Persuasive Presentations by Nc7M7xzF

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									Persuasive Presentations


Chapter 14
What is persuasion?

Persuasion
•   Using communication
•   To present logical arguments
•   That voluntarily
•   Change a person’s belief, attitude, or
    behavior.
Persuasion is NOT:

• Coercion
-The use of force to persuade.



• Manipulation
-The use of trickery to persuade.
Two Types of Persuasive
Presentations
• Proposals – you advocate your
  audience to take a specific action.
• Example: Your company needs to
  reimburse employees who carpool.
• Example: Your city should build
  additional town parks for children.
Two Types of Persuasive
Presentations
• Sales Presentations – remarks aimed
  at persuading another to purchase a
  product or service.
• Example: Presenting a speech aimed at
  selling new computers to CTC.
• Example: Presenting a speech aimed at
  selling you extermination services to the
  local H.E.B.
Guidelines for Sales
Presentations
1. Establish a relationship before trying
   to sell – get to know your audience.
2. Put your client’s needs first – word
   your language to solve the client’s
   problems.
NO: This copier is very easy to service.
YES: This copier can shave 45 minutes of your
    workday.
3. Listen to your clients – listen to the
    client’s needs and desires for products
    or service.
Guidelines for Sales
Presentations
4. Emphasize benefits rather than
  features
  -Feature – qualities of the product or
  service that make it desirable
  -Benefits – how the product or service
  will impact the client.
5. Choose the most effective
  organizational pattern
Persuasive Strategies

•   Greek philosopher Aristotle
•   Ethos – credibility
•   Logos – logic
•   Pathos – emotional appeals
Ethos – A Speaker’s Credibility

• Credibility – the persuasive force that
  comes from the audience’s belief and
  respect for the speaker.
• How do you become credible?
Demonstrate competence
Earn the trust of the audience
Emphasize your similarity with the
  audience
Logos – A Speaker’s Logic

• Logic – the presentation of good
  arguments.
• Fallacies – errors in logic
Fallacies in Reasoning

•   Ad Hominem (Attack-on-the-Person)
    – criticizes an opponent rather than
    the opponent’s arguments.
•   Example: How can we trust Doyle’s
    campaign spending report when he
    got a D in Algebra 1?
Fallacies in Reasoning

•   False Cause – assumes that because
    two events are related in time, the first
    must have caused the second.
•   Example: President Bush obviously
    caused the drop in the American
    economy because when he took office
    the market plummeted.
Fallacies in Reasoning

•   Either-Or – forces listeners to choose
    between two alternatives when more
    than two exist.
•   Example: We either raise taxes or we
    close the library; there is no other way
    to keep the library open.
Fallacies in Reasoning

•   Bandwagon – assumes because
    something is popular that is must also
    be good, correct, and desirable.
•   Example: Everyone smokes, so it
    must be okay to do so.
Fallacies in Reasoning

•   Slippery Slope – assumes that taking a
    first step will lead to a second step, and so
    on until disaster.
•   Example: If we elect Kerry as the next
    president, he will discontinue all support for
    the war of terrorism, terrorists will target the
    United States, and our nation will eventually
    be taken over.
Practice
• I don’t see any reason to wear a helmet when I ride a
  bike. Everyone bikes without a helmet.
• Bandwagon
• There can be no doubt that the Great Depression
  was cause by Herbert Hoover. He became President
  in March 1929, and the stock market crashed just
  seven months later.
• False cause
• Our school must either increase tuition or cut back on
  library services for students.
• Either-or fallacy
Practice

• If we allow the school board to spend
  money remodeling the gymnasium, next
  they will want to build a new school and
  give all the teachers a huge raise.
  Taxes will soar so high that businesses
  will leave and then there will be no jobs
  for anyone in this town.
• Slippery slope
Pathos – A Speaker’s Emotional
Appeals
• Elicit feelings of fear, anger, sadness,
  guilt, etc
• Use emotions sparingly!
• Always combine emotional appeals with
  rational appeals.
Organizational Patterns for
Persuasive Presentations
1.   Problem-Solution
2.   Monroe’s Motivated Sequence
3.   Criteria Satisfaction
4.   Comparative Advantage

**Call the audience to action!**

								
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