagement of the University in real-world issues as they create and transmit their
knowledge.

The increasingly visual nature of contemporary society and the rapid pace of
technological change and information consumption place the study and pursuit of
experimental media, documentary arts, visualization and visual literacy, narrative
construction, interactivity, and related areas in computation science at the heart of how
we communicate with and understand one another in our future endeavors.

We believe that we are harnessing the particular energies of this moment at Duke and
that we are focusing on an unmet demand of a generation of students who are no
longer passive consumers of art and popular culture, but are active producers. We hope
to build on their interest in new media, in visual forms and in production, and
intentionally to provide context, content, a social dimension, cross-disciplinary function
and form, methodology, rigor, and perhaps most important, history and critical
perspective, thereby increase their visual literacy.




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2:   ADMINISTRATIVE STRUCTURE

2.1. Executive Committee

The Executive Committee consists of the directors and Department Chair of the three
primary programs involved in the MFA program. At present, those are:

Stanley Abe, Director, Program in the Arts of the Moving Image, and Associate
    Professor, Department of Art, Art History & Visual Studies
Tom Rankin, Director, Center for Documentary Studies, and Associate Professor of the
    Practice of Art, Department of Art, Art History & Visual Studies
Hans van Miegroet, Professor and Chair, Department of Art, Art History & Visual
    Studies

2.2. MFA Planning Committee

Stanley Abe, Director, Program in the Arts of the Moving Image, and Associate
    Professor, Department of Art, Art History & Visual Studies
Josh Gibson, Associate Director and Instructor, Program in the Arts of the Moving
    Image
Mark Hansen, Professor, Program in Literature
Alex Harris, Professor of the Practice, Public Policy Studies and Center for
    Documentary Studies
Tim Lenoir, Kimberly J. Jenkins Chair of New Technologies and Society
Tom Rankin, Director, Center for Documentary Studies, and Associate Professor of the
    Practice of Art, Department of Art, Art History & Visual Studies
William Seaman, Professor of Visual Studies, Department of Art, Art History & Visual
    Studies
Victoria E. Szabo, Program Director, Information Science + Information Studies (ISIS),
    and Assistant Research Professor of Visual Studies and New Media, Department of
    Art, Art History & Visual Studies
Charles Thompson, Education and Curriculum Director, Center for Documentary
    Studies, and Lecturer, Department of Cultural Anthropology
Hans van Miegroet, Professor and Chair, Department of Art, Art History & Visual
    Studies

2.3. Administrative Personnel

In addition to the Director of Graduate Studies, the MFA program will be assisted by
one full-time-equivalent staff position, the Assistant Director of Graduate Studies.
Additional administrative support will be available from staff members within each of
the three participating programs.




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3:   PROGRAM CURRICULUM

3.1. Curricular Goals

Students will enter the program with training and proclivities towards certain types of
production— experimental or documentary—and certain media: photography, film,
video, audio, or computational media. The goal of the program is to train students to
build on their strengths, draw inspiration from a broad range of production courses in
various media, and produce innovative, hybrid, and imaginative works of experimental
and documentary art.

3.2. Degree Requirements

The program will require the completion of fourteen courses: a combination of studio
courses, with production as the focus, and seminars, with critical thought and writing
as the focus. Some of the core and elective courses will follow a modular or team-
teaching approach, to draw upon the fullest resources of existing faculty and the
potential of visiting lecturers and other contributing instructors working in the field.

• Three studio courses are required of all students: Documentary Process, Experimental
      Film/Video, and Computational Media.
• Three seminars are required of all students: Introduction to Documentary Arts,
      Genealogies and Theories of the Experimental, and Critical Approaches.
• Four courses focus on the individual MFA project and thesis: three Thesis Studio
      courses and one Thesis Writing Workshop.
• Four electives complete the requirements.
• An exhibited thesis project and written thesis are required at the end of the fourth
semester.




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3.3. Sequence of Coursework

YEAR 1 – FALL
  • Documentary Process (Studio, 3 units): Exploration of the range of mediums and
     approaches to community-based documentary work that expresses both
     cultural/political realities through a personal point of view.
  • Experimental Film/Video (Studio, 3 units): Techniques and methodologies of
     experimental film and video production. Final project required.
  • Genealogies and Theories of the Experimental (Seminar, 3 units): History, philosophy,
     and critiques of experimental art and non-traditional creative production. Final paper
     required.

YEAR 1 – SPRING
  • Computational Media (Studio, 3 units): Experimental computational media techniques
     for graphics, interactivity, and data visualization. Final project required.
  • Introduction to Documentary Arts (Seminar, 3 units): Historical and conceptual survey
     of documentary studies with attention to experimental and artistic practices. Final paper
     required.
  • Thesis Studio 1 (1 unit): Exploration of possible thesis projects based on first-year
     coursework. Final project and review required.
  • Elective 1 (3 units)

SUMMER
   • Individual Thesis Research

YEAR 2 – FALL
  • Critical Approaches (Seminar, 3 units): Thesis research and preparation. Final paper
     required.
  • Thesis Studio 2 (1 unit): Production and critique.
  • Elective 2 (3 units)
  • Elective 3 (3 units)

YEAR 2 – SPRING
  • Thesis Studio 3 (2 units): Production and completion of thesis project. Equivalent to two
     studios.
  • Thesis Writing Workshop (Seminar, 2 units)
  • Elective 4 (3 units)

MFA Exhibition opens mid-March.

MFA Thesis must be submitted and defended according to the Graduate School deadlines (in the 2009–
2010 academic calendar: submitted by April 1, 2010, defended by April 9, 2010, final submission by
April 23, 2010).




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3.4. Advancement to Candidacy Process and Timeline

YEAR 1 – FALL

Week 2       REVIEW OF PRIOR WORK
             All students make a 10-minute presentation of their previous work to the
              program faculty and second-year students.

Week 14      FINAL STUDIO REVIEWS
              Juried studio reviews for Documentary Process and Experimental Film/Video
              studio courses.

Week 14      DEADLINE FOR MEETING WITH FIRST YEAR ADVISORS
              Students must submit their review forms after meeting and evaluating progress
              with first-year advisors.

YEAR 1 – SPRING

Week 13      FINAL STUDIO REVIEWS
              Juried studio reviews for Computational Media studio course.

Week 14      FIRST YEAR EXHIBITION
              Exhibition of projects from Thesis Studio 1 course.

Week 14      DEADLINE FOR MEETING WITH FIRST YEAR ADVISORS
              Students must submit their review forms after meeting and evaluating progress
              with first-year advisors.

YEAR 2 – FALL

Week 3       THESIS COMMITTEE SIGNATURES DUE
              Students must submit their faculty thesis committee forms with signatures.

Week 4       THESIS PROPOSAL PRESENTATIONS
              Presentation of thesis project proposals to faculty and first-year students.

Week 14      THESIS PROGRESS REVIEW
              Installation and critique of thesis progress by thesis committee for advancement
              to candidacy. Signed thesis progress and candidacy forms due.

YEAR 2 – SPRING

Mid-March MFA THESIS EXHIBITION
           Presentation and juried review of final thesis projects (two-week exhibition).

Early April WRITTEN THESIS DUE
             MFA Thesis submission deadline to the Graduate School.

Early April MFA DEFENSE DEADLINE
             MFA Thesis must be defended by this date.

Week 14      MFA EXHIBITION FINAL DOCUMENTATION DUE
              Final student documentation of MFA projects due.




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3.5. Required Courses

The following are the required courses for the degree (descriptions are provided in
Appendix A).

Seminars:

• Introduction to Documentary Arts (Thompson)
• Genealogies and Theories of the Experimental (Seaman, Lenoir, Hansen)
• Critical Approaches (Lenoir, Hansen)
• Thesis Writing Workshop (Abe)

Studios:

• Documentary Process (Harris)
• Experimental Film/Video (Gibson)
• Computational Media Studio (Brady)
• Thesis Studio 1, 2 and 3 (Rankin, Szabo, Noland, Seaman, Gibson)

3.6. Elective Courses

Electives will be available from a rich array of existing graduate courses. A complete list
of courses available for electives is provided in Appendix B.




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3.7. Three-Year Schedule of Courses
REQUIRED COURSES:                     FALL 2011   SPRING 2012     FALL 2012   SPRING 2013   FALL 2013   SPRING 2014

Documentary Process (3 units)         Harris                      Harris                    Harris
Experimental Film/Video (3 units)     Gibson                      Gibson                    Gibson
Genealogies and Theories (3 units)    Seaman                      Lenoir                    Hansen

Computational Media (3 units)                     Brady                       Brady                     Brady
Intro to Documentary Arts (3 units)               Thompson                    Thompson                  Thompson
Thesis Studio 1 (1 unit)                          Rankin                      Rankin                    Gibson
Plus one elective (3 units)

Critical Approaches (3 units)                                     Hansen                    Lenoir
Thesis Studio 2 (1 unit)                                          Szabo                     Noland
Plus two electives (6 units)

Thesis Writing Workshop (2 units)                                             Abe                       Abe
Thesis Studio ¾ (2 units)                                                     Seaman                    Rankin
Plus one elective (3 units)




                                                             15
4: STUDENTS

4.1. Applicant Pool

As mentioned above, we are focusing on the unmet demand of a generation of students
who are no longer passive consumers of art and popular culture, but are active
producers. We will build on their interest in new media, in the visual, and in
documentary production, and to intentionally provide context, content, a social
dimension, cross-disciplinary function and form, methodology focused on connecting
theory, practice, and perhaps most importantly, history and a critical perspective.

The MFA in Experimental and Documentary Arts occupies a unique niche in the
academic landscape in that it is designed for those creative, intellectually engaged
students who demonstrate a commitment to using knowledge, and specifically the arts,
in the service of society and who desire advanced training in the production of
innovative experimental and documentary art projects (e.g., photographic, spoken
word, sound, film, video, computational digital arts) in conjunction with a challenging
intellectual immersion in history, philosophy, and critical theory. Prospective students
will have demonstrated skills in creative arts or documentary studies with interest in
experimental approaches and technologies. They will be familiar with the history of
experimental and documentary arts and possess an understanding of the basic concepts
in critical theory.

Many entering students will have completed a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree, while
others will have degrees in the History of Art and Visual Studies, Photography, Film,
New Media, Music, Narrative Writing, Theater, or Documentary Studies. Others will
have attained a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science or Computer or Electrical
Engineering.

Potential applicants, likely to range in age from their mid 20s to late 30s, will be multi-
skilled and able to show a level of professional experience, with work portfolios in the
arts and media fields, in either production or teaching.

All successful applicants must demonstrate substantial achievements or potential for
achievements in documentary studies or the experimental arts.




                                             16
4.2. Admission Requirements and Selection

In addition to the Graduate School application form, applicants will be required to
submit a personal history and a portfolio. The history and portfolio along with the
Statement of Purpose constitute the most important elements of the application.
Applicants are expected to clearly articulate their reasons for applying to the program,
the specific courses and faculty members of most interest for their participation, and the
thesis project which they would like to pursue.

Portfolios should highlight the applicant's most exciting work to date. Portfolios might
include photographic images (10–15 maximum), sound works, video productions (10
minutes maximum), digital computer works, and interactive productions. Portfolios
should be made available online at websites such as myartspace.com or the applicant’s
site of choice.

4.3. Admissions Criteria

Admission will be based on the following criteria:
• Evidence of artistic talent and creativity
• Motivation and goals
• Demonstrable technical skills, e.g. photography, computer programming, etc.
• Undergraduate and post-graduate preparation and accomplishments
• Recommendations
• GPA
• For foreign students, English language skills, e.g. TOEFL

The GRE is not required; this follows the policy for admission to comparable MFA
programs such as those at the Rhode Island School of Design and the Digital Arts and
New Media MFA at the University of California, Santa Cruz.

4.4. Admissions Committee

The Admissions Committee will be chaired by the Director of Graduate Studies and
consist of four other members nominated by the Executive Committee.
The Admissions Committee will review all applications and produce a list of finalists to
be considered further. The committee will conduct a telephone interview with each
finalist and ask each a predetermined set of questions. Candidates will be encouraged
to visit campus (at their expense) to have interviews with faculty members.




                                            17
4.5. Student Trajectory

Applicants will be highly motivated, talented artists with the desire to refine their skills
in a prestigious MFA program. Students of this type are dedicated to attaining the
highest degree of creative achievement and are willing to make financial sacrifices to
establish a foundation for careers in the experimental and documentary arts. For
example, graduates of MFA programs at Stanford, Yale, the Rhode Island School of
Design, and the Pratt Institute, typically finance their education with a combination of
financial aid, graduate teaching awards, and significant amounts of student loans.

Since the MFA is the terminal degree in the arts, students in this program will be
seeking a rigorous academic experience that prepares them for careers in higher
education—teaching in film, digital media, documentary studies, and art departments,
among others. Additionally, the program is designed for those artists and intellectuals
who see creativity as a powerful force in community life and the public realm, and
whose work may be variously classified as artistic media production.

Graduates of peer programs have become teachers, documentary filmmakers, web
developers, publishers, multimedia producers, practicing artists, freelancers, and
entrepreneurs. Examples include film production management at a nonprofit scientific
research institute; producer and editor at a major television network’s interactive
division; faculty member in film and media studies; founder of a company creating
documentaries and other media for exhibitions and museums; executive producer of
media for nonprofits and non-governmental organizations; filmmaker and blogger for
the Obama campaign and presidential transition team in the new media department;
and video developer for the Facebook company’s new project on media production.

For the employment of graduates of the University of California, Santa Cruz Digital
Arts and New Media MFA Program, see Appendix C.

4.6. Academic and Career Advising

Academic advising will be provided through each student’s faculty committee.
Students will have a primary advisor and must form a three-person thesis committee no
later than the beginning of the third semester. The primary advisor and committee
members will guide the academic program and professional development of the
student.

Career development begins with producing creative work of high quality and making
the work as visible as possible. MFA students will be required to maintain an online
portfolio of work to promote their projects and develop networks of artistic and
professional interest. Furthermore, students will be encouraged to submit their work to
national and international exhibition venues such as film festivals, new media
exhibitions, refereed online forums, specialized websites, and museums. At the time of
graduation, each MFA student should have a well-developed profile in his or her field
of creative production.

Career advising will be attentive to academic careers as well as opportunities in private
industry. Students will develop pedagogical skills and strategies through teaching

                                             18
assistantships and mentorship from MFA faculty. In conjunction with Alumni Affairs
and the Career Center, successful Duke alumni in the fields of film and video
production, website design, communications, documentary arts, and computational
media arts will be brought to campus to inform students of career opportunities outside
of the academy and to build networks to enhance career possibilities.

Furthermore, the program will develop an alumni network of MFA graduates—the
most important career mentors in any MFA program. Graduates typically initiate
projects together, share professional contacts, provide career guidance, and enhance
employment opportunities for one another and for students currently enrolled in the
program. Successful MFA program graduates will be brought back to teach courses as
visiting faculty and to participate in conferences, symposia, and invited lectures.

5:   STATEMENT OF RESOURCES

The proposed Master of Fine Arts in Experimental and Documentary Arts will not
require additional faculty in order to initiate the program. With the approval of their
unit heads, the eleven faculty members (listed below) have committed to teaching the
ten core MFA courses over the first three years of the program beginning Fall 2011. No
faculty will need to teach more than one MFA core course per academic year.

The technological infrastructure developed by the sponsoring units and the Visual
Studies Initiative provides a broad foundation for the MFA program (see Appendix D).

We will also utilize the administrative infrastructure of Art, Art History & Visual
Studies, that of the Center for Documentary Studies, the Program in the Arts of the
Moving Image, and the administrative infrastructure of the Visual Studies Initiative.

5.1. Faculty for Core Courses

See Appendix E for additional information on faculty for core courses.

Stanley Abe, Associate Professor, Department of Art, Art History & Visual Studies, and
    Director, Program in the Arts of the Moving Image
Rachael B. Brady, Adjunct Associate Professor of Visual Studies, Department of Art,
    Art History & Visual Studies; Research Scientist, Computer Science and Electrical
    and Computer Engineering
Josh Gibson, Associate Director and Instructor, Program in the Arts of the Moving
    Image
Mark Hansen, Professor, Program in Literature
Alex Harris, Professor of the Practice, Public Policy Studies and Center for
    Documentary Studies
Tim Lenoir, Kimberly J. Jenkins Chair of New Technologies and Society
William Noland, Associate Professor of the Practice of Visual Arts, Sculpture,
    Photography, and Video, Department of Art, Art History & Visual Studies
Tom Rankin, Associate Professor of the Practice of Art, Department of Art, Art History
    & Visual Studies, and Director, Center for Documentary Studies
William Seaman, Professor of Visual Studies, Department of Art, Art History & Visual
    Studies

                                           19
Victoria Szabo, Program Director, ISIS, Assistant Research Professor in Visual Studies
    and New Media, Department of Art, Art History & Visual Studies
Charles Thompson, Education and Curriculum Director, Center for Documentary
    Studies, and Lecturer, Department of Cultural Anthropology

5.2 Faculty for Electives, Mentoring, & Advising

Casey Alt, Visiting Assistant Professor of the Practice of Visual Arts, Department of Art,
    Art History & Visual Studies
Paul Berliner, Professor, Department of Music
John Biewen, Research Associate and Audio Instructor, Center for Documentary
    Studies
Robert Duvall, Lecturer, Department of Computer Science
Wendy Ewald, Research Associate, Center for Documentary Studies
Nicholas Gessler, Research Scholar, Information Science & Information Studies
    Program
Gary Hawkins, Instructor, Center for Documentary Studies and the Program in the
    Arts of the Moving Image
Katherine Hayles, Professor and Director of Graduate Studies, Program in Literature
Katie Hyde, Ph.D., Research Associate and Instructor, Center for Documentary Studies
Nancy Kalow, Instructor, Center for Documentary Studies
Shambhavi Kaul, Instructor, Program in the Arts of the Moving Image
James S. Lee, Ph.D., Instructor, Program in the Arts of the Moving Image
Pedro Lasch, Assistant Research Professor, Department of Art, Art History & Visual
    Studies
Scott Lindroth, Professor, Department of Music
Richard Lucic, Associate Professor of the Practice of Computer Science
Steve Milligan, Instructor, Program in the Arts of the Moving Image
John Moses, M.D., Instructor, Center for Documentary Studies
Negar Mottahedeh, Associate Professor, Program in Literature
Mark J. Olson, Ph. D., Visiting Assistant Professor in Visual Studies, Department of
    Art, Art History & Visual Studies
Raquel Salvatella de Prada, Visiting Assistant Professor of the Practice of Visual
    Studies and New Media, Department of Art, Art History & Visual Studies
Christopher Sims, M.F.A., Instructor, Center for Documentary Studies
Rebecca Stein, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Cultural Anthropology
Kristine Stiles, Ph.D., Professor, Department of Art, Art History & Visual Studies
Timothy Tyson, Ph.D., Research Scholar, Center for Documentary Studies
Jacqueline Waeber, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Music




                                           20
5.3. Facilities

The MFA program offices and studio space will be located in Building 7250 (Warehouse
East – Cabinet Shop) near to the East Duke Building (AAHVS), the Center for
Documentary Studies. and the Smith Warehouse (AMI). The University has in place an
impressive array of facilities, infrastructure, and technology to support the MFA in
these and other locations (see Appendix D).

5.4. Resources Needed

The MFA in Experimental and Documentary Arts does not depend on additional
faculty, administration, or staff. The business plan (see Section 5.6, Table 1) outlines
resources that will fund any additional needs. This budget projection is based on the
premise that the Graduate School will allow the program to keep all tuition revenues in
the five-year startup phase.

The principal resource required is faculty time for teaching, advising, and mentoring.
The addition of ten core courses per year—staffed by current regular-rank faculty from
the three sponsoring units—will be offset through course buy outs. Undergraduate
course offerings will not be decreased. Any new elective courses initiated for the MFA
will be open to all graduate students (e.g. those in the Literature, Visual Studies, and
other Ph.D. programs) and will in most cases replace currently offered graduate
courses. With ten course buyouts from the MFA program per year, there will be no
reduction in the number of undergraduate or graduate courses in any of the three
sponsoring units.

5.5. Potential or Actual External Funding

The Center for Documentary Studies, AAHVS, and AMI will aggressively seek external
funding in order to enhance and broaden the MFA program. However, the proposed
program is not dependent upon external funding.




                                            21
5.6. Budget Projections in Startup Period (five years)

Table 1. 15 Matriculants per Year

                             Year 1      Summer   Year 2    Summer   Year 3    Summer   Year 4    Summer   Year 5
New Students                        15        0       15         0       15         0        15        0       15
Returning Students                   0       15       15        30       15        30        15       30       15
Total Students                      15       15       30        30       30        30        30       30       30
Tuition per course             3,240          0     3,400        0     3,600        0     3,800        0     4,000


Tuition Revenue              388,800          0 816,000          0 864,000          0   912,000        0 960,000


Fellowships                  129,600              272,000            288,000            304,000            320,000
Additional TA support         10,000               20,000             20,000             20,000             20,000
1.0 FTE Staff / Asst. DGS     50,000               60,000             60,000             60,000             60,000
Faculty Buy-outs              40,000               80,000             80,000             80,000             90,000
Exchange Le Fresnoy                  0             70,000             70,000             70,000             70,000
Marketing program             10,000               20,000             10,000             10,000             10,000
IT Costs                     100,000               80,000            100,000            100,000            100,000
Exhibition / installation            0             20,000             30,000             30,000             30,000
M&O                           62,467               62,467             62,467             62,467             62,467
Direct DocXArts expenses     402,067              684,467            720,467            736,467            762,467


Revenue minus expenses       -13,267              131,533            143,533            175,533            197,533
Surplus / Deficit            -13,267              131,533            143,533            175,533            197,533

$ 1080 / unit = $ 3240 /
course
Counted on 9 units /
semester

36 units standard rec MFA




                                                       22
Table 2. 9 Matriculants per Year

                              Year 1    Summer   Year 2    Summer   Year 3    Summer   Year 4       Summer   Year 5
New Students                       9         0        9         0        9         0            9        0        9
Returning Students                 0         9        9        18        9        18            9       18        9
Total Students                     9         9       18        18       18        18        18          18       18
Tuition per course              3,240        0     3,400        0     3,600        0     3,800           0     4,000


Tuition Revenue               233,280        0 489,600          0 518,400          0   547,200           0 576,000


Fellowships                    58,320            122,400            129,600            136,800               144,000
Additional TA support          10,000             20,000             20,000             20,000                20,000
1.0 FTE Staff / Asst. DGS      50,000             60,000             60,000             60,000                60,000
Faculty Buy-outs               40,000             80,000             80,000             80,000                80,000
Exchange Le Fresnoy                0              70,000             70,000             70,000                70,000
Marketing program              10,000             20,000             10,000             10,000                10,000
IT Costs                       70,000             60,000             60,000             60,000                60,000
Exhibition / installation          0              20,000             30,000             30,000                30,000
M&O                            62,467             62,467             62,467             62,467                62,467
Direct DocXArts expenses      300,787            514,867            522,067            529,267               536,467


Revenue minus expenses        -67,507            -25,267             -3,667             17,933                39,533
Surplus / Deficit             -67,507            -25,267             -3,667             17,933                39,533


$ 1080 / unit = $ 3240 /
course
Counted on 9 units /
semester

36 units standard rec MFA

First year equivalent 2.25
student support (25%)
Second-fifth equivalent 4.5
student support (25%)




                                                      23
6:   RELATIONSHIP TO EXISTING PROGRAMS

6.1. Core Duke Programs

The MFA in Experimental and Documentary Arts is a collaborative graduate program
of the Department of Art, Art History & Visual Studies; the Center for Documentary
Studies; and the Program in the Arts of the Moving Image (formerly the
Film/Video/Digital Program), with integral ties to the Visual Studies Initiative and the
Information Science + Information Studies (ISIS) program, both of which bring faculty,
courses, research, facilities, and other resources from multiples departments and units
across campus, including Computer Science, Engineering, Literature, English,
Philosophy, Music, Public Policy, the Medical School, the Office of Information
Technology, the Nasher Museum of Art, Perkins Library, and the Renaissance
Computing Institute (RENCI) Center.

Detailed descriptions of the core programs are delineated in Appendix F.

6.2. Supportive Duke Programs
Students in the MFA in Experimental and Documentary Arts program will benefit from
intellectual interaction, courses, and faculty affiliated with a number of related PhD and
graduate certificate programs at Duke. While each of these programs is complementary
to the proposed MFA program, none emphasizes the particular combination of a
terminal degree that combines practice and theory as well as new media and
documentary arts and traditions.

Supportive Duke programs are delineated in Appendix G.

6.3. Local Community Programs & Resources

A wide range of local community resources will inform and support student
coursework and theses. These include the annual Full Frame Documentary Film
Festival, public radio station WUNC-FM, the Southern Documentary Fund (SDF),
Working Films, the Southern Oral History Program at the University of North Carolina
at Chapel Hill, and the School of Information and Library Science at the University of
North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

These resources are delineated in Appendix H.

6.4. Exchange Sites

MFA students will have foreign exchange sites available for summer research and post-
graduate project development at Le Fresnoy, Tourcoing, France, and the China
Academy of Art, Hangzhou. These exchange sites are described in Appendix I.




                                            24
6.5. Programs at Peer Institutions

Related Master of Fine Arts degrees at other universities fall into two major categories
of emphasis: a focus on a particular medium such as photography or film, or a focus on
new media and technology. No other MFA program provides the unique blend of
creative documentary practice in all mediums and computational or new media and
technology proposed in the MFA in the Experimental and Documentary Arts at Duke.
Brief descriptions of a number of other programs are provided in Appendix J.

A comparable program is the Stanford University MFA in Documentary Film. Tuition
for the program is $37,380 per year compared to $24,740 for Duke. Other expenses at
Stanford are estimated at $23,169 (the estimate for Duke is $19,105). According to these
figures, the Stanford MFA program would cost students about $33,000 more than Duke
over two years. Despite the significant expense, the Stanford MFA program receives
some 60 applications per year for 8 openings.




                                           25
APPENDIX A: Required Courses

STUDIOS

• Documentary Process (Harris)
Exploration of the range of mediums and approaches to community-based documentary work
that expresses both cultural/political realities through a personal point of view. This studio
course will encourage documentary expression in a range of mediums, including film/video,
photography, audio, long-form writing, and a blend of the above. We will experiment with
collaborative approaches to documentary fieldwork as well as individually driven work in
documentary art. Team-taught. Final project required.

• Experimental Film/Video (Gibson)
Poetic and experimental image-making, utilizing techniques that trace a historical trajectory
from celluloid to digital. Exploration of cinematographic principles and cameraless
experiments. Readings and screenings focusing on avant-garde film and digital traditions
supplement student productions. Team-taught.

• Computational Media Studio (Brady)
Introduction to computer programming and interactive media production as artistic practice.
In-depth exploration of critical possibilities opened by computational media through exercises,
projects, and critiques. Experience with programming basics includes procedural and object-
oriented programming, two- and three-dimensional graphics, data visualization, and
innovative methods for interactivity. Team-taught. No previous programming experience
required.

SEMINARS

• Introduction to Documentary Arts (Thompson)
Historical and conceptual survey of documentary studies with specific attention to
experimental and artistic practices that have expanded the tradition. Students will be
introduced to a range of documentary expression from photography to writing, from film to
installations based on documentary fieldwork. This course will explore the range documentary
practice, from journalism, art, ethnography, musicology, political advocacy, and autobiography.
Final paper required.

• Genealogies and Theories of the Experimental (Seaman, Hansen)
This course will trace the history of experimental expression in 20th and 21st century art. The
course will cover a series of different movements including Dada, Surrealism, Futurism,
Cubism, Constructivism, The Bauhaus, Vorticism, Installation Art, Performance Art, Fluxus,
Happenings, Actionism, Art Povera, The Situationists, Experimental Film, Video Art, Media
Art, Net Art, Land Art, Body Art, Intervention Art, Art/Science and Technology, Bio Art, and
Conceptual Art. A series of weekly readings as derived from both artists and art theorists will
be discussed. A major paper will be required. Students will also articulate a personal and/or
group relationship to the current potentials of the “experimental” as one assignment. A number
of individual works will be viewed as part of the class.

• Critical Approaches (Lenoir, Hansen)
Readings and discussion of research methodologies for the development of the thesis project.
Final paper required.



                                               26
THESIS PREPARATION

• Thesis Writing Workshop (Abe)
Support for the writing of the thesis paper through multiple drafts and group discussion.
Writing of a concise critique of the MFA project following its completion and exhibition.

• Thesis Studio 1 (Rankin, Gibson)
Exploration of the thesis project based on first semester coursework and individual research.
Final project and review of thesis project required.

• Thesis Studio 2 (Szabo, Noland)
Continuation of thesis project production and critique.

• Thesis Studio 3 (Seaman, Rankin)
Completion of thesis project. Equivalent to two studio classes.




                                               27
APPENDIX B: Elective Courses

COMPSCI 296S Data Visualization (Brady)
Data visualization should communicate trends or features in data clearly and cleanly. This hands-on
course covers good visualization practices as applied to simple 2D representations, such as graphs and
charts, 3D representations for scientific data, and abstract representations for network or relationship
data. Topics include visual design, 3D data rendering techniques, information visualization techniques,
and methods for handling time-varying data. The course consists of lectures and projects. Final projects
consist of visualizing a student's own research data. The software used in this course includes Matlab,
Paraview, and Processing.

DOCST Graduate Photography Seminar (Rankin or Harris)
A documentary photography fieldwork course that focuses on project-based work. Students
create distinct photographic essays/portfolios during the semester and study the way other
photographers have created presented the photograph to communicate to a wide audience.
Students learn to create, print, choose, sequence, and pace their images while studying some of
the classic and contemporary masters of photography.

ARTSVIS 236S Experimental Communities (Lasch)
Interdisciplinary seminar examining visual culture and experimental social structures. Readings across
academic spectrum focusing on alternative corporate models and workers' unions, early soviet social
networks, neighborhood associations, anarchist communes, art collectives, minority alliances, reality TV,
fan clubs and fundamentalist organizations, encouraging students to fuse theories of social change with
practice to produce new social structures. Class productions may include research papers, performances,
experimental theater, social actions, new media works, as well as conventional art forms. Work will be
judged by its formal sophistication or aesthetic merits, its social or political relevance, and its engagement
with methods of ethical inquiry studied throughout the semester.

CULANTH 285S Space, Place, and Power (Stein)
Examines relationship between space and power by studying how communities make and negotiate
spaces, how identities are forged out of space, and the relationship between cultural and spatial
practices. Spatial components of globalization, sexuality and sexual identity, race and gender, and the
geographic and cartographic histories of imperialism. Interdisciplinary readings from disciplines of
geography, anthropology, cultural studies, women's studies, urban studies and others. Readings in the
work of Lefebvre, Foucault, Harvey, Stoler, Pratt, and others. Aims to develop a critical, theoretical
approach to space and spatiality.

VISUALST 260S Trauma in Art/Literature/Film (Stiles)
This course explores the visual signs of trauma in art, literature, and film. The aim of the course is to
develop a critical and visual vocabulary for the identification of traumatic images and to cultivate
awareness of trauma for an empathic approach to interaction and prevention. An interdisciplinary
approach will enable a consideration of the representation of traumatic experience in domestic and social
situations, ethno-political violence, racism, war and forced migration and genocide, as well as sexual and
physical violence and cults. Readings are multidisciplinary, drawing from clinical psychology, cultural
studies, history, art history, and criticism. Before the 1990s, clinical psychology maintained that the
etiology and pathogenesis of trauma was invisible. Over the past decade that view has changed and some
clinical psychologists argue that trauma may be read as a “blueprint.” We will begin with a history of
theories of trauma and then apply this knowledge to an examination of particular works of contemporary
art, literature, and film. We will discuss these works in relation to current controversies over trauma. We
will consider this visual printing in terms of both the “recovered memory syndrome” and the “false-
memory syndrome” movement. We will consider the issue of trans-generational transmission of trauma
and think about the impact of trauma on broader social communities will also consider cults and their
relation to trauma.




                                                     28
VISUALST 265S Emergent Interface Design (Seaman)
Seminar exploring issues surrounding embodied approaches to interface design, including bio-memetics;
haptic body knowledge; multi-modal sensing; physical computing; physical/digital relationships;
networked relations; the potentials of virtual space and different qualities of space, both visual and sonic;
as well as database potentials, and emergent generative methodologies for creating works of art,
drawings, and diagrams related to these subjects.

VISUALST 266S The Human As Electrochemical Computer —Toward a
Computational and Aesthetic Paradigm (Seaman)
Lectures weekly related to different disciplinary understandings of body. Exploring new computational
and aesthetic paradigms for brain/mind/body/ environment relations; articulating bridging languages
enabling researchers to talk across disciplines. Required to participate in ongoing discussion, develop
particular aspects of research and write a major research paper as course requirements.

VISUALST 270S New Media, Memory, and the Visual Archive (Olson)
Considers the impact of new media on the nature of archives as material technological platforms for
cultural memory and knowledge production. Though a sustained engagement with major theorists of the
archive alongside the analytical resources of visual and new media studies, this course will explore
several intertwining themes, including the “storage capacity” of media; the "media specificity" of the
archive; the database as cultural form; the body as archive; new media and the documentation of
“everyday life”; memory, counter-memory and the politics of the archive; and archival materiality in the
context of digital ephemerality. Our primary focus will be on visual artifacts (image, moving image) with
consideration of the role of other sensory modalities in the construction of individual, institutional and
collective memory.

DOCST Documentary and Digital Media (Sims)
A fieldwork and production course focused on the publication of interactive Web-based
multimedia presentations, as pioneered by washingtonpost.com, nytimes.com, Magnum in
Motion, and a variety of independent producers/artists. Utilizing digital audio and
photography, the class will work as a team to create a series richly textured digital
presentations around a common theme in a documentary style. Students work with current
technologies and techniques for multimedia publications; basic field recording and digital audio
editing techniques; digital photography and editing in Adobe Photoshop and relationed
programs; and graphic design principles. Fieldwork and productions ethics will also be
examined and will be a critical part of the course.

ISIS 210S How They Got Game (Lenoir)
This course focuses on the history and cultural impact of interactive simulations and video games,
particularly the evolution of computer and video game design from its beginnings to the present:
storytelling, strategy, simulation, sports, 3D first-person games. Includes cultural, business, and technical
perspectives. Provides insights into design, production, marketing, and socio-cultural impacts of
interactive entertainment and communication.

ISIS 250S Critical Studies in New Media (Lenoir, Hayles, Hansen)
Examines new media technologies from a transdisciplinary perspective by exploring how the use of new
media is affecting academic practice across disciplines. Builds upon existing expertise in film, literature,
and media studies to analyze what is "new" about new media and how they compare with, transform,
and remediate earlier media practices. Proposes the development of a critical analytical framework for
approaching new media and relating them to other areas of critical academic discourse. Promotes a
hands-on, active engagement with the technologies as a means for analysis and critique of new media
approaches in contemporary academic research.




                                                     29
ISIS 260L Exploring the Metaverse (Szabo)
History, theory, criticism, practice of metaverse development. Virtual worlds annotate/reference physical
word; experience of physical world transformed by connection to the virtual. Links to "old," analog
media. Virtual world-building and historical narrative, museum, mapping, and architectural practices.
Project-based seminar course w/ critical readings, historical and contemporary examples, world-
building. Class exhibitions, critiques, and ongoing virtual showcase. Projects might include: web and
multimedia, GPS and handheld data and media capture, 2D & 3D mapping, screen-based sims and game-
engine based development, sensors and biometrics, and multimodal, haptic interfaces.

ISIS 260S Information Archaeology
Interdisciplinary exploration of the nature of artifact and evidence, information and knowledge
embedded in structured and unstructured digital data. Critical analysis, research and technology labs
focus on societal and technological implications of data warehousing, Internet archives, analog to digital
conversion, data recovery, and identity theft and management.

ISIS 270S Body Works (Lenoir)
Influence of new medical technologies (organ transplantation, VR surgery, genetic engineering, nano-
medicine, medical imaging, DNA computing, neuro-silicon interfaces) on the American imagination from
WWII to the current decade. Examines the thesis that these dramatic new ways of configuring bodies
have participated in a complete reshaping of the notion of the body in the cultural imaginary and a
transformation of our experience of actual human bodies.

AMI Producing Docu-Fiction (Gibson)
An exploration of hybrid film forms from neo-realism to the art of the documentary
reenactment and recreation to mockumentary and reality TV. Students investigate the elusive
boundaries of documentary and fiction by producing work that engages with the gray areas of
these forms.

LIT 210S Basic Concepts in Cinema Studies (Mottahedeh)
Review of theory, methodology, and debates in study of film under three rubrics: mode of production or
industry; apparatus or technologies of cinematic experience; text or the network of filmic systems
(narrative, image, sound). Key concepts and their genealogies with the field: gaze theory, apparatus
theory, suture, indexicality, color, continuity.

LIT 212S Film Feminisms (Mottahedeh)
Philosophical debates and approaches to the female form in film theory and history. Phenomenology,
cultural studies, Marxism, psychoanalysis, structuralism, post-structuralism, as well as gaze theory,
apparatus theory, and feminist film theory as they approach readings of the body, subjectivity and
identity in cinema. Questions of spectatorship and the gendered subject. Screening and discussion of
Hollywood and European avant garde films key to early debates, and of international films central to
debates around the gendered subject and representation in modernity. Interrogation of feminist
approaches to national cinemas.

LIT 279S Phenomenology, Film, Media (Hansen)
This course focuses on the correlation of phenomenology and twentieth and twenty-first century visual
media, from cinema to video games. Part of our time will be spent reading classical phenomenological
texts (Husserl, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty) in light of Czech phenomenologist Jan Patocka’s (and
contemporary French philosopher Renaud Barbaras’s) reconstruction of an a subjective phenomenology
of appearance as the original phenomenological (which is to say, Husserlian) project. The remainder of
our time will be spent focusing on the link between the phenomenological subject, or the subject of
appearance, and technical exteriorizations of subjectivity (or more exactly, of subjective elements, what
Slavoi Zizek has recently called “organs without bodies”). Works likely to be studied include films by
Brakhage, Tarkovsky, Sukarov, Hitchcock, and Godard, TV shows The Wire and Lost, video art by Pierre
Huyghe and Philippe Pareno, digital films by Barbara Latanzi and Mario Klinsman, and videogames
Halo 3 and Bioshock. In addition to the phenomenological texts mentioned above, we will likely read
texts by Ricoeur, Derrida, Deleuze, Godard, Lacan, Zizek, Bernard Stiegler, Jacques Rancière, Alain


                                                    30
Badiou, Mladen Dolar, Stan Brakhage, Hollis Frampton, Gilbert Simondon, Félix Guattari, and Raymond
Ruyer.

LIT 294S Theories of the Image (Mottahedeh)
Different methodological approaches to theories of the image (film, photography, painting, etc.), readings
on a current issue or concept within the field of the image. Examples of approaches and topics are
feminism, psychoanalysis, postmodernism, technology, spectatorship, national identity, authorship,
genre, economics, and the ontology of sound.

MUSIC 317S Sound, Voice, and Music in Film (Waeber)
This seminar introduces students to film studies with emphasis on the “aural objects” of film,
understanding “aural” in its broadest meaning, thus encompassing not only music (whether score music
(“nondiegetic”) or source music (“diegetic”)), but also noise and the voice. Topics discussed will include
the representations of the aural in film; the functions of pre-existing music; narration and voice-over and
their interrelation with music scoring; Hollywood practices and non-Hollywood practices; approaches to
the uses and functions of music and voice notably through Lacanian and feminist film theories. The
seminar will be based on a selected corpus of movies and critical literature, the list of which will be given
at the beginning of the seminar.

AMI Audio: Theory, Criticism, and Aesthetics (Lee)
An examination of theories and practices of aurality, psycho-acoustics, and audio aesthetics in
art, moving image, theater, and mixed media. The objective of this course is examine the many
ways that sound has been conceived of and developed as a unique and powerful artistic
medium and to explore sound as it drives and is driven by production in other media,
especially those involving the moving image. We will look at historical and contemporary
approaches to the use of sound as a fundamental material for the creation of art. The course
begins with an introduction to the basic physics, physiology, and psychology of hearing and
listening. It includes a reconstruction of the history and prehistory of sound reproduction with
view toward understanding the limits and potential of technologically aided sound work.
Further areas of exploration are theories of sound art, sound art in contemporary broadcasting,
site specific acoustic installations, sound and a sense of place, acoustics and architecture
(ancient and contemporary), the development of audio in cinema, and sound art as a counter to
the traditional musical canon. In keeping with the program’s view of the coequality of the
production of media artifacts and the understanding of the theory and conventions of criticism
surrounding those artifacts, the course will have a production component that encourages
individual or group work in any of those areas. In addition to serving the needs of students in
Experimental and Documentary Arts, the course should be of interest to students in several
other disciplines including, music, theater, art, psychology, computer science, and various
communications disciplines.

DOCST Documentary Audio Art (Biewen)
Techniques of audio documentary, with the goal of producing compelling audio art for use in
installations, broadcast, or on the web. Includes instructor-supervised fieldwork with digital
audio equipment in a variety of cultural settings, as well as independent work on students’ own
audio productions resulting in high-quality pieces suitable for a variety of uses. Course will
also introduce graduate students to range of audio art from a variety of contexts.




                                                     31
APPENDIX C: POST-GRADUATE EMPLOYMENT, DIGITAL ARTS AND NEW
MEDIA MFA, UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA CRUZ, 2007


Lead developer, metavid.org funded by Sunlight Foundation
Founder, Highbeam Associates, LLC
Adjunct faculty, UCSC; academic preceptor, Porter College, UCSC; 2008-9, Asst.
    Provost, Porter College, UCSC; practicing artist
Adjunct faculty, UCSC; Digital Media Academy; Academy of Art University
Adjunct faculty, UCSC; practicing artist
Adjunct faculty, UC Merced, practicing artist
Transmedia producer/practicing artist. adjunct faculty, UCSC, SFSU
Manager and developer, metavid.org funded by Sunlight Foundation
Adjunct faculty, UCSC; practicing artist
Practicing artist
Interaction designer, Yahoo! Groups
Web developer, Mediatrope Design Studios; practicing artist and musician
Adjunct faculty, UCSC, CSU East Bay
Pursuing PhD; performing musician
Adjunct faculty, UCSC
Global Webjam online music collaboration series; adjunct faculty, UCSC
Multimedia specialist, College of Southern Nevada, Las Vegas
Co-Coordinator, I Go! Youth-Leadership Poetry Program, Oakland; artist-in-residence
    in Oakland, Richmond and San Francisco high schools
Part-time employment, private sector
The Grassroots Institute for Fundraising Training; practicing artist, curator
Adjunct faculty, CSU Stanislaus
Adjunct faculty, UCSC; practicing artist
Customer service representative, practicing artist and musician
Pursuing MFA, Electronic Music, CalArts
Web designer, ArrowBreeze.com
Web developer; practicing artist
Practicing artist
Pursuing PhD, Computer Science, UCSC
Web developer, UCSC; freelance animator, editor and videographer
Pursuing PhD in media and music technologies, England
DANM Research Associate, UCIRA grant recipient; adjunct faculty, UCSC Summer
    Session and California College of Arts




                                         32
APPENDIX D: AVAILABLE FACILITIES

1. Center for Center Documentary Studies
The Center for Documentary Studies shares a basic software image and online file storage
system with the Smith Warehouse Bay 12 facilities. Some CDS courses are taught at Smith, and
the IT staff collaborate on the IT infrastructure that exists to support production work in various
media, including photography, film/video, audio, and narrative writing.

       A. Labs
       104 Bridges Bldg. - 12 MacPros, all dual-core Intel Xeon 2.66GHz CPUs, all with 4GB of
       RAM. Each computer is connected to a 23" Apple Cinema Display. This is the primary
       computer lab for CDS.

       2nd Floor Bridges Bldg. - 4 MacPros, all dual-core Intel Xeon 2.66GHz CPUs, all with
       4GB of RAM. Each computer is connected to a 23" Apple Cinema Display. 1 computer
       is connected to an Epson V700 photo scanner and Nikon CoolScan 9000 film/negative
       scanner. 1 computer is connected to an Epson V700 photo scanner and Nikon 4000
       film/negative scanner. 2 computers are more or less dedicated to film capturing with
       the mini-DV decks/videocams used for importing available via checkout from the CDS
       "Cage.” This is the primary scanning and film capturing computer lab for CDS.

       209 Bridges Bldg. - 1 dual-core Intel Xeon 2.66GHz CPU with 32GB of RAM. This
       computer is connected to a 23" Apple Cinema Display and has three (3) 1.0TB internal
       drives arranged in a striped set (RAID 0). This computer is a workhorse 1080p HD
       rendering computer and is available for special projects.

       210 Bridges Bldg. - 10 PowerPC G5 (Motorola, not the latest Intel) computers, various
       levels of computer memories, includes 17"/20" LCD iMacs and PowerMacG5s. These
       computers serve as overflow, primarily for the CDS "Learning Outreach" students, but
       can also be used for Duke Undergraduate/Graduate students.

       All CDS lab computers are connected to the Arts & Sciences Active Directory system
       that provides user management and data storage.

       B. Equipment
       The CDS "Cage" is a hardware repository where various pieces of hardware - including
       1080p-compatible mini-DV decks, 1080p Sony Videocams, external hard drives - are
       available for checkout. The Cage is staffed 9 a.m.-9 p.m. Monday-Thursday, 9 a.m.-7
       p.m. Friday, and 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday. Items can be reserved and the amount of time
       an item can be checked out varies depending on availability and needs.

       C. Classrooms and Auditorium
       CDS maintains five teaching classrooms, ranging in size from a seminar room seating up
       to 15 to an auditorium with maximum capacity of 165. All classrooms are equipped with
       A/V and digital projection capability. The auditorium is equipped for theatre
       screenings, with sound and projection equipment to accommodate almost all platforms.

       D. Gallery Spaces
       2D galleries in CDS include the Kreps Gallery (maximum 176 running feet), the Porch
       Gallery (50 running feet), the University Gallery (60 running feet), and the Lyndhurst
       Gallery (55 running feet). CDS also maintains an On-line Multimedia Gallery within its
       extensive website (http://cds.aas.duke.edu) and provides rich content in Duke’s iTunes
       U space. CDS also organizes exhibits off-site in Durham and the surrounding area and

                                                33
       tours exhibits regionally and nationally.

2. Art, Art History, and Visual Studies
The East Duke Building is the departmental home of Art, Art History & Visual Studies, one of
the core partners in the new MFA Program. The facilities in East Duke fall into three main
categories: the Visual Resource Center, Lab and Production Spaces, and Gallery Spaces. East
Duke also houses a graduate student lounge that would be available for use by the incoming
MFA students.

       A. Visual Resources Center
       The Visual Resources Center of the Department of Art, Art History & Visual Studies
       maintains the existing collection of analog images and the expanding collection digital
       images that primarily support the daily teaching and ongoing research of the faculty
       and graduate students in the department, and secondarily the general teaching of visual
       culture by Duke University faculty. Works of art and architecture from prehistoric times
       to the present, from both Western and non-Western cultures, are represented.

       The holdings currently number approximately 75,000 locally produced digital images
       and 77,000 commercially licensed digital images; 320,000 35mm slides; and 40,000
       photographs (stored off-site), The collection contains images of traditional media, such
       as architecture, drawing, painting, photography, prints, and sculpture; the many applied
       or decorative arts in glass, ivory, jewelry, metal, wood, etc.; newer media such as body
       art, computer art, digital art, performance art, video, etc.; and images of social, cultural,
       and historical documentation.
       Visual Media Collections@Duke (https://imagine.aas.duke.edu) is the digital image
       database for the Visual Resources Center’s digital collections and is also used to develop
       various digital image collections at Duke University, such as those of the Department of
       Classical Studies and the School of Nursing. VMC@Duke is being supported and
       maintained by the Trinity College of Arts and Sciences Office of Technology Services.

       The software used to build these collections is known as MDID (Madison Digital Image
       Database), which is “an online image database and multimedia instructional system
       designed to create and show Internet-based lectures using digitized images. The system
       permits instructors to remotely generate ‘slideshows,’” which can be annotated, placed
       online for student study, or archived for testing or future use.”

       Patrons can also use the VMC@DUKE as a search-and-retrieve digital image repository,
       and then export images individually or as a group for use in other presentation software
       such as PowerPoint, Keynote, or ARTstor’s Offline Image Viewer (OIV).

       The University subscribes to ARTstor through the University Libraries
       (http://library.duke.edu/research/image/online/arthistory.html).

       B. Labs
       Architecture/Design Lab (110)- The Visual Resources Center also contains a small
       architecture/design lab with three (2 Mac and 1PC) computer stations for oversize
       (11x17) scanning and experimenting with design programs, work tables, and a high-end
       plotter printer, a Canon IPF 8100 44" Wide Format Printer/Plotter that is ideally suited
       for architectural and other design renderings. The VRC staff provides training in digital
       scanning, Photoshop, and image database search strategies. Software includes Adobe
       Creative Suite CS4 Master Collection, and SketchUp Pro.

       Scanning Lab (109)- Adjacent to VRC is a multi-user scanning area used by graduate
       students and faculty for digital flatbed (reflective) and slide scanning using a variety of

                                                34
Nikon and Scanmaster scanners on both iMac and Windows computers. HP LaserJet
black-and-white printers are available in this lab and elsewhere within the department,
as are also two high-volume Lexmark c534dtn color printers deployed conveniently near
concentrations of departmental offices.

Graduate Student Office - The graduate student office and adjacent colloquium provide
two recent model iMac computers with a variety of software designed to assist graduate
teaching assistants in particular in supporting their teaching needs. A HP LaserJet
black-and-white printer is located in the colloquium, and one of the department's
Lexmark color printers is in an adjacent commons area.

C. Gallery Spaces
The building's main public space in the long central first-floor hallway hosts three video
presentation venues and a static display area.

       Display Walls - The display area includes all walls of the first floor hallway,
       nearly 150 running feet of exhibition space. Art can be mounted either directly
       on the walls or hung from an exhibition suspension system. Exhibitions of
       student and visiting faculty are currently on display.

       Infoscreen - The first electronic display is the department's InfoScreen, a 42-inch
       LCD display over the department's main entrance, which is driven by a Mac
       Mini computer, which displays up-coming lectures and events within the
       department and at the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University.

        Big Screen Projection - At the functional main entrance of the building are two
       other video-art display resources. One is a ceiling-mounted digital projector that
       displays student and faculty art-- particularly video creations -- on a screen
       eleven-feet wide. A single Intel quad-core MacPro computer housed in an
       adjacent secure area drives this display. The existing projector is currently being
       evaluated for imminent replacement by a cutting-edge 24/7-capable projector,
       the Sanyo PLC-XTC50L. This projection system is currently showing an
       alternation of two video creations by departmental faculty.

       Multiscreen Plasma Display - The main video display/presentation resource in
       the area is a six-screen flexible-arrangement plasma array powered by three Intel
       eight-core processor MacPro computers. The projectors -- Panasonic 42” Plasma
       TH-42PF11UK 1920x1080 -- can be mounted in varying orientations (landscape,
       portrait; adjacent or separated) to suit the presentation needs of the artist whose
       work is displayed.

       Exhibitions on this and the digital projection system remain on during the
       daytime and evening hours seven days a week, to exhibit department art not
       only to student traffic during school sessions, but also to attendees of concerts,
       dramas, and lecture activities that take place regularly in the building.

D. Classrooms
There are three lecture/seminar classrooms in the East Duke Building, each of which has
an in situ Windows computer, digital projection, audio, DVD, multi-format Video Tape
playback equipment. These teaching spaces are also equipped for video and audio
recording of lecture, including voice, in-line audio and video capture of any installed
piece of equipment including computer presentations. Lectures can be thus captured for



                                        35
       streaming playback or download via the Lectopia software package, or can be linked
       from within Blackboard web-presentation software.

3. Smith Warehouse
The Smith Warehouse Bay 11-up and Bay 12 facility is a mixed use space supporting studio art,
printing, painting and various forms of digital media production. It provides the
administrative home of the Visual Studies Initiative, the Arts of the Moving Image, Information
Science + Information Studies, and the Visualization Technology Group. Faculty partners from
Literature, Computer Science, and Art, Art History & Visual Studies have offices and
workspaces in the area as well.

All computer workstations include a full complement of multimedia software applications,
including the Adobe Master Collection for media authorship, FinalCut Pro, Motion, Maya,
Logic, and various other specialized multimedia production packages. Systems are customized
to the needs of the existing courses and projects each semester.

       A. Private Studios: All studios have M-Audio Keystation 88 (Full Sized Weighted MIDI
       keyboard)

              Private Studio 1 (and 1a) - 1 SD DV Import Unit

              Private Studio 2 - Flatbed 16mm Film Editor and Manual Editor

              Private Studio 3 - Video Analogue Import (BlackMagic Intensity Pro Card for
              HDMI, Component, and RCA import), HD DV Import Device, NTSC+PAL
              LaserDisc Players (from Bill Seaman), Sony 5.1 Stereo, Standalone DVD player,
              A/V Switching System, Rode NT 2 Microphone, Fireface 400 FW Audio Import
              Device, Mackie H65 Studio Monitors, 1 Universal VCR.

              Private Studio 4 (and 4a) - 7.1 Composer's Studio (also audio overly for film)
              Apogee Ensemble Audio Import Device (also works with FCP), 5 Mackie H65
              Studio Monitors, 1 Mackie Sub-Woofer, 1 DynAudio Studio Monitors, TASCAM
              Cassette Deck (DAT to come a little later), Furman power conditioner, Rode NT 2
              cardiod microphone

              Private Studio 5 - (Digital Imaging and Reprographics) Epson Stylus Pro 9880
              44" Professional Imager, NikonScan 44 Slide Scanner, CanonScan 8800 (regular
              scanner), Wacom Intous Drawing Tablet, Luminary, Binding Machine

       B. Labs and Classrooms
             228 Smith - 15 MacPro worktstations. All machines are Mac Pro (Early 2008)
             Dual-Quad Core 2.8 GHz, w/ 6GB FB-DIMM, 256MB VRAM (Nvidia), 380GB
             HD, with 23" rev. 3 Apple Cinema Displays (calibrated), 4 additional machines in
             the Bryan Center, and 1 more in A121.

              101 Smith - Seminar style room with access to laptop cart with 14 machines with
              full suite of Lab software.

              Bay 12 - Other printers: Epson Stylus Pro 4800 (2), Xerox Phaser 8560dn Other:
              Samsung Series 9 HD LCD TV, High(er) End Scanners (Epson V70, Microtek
              1000XL), Edirol M36 Keyboards




                                              36
       112 Smith Special Project Lab - Small mixed-use lab for sustained project
       development and hardware experimentation. Open tables and open-admin
       workstations for customized applications and user-configurations. Windows
       machines for GIS and game-related project work. Open to faculty and graduate
       students and ISIS Certificate students, as well as on request to undergraduate
       students working in Bay 11-12 classrooms in a given semester.

       Bay 11 VTG Lab (A237) – Includes 8 PC workstations imaged with multimedia
       production tools specialized for scientific visualization.

       Bay 11 Green Wall - The nearby Green Wall is painted with Chromakey Green
       and includes access to stage lights and green drapery for still and video shooting
       of green-screen sequences.

C. Gallery Spaces
Smith Bay 11-12 walls are considered part of the “Laboratory” space of the Warehouse.
Rotating exhibits of student and faculty work are shown on hallway walls in Bays 11-12,
and on large LCD screens in the area. The “mini-Link” tile wall provides a working
space for students interested in large-format displays on a tiled background. The best
projects developed on the mini-Link wall can be shown on the main tile wall located in a
public area of Perkins Library on West Campus.

In addition, the whole Bay 11 area is fully wired for hardware and electricity to facilitate
flexible computing setups and presentation installation-based work. Informal seating
areas and interesting corners provide opportunities, as do the walls themselves.
Advanced student projects take priority for display in these common areas.

D. Common Areas
      Smith Bay 11-12 has a kitchen, benches, and soft seating with tables situated in
      various corners. In particular, the Skylight Lounge in the center of Bay 11 is a
      common meeting area for small groups and informal chats.

       The VTG Meeting Room is also schedulable for special group meetings. It
       contains walltalker whiteboard walls and an HD projection system and speakers.

E. Faculty Studios
Faculty studios are available on an invitation to graduate students working with those
faculty on research and special projects.

       Game Studio and Jenkins Collaboratory (Tim Lenoir) - includes an HD
       projector and two large screen TVs, along with various console game stations
       (XBox 360, PS 2 and 3, Wii) and a hardware capture system for capturing game
       play.

       The Physical Computing lab (Nick Gessler) includes a large private collection of
       historical computing devices and peripherals suitable for physical computing
       experimentation. Outside the Physical Computing Lab is the Mondrian Wall,
       where students may request to display computationally driven physical art.

       The Recombinant Media Lab (Bill Seaman) includes a rich variety of privately
       owned analog and digital media production and conversion tools.




                                         37
4. Archive of Documentary Arts
The Archive of Documentary Arts in Duke’s Special Collections Library collects, preserves, and
makes accessible photography and moving image materials related to human rights, social
change, occupational culture, migration, race and ethnicity, gender, the American South, and
African-American history and culture. It works closely with Duke’s Center for Documentary
Studies and the Full Frame Documentary Film Festival.

The focus of the library’s collecting is on photographs, films, and other visual materials as
documentary sources, with a particular emphasis on social change, occupational culture, race
and ethnicity, gender, the American South, and African-American history and culture. The Rare
Book, Manuscript, and Special Collections Library works closely with the Center for
Documentary Studies in coordinating the development of its collections.

5. Nasher Museum of Art
The Nasher Museum includes high-end meeting spaces suitable for formal lectures and
presentations by visiting artists working in various media, as well as for special event group
study.

   A. Lecture Hall
   The lecture hall includes fixed audience seating with flip-top desks for 173; stage with 1
   lectern. Upon request, the stage can be configured for a panel discussion with rectangular
   tables and chairs.
       Audio Visual Features:
       DVD/ VHS/ Digital projection systems
           • Slide projectors with single or dual frame capability
           • Large drop down screen (10’x20’)
           • Lectern with microphone, touch screen AV control panel and PC with Office Suite
              & internet access
           • Document camera
           • Wireless presentation devices
           • House sound system with XM satellite radio and CD player
           • Wireless microphones: 2 handheld; 2 lavaliere
           • Wired microphones: 8
           • Presentation recording capability
           • Lutron lighting system

   B. University Classroom
   The classroom includes six tables set as one large conference table with 16 to 22 chairs. One
   lectern. Available upon request: one 8’ banquet table for catering/ display; additional chairs
   for perimeter seating.
       Audio Visual Features:
           • DVD/ VHS/ Digital projection systems
           • Slide projectors with single or dual frame capability
           • Document camera
           • Large drop down screen (6’x10’)
           • Lectern with microphone, portable touch screen AV control panel and PC with
              Office Suite & internet access
           • Laptop projection capability from lectern or table
           • Wireless presentation devices & keyboard
           • House sound system with XM satellite radio and CD player
           • Teleconferencing with capability up to five phone lines; additional lines require
              Duke OIT support


                                               38
6. Full Frame Archive
In April 2007 the Full Frame Documentary Film Festival partnered with the Duke University
Libraries to acquire, archive, and preserve copies of the festival’s award-winning films. As a
unique record reflecting the social, cultural, political, and economic realities of our global
landscape, these films are valuable resources that benefit both the University and broader
scholarly community. The Full Frame Archive at Duke University protects these vivid
depictions of our changing world by providing each award-winning documentary film with a
safe and permanent home.
A pioneering effort and unique resource for interdisciplinary research, the Full Frame Archive
constitutes one of a few collections in the nation dedicated to preserving award-winning
documentary films. Full Frame’s award-winning films strengthen the Library’s collection with
the potential to support research in a wide variety of disciplines and programs, including
African-American studies, environmental studies, immigration studies, visual studies, and
literature, to name just a few.
The Full Frame Archive promotes the groundbreaking work created by today’s documentary
filmmakers and guarantees a lasting legacy for both the festival and the artists. This exciting
new collaboration encourages the use of documentary film as a catalyst for interdisciplinary
scholarship, dynamic dialogue, and social change.
Non-circulating DVD copies of each preserved film will be available for individual research in
the reading room of the Rare Book, Manuscript, and Special Collections Library. Licensed
copies of the award-winning documentaries will be purchased from the filmmakers and
available for wider use through the circulating collection at Lilly Library.
Preservation of all the Full Frame Documentary Film Festival award-winning films is in
progress. A Full Frame Archive finding aid will be available online in the fall of 2009.

7. OIT Lab Resources
  A. General Labs
  OIT Maintains a variety of computer lab spaces around campus. Most of these regionalized
  workstations are open 24 hours while classes are in session. Workstations are a mix of Macs,
  PCs, and Linux boxes. These include locations in:
          • Alexander 218C
          • Bell Tower 213 Cmp
          • Bostock Lower Level
          • Brown Res. Hall 122
          • Craven Quad (House E 108)
          • Crowell Quad
          • Edens House 1A 109
          • Edens House 2A 208
          • Few Quad (House FF116)
          • Gilbert-Addoms 022
          • GIS Lab
          • Hudson Hall 117
          • Hudson MPS Rm 139
          • Keohane Quad 401
          • Kilgo Quad N001Sem
          • Old Chem. 01
          • Soc.-Psych. 133
          • Teer Eng. Library 106
          • Wannamaker
          • West Duke 08C


                                               39
B. Multimedia Project Studio (Old Chem & Lilly Library)
The Mulitmedia Project Studio spaces are managed by Duke’s Office of Information
Technology and are meant for broadbased campus use. They are run by a Lab Manager a
group of student multimedia specialists who can provide assistance with basic multimedia
applications.

The Multimedia Project Studio includes two multimedia production facilities for Duke
students, faculty and staff. Both labs feature high-end, integrated hardware and software that
encourage imaginative creation and editing of graphics, Web pages, audio and video.
Production tools include industry standard software such as The Adobe CS 3 Master
Collection and Final Cut Pro, as well as standard productivity applications. The nine top-of-
the-line workstations in each lab are equipped with LCD displays and specialized
peripherals, such as drawing tablets, scanners, video digitizers and DVD burners.

     West Campus MPS in Old Chemistry 016
       Computer systems
       • 9 Mac G5 towers: Dual 2 GHz processors, 1GB DDR SDRAM, 80 GB HD, DVD
           burner, OS 10.4
       • 9 flat-panel displays (three with dual-monitor setups)
       • Peripherals
       • 1 Epson Perfection V700 Photo flatbed scanner
       • 2 Video Importing Stations with support for DV, VHS, and DVD importing
       • 1 M-Audio Oxygen-8 25-Key USB MIDI Keyboard
       • 1 Nikon COOLSCAN IV ED 35mm/IX240 film scanner
       • 1 WACOM Intuous 2 graphics tablet
       • 1 HP Photosmart 7550 color printer
       • 1 HP LaserJet 4100dtn printer

     East Campus MPS in 115 Lilly Library
        Computer systems
        • 8 Mac G5 towers: dual 1 GHz processors, 2 GB RAM, 200 GB hard drive, DVD
            burner, OS 10.4
        • 8 23-inch flat panel displays
        Peripherals
        • 1 Nikon COOLSCAN IV ED 35mm/IX240 film scanner
        • 1 HP Scanjet 3970 flatbed scanner
        • 2 Video Importing Stations with support for DV, VHS, and DVD importing
        • 1 HP LaserJet 4100dtn printer

C. Virtual Computing Lab
The Nicholas School of the Environment and OIT are piloting a Virtual Computing Lab (VCL)
begining Fall 2009. VCL is a service that allows authenticated users to reserve a computer
with specialized software and access it remotely over the internet. Three application
environments are available: GIS, NVivo, and Stats (Stata, Stella, SAS). Reservations can be
made for up to four hours through a web interface. At the scheduled time, the image is
loaded onto a virtual machine, which is accessible from the user's desktop via Remote
Desktop Client.




                                            40
  D. GIS Labs
  GIS and Mapping resources are of special potential interest to new forms of experimental
  documentary work. ArcGIS System Software Resources can be found in the following labs:
           • Bostock Basement (21 Dell Optiplex 620 systems)
           • Old Chemistry (31 Dell Optiplex GX280 systems)
       Instructional aids:
           • Data projection device with automatic screen and remote mouse
           • VCR/DVD player
           • Instructor computer and laptop docking station
           • Whiteboard
           • 2 LaserJet 4300 printers

8. Interactive Multimedia Project Space (IMPS), John Hope Franklin Center
  The John Hope Franklin Center for Interdisciplinary & International Studies houses the
  Interactive Multimedia Project Space (IMPS), a classroom and project space reservable
  through the JHFC staff and as a regular classroom.
       IMPS is a highly configurable space:
           • Organize trapezoidal furniture into clusters to facilitate both small and large
               group interaction.
           • Group around individual plasmas for intensive work sessions, and return to a
               central conference table to share results.
           • Collaborate internationally over IP videoconference connections while recording
               interaction to DVD-R.
           • Annotate a powerpoint in the midst of its delivery, and record a class presentation
               to podcast format.
           • Capture images of a whiteboard-based brainstorming session and review them
               later over the web.
       IMPS includes:
           • Four 50" plasmas screens
           • XGA projection system
           • Seven laptop and five component and S-video inputs, fully routeable to any
               display
           • DVD playback with surround sound
           • IP-based videoconferencing and web streaming
           • Mobile Multimedia Mac Cluster integration
           • PC-based plasma annotation system
           • Wireless ethernet
           • Full-room-audio and video-source recording to DVD-R and Lectopia
               (podcast/vodcast/streaming)
           • Copycam whiteboard capture system
           • Wireless room control

9. Center for Instructional Technology Lab, Bostock Building, Perkins Library
The Instructional Technology Lab may be used by faculty, academic support and library staff to
create digital and multimedia materials for use in teaching. Consulting support is available to
assist faculty and graduate students with teaching-related project development.

       Bostock 024 Lab - includes the standards Adobe Authoring Suite, as well as specialized
       applications to support instructional technology uses: Adobe Captivate 4 and Camtasia
       Studio 6

       Bostock 301 Lab – Sound recording and editing room.


                                              41
10. Renaissance Computing Institute (RENCI) Center
The Renaissance Computing Institute (RENCI) facility in the Tel-Comm building provides
opportunities to partner with visualization experts within the RENCI network through the use
of state-of-the art hardware and software applications.

       Multi-Touch Interactive Visualization Wall - The RENCI Center in the Tel-Comm
       building includes a wall-sized (13.5 ft x 5 ft) multi-touch screen system along with
       advanced teleconferencing capabilities within a state-of-the-art conference room.

       Informatics and Data Mining - The Center provides an entry point into data mining
       and visualization techniques for public policy experts, historians, and other researchers
       in disciplines where the data exploration challenges may be significant but the
       computational expertise required to tackle those challenges may be scarce. They offer
       access to the IRODS grid of massive storage and database resources.

       Application Development and Support - RENCI visualization scientists are available to
       partner with faculty and graduate students on projects related to major RENCI research
       areas, particularly massive media storage and database development, data visualization,
       and rich mapping applications. like the BigBoard collaborative mapping application,
       which can be used locally or in a networked context to annotate a map-space.

       North Carolina University Partnerships - Duke RENCI partners also provide
       opportunities for Duke researchers to access visualization resources at other RENCI
       Engagement Centers, including the UNC Center, which includes a visualization dome
       and 4 sided tele-immersion room. Other locations include a main center in Chapel Hill,
       ECU, NC State, UNC Asheville, UNC Charlotte, UNC Coastal Studies, and UNC HSL.




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APPENDIX E: FACULTY FOR CORE COURSES

Stanley Abe, Associate Professor, Department of Art, Art History & Visual Studies,
and Director, Program in the Arts of the Moving Image
Stanley Abe has published on Chinese Buddhist art, contemporary Chinese art, Asian American
art, Abstract Expressionism, and the construction of art historical knowledge. He has taught
courses on Chinese cinema and Contemporary Documentary Film.

Rachael B. Brady, Adjunct Associate Professor of Visual Studies, Department of Art,
Art History & Visual Studies; Research Scientist, Computer Science and Electrical
and Computer Engineering
Rachael Brady specializes in the use of technology to aid data exploration and analysis. She
promotes the use of visualization and virtual reality technologies for improved understanding
of scientific data and human cognition. With twenty years of experience, she is a leader in the
creation of facilities and development of solutions that combine statistical methods, digital
image processing methods, and visualization methods to provide insight into scientific
questions. Brady is the founding director of the Visualization Technology Group at Duke,
where she is responsible for the installation and operation of a six-sided CAVE-like virtual
reality theater. She is also actively involved with developing innovative cross-disciplinary
research programs through her role is faculty advisor to the ISIS (interdisciplinary studies +
information sciences) program. In this capacity she has worked on art and engineering
collaborations that have produced the FreeSpace and soundSense
demonstration/performances.

Josh Gibson, Associate Director and Instructor, Program in the Arts of the Moving
Image
Josh Gibson is a filmmaker and cinematographer with many credits in narrative, documentary,
and experimental production. His most recent film, The Siamese Connection (2008), was screened
at the Full Frame Film Festival and other festival venues. He teaches digital film production,
cinematography, and the AMI certificate capstone course.

Mark Hansen, Professor, Program in Literature
One of the leading scholars of new media studies, Hansen is the author of three influential
books in the field: Embodying Technesis: Technology Beyond Writing, New Philosophy for New Media,
and most recently Bodies in Code: Interfaces with New Media. In addition to publishing many
articles, he has co-edited volumes on Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Critical Terms for New Media Studies,
and Second Order Cybernetics. His current work focuses on the coupling of the human and the
technical that has characterized the human since inception. In a study of time and media, he is
seeking to update Husserl’s model of time-consciousness in order to address the technical
inscription of time in our world today.

Alex Harris, Professor of the Practice, Public Policy Studies and Center for
Documentary Studies
A photographer and a co-founder of the Center for Documentary Studies, and a founding editor
of DoubleTake magazine, Harris has taught documentary photography and writing at Duke
since 1975. His current work is about contemporary Cuba, documentary work and
humanitarian issues, aging in America, and cultures of the Southwestern U.S. Among his books
are River of Traps, a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, and Red, White, and Blue and God Bless You,
published in conjunction with a traveling exhibit that opened at the International Center of
Photography. His latest book, The Idea of Cuba, was published in 2007. Harris’s photographs are
in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the John Paul
Getty Museum, the Addison Gallery of American Art, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and the


                                               43
San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, among others. His awards include a Guggenheim
Fellowship, a Rockefeller Foundation Humanities Fellowship, and a Lyndhurst Award. In
addition to his teaching, Harris directs the Lewis Hine Documentary Fellows Program, a year-
long postgraduate fellowship program based at the Center for Documentary Studies.

Tim Lenoir, Kimberly J. Jenkins Chair of New Technologies and Society
Tim Lenoir has published several books and articles on the history of biomedical science from
the nineteenth century to the present. His more recent work has focused on the introduction of
computers into biomedical research from the early 1960s to the present, particularly the
development of computer graphics, medical visualization technology, and the development of
virtual reality and its applications in surgery and other fields. Lenoir also has been engaged in
constructing online digital libraries for a number of projects, including an archive on the history
of Silicon Valley. Two recent projects include a web documentary project on the history of
bioinformatics, funded by the Bern Dibner and Alfred P. Sloan Foundations, and “How They
Got Game,” a history of interactive simulation and video games. With economists Nathan
Rosenberg, Henry Rowen, and Brent Goldfarb he has just completed a collaborative study for
Stanford University on the school’s historical relationship to Silicon Valley titled “Inventing the
Entrepreneurial Region: Stanford and the Co-Evolution of Silicon Valley.” In support of these
projects, Lenoir has developed software tools for interactive web-based collaboration. In this
connection he is currently engaged with colleagues at the University of California–Santa
Barbara in developing the Center for Nanotechnology in Society, where he contributes to the
effort to document the history, societal, and ethical implications of bionanotechnology.

William Noland, Associate Professor of the Practice of Visual Arts, Sculpture,
Photography, and Video, Department of Art, Art History & Visual Studies
A sculptor, photographer, and experimental documentary filmmaker, William Noland focuses
his video work in ways closely related to the work he’s done in other media, particularly his
photographic projects, which intimately examine the individual in public space by isolating
moments of psychological resonance within everyday experience. His video imagery extends
the still image into a time-based medium, by carefully observing and often lingering on
individuals. His soundscapes feature richly layered ambient sound and original music. He is
the recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts Visual Artist Fellowship in Sculpture, a
Fulbright Scholar Award in Photography, and Josiah Charles Trent Foundation Grants for both
Photography and Video. From 1995 to 2004 he worked for DoubleTake, the highly esteemed
quarterly magazine of writing and photography, first as an editorial advisor and subsequently
as a contributing photographer. Noland has mounted numerous solo exhibitions of sculpture
and photography in New York and elsewhere, including twenty solo exhibitions. His video
work has screened in a number of venues, including the Full Frame Documentary Film Festival
in Durham, North Carolina, the Ann Arbor Film Festival in Ann Arbor, Michigan, and the
Athens International Film & Video Festival in Athens, Ohio.

Tom Rankin, Associate Professor of the Practice of Art, Department of Art, Art
History & Visual Studies, and Director, Center for Documentary Studies
A photographer, filmmaker, and folklorist, Rankin has been documenting and interpreting
American culture for more than twenty years. His photographs have been published in
numerous magazines, journals, and books, and he has exhibited throughout the country. He co-
produced two documentary record albums, and he is co-director and co-producer of the
documentary film Powerhouse for God. He has published numerous articles and reviews on
photography and culture and has curated many exhibitions. His books include Sacred Space:
Photographs from the Mississippi Delta, which received the Mississippi Institute of Arts and
Letters Award for Photography, Deaf Maggie Lee Sayre: Photographs of a River Life, Faulkner's
World: The Photographs of Martin J. Dain, and Local Heroes Changing America: Indivisible. He is
working on a book tracing the historical evolution of documentary work over 150 years through

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selections from major practitioners in photography, filmmaking, oral history, folklore,
anthropology, musicology, radio, and writing.

William Seaman, Professor of Visual Studies, Department of Art, Art History &
Visual Studies
An internationally known media artist and scholar, Seaman has had more than thirty major
installation works and commissions around the world, in addition to a dozen solo exhibitions
and numerous performance collaborations, video screenings, and articles/essays/reviews in
books and catalogues. His work explores an expanded media-oriented poetics through various
technological means. A self-taught composer and musician, he frequently collaborates with
dancers and choreographers to create evocative multimedia performance pieces. He has been
commissioned on a number of occasions. He is currently working on a series of poetic
installations, scientific research papers, and a book in collaboration with the scientist Otto
Rössler. He is also collaborating with artist/computer scientist Daniel Howe on a work
exploring AI and creative writing—the Bisociation Engine.

Victoria Szabo, Program Director, ISIS, Assistant Research Professor in Visual
Studies and New Media, Department of Art, Art History & Visual Studies
Victoria Szabo works in the areas of media fluency as theory-into-practice, pervasive computing
and virtual world technologies, non-linear narrative and mapping, new media art, "old" new
media, and intellectual property in the digital age. She is curating the "Informational Aesthetics"
exhibition at the 2009 annual meeting of SIGGRAPH (the Special Interest Group on Graphics
and Interactive Techniques of the Association for Computing Machinery). She teaches the ISIS
certificate capstone course.

Charles Thompson, Education and Curriculum Director, Center for Documentary
Studies, and Lecturer, Department of Cultural Anthropology
Director of the undergraduate program at CDS, Thompson holds a Ph.D. in religious studies
from UNC-Chapel Hill, with concentrations in cultural studies, ethnography, and Latin
American studies. His particular interests in documentary work fall into the categories of oral
history, ethnography, and community activism. A former farmer, he remains immersed in
agricultural issues and the cultures that surround our food system. He has written about
farmworkers, and he is an advisory board member of Student Action with Farmworkers. His
latest book, with Melinda Wiggins, is The Human Cost of Food: Farmworker Lives, Labor, and
Advocacy. Currently Thompson is researching the history, culture, and agriculture of the Old
German Baptist Brethren in the mountains of Virginia. He has also published a book and
several articles on Guatemalan Maya refugees.




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APPENDIX F: CORE DUKE PROGRAMS

The Department of Art, Art History & Visual Studies, as its name implies, has
three distinct parts: 1) a visual arts unit that is devoted to all aspects of the practice of
the arts, including computational and new media arts; 2) a history of art unit, with its
emphasis on the historical and theoretical study of art; and 3) its most recent addition,
visual studies, which offers a new major in Visual Studies and a Ph.D. concentration.
This major, added in 2007, and the Ph.D. concentration in Visual Studies and New
Media, proposed in 2009, capture the dramatic changes both in our field and in our
present-day environment. Visual Studies operates at the interface of the humanities, the
social sciences, and the sciences. It includes historical and contemporary perspectives,
develops students’ visual literacy, and connects theory and practice.

All members of the department are actively engaged in teaching and research as well as
scholarly, artistic, or integrated theory-practice production. Faculty and students,
undergraduate and graduate, are committed to international research, interdisciplinary
courses, and the study of visual culture across geographic and historical categories.
Although founded in 1931, the Department of Art, Art History &Visual Studies has
taken its present shape within the last twenty years. Since 1986, the department
broadened its perspective by introducing courses in theory, methodology, and criticism;
by attracting faculty specialists in African and African Diaspora, East Asian, and Latin
American art. In the past decade, the department has redefined its academic mission to
engage visual literacy in a wide variety of media and cross-disciplinary contexts.

Compared to verbal literacy, visual literacy is both underdeveloped and increasingly
urgent. It is critical to understanding the complexity of the cultural constructs that
shape a particular society, how systems of visual codes differ from culture to culture,
and how visualized constructions, past and present, inform how one sees, understands,
produces visual content, and participates in a variety of everyday life situations or
socioeconomic contexts. In addition, the University has made Visual Studies one of five
priorities in the Arts & Sciences Strategic Plan.

The three distinct foci of Art, Art History & Visual Studies support the essential
components of the MFA in Experimental and Documentary Arts, a terminal degree in
the field of the arts emphasizing the creation of knowledge/artwork, the significance of
visual expression, the relevance of artistic practice in contemporary society, and the
currency and importance of computational media to multiple facets of scholarly
research and practical applications across fields and disciplines.

The proposed MFA program will be a rich complement for, and a beneficiary of, the
Ph.D. Program in Art History and Visual Studies. Designed to be small and highly
selective, the program has graduated twenty students, who are currently working as
university teachers, program coordinators, museum professionals, and postdoctoral
fellows. Thirty-five current graduate students, in various stages of their studies, have
also distinguished themselves through publications, public lectures, and internationally
competitive fellowships. We also envision a lively exchange and the formation of a new
type of graduate community composed of our new MFA students, the doctoral students



                                             46
in Art History and Visual Studies, and those from other units, ranging from Computer
Science to Literature and English.

Combining the conceptual academic framework of Art, Art History & Visual Studies
with the praxis of the Center for Documentary Studies distinguishes the MFA in
Experimental and Documentary Arts, drawing upon Duke’s unique programs in these
areas. The MFA will build on and expand the successful educational approach of the
Center for Documentary Studies, which since 1989 has offered an interdisciplinary
program for undergraduates (and continuing education students) that introduces,
broadens, and enhances technical skills and theoretical, historical, and ethical awareness
through one or more of the following modes of community-based fieldwork:
photography, oral history, audio, filmmaking, folklore, or ethnographic writing.
Working across disciplines, mediums, and methodologies, Documentary Studies
courses are offered in conjunction with a number of other departments and programs,
including but not limited to African and African-American Studies; Art, Art History,
and Visual Studies; Cultural Anthropology; Arts of the Moving Image; History; Public
Policy Studies; and Women’s Studies. The Center also houses a number of documentary
projects that address, among other topics, issues of literacy, collaborative photography,
oral history, and farmworker advocacy, which students are exposed to through their
studies. In addition, the Center maintains four active exhibitions spaces, a radio
production unit, wet and digital darkrooms, multimedia labs, a publishing program,
and a full schedule of public screenings and other events. All of these resources will be
available to MFA students, who in turn will contribute immensely to the learning
environment for undergraduates and to a more public profile of the documentary arts
at Duke and beyond.

A major goal of the Center’s educational program, which will be reflected in the design
of the MFA philosophy and curriculum, is to connect student experience and creativity
to broader community life through documentary fieldwork projects, while students also
examine theoretical and practical issues related to this work through readings,
screenings, and classroom discussion. Program courses foster concrete analytical,
interpretive, and communication skills connected to a broad range of academic
disciplines, challenging students to combine intellectual ideas with grassroots
engagement as they use tools of documentary inquiry to learn and render in various
mediums. Achievement of the program’s goal is facilitated by an integrated curriculum
of required and elective courses that allow students to specialize in one or more areas of
documentary work, and to complete a major documentary project under the guidance
of participating faculty members. A certificate is available for students who complete
program requirements, which include a survey course, four related courses (including
electives), and a capstone seminar in which students bring to completion a
documentary project and present it to an audience outside the classroom by semester’s
end. Students in the program are asked to consider seriously the representational and
ethical matters of documentary work as they engage in their coursework and to put
these considerations to use in their fieldwork projects. The educational program in
Documentary Studies resides at the nexus of the documentary arts and active
engagement in broader society.




                                           47
The third major partner in the MFA program, the Program in the Arts of the
Moving Image (formerly the Film/Video/Digital Program), further
strengthens and distinguishes the nature of this new terminal degree through its focus
on all aspects of the moving image. The Program offers courses in the production,
history, and analysis of the moving image from silent film to computational image
making. The study of established cinematic codes and visual forms remains
fundamental. These constitute the historical and theoretical framework from which
innovative new works are and will be produced. The Program in the Arts of the Moving
Image is unique in joining the most sophisticated historical research, analysis, and
critical theory to the production of exciting, ground-breaking new forms of the moving
image.

All three of these University programs, along with a number of other units on campus,
are working together on the recently established Visual Studies Initiative, which
serves as strategic example and foundational infrastructure for the new MFA program.
Understanding the goals and strategies of the Visual Studies Initiative at Duke is central
to envisioning the approach, implementation, and importance of the MFA in
Experimental and Documentary Arts.

Visual Studies concerns all aspects of the production, circulation, and reception of
visual images in culture, science, and society. It emerged in the late 1970s during the
same period as Cultural Studies as a field of inquiry throughout the humanities. Studies
in visual culture engage students in the analysis of the rhetoric and semiotics of images,
providing access to how visual meaning is socially, politically, and culturally
constructed and received. Visual Studies enables students to interpret the
representations that shape the visual constructs of a particular society, to consider how
systems of visual codes differ from culture to culture, and to think through how the
symbolic constructions of life organizes how one sees, understands, and participates in
natural and social environments.

Most importantly, establishing a clear connection between the theory and the practice of
visuality is the foundation of Duke’s Visual Studies Initiative. Visual Studies at Duke
operates at the interface of science, social sciences, and the arts and humanities. The
scope is university-wide. The Visual Studies Initiative addresses work produced across
a broad spectrum of areas in the arts and humanities as well as the natural sciences,
mathematics, engineering, medical imaging, cartography, circuit design, information
science, logic, and the many zones of graphic production in commercial and public
sectors.

The Visual Studies Initiative does not limit its investigation to the study of
representation alone. Rather, it investigates the material production, dissemination,
semiotics, and remediation of images and imaging systems in all their various forms—
artistic, popular, scientific, and commercial. Computation and the effects of digitality on
knowledge-production are central to the VSI enterprise, both in theory and in practice.
The aim is to activate Visual Studies not only horizontally across disciplines and
administrative structures, but also vertically, from introductory coursework to
advanced teaching and research collaborations. The Steering Committee includes
leaders from Art, Art History & Visual Studies; the Nasher Museum; the Scientific

                                            48
Visualization Lab; Information Science + Information Studies; the Renaissance
Computing Institute (RENCI); the Franklin Humanities Institute; the Center for
Documentary Studies; Literature; Engineering; English; Computer Science; Arts of the
Moving Image; Duke’s Office of Information Technology, and the University Libraries.
The Visual Studies Initiative is made possible through the generous support of the
Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

The recent addition of faculty in computational media places Duke in a leading role in
the field, and provides significant intellectual energy and resources to take the MFA in
Experimental and Documentary Arts into a distinguished category of its own. The
mission of the Information Science + Information Studies (ISIS) program is to
study and create new information technologies and to analyze their impact on art,
culture, science, commerce, society, and the environment. At the core of the ISIS
program is its innovative curricular model, which focuses on extremely collaborative,
interdisciplinary, student-driven courses. ISIS courses offer students the opportunity to
fully engage with the creation and study of information technologies at macro and
micro levels and within many different thematic areas. ISIS students not only acquire
fluency and familiarity with current information technologies, they also develop a deep
understanding of the meaning and utility of such technologies within the contemporary
technological landscape.

In keeping with its mission to promote innovative technological research across all
segments of the Duke community, ISIS regularly plans and helps to coordinate a
diverse array of engaging campus events that bring together faculty, students, and
outside guests into a common space to encourage the intense investigation of current
topics of importance to the study and practice of information science and information
technology. ISIS also functions as a central organizational node in the larger network of
research at Duke by encouraging and initiating new interdisciplinary research
collaborations in the pervasive fields of information science and information studies.
Key ISIS research areas include data visualization; networks, information fluency, and
ethics; new media arts and cultures; serious games, simulations, and mapping; and
digital media authorship and pedagogical practice.




                                           49
APPENDIX G: SUPPORTIVE DUKE PROGRAMS

The Art, Art History & Visual Studies Ph.D. Program, which is designed for a small
group of students, emphasizes the study of art, architecture, and visual culture within a
theoretical and historical frame. The Department of Art, Art History & Visual Studies
offers an interdisciplinary program of graduate study leading to the Ph.D. for dedicated
students interested in careers in research, criticism, teaching, and museum work.
Admission is highly competitive and limited to an average of six new students per year.
Students are trained for teaching by serving as readers and teaching assistants. Duke
University is now in the forefront of academic institutions supporting interdisciplinary
and theoretical initiatives in the humanities. Art History and Visual Studies has a
unique contribution to make to these ventures, and all members of the Art History and
Visual Studies faculty are engaged in innovative teaching or research projects involving
faculty from other departments and programs. All members of the graduate faculty
team-teach courses or have courses cross-listed in other departments (Classical Studies,
Economics, Literature, Germanic Languages and Literature, Religion) or programs
(African and African-American Studies, Documentary Studies, Women's Studies,
International Comparative Studies, Medieval and Renaissance Studies). Students may
choose a minor field outside the department. The department works cooperatively with
the art history program at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill as well as
with the North Carolina Museum of Art in Raleigh.

With its many courses, the Information Science + Information Studies program offers
both undergraduate and graduate certificate programs. The ISIS Graduate Certificate
program is designed for doctoral students wishing to complement their primary
disciplinary focus with an interdisciplinary certificate in Information Science +
Information Studies. The purpose of the certificate is to broaden the scope of the typical
disciplinary PhD program and to engage the student in ISIS-related research. The ISIS
Graduate Certificate is not intended to provide a disciplinary canon in information
science and information studies but rather to develop a structured set of trans-
disciplinary skills and resources for exploring new areas of academic research. As such,
the ISIS Graduate Certificate is not to lead students down an existing path of traditional
academic research but rather to provide them with the means for expanding the scope
of their main disciplinary focus by creating new paths of their own. These courses and
faculty members who teach them will contribute substantially to the MFA program
outlined in this proposal.
The new MFA in Experimental and Documentary Arts program will engage with
ongoing campus initiatives around interdisciplinary research and technology
advancement, particularly the John Hope Franklin Center (ISIS and the Franklin
Institute), the Duke Digital Initiative (with support from the Center for Instructional
Technology), the Visual Studies Initiative, the Visualization Technology Group at the
Pratt School of Engineering, the Renaissance Computing Institute (RENCI) Center, and
the DeWitt Wallace Center for Media and Democracy.

John Hope Franklin Center for Interdisciplinary and International Studies
The John Hope Franklin Center for Interdisciplinary and International Studies is a
unique consortium of programs committed to revitalizing notions of how knowledge is
gained and exchanged. Participants from a broad range of disciplines converge to

                                            50
explore intellectual issues, including some of the most pressing social and political
themes of our time: race and race relations, the legacy of the African American
experience, equality and opportunity among diverse populations, the implications of
accelerated globalization. At its core, the Center claims an intrepid and daring mission:
to bring together humanists and those involved in the social sciences in a setting that
inspires vigorous scholarship and imaginative alliances. In this way, historians, artists,
literary scholars, and philosophers contribute to a rich understanding of moral and
ethical issues.
The Franklin Center embraces a creative cross-pollination of ideas, perspectives, and
methodologies. Using such sophisticated resources as multimedia and high-speed
videoconferencing, the Franklin Center employs advanced technologies not only as a
means to an end, but as objects of critical inquiry themselves. These striking new
directions in higher education require the marriage of philosophical imagination and
pragmatic design.

In addition to consortium members involved in area studies, such as the Center for
International Studies, the Center for Global Studies and the Humanities, and the
Human Rights Center, the Franklin Center also brings together the efforts of a number
of programs integral to the proposed MFA in Experimental and Documentary Arts.
These include HASTAC – Humanities, Arts, Science, Technology Advanced
Collaboratory, the Information Science + Information Studies (ISIS) program, the John
Hope Franklin Humanities Institute, and the Jenkins Chair in New Technology &
Society.

HASTAC – Humanities, Arts, Science, Technology Advanced Collaboratory
A consortium of humanists, artists, scientists, and engineers, of leading researchers and
nonprofit research institutions, HASTAC ("Haystack") is committed to new forms of
collaboration across communities and disciplines fostered by creative uses of
technology. Primary members are universities, supercomputing centers, grid and
teragrid associations, humanities institutes, museums, libraries, and other civic
institutions. Since 2003, the consortium has been developing tools for multimedia
archiving and social interaction, gaming environments for teaching, innovative
educational programs in information science and information studies, virtual museums,
and other digital projects.
HASTAC’s mission is two-fold: to ensure that humanistic and humane considerations
are never far removed from technological advances; and to push education and learning
to the forefront of digital innovation. Similarly, HASTAC is dedicated to the idea that
this complex and world-changing digital environment requires all the lessons of
history, introspection, theory, and equity that the modern humanities (broadly defined)
have to offer. The aim is to promote expansive models for research, teaching, and
thinking.
Many of the top innovators in the fields of science and technology share the necessity to
draw centrally upon human and social developments and considerations as new digital
possibilities are created. HASTAC has helped foster this exchange, working in complex
and important partnerships with colleagues across varying domains and disciplines.



                                            51
HASTAC leaders have served as consultants to U.S. and international organizations
and governments on grid computing and cyber infrastructure.
The HASTAC network consists of more than eighty institutions principally located in
the US and reaches over 30,000 people worldwide. In reality, it is more a network of
networks, located at the intersection of technology, engineering, and computing on one
hand, and the humanities, arts and social sciences on the other. This profound
interconnectivity has allowed HASTAC to develop its successful network, which in turn
promotes greater interactive connections.
Funding for HASTAC has come from grants from the National Science Foundation, the
Digital Promise Initiative, and the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, as
well as the generosity and support of its member institutions. In the past, collaborative
teams at each “site” (more a network than a precise physical locale) have raised funds
for their specific events, which were then coordinated by a centralized HASTAC team
providing administrative, technical, and communication support.

In particular, the infrastructure of HASTAC has been supported by Duke University
and the University of California Humanities Research Institute (UCHRI). Through
programs such as Information Science + Information Studies (ISIS) and the John Hope
Franklin Center for Interdisciplinary and International Studies at Duke and UCHRI’s
system-wide extensive research, HASTAC has been supported by universities of
exemplary quality and unusual risk-taking vision. Duke and the UC system have taken
early leadership roles in the study and propagation of “net sciences”: the
computational, social, and humanistic understanding of the role of networked, digitally
supported relationships that extend throughout education, community-based learning
organizations, business, and global partnerships.

Duke Digital Initiative
The Duke Digital Initiative (DDI) is a multi-year program of experimentation,
development and implementation of new and emerging technologies to explore their
effective use in support of the university's mission. The goals of DDI are to promote
innovative and effective teaching, to use technology in support of curriculum
enhancement, to develop our technology infrastructure and to share knowledge about
effective instructional technology strategies. The staff of the Center for Instructional
Technology provides project management, consulting, training and technical assistance
to faculty participating in DDI programs.

The Duke Center for Instructional Technology (CIT), a department within the Duke
University Libraries, supports the academic mission of Duke by helping instructors find
innovative ways to use technology to achieve their teaching goals. Drawing on expertise
in both technology and pedagogy, CIT staff members assist instructors with projects,
share information across the university about effective practices, and examine the effect
of technology on teaching and learning.

The CIT supports instructional technologies that can contribute to Duke’s academic
excellence by increasing student engagement with course materials, supporting active
learning strategies, better matching teaching and learning styles, fostering
communication and collaboration, streamlining course administration and developing

                                           52
students’ skills for future learning and work. CIT systematically monitors and evaluates
the impact and effectiveness of instructional technologies on the teaching and learning
experiences of faculty and students and shares these findings with the campus
community.

Visualization Technology Group, Pratt School of Engineering
Through education and training programs, the creation and management of
visualization facilities, and advanced visualization research, the visualization
technology group (VTG), promotes the use of visualization and virtual reality
technologies for improved understanding of scientific data and human cognition. The
VTG hosts a weekly seminar that is loosely organized around the general theme of
visualization.

VTG also manages the DiVE (Duke immersive Virtual Environment), a 6-sided virtual
reality theater. The DiVE came on-line mid-November 2005 representing the fourth 6-
sided CAVE-like system in the United States. The DiVE is a 3m x 3m x 3m stereoscopic
rear projected room with head and hand tracking and real time computer graphics. All
six surfaces – the four walls, the ceiling and the floor – are used as screens onto which
computer graphics are displayed. For virtual worlds designed for this system, it is a
fully immersive room in which the individual (researcher, educator, etc) literally walks
into the world, is surrounded by the display and is capable of interacting with virtual
objects in the world. Stereo glasses provide depth perception, and a handheld “wand”
controls navigation and input to into the world for manipulating virtual objects.
The acquisition of the DiVE is a direct result of Duke’s strategic plan, Building on
Excellence. One component of this plan is to improve computational resources,
methods, and expertise within the Duke community. Visualization tools are a
fundamental and necessary component of any computational solution as they provide a
high bandwidth interface between the human and computer. The DiVE takes this
concept one step further, in that the immersive quality of the experience engages the
imaginations of people in disciplines that are not traditionally computational.

The DiVE represents a substantial investment that provides an unparalleled interface
between humans and digital worlds. It is precisely the cost and scarcity of this resource
that compels researchers to leave their offices and engage in a larger community.
Facilities like the DiVE are “watering holes” that bring people together and foster their
awareness of one another’s research. Examples of impacts of emergence of rare
technical resources on fostering intellectual cross-pollination across distinct sub-
specialities exist in all areas of science, such as the phenomenon of large telescopes
attracting diverse teams of astronomers and particle accelerators serving as communal
spaces for high-energy physicists. However, unlike these domain-specific examples, all
researchers require visualization in some form or other. The DiVE is a shared resource
that excites the imagination and unites faculty and students from all disciplines.

Renaissance Computing Institute (RENCI) Center
The Renaissance Computing Institute (RENCI) opened an office on Duke’s campus in
the spring of 2008. The site supports the use of visualization technology and advanced
computational methods to explore issues in science, engineering, the arts, humanities
and social sciences. This state-of-the-art facility gives RENCI the opportunity to
collaborate with Duke faculty and students on new and existing multidisciplinary

                                           53
research projects. The center is one of several linked in a high-speed network to other
institutions of higher education across North Carolina under the auspices of the
nonprofit Renaissance Computing Institute. Duke, along with North Carolina State
University and the University of North Carolina, is a founding member of RENCI. The
state-supported centers are part of a grid that enables large data and media transfer and
teleconferencing and are linked to each other and a national grid by a powerful
research-computing center based at RENCI headquarters in Chapel Hill.

Dewitt Wallace Center for Media and Democracy, Terry Sanford Institute of Public
Policy
The DeWitt Wallace Center for Media and Democracy was founded on the premise that
free news media are essential to the sustainability of democracy. Combining scholarly
research and real-world experience, the Center supports a policy of democratic free
media in the United States and around the globe. Through its missions the Center has
become a nationally and internationally acknowledged leader in the critical effort to
support policies of democratic media.
The rapid spread of powerful new technologies means that more people have access to
more information than ever before. At the same time, national boundaries are fading in
significance as a complex global economy takes hold. In this climate, emerging and
established democracies alike face challenges in creating and maintaining media that
citizens can trust to help them make informed decisions. Such concerns include how to
guarantee broadcaster autonomy, how to design policies for unbiased electoral
campaign coverage, the role of political advertising, and how to ensure balanced
reporting on ethnic and racial conflict.
Moreover, thoughtful and relevant political coverage is often obscured by information
and entertainment overload. Changes in the structure of media ownership can have
serious consequences for the willingness and ability of reporters and editors to provide
compelling analysis of important issues.
In order to address the choices confronting the media of different nations, the DeWitt
Wallace Center believes that a broad range of approaches is needed. From scholarly
research to real-world applications, from Duke University classrooms to newsrooms
around the world, the Center is committed to supporting and enhancing democracy
through free and responsible media.
The Center’s faculty, courses, media fellows program, lectures, and conferences increase
the scope of possibilities for MFA students who are interested in teaching and
leadership in expanding definitions and practices of the news media through the
experimental and documentary arts.
Full Frame Archive
In April 2007 the Full Frame Documentary Film Festival partnered with the Duke
University Libraries to acquire, archive, and preserve copies of the festival’s award-
winning films. As a unique record reflecting the social, cultural, political, and economic
realities of our global landscape, these films are valuable resources that benefit both the
University and broader scholarly community. The Full Frame Archive at Duke
University protects these vivid depictions of our changing world by providing each
award-winning documentary film with a safe and permanent home.

                                            54
A pioneering effort and unique resource for interdisciplinary research, the Full Frame
Archive constitutes one of a few collections in the nation dedicated to preserving
award-winning documentary films. Full Frame’s award-winning films strengthen the
Library’s collection with the potential to support research in a wide variety of
disciplines and programs, including African-American studies, environmental studies,
immigration studies, visual studies, and literature, to name just a few.
The Full Frame Archive promotes the groundbreaking work created by today’s
documentary filmmakers and guarantees a lasting legacy for both the festival and the
artists. This exciting new collaboration encourages the use of documentary film as a
catalyst for interdisciplinary scholarship, dynamic dialogue, and social change.
Archive of Documentary Arts
The Archive of Documentary Arts in Duke’s Special Collections Library collects,
preserves, and makes accessible photography and moving image materials related to
human rights, social change, occupational culture, migration, race and ethnicity,
gender, the American South, and African-American history and culture. It works
closely with Duke’s Center for Documentary Studies and the Full Frame Documentary
Film Festival.




                                          55
APPENDIX H: LOCAL COMMUNITY PROGRAMS & RESOURCES

MEDIA/PRESENTATION: The Durham-based Full Frame Documentary Film Festival
(formerly the DoubleTake Documentary Film Festival) was founded at the Center for
Documentary Studies and maintains strong ties to CDS and to Duke University as a
whole. Currently the University is the largest financial contributor to the festival,
making it the lead sponsor and an active participant in programming for the four-day
event each spring and in year-round screenings that supplement the festival. The Center
for Documentary Studies also maintains active, ongoing relationships with local public
radio station WUNC-FM (through frequent provision of documentary content) and
with larger distribution networks, including Public Radio International, American
Public Radio, National Public Radio, and the British Broadcasting Corporation. The
Center for Documentary Studies also maintains an active collaboration with the
Southern Documentary Fund (SDF), which encourages documentary media projects
made within or about the American South, and with Working Films, which advances
social, economic, environmental and racial justice by linking independent nonfiction
media to activism.

RESEARCH: A number of Duke programs maintain strong alliances with the Southern
Oral History Program, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, which makes
available its more than 4,000 interviews through UNC’s Southern Historical Collection
and, increasingly, through the innovative use of web-based technologies. The SOHP’s
mission is to create an unparalleled archive of sound recordings documenting life in the
20th-century South; provide students with research opportunities and encourage them
to combine scholarship with public service; make history accessible through
community-based workshops and collaborations with public schools; and produce
publications and documentaries that offer a fresh understanding of southern history.
Another rich local resource for Duke MFA students is the School of Information and
Library Science, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Currently ranked No. 1
in the nation by U.S. News & World Report, SILS is home to the Interaction Design
Laboratory (IDL), a research facility focusing on initiatives in the areas of human-
computer interaction and user-centered information systems design. SILS also houses
ibiblio.org, “the Public's Library” – a Web-based conservancy of freely available
software, music, literature, art, history, science, politics, and cultural studies. The Open
Video Project, funded by the National Science Foundation, is a shared digital video
repository and test collection that contains video or metadata for 2,000 digitized video
segments. Other important research areas include information seeking and use,
collaboration, bioinformatics, metadata, and health informatics.




                                             56
APPENDIX I: EXCHANGE SITES

Le Fresnoy, Tourcoing, France
Through the Visual Studies Initiative at Duke, a student and faculty exchange program
began in 2008 with Le Fresnoy, the most advanced institute in France devoted to
teaching, research, and experimenting with all aspects of the visual and media. It is the
brainchild of Alain Fleischer, a prodigious author, visual artist, producer, and cineaste.
Le Fresnoy admits a selected group of international artists and scholars for a two-year
period, during which that produce and present a new, innovative project that engages
the visual in original ways. These products can range from installations, performances,
and multimedia presentations to movies and digital productions. Le Fresnoy also
organizes exhibitions of contemporary art and movie and multimedia screenings. The
works realized at Le Fresnoy are shown throughout the world, including at Duke.

The MFA in the Experimental and Documentary Arts would significantly advance
opportunities for faculty and student exchanges with Le Fresnoy, building on the
existing relationship established through the Visual Studies Initiative at Duke.

China Academy of Art, Hangzhou
The Department of Art, Art History, and Visual Studies plans a new exchange program
with the China Academy of Art, which has the most complete range of degree offerings
and programs of study in fine arts in China. There are eight schools under its
jurisdiction, offering Ph.D., master’s and bachelor’s degrees in fine arts, design,
architecture, multimedia and film. There are currently 7,000 undergraduate and
graduate students in three campuses with a faculty and staff of 800. The administration
of the Academy is headquartered in the Nanshan Campus, which is located right on
West Lake in Hangzhou. Other regional campuses are the Zhangjiang Campus, which is
strategically located in Shanghai, and the Xiangshan Central Campus. There are plans
for the undergraduate student population to grow to 6,600, with a graduate student
body of 800, making it one of the biggest fine art institutions in the world.
Undergraduate students typically spend one year in general education courses in the
Department of Foundation and then three years in the core courses of their particular
majors. Graduate courses are typically three years long and include extensive
experience in the studio and research with mentoring faculty. Foreign students can take
short-term or long-term courses in Chinese art, language, and culture in the Institute of
International Education. The Academy encourages diversity in thinking, art
exploration, and academy research. It takes as its motto “diversity in harmony” and
fosters an environment for innovation.




                                            57
APPENDIX J: RELATED PROGRAMS AT PEER INSTITUTIONS

Stanford University, MFA in Documentary Film (Palo Alto, California)
This MFA degree is designed to prepare students for professional careers in film, video,
and digital media. Graduates are qualified to teach at the university level. The
philosophy of the program is predicated on a paradigm of independent media that
values artistic expression, aesthetics, social awareness, and an articulated perspective.
Students become conversant with the documentary tradition as well as with alternative
media and new directions in documentary. In addition to the training in documentary
production, students graduate from the program with substantive research skills in film
criticism and film analysis. The non-production courses provide an intellectual and
theoretical framework within which creative work is realized. The dual emphasis on
production and theory classes fully prepares the student to undertake an academic
position that typically requires the teaching of both film studies and media production.

University of California, Santa Cruz, MFA in Digital Arts and New Media
The Digital Arts and New Media MFA Program serves as a center for the development
and study of digital media and the cultures they have helped create. Faculty and
students are drawn from a variety of backgrounds, such as the arts, computer
engineering, humanities, the sciences, and social sciences to pursue interdisciplinary
artistic and scholarly research and production, in the context of a broad examination of
digital arts and culture.

Parsons (The New School), MFA in Design and Technology (New York City)
Parsons School of Design and the Master of Fine Arts in Design and Technology look to
a future in which the partnership of design and technology will affect the world in
beneficial ways. From the day a student enters the program, the process of problem
solving is at the core of their investigation. The dialogue pushes beyond the visual;
design is seen as a mechanism for developing strategy, knowledge organization,
business structure, and social consciousness. It provides fertile ground for investigation
of the aesthetic and intellectual challenges created by technology. The Design and
Technology Program explores the relationship between digital technology and the
creative process. Areas of emphasis include Multimedia, Physical Computing,
Animation, and Broadcast Design. This is a studio program with an emphasis on the
critique. Students complete individual and collaborative studio projects that
demonstrate aesthetic and intellectual refinement as well as technical mastery. The
program and its curriculum are closely linked to the real world, and students are
actively engaged in real design projects for social change.

School of Visual Arts, MFA in Social Documentary Film (New York City)
The MFA in Social Documentary Film gives students the opportunity to learn how to
find and capture important stories that speak to varied audiences on subjects of public
concern, within a social, political and cultural consciousness that can change how we
view our world. The program is a hands-on and highly innovative pursuit designed to
foster vibrant creative media that generate both social and aesthetic influence. Working
directly with some of the most relevant and inventive nonfiction storytellers and visual
journalists—as faculty, mentors, and collaborators—students gain the creative and
technical experience to work in the film and broadcast industries. Upon completion of
their studies students will be equipped with the tools that both enable and support

                                            58
individual expression, while fostering filmmakers who are fluent artistically,
technologically, socially, and critically.

School of Visual Arts, MFA in Photography, Video, and Related Media (New York
City)
The graduate program in photography, video, and related media at SVA brings
together traditional and digital lens-based arts. Students in the photography graduate
school are encouraged to explore ways they can utilize new technology to engage
creative potential and advance in their fields. The focus is to challenge traditional
assumptions of how the mediums of photography and video are taught, with the belief
that photography is a universal matrix for the documentation of the world. The
complexities of 21st-century cultural relationships—between and among photography
and the fine arts, communications, sciences, and the humanities—require examination
and analysis in order to produce original imagery that stems from the exploration of
these relationships. The implications of new technology form the cornerstone of the
program as it evolves new strategies for engaging creative potential. The teaching at
SVA holds that the computer is unlike other forms of expression. The virtual world is
an exciting realm of exploration and innovation for the lens-based artist.

New York University, Tisch School of the Arts, MFA in Filmmaking (New York City)
New York University’s Graduate Film Program, offered in both New York and
Singapore, is an intensive three-year conservatory which trains students in the art of
cinematic storytelling. It focuses on helping writer/directors develop a narrative voice
and the technical virtuosity to express that voice in cinema. Students learn by doing --
writing scripts, directing and producing films and exercises, shooting and crewing on
each other's projects. Every student has an opportunity to make a minimum of five
movies while at NYU. The program confers a Masters of Fine Arts degree. The
Graduate Film Program encompasses both fiction and documentary filmmaking. Each
semester, courses in screenwriting, directing, aesthetics, acting, cinematography,
editing, producing, and sound design compliment specific filmmaking projects that
provide hands-on training. Students are prepared to transition into the professional
world with a range of technical skills that often lead to employment in the industry, a
reel of short films which can serve as calling cards, and a feature film script.

American University, MFA in Film and Electronic Media (Washington, D.C.)
In the M.F.A. program in Film and Electronic Media, you will master the media
production skills and digital techniques required to compete in the explosive new
media industry. And, you will gain the broad-based understanding of media issues and
their historical and critical context necessary to begin a research or teaching career at the
university level. Using American University's film, video and digital equipment and
facilities, you will explore such skills as film and video production, script writing,
computer animation, digital imaging, sound production, and electronic media design
and programming for CD-ROM and the World Wide Web.

Hofstra University, MFA in Documentary Studies and Production (Long Island, New
York)
The Master of Fine Arts program in Documentary Studies and Production provides
students with the critical, analytical and practical tools for producing documentaries. In
combining studies and production, the documentary graduate program reflects a

                                             59
balance between critical inquiry and technical skill, while stressing the importance of
aesthetics, ethics and humanistic values through personal, creative expression. The
MFA documentary program is designed to encourage in students the capacity to
discover, develop, and express their own voices and individual perspectives on
important issues in society in general and their own communities in particular. With the
MFA as their terminal degree, graduates of the documentary graduate program will be
prepared to continue their work in current and emerging fields of non-fiction media as
well as to teach at the university level.

New York University, Tisch School, Master’s of Professional Studies in Interactive
Telecommunications (New York City)
An oversized Greenwich Village loft houses the computer labs, rotating exhibitions, and
production workshops that are ITP -- the Interactive Telecommunications Program.
Founded in 1979 as the first graduate education program in alternative media, ITP has
grown into a living community of technologists, theorists, engineers, designers, and
artists uniquely dedicated to pushing the boundaries of interactivity in the real and
digital worlds. ITP is internationally recognized as a unique and vital contributor of
new ideas and talented individuals to the professional world of multimedia and
interactivity. The department takes a creative and professional approach to the
challenges of the information age. The department provides an open and nurturing
environment in which people are empowered to develop their own ideas, no matter
how experimental. ITP emphasizes the user's creativity rather than the capability of the
computer. The department challenges students to apply their creativity and imagination
to the latest digital tools and techniques. The curriculum is devoted to teaching the
practice and theory that emerge from the convergence of new media technologies.

The New School, Graduate Certificate in Documentary Media Studies (New York
City)
The New School’s Certificate in Documentary Media Studies is a one-year, full-time,
graduate-level program. The certificate program offers you an opportunity to study
documentary history, theory, and practice in a small, intensive program situated in
New York City, the world’s documentary capital. Upon completion of the program,
certificate holders will be qualified to enter documentary professions through a variety
of routes— documentary director/producer, documentary television business,
theatrical distribution business, work with film festivals, film magazines or museums—
or to continue graduate school in pursuit of an MA and/or PhD in Media,
Anthropology, Film Studies, or related field.




                                           60
APPENDIX K: DUKE LETTERS OF SUPPORT




                               61
Duke University
                                                                                  ART, ART HISTORY &
                                                                                   VISUAL STUDIES
______________________________________________________________________________

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December 17, 2009



Dear Executive Committee of the Graduate School,

I write to convey the enthusiastic endorsement of the Program in the Arts of the Moving
Image for the proposal for a Master of Fine Arts in the Experimental and Documentary
Arts at Duke University.

AMI is the only academic unit at Duke focused on the making and study of the moving
image. As such, it is proud to play an integral role in this groundbreaking MFA
program. Our major contribution will be the expertise of our faculty in the production,
history, criticism, and theory of the moving image from film and video to
computationally generated works. Our facilities, staff, equipment, technical and
administrative expertise are fully available to the new MFA program.

The MFA will be a dynamic addition to the University and an important catalyst for the
development of undergraduate and graduate study of the moving image at Duke
University. As Director of AMI, I am fully committed to the success of the MFA in
Experimental and Documentary Arts.



Sincerely,




Stanley K. Abe
Director
                                                        INFORMATION SCIENCE ! INFORMATION STUDIES
                                                                                                        DUKE UNIVERSITY




Stan Abe
Faculty Director
Program in the Arts of the Moving Image

8 January 2010

Dear Stan,

I am writing in my capacity as the ISIS Program Director to support the proposed MFA in
Experimental and Documentary Arts. As we have discussed, this MFA as imagined ia an innovative and
timely degree program, and one which shares the ISIS commitment to critical and creative material
practice grounded in theoretical and historical bases. We are excited to be part of the group who are
working to make this new interdisciplinary program possible at Duke.

ISIS can support the MFA program most in the areas of computational media curriculum planning
and execution, and in infrastructure development and support. On the curriculum side, we already
teach courses in web and multimedia production, as well as special topics classes centered around
subject like multimedia mapping, virtual worlds development, and game development. All of these
areas are easily adaptable to the MFA curriculum. In addition, we are piloting module-based Technology
and New Media Practice seminars that bring together digital media and IT practitioners from all over
campus to teach interested graduate students topics like data visualization, textmining, and sensor
network development within a scholarly and creative context. This model could be expanded easily to
include the MFA students, who in turn could work with our undergrads. The cooperative teaching
exchanges built into the MFA program proposal make such a relationship both mutually satisfying and
sustainable. Our thematically-based project-based seminars could be expanded to include MFA student
participants as well.

The other main area in which ISIS can contribute is infrastructure development. In collaboration with
the Visual Studies Initiative, we have led the way in developing the Bay 11-12 complex into a mixed-use,
flexible teach/lab/research/studio environment. The Technology Manager for Bay 11-12 has a secondary
report to the ISIS Program Director and VSI Steering Committee; we will work actively to ensure the
computing and AV infrastructure supports professional-quality production, display, and archiving of work
done within the MFA program alongside that of our other programs. In collaboration with the Jenkins
Collaboratory for New Technologies we could offer access to the Game Lab as well, which includes video
capture and editing tools for machinima-based work. Additionally, the ISIS Project Lab in Bay
12 already houses a visiting installation artist this year, and will serve as a model for other similar spaces
going forward as the program develops.

Sincerely,




ISIS
Victoria Szabo
Assistant Research Professor, Department of Art, Art History, and Visual Studies
Program Director, Information Science + Information Studies Information Science ! Information Studies " Duke University
             Smith ACT Warehouse# Bay $% " $$& S' Buchanan Blvd' " Box ()*++ " Durham# NC %**), " P: ($(-++,-$(.& " F: ($(-+,$-$.*,
                                                                                                 isis-info@duke'edu " isis'duke'edu
To:            Duke University Arts and Sciences Council Committee on Curriculum
From:          Robert L. Byrd, Associate University Librarian for Collections Services
Date:          December 28, 2009

Statement of Library Support for the proposed Master of Fine Arts in Experimental and
Documentary Arts

Prepared by Danette Pachtner (Film, Video, & Digital Media Librarian), Karen Glynn (Visual
Materials Archivist), Kirston Johnson (Moving Image Archivist), and Lee Sorensen (Art,
Photography & Images Librarian)


Summary
The collections and services of the Duke University Libraries are adequate to support the
proposed MFA in Experimental and Documentary Arts, but some issues need to be addressed
and additional funding is needed to sustain some aspects of this support.

Many of the courses that comprise the MFA have been offered in previous semesters, and the
Libraries have been providing the necessary research support and collection development for
these intersecting, interdisciplinary areas. Currently three libraries on campus—Perkins
Library, Lilly Library, and the Rare Book, Manuscript, and Special Collections Library
(RBMSCL)—collect books, reference works, journals, databases, films and other media in the
fields of Visual Studies, Film Studies, New Media and Documentary Studies. Additional
resources may be requested by faculty and students as the MFA develops and grows, and the
Libraries’ collection development department will be responsive to those needs.

Subject librarians in the Duke University Libraries will provide programmatic services to
support the proposed MFA. Archivists and librarians for Film, Video & Digital Media (Lilly),
Computer Science (Perkins), Visual Materials (RBMSCL), Moving Image (RBMSCL), and
Art, Photography & Images (Lilly) as well as those with subject expertise in International and
Area Studies (Perkins) will facilitate the projects of MFA students and faculty. Two key
positions for support of the MFA—Visual Materials Archivist and Moving Image Archivist in
the RBMSCL—are currently supported in part on soft money, and additional funding is needed
to assure their continuation.

Visual Studies Collection in Lilly Library

Information and source material requirements for the proposed MFA fall into three categories:
(1) documentation of currently practiced forms [e.g. video games, internet videos, etc.]; (2)
commentary, criticism and practice guides to media; and (3) source material (images, sound
recordings, etc.) from which to create arts projects. Each of these types of material is needed
for all of the interdisciplinary areas covered by the degree—documentary studies, time-arts, and
behavior/reception theory.

Current Products/Art Forms
Which unit(s) within the university should acquire, support and conserve media arts has not
been resolved, and this issue needs to be addressed. Lilly Library’s visual studies collection has
not included video or electronic games up to now. Art media products such as cd-roms of
historical importance that the Libraries purchased (e.g. Art Spiegelmann’s Maus, 1994) run on
antiquated computer platforms that are no longer supported or playable on current systems.
Lilly has long acquired material on designing, programming and technical analysis of digital
arts. Electronic or print subscriptions supporting these areas include Games and Culture, JoVE:
Journal of Visualized Experiments, Digital Content Producer, Journal of Visualization and
Computer Animation, and Visual Computer.

Lilly Library has maintained contemporary art journals in print and is migrating to electronic
access whenever possible to address contemporary time arts. Bomb, Parkett, and High
Performance are three such journals that focus on experimental, ultra-modern art. Segment
journals, such as the respected Women’s Art Journal, also cover media artists and trends. Lilly
instituted approval program coverage of media arts criticism over ten year ago through the
Libraries’ principal book jobber, YBP. Museum exhibition catalogs including experimental
and motion arts—for example, the New Museum of Contemporary Art in New York—have
also been routinely purchased, though less comprehensively. This would be an area for
potential increases in funding in future years. Critique on experimental art outside the fine-arts
venue is collected under popular culture initiatives. The Libraries’ many standing-order book
series includes the “Digital Media and Society” series of which the 2009 imprint, YouTube:
Online Video and Participatory Culture, is one example. Local, grass-roots, experimental arts
are well documented by the Libraries’ online news databases such as Lexis-Nexis and
America’s Newspapers that include both newspaper articles and broadcast media and vital
sources documenting regional experimental arts initiatives.

Visual Source Material
Lilly Library has consistently and broadly supported documentary arts, particularly
photography. Books in the ‘documentary photography’ classification TR600-TR800 form the
principal portion of Lilly’s photography collection. Because photography is bound by
copyright issues, printed books and not electronic sources are still the format in which to find
comprehensive publication of documentary art. Lilly holds long print runs of photography
serials and collects retrospectively. Film and media-creators in the MFA will find rich image
resources through the Duke University Libraries’ “Image Research Portal” web pages that are
continuously updated with both free and proprietary image collections. Specifically, the AP
Media Archive, which the Libraries have subscribed to for over a decade, can provide a wide
variety of film and motion-arts creators with international images and sources from which to
model animation or produce film art.




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Film & Video Collection in Lilly Library

Background and Scope of Collection
The Lilly Library film and video collection is multidisciplinary and international in scope. It is
composed of feature films, documentaries, and shorts on 16mm, laser disc, videocassette (both
VHS and U-matic), DVD, and streamed. Areas of collection strength include African –
American History and Early Cinema, Animation, Asian Cinemas, Dance (the ADF Archive is
held on site), Early/Silent Cinema, Experimental Film, Middle Eastern Cinema, Russian/Soviet
Cinema, Science Fiction, Southern Americana and Women’s Studies.

In the late 1970s Dr. Inez Hedges submitted the first requests for the Libraries to purchase film
in support of a French film course. At around the same time several History Department
professors, a Political Science professor, and a few other Romance Language professors began
requesting video in support of their courses. 1980-81 saw the first purchases of 16mm film.
The collection grew rapidly, due almost entirely to faculty requests, and the first printed catalog
of holdings was distributed in 1983. In 1985 the first library budget line devoted solely to
collecting in film studies—both books and videos—was established. The film and video
collection has benefited over time from donations and gifts of both materials and equipment.
Among its benefactors are J. B. Fuqua, Paul B. Williams, Jr., Barbaralee Diamonstein, the
Canadian Consulate in Atlanta, and most recently, the Korean Film Council. The Duke
University Libraries currently hold over 27,000 film titles in various formats—including 15,000
dvds, 10,000 videocassettes, and 700 16mm films—and subscribe to several databases of
streaming video titles.

Location and Staffing
Lilly Library houses the bulk of the film/video collection, while part of the collection is located
off-site at the Library Service Center. The mechanism for requesting titles for use in class is
streamlined and works well for both staff and patrons. A full-time librarian is responsible for
collecting,

Collection Highlights in Support of MFA
Film and Visual Studies Journals
New Cinemas: Journal of Contemporary Film, Television and New Media, Nmediac: The
Journal of New Media & Culture, Documentary, Studies in Documentary Film, Documentary
Box, Convergence: the Journal of Research into New Media Technologies, Visual Studies,
Iconomania: Studies in Visual Culture, Visual Resources: VR, Journal of Visual Culture,
Invisible Culture: an Electronic Journal for Visual Studies, Image & Narrative: Online
Magazine of the Visual Narrative

Film/Video Directors/Artists represented in the collection
Experimental Filmmakers: Maya Deren, Chris Marker, Alexander Kluge, Guy Maddin,
Yvonne Rainer, Jonas Mekas, Brothers Quay, Oskar Fischinger, Kurt Kren, Man Ray, Luis
Bunuel, Kenneth Anger, Matthew Barney, Stan Brakhage, Todd Haynes, Joseph Cornell, Bruce
Conner, Su Friedrich, Hans Richter, Jan Svankmajer, Les LeVeque, Paul Morrissey, Andy
Warhol, Sadie Benning, Alan Berliner, Chel White, Vanessa Renwick, Ximena Cuevas, Ken
Jacobs, Mike Kelley, Chris Welsby, Malcolm le Grice, Takahiko Iimura, Ian Breakwell, Zibg



                                              3 of 5
Rybczynski, Joanna Priestley, Harry Smith, Jack Smith, Shirley Clarke, Derek Jarman, Robert
Frank, Alfred Leslie, Steve McQueen, Isaac Julien, Jean Genet, James Broughton, Bill Viola
Documentarians: Robert Gardner, Robert Flaherty, Errol Morris, Ross McElwee, Barbara
Koppel, Werner Herzog, Stephanie Black, Ken Burns, Michael Apted, Mitchell & Kenyon,
Dziga Vertov, Lumiere Brothers, R. W. Paul, William Greaves, Albert and David Maysles,
Lynne Sachs, Frederick Wiseman, Leni Riefenstahl, Spike Lee, Humphrey Jennings, John
Grierson, Basil Wright, Pare Lorentz, Richard Leacock, Gary Hawkins, Steve James, Chantal
Akerman, Joris Ivens, St. Clair St. Bourne, Kim Longinotto, Jean Rouch, Walther Ruttman,
Marcel Ophuls, Les Blank, Phill Niblock, Johan van der Keuken, Lindsay Anderson, Nicolas
Philibert, Morgan Spurlock, Robert Greenwald, Emile de Antonio, Dante James, Agnes Varda

Archive of Documentary Arts in the Rare Book, Manuscript, and Special Collections
Library

Resources
The Archive of Documentary Arts (ADA) in Duke’s Rare Book, Manuscript, and Special
Collections Library collects, preserves, and makes accessible photography and moving image
materials from around the world related to human rights, social change, occupational culture,
migration, race and ethnicity, gender, the American South, and African-American history and
culture. Collection formats cover the history of photography from daguerreotypes to
contemporary digital prints, small gauge motion picture film to 35mm film, video, and digital
moving image formats, !” reel to reel audio to mp3 files. The ADA works closely with Duke’s
Center for Documentary Studies and the Full Frame Documentary Film Festival. Since April
2007 the Archive of Documentary Arts has partnered with the Full Frame Documentary Film
Festival to acquire, archive, and preserve copies of the festival’s award-winning films. The
Archive of Documentary Arts has been collecting work generated by the Center for
Documentary Studies for almost thirty years.

The ADA and associated research centers in RBMSCL contain an enormous wealth of primary
materials, both visual and text, on a variety of subjects from the history of advertising to
African and African American Studies to Human Rights and Women’s History and Culture.
Many collections of original materials have been digitized and are available through the Duke
Digital Collections link on the Duke University Libraries’ website
<http://library.duke.edu/digitalcollections/>.

New digital collections are generated regularly by the Perkins Library Digital Production
Center, which is dedicated to digitizing Library materials. Digital collections of documentary
photography are also available through the ADA’s online exhibit program at
<http://library.duke.edu/specialcollections/collections/photography.html>.

Some representative collections include Behind the Veil, Documenting African American Life
in the Jim Crow South; the H. Lee Waters collection of films documenting small towns and
vernacular scenes throughout the Piedmont region during the Great Depression; the Morris and
Dorothy Margolin collection of home movies documenting trips during the 1950s and 1960s to
lesser-travelled places such as the former U.S.S.R., Thailand, Israel, and South America; the
D’Arcy, Masius, Benton, & Bowles collection of over 10,000 vintage television commercials



                                             4 of 5
circa 1950 to 1980, all of which have been digitized and made available online; and countless
others. All these materials may be used for research and to generate new works of art.

Creative and Research Opportunities
In addition to accessing materials online, students pursuing the MFA can work with the original
photographs contained in the manuscript and documentary photography collections. Many 19th
century manuscript collections include multiple photographic formats, documenting the
evolution of the photographic process. The ADA maintains contact with the living artists whose
works are in the collection and who might be a resource for MFA students. Reference
librarians in the RBMSCL Research Services Department can assist MFA students interested in
mining the archive.

The Archive of Documentary Arts not only supports curriculum and faculty in the Center for
Documentary Studies, the Program in the Arts of the Moving Image, and the Department of
Art, Art History, and Visual Studies, but it also serves the entire Duke community as a resource
for interdisciplinary study and materials related to the documentary arts. These materials
provide opportunities for research in a wide variety of disciplines and programs, including
African-American studies, environmental studies, immigration studies, visual studies, and
literature, to name just a few.

As unique records reflecting the social, cultural, political, and economic realities of our global
landscape, materials in the Archive of Documentary Arts are a rich resource for reinterpretation
and reprocessing in order to create new works of art. Artists working in the documentary and
experimental arts have long been aware of the power and potential of mining the Archive as
inspiration and fuel for new works. MFA students will have opportunities to work with
archival visual materials to curate exhibits and create new works that can be shared with the
entire Duke community via screenings, exhibitions, and publications.

Funding Needs
To support the proposed MFA in Experimental and Documentary Arts on an ongoing basis, the
Archive of Documentary Arts needs additional funding for its two dedicated positions, Visual
Studies Archivist and Moving Image Archivist. The latter was established with initial support
from the Mellon Foundation grant for the Visual Studies Initiative. Half of the position is
currently funded by the Libraries, and a plan for moving it fully to the Libraries’ budget has
been developed. The Visual Studies Archivist position has been supported for a number of
years by the Center for Documentary Studies and by the Libraries through the sale of duplicate
prints from a gift collection. These sources of funding will no longer be available in FY2011,
and only 25% of the position is currently on the Libraries’ budget.

These two positions are crucial if the Archive of Documentary Arts is to continue to acquire
collections of documentary photography, film, and video and facilitate traditional and
innovative access to these materials through class presentations, digital collections, physical
and online exhibits, virtual collaborations, and public programs. Additional funding is needed
also to purchase equipment and server space for digitization and file-based preservation, to
provide staff support for digitization and metadata creation, and to outsource digitization that
cannot be done in-house.



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APPENDIX L: EXTERNAL LETTERS OF SUPPORT




                               62
8 January 2010


Stanley K. Abe, Director
Program in the Arts of the Moving Image
Duke University
Box 90766
Durham, NC 27708-0766


Dear Professor Abe,

At your request, I am writing to provide a letter of support for the new Master of Fine
Arts in Experimental and Documentary Arts at Duke University. When I visited Duke
last spring to attend the workshop on “From Reel to Virtual,” I was quite intrigued to hear
about the new program. I was then given the opportunity to speak in depth with some of
the lead faculty and to visit informally some of the facilities. I was also grateful to
receive additional documentation about the program.

In my opinion, the new MFA in Experimental and Documentary Arts is a unique program
that will attract many talented students, both for the quality of its faculty and for the
breadth and originality of its course offerings. I know of no other program that is
completely analogous. It does resemble in many respects the Media Anthropology
Program at Harvard, offered in conjunction with the Anthropology Department, the
Program in Film and Visual Studies, and the Film Study Center. The remit of Media
Anthropology was to vastly expand the purview of documentary and artistic work in the
non-fiction arts to include the video and the interactive arts as well as photography and
film, to explore the artistic crossroads between documentary and experimental work,
and to search out intersections between theory and practice. It has become one of the
most popular and innovative components of our graduate program, drawing students
not only from social anthropology, but also from a variety of other departments in the
arts and humanities. In the three years of the Program!s existence, it has built up a
vibrant arts culture and produced some extraordinary work, including Lucien Taylor and
Ilsa Barbash!s Sweetgrass, which has just opened at the Film Forum in New York, and
J. P. Sniadecki!s Chaiqian / Demolition, which one the prize for best film at last year!s
“Cinéma du réel” Festival in France.
Despite these successes, our program takes place on a more modest scale that your
planned MFA. The Media Anthropology Program is open to only Harvard students
already accepted into a PhD. program, whether Social Anthropology, Film and Visual
Studies, or a related program in the arts and humanities. And in fact, we offer fewer
studio courses than your planned program and integration with the study of theory and
history is more ad hoc; in other words, there is no guided sequence of classes moving
students through a progressive curriculum. Nor can we offer much studio work in the
computational and interactive arts. There are all highly desirable and fairly unique
facets to your new and exciting MFA

For all of these reasons, I believe your new MFA has a very high probability of success
and future growth. Our experience has shown that there is a strong degree of interest in
such programs from a wide variety of students with disparate academic and artistic
interests. I believe you will be able to recruit very ambitious and talented applicants,
and, selfishly, I hope they will apply to one of our related doctoral programs after
graduation from yours. The MFA provides a rigorous yet creative program of study in
which students will flourish, and afterwards they are sure to find exciting careers in the
arts, education, journalism, or media production, or perhaps will even pursue further
academic study. The prospects of broadening and enlivening your undergraduate and
graduate media and academic culture are also very good. This is a very innovative and
well-conceived program that will surely be the model for others to come. I endorse it
whole-heartedly and am looking forward to observing and learning from its future
growth.

Sincerely,




D. N. Rodowick
Professor of Visual and Environmental Studies
Director of Graduate Studies in Film and Visual Studies (on leave)
      UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA CRUZ


BERKELEY • DAVIS • IRVINE • LOS ANGELES • MERCED • RIVERSIDE • SAN DIEGO • SAN FRANCISCO                                 SANTA BARBARA • SANTA CRUZ




      DIGITAL ARTS AND NEW MEDIA                                                           http://digitalarts.ucsc.edu
      PORTER FACULTY SERVICES                                                                   (831) 459-1554
      1156 HIGH STREET
      SANTA CRUZ, CALIFORNIA 95064



                                                                       Digital Arts and New Media MFA Program
                                                                                 Digital Arts Research Center 204
                                                                                                           1/7/10
      Dear Professor Abe,

      I am writing in support of your proposal for a Master of Fine Arts program in Experimental and Documentary Arts
      at Duke University. Based on my review of the executive summary of the proposal, and my knowledge of the
      excellent scholars, researchers and artists who will serve as faculty for the proposed program, I offer my unqualified
      endorsement.

      On reading the proposal I was particularly impressed by your decision to combine the study of documentary and
      experimental methods with training in the area of new and computational media. This unique approach will, I
      believe, create a program that will be of critical importance in furthering the development of new media
      documentary production, social and community arts practices, and the digital humanities. The combination of theory
      and practice in the curriculum and the recognition that production emerges out of both research and theory is, as I
      see it, the best way to prepare graduate students in a terminal master’s degree to contribute to their field as
      academics or professional artists. I applaud your focus on the role of the artist in society and the potential for
      artist/scholars to have positive impact in the world beyond the academy.

      I congratulate you on the extraordinary, interdisciplinary roster of faculty who have agreed to participate in this
      endeavor and on the connection to the proposed Ph.D. in Visual Studies. Together these two programs will benefit
      from some of the most important artists and scholars across the various disciplines your students will engage. As the
      chair of an interdisciplinary MFA program in Digital Arts and New Media (DANM) at UCSC I can attest that the
      quality of an interdisciplinary program’s faculty, their willingness to teach through their research and to link their
      research with the program, can be the single most important factor in a program’s success. Given my experience
      fine-tuning the structure and curriculum of the DANM program over the last six years I feel qualified to say that it
      appears you have designed a program that is both innovative and realistic. You have the resources you need and, in
      my opinion, the need for a program in Experimental and Documentary Arts that integrates new media is manifest.

      Please keep me posted on your program’s development and I look forward to further professional interaction with
      your faculty and with your future graduates.


      Sincerely,




      Sharon Daniel
      Professor, Film and Digital Media
      Chair, Digital Arts and New Media MFA program

				
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