Harvest Ridge by wuzhenguang

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									                                                                                              Governance Council Meeting
                                                                                                                            Open to the Public
                                                                                                                                                    March 1, 2012
                                                                    Harvest Ridge Cooperative Charter School
               Harvest Ridge                                         9050 Old State Hwy, Newcastle, CA 95658
               Cooperative Charter School


Vision:	
  	
  The	
  educational	
  vision	
  of	
  Harvest	
  Ridge	
  Cooperative	
  Charter	
  School	
  rests	
  in	
  the	
  belief	
  that	
  partnerships	
  
build	
   communities.	
   	
   Founded	
   on	
   the	
   teacher/student/parent	
   partnership,	
   we	
   will	
   cultivate	
   a	
   cooperative	
  
community,	
   celebrating	
   the	
   unique	
   contributions	
   of	
   each	
   individual	
   and	
   promoting	
   cognitive,	
   imaginative,	
  
physical,	
  emotional,	
  social,	
  civic	
  and	
  creative	
  growth	
  and	
  development	
  of	
  all	
  students.	
  	
  Our	
  pledge	
  is	
  to	
  provide	
  
high	
  quality	
  educational	
  services	
  intended	
  to	
  enhance	
  the	
  joy	
  of	
  learning	
  for	
  all	
  and	
  to	
  inspire	
  a	
  commitment	
  to	
  
lifelong	
  learning.	
  	
  
	
  
Through	
   personalizing	
   the	
   educational	
   experience	
   of	
   each	
   child,	
   we	
   seek	
   to	
   enable	
   students	
   to	
   make	
   relevant	
  
connections	
  between	
  the	
  curriculum	
  and	
  the	
  world	
  around	
  them.	
  Environmental	
  stewardship,	
  National/Global	
  
citizenship	
   and	
   service	
   learning	
   will	
   be	
   woven	
   into	
   the	
   fabric	
   of	
   our	
   curriculum	
   in	
   order	
   to	
   promote	
   a	
   strong	
  
social	
  ethic	
  in	
  our	
  student	
  population.	
  	
  Multi-­‐grade	
  classrooms	
  and	
  strong	
  mentoring	
  programs	
  further	
  develop	
  
a	
  sense	
  of	
  community,	
  encouraging	
  all	
  members	
  of	
  the	
  school	
  to	
  work	
  together	
  to	
  promote	
  the	
  success	
  of	
  each	
  
learner.	
  	
  Enrichment	
  classes	
  organized	
  through	
  parent-­‐teacher	
  partnerships,	
  take	
  students	
  further	
  outside	
  the	
  
classroom	
   and	
   into	
   their	
   community	
   and	
   environment,	
   exchanging	
   ideas,	
   sharing	
   discoveries	
   and	
   making	
  
connections	
  with	
  peers	
  in	
  other	
  educational	
  programs,	
  locally	
  and	
  globally.	
  	
  	
  
	
  	
  
Our	
  staff	
  members	
  are	
  highly	
  skilled,	
  life-­‐long	
  learners	
  and	
  are	
  supported	
  in	
  their	
  endeavors	
  to	
  refine	
  their	
  craft.	
  	
  
A	
   team	
   leadership	
   approach	
   encourages	
   strong	
   professional	
   ethics,	
   monitors	
   progress	
   toward	
   achieving	
   our	
  
goals	
  and	
  ensures	
  that	
  we	
  are	
  effectively	
  utilizing	
  available	
  financial	
  and	
  human	
  resources	
  to	
  maximize	
  student	
  
performance.	
  	
  
	
  
Mission	
  Statement	
  and	
  Educational	
  Philosophy:	
  	
  Harvest	
  Ridge	
  Cooperative	
  Charter	
  School	
  is	
  committed	
  to	
  
nurturing	
   the	
   whole	
   student	
   by	
   cultivating	
   high	
   academic	
   achievement	
   and	
   strong	
   social	
   development.	
   	
  By	
  
encouraging	
   students	
   to	
   discover	
   and	
   pursue	
   their	
   interests,	
   talents,	
   and	
   passions,	
   Harvest	
   Ridge	
   Cooperative	
  
Charter	
  School	
  and	
  its	
  community	
  partners	
  enable	
  students	
  to	
  become	
  self-­‐motivated,	
  competent,	
  and	
  life	
  long	
  
learners	
  of	
  the	
  21st	
  Century	
  and	
  active	
  contributors	
  to	
  the	
  community,	
  while	
  pursuing	
  academic	
  excellence.	
  	
   Our	
  
dynamic,	
   collaborative	
   learning	
   model	
   emphasizes	
   experiential	
   instruction,	
   social,	
   civic	
   and	
   environmental	
  
consciousness,	
   and	
   an	
   awareness	
   of	
   each	
   student’s	
   unique	
   potential.	
   Students	
   are	
   empowered	
   to	
   become	
  
positive	
  contributors	
  to	
  society	
  through	
  partnerships	
  with	
  education	
  specialists,	
  parents,	
  peers,	
  and	
  within	
  the	
  
community.	
  


                      Meeting Facilitator: Dan Flom, HRCCS Governing Council Chair



6:30pm                        OPEN SESSION Room 4 HRCCS

1.     Call to Order

2.     Roll Call and Establishment of a Quorum

3.     Announce Closed Session Item
       3.1. Public Employment (Government Code 54957)
           3.1.1. Title: Education Specialist
           3.1.2. Title: Director
4. Public Comment on Closed Session Items General Public comments on any closed session
   item that will be heard. The Council may limit comments to no more that 3 minutes per individual.

5.     Adjourn to Closed Session

6. 6:35 CLOSED SESSION-
   6.1. Public Employment (Government Code 54957)
       6.1.1. Title: Education Specialist
       6.1.2. Title: Director

7.     7:00pm OPEN SESSION

8.     Call to Order

9. Disclosure of Closed Session Items
   9.1. Public Employment (Government Code 54957)
       9.1.1. Title: Education Specialist
       9.1.2. Title: Director

10. FROM THE GENERAL PUBLIC - It is the policy and practice of the Governance Council of
    Harvest Ridge Cooperative Charter School to encourage public attendance and participation at its
    meeting. This portion of the meeting is set aside for the purpose of allowing an opportunity for
    individuals to address the Council regarding matters not on the agenda, but within the Council's
    subject matter jurisdiction, and is limited to 3 minutes per individual. The Council is not allowed to
    take action on any item that is not on the agenda except as authorized by Government Code Section
    54954.2.

11. Interview and Action to Appoint New Governance Council M ember
    11.1. Chuck Cech

12. Reports And Communication
    12.1. Director’s Report
         12.1.1. Enrollment
         12.1.2. Town Hall M eeting Report
         12.1.3.  Funding Determination for 2010-2011
    12.2. Staff Report
    12.3. Budget Report – Nancy M cKenzie
         12.3.1. Please see State Budget Update notes from Nancy
    12.4.    PTO Report
    12.5. IT/Computers Report
    12.6.    Facilities
         12.6.1. Buildings & Grounds
    12.7. Grant Research Ideas From Council M embers
    12.8. Report from District Board M eeting
    12.9.    Communications from the Community

13. ACTION ITEM S – CONSENT AGENDA
    All actions listed under the Consent Agenda are considered to be routine, and will be enacted by one
    motion followed by a vote. There will be no separate discussion of these items unless a member of the
    Council requests that a specific item be removed from Consent Agenda, and discussed. Such items
    will be considered separately in the order in which they appear on the agenda.




	
                                                                                                          2	
  
       13.1. Council M inutes – request to approve Council minutes for meeting on January
             12, 2011
       13.2. Approval of Bill W arrants for January 2012
       13.3. Approval of Bill W arrants for February 2012
       13.4.         Accept resignation for Joshua Croft
       13.5. Approval of revised contract for Robin Silski
       13.6. Conflict Of Interest Code Resolution


14. ACTION ITEM S – REGULAR AGENDA
    Protocol for action items includes a staff presentation/overview, questions from the Council, public
    input, closing of public input, deliberation and voting by the Council. During public input, there will
    be a time limit per person, normally 3 minutes, set by the Council Chairman.

       14.1. Emergency Plan


15. CONSIDERATION OF: DISCUSSION/ACTION/INFORM ATION ITEM S



16. UPCOM ING AGENDA ITEM S

       16.1. Parent Involvement Policy
       16.2.       Review Director Job Description
       16.3. Budget 2012-2013
       16.4.       School Calendar for 2012/2013
       16.5. M OU Revisions
       16.6.       Director Evaluation
       16.7.       7/8 Grade Configuration/Plan

Future M eeting Dates: 4/12/12, 5/3/12, 6/7/12

HRCCS Governance Council meetings will normally be held the first Thursday of the
month, August – June. Special M eetings may be called anytime with proper notice.

Accommodating Those Individuals with Special Needs – In compliance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, the Newcastle Elementary School District encourages those with disabilities to
participate fully in the public meeting process. If you have a special need in order to allow you to attend or
participate in our public meetings, please contact our office well in advance of the regular meeting you wish
to attend so that we may make every reasonable effort to accommodate you.




	
                                                                                                            3	
  
                        Profile
                        Very technically oriented, highly motivated individual with extensive
                        management experience gained from twenty years in corporate management,
       Chuck Cech       six years leading a successful technical writing and training corporation, and
                        nine years as a naval officer.

                        Experience
       PHONE            CENTRAL ENGINEERING MANAGER, GRASS VALLEY USA, LLC, NEVADA CITY, CA
       (530) 368-7584   2001-2012
                        Responsible for managing all aspects of mechanical design, PCB layout, and
       EMAIL
                        technical writing resources in support of product development teams in Oregon,
       CC@JPS.NET       Utah, and California. Drove the adoption of common development tools for each
                        of the engineering disciplines, and served on several ‘tiger teams’ to improve the
                        efficiency of internal processes, including product lifecycle management and
                        ECO processing. Unilaterally drove implementation of the first company-wide
                        PDM system for managing mechanical data from design through production.
                        Managed the acquisition and maintenance of all software tools licenses for all
                        hardware and software development, reducing licensing costs from from over
                        one million dollars to less than six hundred thousand. Conceived and managed
                        the creation and implementation of work order, scheduling, and data delivery
                        tools that greatly improved the ability of Central Engineering and Operations to
                        support disparate development groups. Worked closely with an external
                        industrial design firm to help establish the look and feel of hardware products,
                        managed the scheduling of external industrial design resources, and drove the
                        implementation of corporate ID and industrial design guidelines across the
                        organization. Expanded the role of Technical Publications to support certain
                        Customer Support and Operations activities, and developed strong inter-
                        discipline cooperation among Mechanical Design, PCB Design, and Technical
                        Publications groups. Served as interim manager of Development Lab resources
                        for several years, during which I oversaw the establishment of a new corporate
                        Interoperability Lab.

                        TECHNICAL PUBLICATIONS MANAGER, GRASS VALLEY USA, LLC, NEVADA CITY,
                        CA 1999-2001
                        Established editorial guidelines for the Technical Publications department, reduced
                        publication production costs, and cultivated closer relationships with Training and
                        Customer Service to help improve user manuals and reduce customer support
                        requirements. Developed new information delivery mechanisms, and new
                        approaches, methods and techniques to improve the efficiency of end user
                        documentation development. Edited all output of the Technical Writing group.

                        SENIOR TECHNICAL WRITER, GRASS VALLEY USA, LLC, NEVADA CITY, CA
                        1997-1999
                        Wrote a variety of technical manuals that addressed the installation and
                        operation of professional broadcast equipment. Worked closely with engineers,
                        product managers, marketing managers, project managers, and other subject
                        matter experts to deliver industry leading end user documentation.




	
                                                                                                            4	
  
       PRINCIPAL, ARCADIA DOCUMENTATION SERVICES, INC., FAIR OAKS, CA
       1991-1997
       Managed as many as 25 contractors on multiple concurrent projects, while
       designing, developing, and writing technical and non-technical documents.
       Documentation included user guides and reference manuals, operations,
       administration, and maintenance manuals, standards and procedures manuals,
       development guidelines, disaster recovery guidelines, marketing material,
       training manuals and instructor guides, and a computer user’s column in a trade
       periodical. Clients included Pacific Bell (AT&T), MetroList Services, Valent USA
       Corporation, OR Consulting, and Integration Systems, Inc.

       DIRECTOR OF EDUCATIONAL SERVICES, METROLIST SERVICES, INC.,
       SACRAMENTO, CA 1985-1991
       Member of a three person team responsible for the successful start-up of
       MetroList, a computer database subscription service. In addition to performing
       management tasks associated with job title, was primarily responsible for
       designing a training syllabus and developing documentation to support
       computer training. During syllabus development, wrote and published more than
       a dozen user manuals rated as best in the nation among sites using similar
       software. These manuals subsequently served as the foundation for the first
       comprehensive computer training syllabus approved for continuing education by
       the California Department of Real Estate.

       NAVAL FLIGHT OFFICER, U.S. NAVY, 1976-1985
       My role as mission commander was to direct the concerted activities of 13 air
       crew members in covert operations against Soviet submarines. When not flying, I
       wrote, edited, and directed the development of thousands of pages of avionics
       technical manuals, technical orders, operating procedures, and other technical
       documents. During my time in the Navy I held the positions of Classified Materials
       Custodian, Legal Officer, Naval Aviation Training and Operational Procedures
       Standardization Officer, Navigator Instructor, Interservice Undergraduate Navigator
       Training syllabus manager, Instructor Trainer, and Air Training Command Master
       Instructor. During the latter part of my Navy service I directed an overhaul of the
       Navy’s maritime air navigation training syllabus, through which American and
       many allied Navy and Marine aviators pass on their way to becoming qualified for
       long range maritime aviation missions.

       Education
       University of Washington — Bachelor of Science, Ocean Physics, 1975

       Skills
       Very technically oriented, with broad experience managing technical resources
       in mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, technical documentation and
       information services, and aviation. Extensive project management experience,
       with expertise in resource assessment, planning, and development. Excellent
       writing, communication, and training skills. Excel at managing technical teams.
       Adept at program management, technical and non-technical documentation
       development, curriculum development, industrial design, infrastructure process
       development and implementation. Above average graphic design skills, with
       proficiency in the Adobe tools suite.

       Referrals
       Available upon request.


       Page 2




	
                                                                                           5	
  
January 24, 2012

Hi everyone:
As I began to create my “snapshot” of changes featured in the 2012/13 State Budget,
School Services began sending out their responses to questions presented after their
recent budget workshop. For those that prefer just a brief overview – please see my
bullet points below. For those “inquiring minds” that want to digest a little more detail –
then beginning on the 2nd page, I have cut and pasted some of the more pertinent
questions/comments/answers from my School Services Fiscal Reports and emails…

2012-13 State Budget Proposal and what it means to our district budgets…


       •   The November ballot initiative is being used to generate “funding” for schools – if it
           passes, it will not generate “new” funding – but will eliminate up to 25% of existing
           deferrals.
       •   Should the initiative pass, it will not increase our spending capabilities because the result
           is not more funding – it’s when the projected funding is to be received.
       •   Should the ballot initiative fail – we can expect to see a mid-year trigger pulled, resulting
           in an estimated $368-$370/ada revenue cut for 2012-13. To protect against this potential
           loss of revenue, all budgets should be built with the lower revenue projection – which
           includes the cut.
       •   There is a 3.17% cost-of-living adjustment (COLA) “budgeted” but the deficit factor is
           increased from 19.754% to 21.666% which ultimately negates the cola.
       •   The $37 “residual cola” you may hear tossed about resulting from using the dept of
           finance calculations, will probably be corrected at the May revise to make the residual
           disappear so that funding is represented as truly “flat” (should the November initiative
           pass).
       •   Prop 98 funding levels can – and have been – manipulated in a multitude of ways to
           negatively affect funding for schools.
       •   At this time, the transportation funding is eliminated for 2012-13, with no information if
           it will return the following year. This is on the heals of the mid-year trigger for 2011-12
           being pulled, resulting in a loss of 50% of our transportation funding due for the
           remainder of this year.
       •   There are proposals to fund Revenue Limit in a per student “weighted value” system, and
           rolling some of the categorical funding into this new proposal. There is no specific
           information at this time as to what that will ultimately look like – or what the base


	
                                                                                                       6	
  
          revenue limit will be. Therefore, budgets should be built based on the known formulas at
          this time. In terms of our “base revenue limit”, since we are so low on the totem pole, we
          could come out ahead – but it will have to be reviewed against any potential loss of
          categorical funding, which could have a negative impact overall.


As always – please give me a call if you have questions or want to discuss anything
presented here.

Thanks!!      Nancy             916.663.3307 ext 202


For those inquiring minds…please read on for more detailed explanations….  . This School
Services Fiscal Report appeared in my inbox today…I have taken some liberties with their report by
deleting some items that didn’t apply and highlighting the hot topics that correspond to my bullet
points.   Following the Fiscal Report are some Q&A’s resulting from the School Services Budget
Workshop. I chose to attend the budget workshop sponsored by School’s Innovation and Advocacy
(which was free) and Michael Leydon joined me.            Nancy


            The Complexity of the Governor’s Plan for Education
          (information comes from School Services Fiscal Report)

Even after careful study, some of the complexities of the Governor’s Budget Proposal
for 2012-13 are still elusive. We want to clarify at least a couple of points that will
hopefully help you to answer the apparent conflict between the Governor’s
announcement that Proposition 98 funding is proposed to go up by $4.9 billion in 2012-
13, and the reality that schools have nothing more to spend.

The Cost-of-Living Adjustment (COLA)

California law sets out a formula for calculation of the annual COLA; the Governor’s
Budget recognizes that amount and adds it to the undeficited revenue limit per unit of
average daily attendance (ADA). The exact amount, expressed as a flat dollar amount per
unit of ADA, is simply added to the prior year’s undeficited base revenue limit. This new
amount is estimated in the January Governor’s Budget Proposal and then finalized at the
May Revision.

The last year that the COLA was actually paid to school agencies was 2007-08. Each year
since 2007-08, the state has decided not to fund the COLA, and, in fact, in many years
the revenue limit has been subject to ongoing cuts in addition to the loss of the COLA.
When the state doesn’t pay a COLA or otherwise reduces the revenue limit, it does so by
employing a deficit factor calculation.



	
                                                                                                   7	
  
The Deficit Factor

The simplest of the concepts is the deficit factor, but even that factor is a bit more
complicated in the Governor’s 2012-13 Proposal. The deficit factor is related strictly to
revenue limits, not overall Proposition 98 funding. When a statutory COLA for the
current year is declared, added to the undeficited revenue limit, and paid, the deficit
factor is unaffected. When the statutory COLA is declared, but not paid by the state, the
deficit factor goes up. When the state pays the current-year COLA, and pays an
additional amount to buy down the deficit factor, i.e., deficit reduction funding, the
cumulative deficit factor is reduced. Any existing deficit factor is applied to the
undeficited revenue limit to calculate the funded revenue limit. School Services of
California, Inc., provides several tools to help an individual district calculate its actual
funded revenue limit.

For 2012-13, the Governor stated his intention that revenue limits would remain as flat
funding between 2011-12 and 2012-13 if his tax package passes in November. But the
deficit factor estimated by the Department of Finance does not completely remove the 2012-13 COLA from
the revenue limit per unit of ADA. As a result, the average district will see that after application of the
state-declared deficit factor, a small COLA of about $37 will appear to remain. This is similar to what
happened last January when the state-declared deficit factor was slightly higher than the percentage
necessary to eliminate the 2011-12 COLA and the calculation left the average district $19 per-ADA short
of flat funding. For 2011-12, the state corrected the deficit factor at the May Revision to eliminate the $19
per-ADA shortfall, and it is our expectation that the same correction will be made this year.

The state has increased the estimated deficit factor from 19.754% for 2011-12 to
21.666% for 2012-13. We advise you to use the estimated deficit factor of 21.666%
provided by the state, as we will, until the May Revision. But you should definitely not
plan to spend the approximately $37 per ADA residual COLA. This single calculation
causes the state to leave $220 million on the table without receiving any credit for it.
Again, we think that was unintentional and will likely be corrected at the May Revision.

The bottom line is that for every dollar the state owes you in the undeficited revenue
limit, you will only receive about 78¢. Thus, there is no new spending authority available
to school districts even under the optimistic assumption that the Governor’s tax package
passes.

The Deferrals

The most complex concepts in the 2012-13 Governor’s Budget are found in the
planned treatment of deferrals, past and present. You will need to follow carefully the
next couple of paragraphs to fully understand what is proposed and its effect on funding
for education. Up to this point, we have been discussing the revenue limit, a measure of
funding available on a per-student basis. Now we are going to move to an entirely
separate calculation of the gross amounts due to Proposition 98 and the effect of the
deferrals on that amount.

First, we need to consider how the deferrals originated in 2001-02. The state declared
its intention to fund education at a level that included full funding of the revenue limits


	
                                                                                                         8	
  
plus the 2001-02 COLA, but the dollars available to the state were insufficient to do that.
So, the state had a choice: cut education funding for 2001-02 or pay some of it a week
late, delaying it from the last week in June to the first week in July on an ongoing basis.
That would create the appearance of a cut in 2001-02, a promise to pay the deferred
amount later, and the state provide authority for school districts to count and spend the
deferred amount in 2001-02.

The deferral mechanism, though far from standard accounting practice, allowed the
state to increase education spending while appearing to reduce state costs. And this
practice became addictive for the state; the cumulative deferral increased from a little
more than $1 billion dollars in 2001-02 to more than $10 billion for 2011-12. Each year
that a series of Governors have desired to maintain spending for education or minimize
cuts, they simply increased the amount of the deferral.

The amount of the deferral does not affect the calculation of revenue limits or deficit
factors in a direct way, but it does affect the ability of the state to provide the dollars
necessary to fund those costs. It is similar to an employer agreeing to pay a certain
hourly wage to an employee. The employee negotiates the wage, but does not necessarily
know where the cash to pay that wage is coming from: current-year revenues of the
employer, or debt, or savings accumulated by the employer.

For 2012-13, the Governor wants to maintain flat funding for education, and
without the taxes, he does not have the money to do that. But if the taxes pass,
education would be entitled to much more than the amount needed to maintain flat
funding, and the Governor does not want to increase funding for education while cuts are
still planned for the rest of the Budget. So, the Governor proposes to decrease the
amount of the cumulative deferrals; essentially the state would be paying itself back for
past advances.

This action would again have no effect on revenue limits or the deficit factor, but just
as spending authority for school districts was not cut when the deficits were created,
spending does not increase when deferrals are restored.

The understanding of the interaction of all of these factors is necessary to see how, on
paper, the Governor adds $4.9 billion to total Proposition 98 funding in 2012-13, yet
spending authority for districts remains flat at best.

Summary of School Services email

For the past decade, the deferrals have “permitted” school districts to maintain higher
spending levels than the amounts appropriated by the state for any given year
(assuming there is cash available to cover the expense either in a District’s reserve or
in issuing a TRAN). Therefore, restoration of the deferrals will not increase spending
authority to districts…because all it does is pay what is due, in the year in which it is
due. The bad news is that the Governor’s plan for 2012-13 deals with one-fourth of the
accumulated $10.6 billion total in a single year. The really bad news is that the other


	
                                                                                       9	
  
three-fourths still remains and could mean education sees no new funding for a very
long time.

Questions from the School Services Budget Workshop:

Q3.     If Proposition 98 is increasing $4.9 billion between 2011-12 and 2012-13, why is funding
flat? Does this show up in the deficit factor?

A3.    Remember that Proposition 98 sets the minimum level of funding for K-12 education and
community colleges in a given year. It does not specify where those funds should be allocated. In
other words, it does not require that funds are to be provided to revenue limits, specific
categorical programs, or new programs. Consequently, it does not affect the deficit factor.

Even though the Proposition 98 minimum guarantee increases almost $5 billion next year, this
increase is being used to address the deferral issue. The first $2.2 billion is being used to hold
current-year deferrals at the $10 billion level. (Remember that the state got a one-time savings of
$2.2 billion in 2011-12; an equivalent amount of new revenue must be appropriated to education
programs in the subsequent year just to keep the deferral at the $10 billion level.) The
Governor’s Budget goes on to propose that $2.5 billion from the tax initiative be directed to buy
down past deferrals rather than provide a cost-of-living adjustment or restore prior program cuts.
Therefore, K-12 education and the community colleges will not see an increase in expenditure
authority in the Budget year under the Governor’s spending plan.

Q2.     If we calculate our revenue limit using the 3.17% cost-of-living adjustment (COLA) and
the 21.666% deficit factor, it appears we do not eliminate the $37 per-ADA error. If we budget
for the $370 per-ADA trigger cut, does this adjust out the $37 increase? Or do we add $370 + $37
for a $407 reduction per-ADA?

A2.      The $370 per-ADA cut related to the Governor’s tax initiative does not include the
$37 per-ADA residual COLA that results when using the Department of Finance’s (DOF’s)
deficit factor. In planning for the trigger reduction in 2012-13, we recommend that you separate
these two issues rather than combine them together as a $407 per-ADA reduction. We believe
that the residual $37 per-ADA COLA is in fact a technical error and will be corrected at the May
Revision. The $370 per-ADA reduction would be ongoing if the Governor’s tax initiative fails. If
you combine the two issues together, you may inadvertently treat the $37 per-ADA reduction as
ongoing when it is likely to be eliminated automatically with a revised deficit factor.

	
  




	
                                                                                              10	
  
	
     11	
  
	
     12	
  
                                                                                              Governance Council Meeting
                                                                                                                            Open to the Public
                                                                                                                                             January 12, 2011
                                                                    Harvest Ridge Cooperative Charter School
               Harvest Ridge                                         9050 Old State Hwy, Newcastle, CA 95658
               Cooperative Charter School


Vision:	
  	
  The	
  educational	
  vision	
  of	
  Harvest	
  Ridge	
  Cooperative	
  Charter	
  School	
  rests	
  in	
  the	
  belief	
  that	
  partnerships	
  
build	
   communities.	
   	
   Founded	
   on	
   the	
   teacher/student/parent	
   partnership,	
   we	
   will	
   cultivate	
   a	
   cooperative	
  
community,	
   celebrating	
   the	
   unique	
   contributions	
   of	
   each	
   individual	
   and	
   promoting	
   cognitive,	
   imaginative,	
  
physical,	
  emotional,	
  social,	
  civic	
  and	
  creative	
  growth	
  and	
  development	
  of	
  all	
  students.	
  	
  Our	
  pledge	
  is	
  to	
  provide	
  
high	
  quality	
  educational	
  services	
  intended	
  to	
  enhance	
  the	
  joy	
  of	
  learning	
  for	
  all	
  and	
  to	
  inspire	
  a	
  commitment	
  to	
  
lifelong	
  learning.	
  	
  
	
  
Through	
   personalizing	
   the	
   educational	
   experience	
   of	
   each	
   child,	
   we	
   seek	
   to	
   enable	
   students	
   to	
   make	
   relevant	
  
connections	
  between	
  the	
  curriculum	
  and	
  the	
  world	
  around	
  them.	
  Environmental	
  stewardship,	
  National/Global	
  
citizenship	
   and	
   service	
   learning	
   will	
   be	
   woven	
   into	
   the	
   fabric	
   of	
   our	
   curriculum	
   in	
   order	
   to	
   promote	
   a	
   strong	
  
social	
  ethic	
  in	
  our	
  student	
  population.	
  	
  Multi-­‐grade	
  classrooms	
  and	
  strong	
  mentoring	
  programs	
  further	
  develop	
  
a	
  sense	
  of	
  community,	
  encouraging	
  all	
  members	
  of	
  the	
  school	
  to	
  work	
  together	
  to	
  promote	
  the	
  success	
  of	
  each	
  
learner.	
  	
  Enrichment	
  classes	
  organized	
  through	
  parent-­‐teacher	
  partnerships,	
  take	
  students	
  further	
  outside	
  the	
  
classroom	
   and	
   into	
   their	
   community	
   and	
   environment,	
   exchanging	
   ideas,	
   sharing	
   discoveries	
   and	
   making	
  
connections	
  with	
  peers	
  in	
  other	
  educational	
  programs,	
  locally	
  and	
  globally.	
  	
  	
  
	
  	
  
Our	
  staff	
  members	
  are	
  highly	
  skilled,	
  life-­‐long	
  learners	
  and	
  are	
  supported	
  in	
  their	
  endeavors	
  to	
  refine	
  their	
  craft.	
  	
  
A	
   team	
   leadership	
   approach	
   encourages	
   strong	
   professional	
   ethics,	
   monitors	
   progress	
   toward	
   achieving	
   our	
  
goals	
  and	
  ensures	
  that	
  we	
  are	
  effectively	
  utilizing	
  available	
  financial	
  and	
  human	
  resources	
  to	
  maximize	
  student	
  
performance.	
  	
  
	
  
Mission	
  Statement	
  and	
  Educational	
  Philosophy:	
  	
  Harvest	
  Ridge	
  Cooperative	
  Charter	
  School	
  is	
  committed	
  to	
  
nurturing	
   the	
   whole	
   student	
   by	
   cultivating	
   high	
   academic	
   achievement	
   and	
   strong	
   social	
   development.	
   	
  By	
  
encouraging	
   students	
   to	
   discover	
   and	
   pursue	
   their	
   interests,	
   talents,	
   and	
   passions,	
   Harvest	
   Ridge	
   Cooperative	
  
Charter	
  School	
  and	
  its	
  community	
  partners	
  enable	
  students	
  to	
  become	
  self-­‐motivated,	
  competent,	
  and	
  life	
  long	
  
learners	
  of	
  the	
  21st	
  Century	
  and	
  active	
  contributors	
  to	
  the	
  community,	
  while	
  pursuing	
  academic	
  excellence.	
  	
   Our	
  
dynamic,	
   collaborative	
   learning	
   model	
   emphasizes	
   experiential	
   instruction,	
   social,	
   civic	
   and	
   environmental	
  
consciousness,	
   and	
   an	
   awareness	
   of	
   each	
   student’s	
   unique	
   potential.	
   Students	
   are	
   empowered	
   to	
   become	
  
positive	
  contributors	
  to	
  society	
  through	
  partnerships	
  with	
  education	
  specialists,	
  parents,	
  peers,	
  and	
  within	
  the	
  
community.	
  


                      Meeting Facilitator: Dan Flom, HRCCS Governing Council Chair

OPEN SESSION Room 4 HRCCS

1.     Call to Order – 6:40 p.m.

2.     Roll Call and Establishment of a Quorum: Dan, Stephen, Jeff, Kimberly
       Others present: Janet, Cathy, Erica, Diane, Andrea, Tina, Janelle, Kathi D. Nancy,
       M ichael Leydon

3.     FROM THE GENERAL PUBLIC – It is the policy and practice of the Governance Council of
       Harvest Ridge Cooperative Charter School to encourage public attendance and participation at its
       meeting. This portion of the meeting is set aside for the purpose of allowing an opportunity for
       individuals to address the Council regarding matters not on the agenda, but within the Council’s
       subject matter jurisdiction, and is limited to 3 minutes per individual. The Council is not allowed to



	
                                                                                                                                                                                13	
  
       take action on any item that is not on the agenda except as authorized by Government Code Section
       54954.2.

4. Interview and Action to Appoint New Governance Council M ember – Diane Pardue
   introduced herself. Council members were able to ask Diane questions. Then Dan
   opened the floor to the public to ask any questions.

       4.1. Diane Pardue
            Kimberly motioned to appoint Diane as a Governance Council member, Stephen
            seconded. Vote was unanimous. M otion carried.
            Kathi D. delivered the “oath of office”. Diane Pardue is a new Governance
            Council member.

           Council is still in search of a community member to serve on the Governance
           Council.

           Dan, Kimberly, Diane – terms end September 2012
           Stephen, Jeff, M onica – terms September in 2014
           Non-parent term is a 2- year term.

5.     Reports And Communication
       5.1. Director’s Report
           5.1.1. Enrollment – 101 students total – 7 HS students and 94 IS students.
           5.1.2. Town Hall M eeting – Thurs. Jan. 19 th 6:00 – will be a workshop format to
                  discuss Enrichment, the future of 7/8 th grade and Volunteers. Garden
                  committee meeting W ed. Jan. 18 at the school with the 5-8 th grade students
                  to formulate some ideas. School painting project happening this weekend.
           5.1.3. Dan brought up the Charter Conference CCSA (Cal Charters.org) coming
                  up Feb. 28, 29 in Sacramento. Stephen asked if we can approach PTO to see
                  if they can fund our Director. Council agreed. Janelle said she could do a
                  special e-mail vote.
       5.2. Staff Report – Andrea and Tina reported things are going great. Tina
            mentioned we had a good staff meeting and we talked about having a school wide
            Science Fair on M arch 7 th . Also we are doing a school wide B Street Theater –
            The Young Thomas Edison. Plans for the International Restaurant Night are
            underway the end of M ay. Ice Skating – field trip – February (check with SIG to
            see if that is approved) If not approved make an IS day and then families can
            participate on their own as a group. K-2 going to Zoo on M arch 29 th . K going to
            Hamburger Farm. Janet reported that the teachers have made web pages that
            link to the school website.
       5.3. Budget Report – Nancy M cKenzie – 1 st interim is completed - Nancy reported
            on a “Cash Flow” report she created for our school.
       5.4. PTO Report – Janelle reported on the Holiday Show – PTO made $1600.00 - It
            was a fun night. All children participated in singing. Seventh & Eighth graders
            did a rhythm “stomp” performance and impressed all who attended. Spring
            Fundraiser is coming up on April 13. M eeting Friday Jan. 20 for the Spring
            Fundraiser. Looking for a venue. Some ideas, The Flower Garden, The Ridge,
            The Foundry in Nevada City. Volunteer Coordinator spot is open and they need
            to fill it.
       5.5. IT/Computers Report – Sam injured his foot and was not present. Janet
            reported that we reshuffled some computers from K-2 to 4-6 so they can have
            more one on one in the upper grades. 4 computers are awaiting Apple Care help.
       5.6. Facilities



	
                                                                                                         14	
  
           5.6.1. Buildings & Grounds – W e Love the Turf!! Thank you to our PTO who
                    provided it for our school. Janet also thanked our District for being good to
                    repair things quickly for us. Thank you!!
       5.7. Grant Research Ideas From Council M embers – Stephen encouraged teachers to
            sign up for “Donors Choose. Only teachers can sign up. It is a great way for
            teachers to get books or items for their classroom.
       5.8. Report from District Board M eeting – Dan gave a report of information from the
            District Board M eeting.
            Jan. 21 – “Crab feed” fundraiser at Blue Goose, Fundraiser “e-waste drive” on Jan
            28 th , (Erica M oore has information on that fundraiser), Newcastle is pursuing a
            solar project – HRCCS may benefit or be a part of it. Newcastle Charter will be
            renewing their charter for the next 5 years in the February meeting. Newcastle
            District is also considering converting to a Full-Charter District. (Cathy needs
            to update all e-mails in Aeries.) Rough Draft for the calendar is on the horizon.
            Ken Hansen is the new School Board President replacing M ichael Leydon whose
            term ended.

6. ACTION ITEM S – CONSENT AGENDA
   All actions listed under the Consent Agenda are considered to be routine, and will be enacted by one
   motion followed by a vote. There will be no separate discussion of these items unless a member of the
   Council requests that a specific item be removed from Consent Agenda, and discussed. Such items
   will be considered separately in the order in which they appear on the agenda.

       6.1. Approval of Governance Council M inutes 12-1-2011:
            Jeff motioned to approve the minutes with a revision – “10.3 Council members
            asked HRCCS to keep information on the teachers who are currently teaching
            home study students without pay in order to pay them “ when funds become
            available. Kimberly seconded. M otion carried.
       6.2. Approval of Bill W arrants for December 2011 – Nancy asked if we want her to
            include a W arrant summary report that she included this month in the future.
            The Council liked the summary report and wants her to include it each month.
            Jeff motioned to approve to warrant report, Stephen seconded. M otion carries.

7.     ACTION ITEM S – REGULAR AGENDA
       Protocol for action items includes a staff presentation/overview, questions from the Council, public
       input, closing of public input, deliberation and voting by the Council. During public input, there will
       be a time limit per person, normally 3 minutes, set by the Council Chairman.
             None

8.     CONSIDERATION OF: DISCUSSION/ACTION/INFORM ATION ITEM S
       8.1. Governance Council/Director Goals for 2011-2012 – Janet reported on the Goals
            1.b – was discussed
           2c – survey – Stephen is willing to chair the survey committee. Diane, Tina, and
           Kimberly offered to be on the committee. Diane asked if we are going to start off
           with what we learned and what we accomplished from the voice of the last survey.
           Everyone agreed that is a good idea. Stephen asked if teachers could use LRC
           again to have computers available so parents can take the survey. Stephen will
           come up with a date for the first meeting of the survey committee. (***M iss
           Cathy will give Stephen dates for LRC after M arch.) Survey Committee is
           Stephen, Diane, Kimberly & Tina.

            3.b Gov. Council member handbook – Dan will be committee chairman.
            Kimberly offered to be on the committee.



	
                                                                                                           15	
  
              Diane mentioned it would be good to have a picture and a bio of each of the
              Council members on the web site. Council thought that was a good idea.

              3.d/3.e – Dan will head goals 3.d and 3.e up. Diane and Jeff will be on the
              committee with Dan.

              W e will need survey feedback for benchmarks for these goals. Dan will seek
              guidance with Kathi D.

              Janet asked if a couple of Council members would work with her after the town
              hall meeting on budget, etc. Stephen offered to work with Janet.

       8.2. Custodial Update – Anthony requested that he would like to bring a helper with
            him. No additional cost. Liability Insurance – he needs to do live scan all the
            proper paper work.
            Anthony is responsible for the job and only he will have keys and the codes.
       8.3. Committees for Upcoming Agenda Items

9. UPCOM ING AGENDA ITEM S

       9.1.   Emergency Plan- Jeff will work with Janet.
       9.2.   Parent Involvement Policy
       9.3.   Review Director Job Description
       9.4.   Budget 2012-2013
       9.5.   M OU

Future M eeting Dates: 2/2/12, 3/1/12, 4/12/12, 5/3/12, 6/7/12

M eeting adjourned at 9:00 p.m.

HRCCS Governance Council meetings will normally be held the first Thursday of the
month, August – June. Special M eetings may be called anytime with proper notice.

Accommodating Those Individuals with Special Needs – In compliance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, the Newcastle Elementary School District encourages those with disabilities to
participate fully in the public meeting process. If you have a special need in order to allow you to attend or
participate in our public meetings, please contact our office well in advance of the regular meeting you wish
to attend so that we may make every reasonable effort to accommodate you.

Minutes	
  Prepared	
  by	
                                     Approved	
  by	
  the	
  Governance	
  
                                                                Council	
  on	
  February	
  12,	
  2012	
  
	
  
	
  
________________________________	
  	
        	
       	
       ____________________________________	
  
Cathy	
  Shaeffer	
     	
         	
         	
       	
       Dan	
  Flom,	
  Chairperson	
  
	
  
	
  
	
        	
     	
     	
         	
         	
       	
       ____________________________________	
  
	
        	
     	
     	
         	
         	
       	
       Jeff	
  Schweig,	
  Clerk	
  



	
                                                                                                             16	
  
	
  




            	
  
	
  
	
  




	
     17	
  
	
     18	
  
	
     19	
  
	
     20	
  
	
     21	
  
	
     22	
  
            	
  




	
     23	
  
            	
  




	
     24	
  
	
     25	
  
            	
  




	
     26	
  
	
     27	
  
            	
  




	
     28	
  
	
     29	
  
	
     30	
  
                   	
  
       	
  
       	
  
       	
  




	
            31	
  
                                                                                                     	
  
                                                        Harvest	
  Ridge	
  Cooperative	
  Charter	
  School	
  	
  
                                              9050	
  Old	
  State	
  Highway,	
  	
  Newcastle,	
  California	
  	
  95658	
  
                                                                                         	
  
                                     REVISED	
  AGREEMENT	
  FOR	
  EMPLOYMENT	
  -­Education	
  Specialist	
  
                                                                               2011-­‐2012	
  
Robin	
  Silski	
  has	
  been	
  hired	
  as	
  Education	
  Specialist	
  by	
  Harvest	
  Ridge	
  Cooperative	
  Charter	
  School,	
  in	
  
the	
  Newcastle	
  Elementary	
  School	
  District,	
  for	
  the	
  2011-­‐2012	
  school	
  year.	
  	
  
It	
  is	
  agreed	
  that	
  Robin	
  Silski	
  will	
  be	
  employed	
  to	
  fulfill	
  the	
  duties	
  of	
  Education	
  Specialist	
  as	
  
described	
  in	
  the	
  approved	
  job	
  description(s).	
  	
  Employee	
  will	
  be	
  paid	
  according	
  to	
  the	
  approved	
  
certificated	
  salary	
  schedule	
  as	
  follows:	
  	
  	
  as	
  a	
  0.5	
  FTE	
  	
  7th/8th	
  grade	
  teacher	
  for	
  Language	
  Arts	
  and	
  
Social	
  Studies,	
  Robin	
  Silski	
  will	
  be	
  paid	
  as	
  an	
  Educational	
  Specialist,	
  Step	
  8,	
  Column	
  B	
  (BA	
  +	
  30)	
  at	
  
50%	
  of	
  $47,695.	
  	
  	
  	
  The	
  term	
  of	
  employment	
  is	
  181	
  days	
  from	
  August	
  16,	
  2011	
  to	
  June	
  7,	
  2012.	
  	
  	
  
	
  
Harvest	
  Ridge	
  Cooperative	
  Charter	
  School	
  will	
  pay	
  Robin	
  Silski	
  on	
  the	
  last	
  day	
  of	
  each	
  month	
  under	
  
the	
  eleven	
  month	
  program.	
  	
  If	
  the	
  last	
  day	
  of	
  the	
  month	
  falls	
  on	
  a	
  weekend,	
  then	
  paycheck	
  will	
  be	
  
distributed	
  on	
  the	
  Friday	
  before	
  the	
  weekend.	
  	
  In	
  addition	
  HRCCS	
  will	
  pay	
  a	
  cap	
  for	
  health	
  benefits	
  in	
  
the	
  amount	
  of	
  $599	
  per	
  month	
  per	
  1.0	
  fte.	
  CAP	
  will	
  be	
  pro-­‐rated	
  accordingly	
  for	
  less	
  than	
  1.0	
  fte	
  as	
  
specified	
  by	
  contract	
  %	
  above.	
  Employee	
  will	
  notify	
  payroll	
  of	
  his/her	
  chosen	
  health	
  plan	
  and	
  
authorizes	
  that	
  any	
  premium	
  not	
  covered	
  by	
  the	
  CAP	
  will	
  be	
  deducted	
  from	
  monthly	
  paychecks.	
  
	
  
Contract	
  Revision	
  effective	
  March	
  9,	
  2012	
  
	
  
It	
  is	
  agreed	
  that	
  Robin	
  Silski	
  will	
  be	
  employed	
  to	
  fulfill	
  the	
  duties	
  of	
  Education	
  Specialist	
  as	
  
described	
  in	
  the	
  approved	
  job	
  description(s).	
  	
  Employee	
  will	
  be	
  a	
  temporary	
  employee	
  paid	
  
according	
  to	
  the	
  approved	
  certificated	
  salary	
  schedule	
  as	
  follows:	
  	
  	
  as	
  an	
  83.41%	
  FTE	
  	
  7th/8th	
  grade	
  
teacher	
  ,	
  Robin	
  Silski	
  will	
  be	
  paid	
  as	
  an	
  Educational	
  Specialist,	
  Step	
  8,	
  Column	
  B	
  (BA	
  +	
  30)	
  at	
  83.41%	
  
of	
  $47,695.	
  	
  	
  	
  The	
  term	
  of	
  employment	
  at	
  this	
  rate	
  is	
  58	
  days	
  from	
  March	
  9,	
  2012	
  to	
  June	
  7,	
  2012.	
  	
  The	
  
total	
  amount	
  of	
  salary	
  remaining	
  under	
  the	
  terms	
  of	
  this	
  contract	
  will	
  not	
  exceed	
  $13,923.	
  	
  
	
  
All	
  other	
  original	
  contract	
  provisions	
  will	
  be	
  in	
  effect	
  until	
  June	
  7,	
  2012.	
  
	
  
	
  
______________________________________________	
  	
  	
  ______________________________	
  
Robin	
  Silski	
                   	
  	
         	
        	
          	
              	
            	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Date	
  
	
  
	
  
______________________________________________	
  	
  _______________________________	
  
Dan	
  Flom,	
  Governance	
  Council	
  President	
   	
                                	
            	
  	
  Date	
  
	
  
	
  
______________________________________________	
  	
  _______________________________	
  
Janet	
  Sutton,	
  Director	
   	
                          	
          	
              	
            	
                                                          	
  Date	
  




	
                                                                                                                                                                          32	
  
Conflict	
  of	
  Interest	
  Code	
  Resolution	
  
	
  
When	
  HRCCS	
  adopted	
  new	
  bylaws	
  last	
  fall,	
  Bylaw	
  9270/Conflict	
  of	
  Interest	
  stated	
  that	
  
the	
  council	
  would	
  adopt	
  a	
  resolution	
  specifying	
  the	
  terms	
  of	
  the	
  school’s	
  conflict	
  of	
  
interest	
  code,	
  the	
  school’s	
  designated	
  positions,	
  and	
  the	
  disclosure	
  categories	
  required	
  
for	
  each	
  position.	
  	
  Placer	
  County	
  has	
  requested	
  that	
  we	
  adopt	
  this	
  resolution	
  and	
  
submit	
  this	
  for	
  their	
  records	
  as	
  is	
  required.	
  
	
  
Conflict	
  of	
  Interest	
  Code	
  	
  
Harvest	
  Ridge	
  Cooperative	
  Charter	
  School	
  
Resolution	
  
	
  
The	
  provisions	
  of	
  2	
  CCR	
  18730	
  and	
  any	
  amendments	
  to	
  it	
  adopted	
  by	
  the	
  Fair	
  
Political	
  Practices	
  Commission,	
  together	
  with	
  the	
  accompanying	
  specified	
  
designated	
  positions	
  and	
  disclosure	
  categories,	
  are	
  incorporated	
  by	
  reference	
  and	
  
shall	
  constitute	
  the	
  school’s	
  conflict	
  of	
  interest	
  code.	
  	
  	
  
	
  
Governance	
  Council	
  members	
  and	
  designated	
  employees	
  shall	
  file	
  a	
  Statement	
  of	
  
Economic	
  Interest/Form	
  700	
  in	
  accordance	
  with	
  the	
  disclosure	
  categories	
  listed.	
  	
  	
  	
  
The	
  Statement	
  of	
  Economic	
  interest	
  shall	
  be	
  filed	
  with	
  the	
  school’s	
  filing	
  officer	
  
and/or,	
  if	
  so	
  required,	
  with	
  the	
  school’s	
  code	
  reviewing	
  body.	
  The	
  school’s	
  filing	
  
officer	
  shall	
  make	
  the	
  statements	
  available	
  for	
  public	
  review	
  and	
  inspection.	
  	
  	
  
	
  
Terms	
  	
  
	
  
The	
  Governance	
  Council	
  shall	
  review	
  the	
  school’s	
  conflict	
  of	
  interest	
  code	
  in	
  even	
  
numbered	
  years.	
  	
  If	
  no	
  change	
  in	
  the	
  code	
  is	
  required,	
  the	
  Council	
  shall	
  submit	
  by	
  
October	
  1	
  a	
  written	
  statement	
  to	
  that	
  effect	
  to	
  the	
  code	
  reviewing	
  body.	
  	
  If	
  a	
  change	
  
in	
  the	
  code	
  is	
  necessary,	
  the	
  Council	
  shall	
  submit	
  an	
  amended	
  code	
  to	
  the	
  code	
  
reviewing	
  body.	
  
	
  
Disclosure	
  Categories	
  
	
  
1.	
  	
  	
   Category	
  1:	
  	
  A	
  person	
  designated	
  Category	
  1	
  shall	
  disclose:	
  	
  	
  
	
  
a.	
  	
  	
   Interests	
  in	
  real	
  property	
  located	
  entirely	
  or	
  partly	
  within	
  district	
  
boundaries,	
  or	
  within	
  two	
  miles	
  of	
  district	
  boundaries,	
  or	
  of	
  any	
  land	
  owned	
  or	
  used	
  
by	
  the	
  district.	
  	
  	
  
	
  
b.	
           Investments	
  or	
  business	
  positions	
  in	
  or	
  income	
  from	
  sources	
  which	
  are	
  
engaged	
  in	
  the	
  acquisition	
  or	
  disposal	
  of	
  real	
  property	
  within	
  the	
  district,	
  are	
  
contractors	
  or	
  subcontractors	
  which	
  are	
  or	
  have	
  been	
  with	
  the	
  past	
  two	
  years	
  
engaged	
  in	
  work	
  or	
  services	
  of	
  the	
  type	
  used	
  by	
  the	
  district,	
  or	
  manufacture	
  or	
  sell	
  
supplies,	
  books,	
  machinery,	
  equipment	
  of	
  the	
  type	
  used	
  by	
  the	
  district.	
  	
  	
  


	
                                                                                                                                    33	
  
	
  
2.	
  	
  	
   Category	
  2:	
  	
  A	
  person	
  designated	
  Category	
  2	
  shall	
  disclose:	
  	
  	
  
	
  
a.	
           Investments	
  or	
  business	
  positions	
  in	
  or	
  income	
  from	
  sources	
  which	
  are	
  
contractors	
  or	
  subcontractors	
  engaged	
  in	
  work	
  or	
  services	
  of	
  the	
  type	
  used	
  by	
  the	
  
department	
  which	
  the	
  designated	
  person	
  manages	
  or	
  directs.	
  	
  	
  
	
  
b.	
  	
  	
   Investments	
  or	
  business	
  positions	
  in	
  or	
  income	
  from	
  sources	
  which	
  
manufacture	
  or	
  sell	
  supplies,	
  books,	
  machinery,	
  or	
  equipment	
  of	
  the	
  type	
  used	
  by	
  
the	
  department	
  which	
  the	
  designated	
  person	
  manages	
  or	
  directs.	
  	
  For	
  the	
  purposes	
  
of	
  this	
  category,	
  a	
  director’s	
  department	
  is	
  his/her	
  entire	
  school.	
  	
  	
  
	
  
***Note:	
  	
  Government	
  Code	
  87500	
  requires	
  public	
  officials	
  and	
  designated	
  
employees	
  to	
  annually	
  file	
  a	
  Statement	
  of	
  Economic	
  Interest/Form	
  700	
  to	
  disclose	
  
any	
  assets	
  and	
  income	
  which	
  may	
  be	
  materially	
  affected	
  by	
  official	
  actions.	
  	
  Under	
  
the	
  PRA,	
  there	
  are	
  two	
  separate	
  categories	
  of	
  Form	
  700	
  disclosure	
  requirements.	
  	
  
For	
  the	
  first	
  category	
  pursuant	
  to	
  Government	
  Code	
  87302,	
  which	
  is	
  applicable	
  to	
  
most	
  school	
  districts,	
  the	
  disclosure	
  requirements	
  are	
  determined	
  by	
  the	
  district	
  
and	
  set	
  forth	
  in	
  the	
  district’s	
  conflict	
  of	
  interest	
  code.	
  	
  The	
  second	
  category,	
  pursuant	
  
to	
  Government	
  Code	
  87200,	
  is	
  only	
  applicable	
  to	
  Board	
  members	
  and	
  
Superintendents	
  who	
  “manage	
  public	
  investments.”	
  	
  Those	
  Board	
  members	
  and	
  
designated	
  employees,	
  referred	
  to	
  by	
  the	
  FPPC	
  as	
  Government	
  Code	
  87200/Article	
  
2	
  filers,	
  must	
  file	
  broader	
  disclosure	
  statements	
  pursuant	
  to	
  the	
  disclosure	
  
requirements	
  specified	
  in	
  law	
  and	
  FPPC	
  regulation.***	
  
	
  
Designated	
  Positions	
  and	
  Designated	
  Position	
  Disclosure	
  Category	
  
	
  
Director	
               2	
  
	
  
Governance	
  Council	
  Members	
                        1	
  
	
  
Disclosure	
  for	
  Consultants	
  
	
  
Consultants	
  are	
  designated	
  employees	
  who	
  must	
  disclose	
  financial	
  interests	
  as	
  
determined	
  on	
  a	
  case-­‐by-­‐case	
  basis	
  by	
  the	
  Director	
  or	
  designee.	
  	
  The	
  Director	
  or	
  
designee’s	
  written	
  determination	
  shall	
  include	
  a	
  description	
  of	
  the	
  consultant’s	
  
duties	
  and	
  a	
  statement	
  of	
  the	
  extent	
  of	
  disclosure	
  requirements	
  based	
  upon	
  that	
  
description.	
  	
  All	
  such	
  determinations	
  are	
  public	
  records	
  and	
  shall	
  be	
  retained	
  for	
  
public	
  inspection	
  along	
  with	
  this	
  conflict	
  of	
  interest	
  code.	
  

	
  A	
  consultant	
  is	
  an	
  individual	
  who,	
  pursuant	
  to	
  a	
  contract	
  with	
  the	
  district,	
  makes	
  a	
  
governmental	
  decision	
  whether	
  to:	
  (2	
  CCR	
  18701)	
  

	
  1.	
  	
  Approve	
  a	
  rate,	
  rule,	
  or	
  regulation	
  

	
  2.	
  	
  Adopt	
  or	
  enforce	
  a	
  law	
  


	
                                                                                                                                  34	
  
	
  3.	
  Issue,	
  deny,	
  suspend	
  or	
  revoke	
  a	
  permit,	
  license,	
  application,	
  certificate,	
  approval,	
  
order	
  or	
  similar	
  authorization	
  or	
  entitlement.	
  

	
  

Adopted	
  3/1/12	
  

	
  	
  




	
                                                                                                                           35	
  
	
  




                      Draft

       HARVEST	
  RIDGE	
  COOPERATIVE	
  	
  
            CHARTER	
  SCHOOL
                      	
  

       EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS
                MANUAL
         March 2012-February 2013




	
                                               36	
  
           THIS	
  DOCUMENT	
  IS	
  OF	
  EXTREME	
  IMPORTANCE.	
  	
  IT	
  
        CONTAINS	
  SPECIFIC	
  INSTRUCTIONS	
  TO	
  BE	
  FOLLOWED	
  IN	
  
          FOR IMMEDIATE HELP ON DISASTERS.	
  	
  REVIEW	
  
        THE	
  EVENT	
  OF	
  REAL	
  OR	
  POTENTIAL	
  LIFE AND DEATH
                               SITUATIONS, CALL 911
        CONTENTS	
  AND	
  KEEP	
  FOR	
  INSTANT	
  ACCESS	
  AND	
  REVIEW.	
  


       THE FOLLOWING NUMBERS ARE CRITICAL TO THE
        SAFETY OF YOUR STUDENTS AND EMPLOYEES:


Director                                  Janet Sutton                              530-908-
4431
	
    	
     	
         	
         	
     	
       	
        	
     	
     530-­‐885-­‐4431	
  
	
  
Administrative	
  Assistant	
      	
     Cathy	
  Shaeffer	
       	
     916-­‐303-­‐3530	
  
	
  
Governance Council President Dan Flom                                      530-320-3707

Maintenance                               Joe Marvel                       530-878-2478	
  

Superintendent/Principal                           Kathleen Daugherty               530-867-
3112
	
        	
     	
         	
     	
     	
       	
        	
     	
     530-­‐878-­‐8284	
  

Business Manager                          Nancy McKenzie                   530-823-1806


                        Newcastle Fire Department 916 663-3323

                 Placer County Sheriffs Office 916 652-2426


ONLY THE DIRECTOR OR HIS/HER DESIGNEE
HAS THE AUTHORITY TO CLOSE A SCHOOL IN
AN EMERGENCY SITUATION.




	
                                                                                                37	
  
                GENERAL EMERGENCY
                   PROCEDURES
       BASIC EMERGENCY RESPONSE GUIDELINES
Harvest Ridge Cooperative Charter School has established guidelines to ensure the care,
welfare, safety and security of all staff and students during an emergency. Staff will be
assigned specific duties to ensure that all students and visitors follow these guidelines.

                        LINES OF AUTHORITY

In an emergency, lines of authority may change. Staff may be requested to
report to a specific staff member or supervisor during an emergency. Staff are expected to
follow the direction of those who have been placed in charge of specific functions
relating to the emergency. All staff are expected to follow the directions of uniformed
responders (law enforcement, fire, etc.) at all times.

                                 EVACUATION

Evacuation Orders:
  1. Clipboard will be posted by each door (including kitchen) with class rosters, red
     and green cards, emergency plan, and map. Clipboard is clearly labeled in large
     print the teachers name and room number. The clipboard in the office will contain
     rosters of each class including PE schedules.
  2. Affected areas will be notified and staff and students are expected to exit
     immediately. Evacuation orders should include the reason for evacuation,
     evacuation routes if possible, and the gathering point to evacuate to.
  3. Provisions will be made to evacuate persons with mobility impairments. Methods
     for evacuating the handicapped and those with language barriers will be contained
     in classroom procedures.

IN THE EVENT OF AN EVACUATION EMPLOYEES WILL:
1. Gather personal and/or emergency equipment;
2. Immediately exit the building by the designated route;
3. Proceed to the established gathering point;
4. Report to the staff person assigned to supervise the gathering point;
5. Wait at the gathering point until given further instructions such as regrouping at a
secondary point or traveling on an identified safe path.

                        ALERT/HIGH ALERT
IN THE EVENT OF AN ALERT OR HIGH ALERT THE STAFF WILL:



	
                                                                                        38	
  
1. Have all students return to the classroom
2. Close all room doors
3. Implement rainy-day recess procedures for all recesses
4. Walk students to car pick-up or buses and stay with them until buses leave and
students are picked up. (This includes walkers as need is determined)
5. Let students use the restroom with a buddy.
6. Report any missing students or unidentified/unregistered visitors to the office


                                  LOCKDOWN
IN THE EVENT OF A LOCK DOWN STAFF WILL:
     1. Lock or secure all room doors with students inside
     2. Lock down all registered guests in the classroom with the students. No one
         may leave until an all-clear signal is given.
     3. Students not in a room will report to the closest classroom with adult
         supervision
     4. Close all blinds or drapes, if possible; cover windows on door with paper
     5. Turn off any unnecessary equipment except teacher computer
     6. Turn off lights if there are windows with no coverings
     7. Place a red or green card on inside of teacher windows near the door to signal
         the accountability of students.
     8. Keep all people away from windows.
     9. Remain as quiet as possible.
     10. Do not leave or release from lock down until notified by administrator.
     11. Use email and/or text message as primary communication
         between staff and office.
     12. Use the School Messenger to contact parents


                        IMMEDIATE EVACUATION
In the event of immediate evacuation, staff shall follow the instructions of
administrator and/or command leader to evacuate self and students to a safe
location. Immediately contact persons in charge to specify location, people/students
in group and await further instruction.

       HANDLING OF POTENTIALLY EXPLOSIVE DEVICES
Should a bomb threat be received or a suspicious object be identified, law enforcement
and administration are to be notified immediately. Administration will direct the
immediate evacuation of the building or areas affected. No one should be
permitted to touch, handle, or move the suspicious object.

            EMERGENCY DATA BACK-UP PLAN
Data that is critical to Harvest Ridge Cooperative Charter School and its classrooms may
be lost in the event of a disaster. The Administrative Assistant is responsible for ensuring




	
                                                                                        39	
  
student, employee, financial, and other relevant Harvest Ridge School data will be
backed-up for retrieval purposes in the event of an emergency.

                     TRAINING AND EXERCISE
Training and exercises are vital to determine the effectiveness of this Crisis Response
Plan. Preparedness activities ensure that the operational concepts outlined are sound and
that personnel are adequately trained to carry out necessary functions during a disaster.
In addition, such testing will provide a basis for the updating and revision of this plan and
for the identification of inadequate resources.
        1. Drills should be clearly stated in plain English before the signal. Example: this
is an earthquake drill, or this is a Lockdown drill.
        2. Practice drills with law enforcement and fire personnel present
        3. Report all concerns and issues to the office immediately following each drill
        4. Practice both the primary and the secondary evacuation procedure
        5. Practice using communication devices (walkie-talkies) between evacuation
        location and main buildings
        5. Practice training drills with other designees in charge to simulate absence of the
        director.

                         PLAN REVIEW CYCLE
The Harvest Ridge Governance Council and director are responsible for ensuring this
Crisis Response Plan is kept current. The following review cycle will be implemented:
1.      By April 1 of each year review and update all aspects of the Emergency
        Preparedness Plan. This review will include legislative updates, updates of
        relevant operational procedures, a review of practical applications, and updates of
        informational materials to all staff.
2.      By September 1 of each year update telephone lists, faxes, emails, personnel
        rosters, resource lists and physical plant changes affecting the implementation of
        the Emergency Preparedness Plan.
3.      At least once per year, by November 30:
            • Ensure that all staff have an updated personal emergency information card
                on file with the office.
            • Ensure that all staff have an updated emergency staff contact list.
            • Schedule one or more training exercises with the staff. Training is critical
                to ensuring the continued viability of the plan.
            • Ensure that changes to this plan are made and distributed immediately.

                      IN CASE OF AN EMERGENCY

Start-Up Actions:
      Assess type and scope of emergency.
      Notify appropriate outside agencies as appropriate.
      Determine threat to human life and structures.
      Implement appropriate desired action from staff.
      Obtain equipment and supplies as necessary.



	
                                                                                        40	
  
Operational Duties:
  • Continue to monitor and assess total situation.
  • Check with staff for periodic updates.
  • Reassign staff as needed.
  • Remind school site/staff volunteers to refer all questions from media,
     students, parents or general public to the administrator or designee.
  • Ensure announcements and other information are translated into other languages
     as needed.
  • Consider areas with additional security/safety needs.
  • Plan regular breaks for all staff and volunteers. Take care of your
     caregivers.
  • Release staff/volunteers as appropriate.
  • Remain on site and in charge until relieved or incident concludes.
  • Compose an announcement to go out to all families relating to the emergency
     using School Messenger.

Closing Down:
   • Authorize culmination of emergency response activities/staff as appropriate.
   • Ensure that any open actions not yet completed will be taken care of after
      culmination.
   • Ensure the return of all equipment and reusable supplies.
   • Ensure that all reports and other relevant documents are completed.
   • Send a final update to all staff.

Recommended Equipment and Supplies for Each Classroom:
Personal cell phones, map(s), disaster response forms, emergency/disaster plan, class
lists, bottled water, first aid supplies, clipboards, pens, pencils, red and green response
card, paper, appropriate identification, flashlights, AM/FM radio (battery), bullhorn, two-
way radio, reading materials for students as appropriate.


Media Release Policy:
The public has the right and need to know important information related to emergencies
at the school site as soon as it is available for release.	
  	
  The Director or designee acts as
the official spokesperson for Harvest Ridge Cooperative Charter School in any
emergency situation. If the situation includes community responders they will work
jointly with the designated staff as the official spokesperson for the incident. News
media can play a key role in assisting the district by releasing emergency/disaster related
information to the staff, general public and parents. Information released must be
consistent, accurate, and timely.

Aftermath:
Remain updated on any subsequent actions taken.
Consult with the legal counsel if appropriate before releasing any information.




	
                                                                                              41	
  
WHEN YOU MUST HAVE HELP IMMEDIATELY CALL 911
	
  	
  
       ♦   State your emergency.

       ♦   Stay calm.

       ♦   Give your name and address. (Give location and directions to your
           site.)

       ♦   Allow 911 communications center employees to direct
           conversation.

       ♦   Be prepared to answer questions in a clear, calm manner.

       ♦   Remain on the phone. DO NOT hang up until the dispatcher says
           that you may.

       ♦   Follow up with your administrator.


DIRECTOR’S ROLE

The Director must:

       ♦   Provide and review all emergency procedures and classroom and/or office
           evacuation plans with the staff at the beginning of each year.

       ♦   Be responsible for posting in each classroom or building, emergency
           procedures and evacuation maps.

       ♦   Be responsible for all on site direction of emergency procedures.

       ♦   Provide emergency drills in a manner that conveys to your staff and/or
           students the importance of following preplanned procedures.

       ♦   Have an understanding of the use of and method of communication between
           school/offices and public agencies in an emergency situation. It is required
           that at least one person be TRAINED if disaster relief monies are anticipated.

       ♦   Secure and maintain an inventory of emergency equipment within the office:
              1.     One battery-operated megaphone (optional)
              2.     Two-way radios (optional)
              3.     First aid equipment and supplies


	
                                                                                     42	
  
               4.     Flashlight
               5.     Phone that does not require electrical power to operate
               6.     Emergency alert radio with back-up batteries.

       ♦   Identify potential hazards and know location of all main gas, water and
           electrical valves and switches. Ensure any special tools and keys necessary to
           operate shutoffs are available.

       ♦   Develop a signal for notifying staff members when real emergencies exist
           instead of drills.

CONDUCTING DRILLS
	
  
Because emergencies strike without warning, life-protecting actions must be immediately
taken at the first indications of such emergencies. There will be no time to think through
what to do.

The essential components of emergency drills are classroom/office discussions,
demonstrations, and exercises designed to help students and/or staff learn and practice
where to seek shelter and how to protect their heads and bodies. Written records of these
activities must be made and retained for a minimum of three years.

Effective emergency drills simulate actions to be taken during an actual emergency and
what to do after such emergency.

DIRECTOR/ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT
	
  
       ♦   Responsible for the use of emergency equipment, the handling of supplies,
           and the safe use of available utilities.
       ♦   Survey and report damage in all emergencies to the site administrator.
       ♦   Direct or assist rescue operations, as required.
       ♦   Control main shutoff valves for gas, water, and electricity and determine if
           hazards have resulted from broken or downed utility lines.
       ♦   Disburse supplies and equipment as needed.
       ♦   Conserve usable water supply if needed.
       ♦   Secure unsafe areas.
       ♦   Keep a continuous written record of crisis with timelines.
       ♦   Locate student and/or staff emergency cards and records and documents.
       ♦   Provide for the safety of all essential records and documents.
       ♦   Attend telephone, monitor radio emergency frequency broadcasts, and act as a
           messenger and carrier as directed.




	
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NURSE/ADMINISTRATOR/ADMIN ASSISTANT/OTHER FIRST AID
CERTIFIED STAFF

♦      Disburse first aid supplies throughout site as appropriate.
♦      Administer first aid.
♦      Supervise administration of first aid by those who are trained.
♦      Arrange first aid and medical supplies.
♦      Ensure that first aid kits are in order at all times.
♦      Keep a written record of who received treatment, the type of injury and the
       severity of the injury.

SITE EMERGENCY CONTROL CENTER (SECC)

The following guidelines are suggested in the formulation of a Site Emergency control
center.

A Command Post should be established immediately after a disaster. This is where
record keeping, communication, and major decision-making should take place. The
administrator should be there. Each Command Post should have a primary location and
an alternate location. An individual shall be named as media coordinator and no
information should be released to media except through the media coordinator.

PRIMARY LOCATION: During drills and after evacuation phase of an emergency, a
permanent center will be set up at a location with easy access to records and staff.

ALTERNATE LOCATION: To manage through the first phase of evacuation or in
case the primary location is unsafe, a second Command Post will be set up near the
evacuation site. (Secret Ravine School or Newcastle Cemetery)

SAFE PICK UP ZONE: Safe Pick Up Zone options include Del Oro High School and
Auburn Fairgrounds as designated by emergency command at the time an emergency
evacuation is needed.

EVACUATION PLAN

Each site administrator or coordinator shall establish an evacuation area for his or her
particular site. If an evacuation alarm is given, a preplanned system of site evacuation
and transportation should be established. If students are involved none should be
released to individuals other than parents without prior permission. Written release
records must be kept to ensure every student release is documented. Provisions should be
made for those students to be picked up by parents. The site administrator or designee is
responsible for accounting for all students after the event.
Once the event has been resolved, evaluate the need to keep the SECC phones staffed to
answer any calls from parents who may have heard of the event and are calling in late or
to locate their children.
	
  


	
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SIGNAL:                              RESPONSE:

(Level 1) Alarm (buzzer, voice)      Leave room; go immediately to your assigned area.
(Level 2) Alarm (voice)              Escort students to secondary evacuation on the
                                     campus. If office buildings are involved, direct
                                     staff to secondary evacuation area.
(Level 3) (voice)                    Evacuate campus and/or office building areas.
                                     Coordinate transportation.

FIRE AND GENERAL EVACUATION

       ♦   Notify fire agency of location, emergency situation and needs.
           CALL 911. (9050 Old State Highway, Newcastle. Cross street Peach
           Lane.)

       ♦   Direct the evacuation of buildings using fire alarms and evacuation routes.

       ♦   During and after the evacuation the teacher must account for every student
           and staff person in his or her classroom. The Site Administrator is responsible
           for accounting for all building occupants.

           Signal and Exit
           1. Signal is a loud, beeping tone on outside buzzers and inside speakers.
           2. Students and staff are to exit the buildings via the posted routes. Close
               classroom doors but leave unlocked.
           3. Staff is required by Code to take roll upon reaching the designated
               assembly area. Account for all students and staff using the green and red
               cards.
           4. Non-assigned staff is to report to the office to receive an emergency
           assignment.

       ♦   Administrative staff and designee should assist local fire and rescue crews
           with utility location determinations.

       ♦   Staff members shall report any injuries to administrators and administer first
           aid if necessary.

       ♦   Sound “all clear” when emergency is cleared and return teachers and students
           to their classrooms and/or staff to their workstations.

EARTHQUAKE

Students and staff should follow “duck, cover, and hold” routine.
	
  
       1.      Signal is a verbal instruction on the intercom.




	
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           2.      Teacher to secure emergency procedures booklet.

           3.      Procedures:
                         Drop and cover
                         Wait for specific instructions from designated staff
                         Designated staff: school administration and office staff.

At cessation of earthquake tremor, assess the situation. Staff should survey and report
damage to the site administrator.

Administrative staff, at the direction of site administrator, shall turn off gas main valves
ASAP.

Evacuation areas shall include Newcastle Elementary, Secret Ravine Schools, and
Newcastle Cemetary. Evacuation routes shall be included in classroom emergency
book.
	
  
All staff members not directly responsible for students should be posted at a safe distance
from all building entrances to prevent anyone from reentry and check buildings to ensure
all students have evacuated.

All missing or injured students and/or staff should be reported to the administrators.

Account for all students and staff via red and green cards.

Be prepared for aftershocks.

BOMB THREAT
	
  
DO NOT USE ANY ELECTRICAL DEVICES SUCH AS RADIOS, CELL
PHONES, OR WALKIE-TALKIES IN AN AREA WHERE A BOMB MIGHT BE
LOCATED.	
  

Staff member will immediately notify the office of any threats. Staff will immediately
instruct students to power down all personal and school electronic devices.

The site administrator will determine whether to evacuate all students and/or staff from
classrooms and buildings, using appropriate signals and procedures.

       ♦        Administrative Assistant will call 911 and report bomb threat and request
                assistance.

       ♦        If students and/or staff need to be moved further away from buildings than the
                regular assigned area, make sure it is done in a speedy and orderly manner.

       ♦        Never touch or move any suspicious objects. Report their location to
                responding law enforcement personnel.


	
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       ♦   Administrator sounds “all clear” and returns students and/or staff to class or
           assigned work areas when clearance has been given by the proper public
           agency.

       ♦   Account for all students and staff.

THREATENING INDIVIDUALS/RIOT/CIVIL DISORDER
* All guests will sign in at the office during school hours and obtain a visitor sticker
* All teachers will provide cell phone numbers to the office.
* All teachers will inform the office of invited volunteers

Administrator/Designee: Give verbal instructions for Threatening Individuals/Lockdown
or Immediate Evacuation on intercom to all teachers and students to stay in their
classrooms and all staff to remain in buildings.
Administrator or Administrative Assisstant will call 911 for assistance and wait for
further instructions.

Staff will turn off inside lights, will lock doors and secure the windows.

Staff will take accounting of students in the class and post red or green sheet, and notify
the office if anyone is missing, or if anyone is present who is not a member of the class
and designate either approved or not approved, using the following priority for
communication:
        1. email
        2. school phone
        3. cell phone

Students who are under the supervision of an adult and are already indoors should not
leave that room.

Students on playground should report immediately to the closest classroom. Classes in
PE or out on the playground, should report immediately to the closest classroom.

If necessary, as notified by intercom or email, teachers have everyone drop to the floor.
The office will notify everyone of the nature of the emergency once everyone is secure
via the following priorities:
        1. email
        2. school phone
        3. cell phone

After threat has been neutralized, administrator announces “all clear”.
If the situation requires room-to-room checks, the administrator/designee or law
enforcement official will provide a designated password if the above three options are not
available.




	
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If problem continues beyond regular dismissal time, instruct staff and/or students to
remain inside until further notice and School Messenger will be used to notify parents of
instructions and procedures for picking up their children.

Sound “all clear” and return all personnel and/or students to normal routine when proper
public agency clearance has been given.

CHEMICAL ACCIDENT/GAS LEAK/EXPLOSION/FALLEN AIRCRAFT

Evacuate all students and/or staff from classrooms or offices using proper signals and
evacuation routes.

Administrative Assistant will call 911 to report the nature of the crisis.

During and after the evacuation the teacher must account for every student and staff
person in the classroom.

If chemical accident is off campus but will affect school or office site, move students
and/or staff upwind or crosswind of the fumes or as directed by emergency coordinator.

All staff should be directed to their pre-assigned responsibility as outlined in the General
Emergency Procedures Section.

Report all injured students and/or staff to the school nurse or designated first aid	
  person.
	
  
If students and/or staff need to be moved further away from buildings than the regular assigned
evacuation areas, make sure it is done in a speedy and orderly manner.

VICIOUS/NON-DOMESTICATED/SUSPECTED RABID ANIMALS

Administrator shall, via intercom or whistle, ask staff to direct all students or employees
to move quietly and quickly inside buildings.

Administrator shall direct that all doors and windows be closed and remained closed until
animal has been removed.

Administrative Assistant shall contact Animal Control at (530) 889-7315 of a suspected
rabid animal situation and request their assistance.

School or office personnel should not attempt to capture or interfere with the animal in
any way.

Administrator reports “all clear” when animal has been removed.

TORNADO/SEVERE STORM



	
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♦      Administrator will, via the intercom, direct that windows, blinds and drapes be
       closed.
♦      Have everyone remain inside with their backs to the windows and as far away
       from the exterior windows as possible.
♦      Evacuate classrooms or offices that bear full force of wind.
♦      If the storm continues beyond regular dismissal time, students, instructors, and/or
       staff shall be held inside until notified by the site administrator.
♦      Notify the proper public agency of any emergency caused by the windstorm and
       of any service required.
♦      All teachers, students, and/or staff should stay in the building until further
       instructions are issued.
♦      Keep radios tuned to local station and follow emergency instructions.
♦      Administrator instructs staff to shut off all utilities at main power switch and close
       the main gas valve if evacuation from school and/or office appears necessary.
♦      Administrator directs evacuation of campus and/or buildings if necessary.
♦      Administrator and teachers account for all students and staff.

	
  
	
  




	
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