WILLAMETTE UNIVERSITY

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					                                      WILLAMETTE UNIVERSITY
                                 Atkinson Graduate School of Management

COURSE NUMBER: GSM 660                                   TERM/YEAR: Fall 2007

COURSE TITLE: Research for Marketing Decisions

INSTRUCTOR:          Debra J. Ringold, Ph.D.
                     Office: 103 Seeley G. Mudd Building

                     Office Phone: 503-370-6125
                     Office Fax: 503-370-3011
                     Home Phone: 541-752-1058
                     Home Fax: 541-752-1160

TIME/PLACE:          Monday 3:00 to 5:50 p.m. 204 Mudd Building

OFFICE HOURS:        Monday 1:00 to 2:30 p.m.
                     and by appointment on Friday

PREREQUISITES: Core

REQUIRED TEXT (available at the bookstore):

Churchill, Gilbert A. and Dawn Iacobucci (2005), Marketing Research: Methodological Foundations, Ninth
Edition, Mason, Ohio: South-Western.

REQUIRED CASES (available from universityreaders.com):

Lovelock, C.H. and P.P. Merliss (1983), "American Repertory Theatre," Harvard Business School case number
9-580-133, 28p.

Yips, G.S. and J.R. Williams (1985), "Vicks Health Care Division: Project Scorpio (B and B1)," Harvard
Business School case numbers 9-582-040 and 9-582-041, 18p and 4p, respectively.

REQUIRED ARTICLES (available from universityreaders.com):

Tybout, Alice M. and Gerald Zaltman (1974), “Ethics in Marketing Research: Their Practical Relevance,”
Journal of Marketing Research, 11 (November), 357-368.

Day, Robert L. (1975), “A Comment on Ethics in Marketing Research,” Journal of Marketing Research, 12
(May), 232-233.

Tybout, Alice M. and Gerald Zaltman (1975), “A Reply to Comments on Ethics in Marketing Research: Their
Practical Relevance,” Journal of Marketing Research, 12 (May), 234-237.

Frey, Cynthia J. and Thomas C. Kinnear (1979), “Legal Constraints and Marketing Research: Review and Call
to Action,” Journal of Marketing Research, 16 (August), 295-302.
Hunt, Shelby D., Lawrence B. Chonko, and James B.Wilcox (1984), “Ethical Problems of Marketing
Researchers, Journal of Marketing Research, 21 (August), 309-324.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Marketing professionals work in information rich environments and their capacity
to add value to their organizations is determined by their ability to generate, interpret, and utilize information.
Marketing research is a set of techniques and principles for systematically collecting, recording, analyzing, and
interpreting data that can aid decision makers who are involved with marketing goods, services, or ideas. The
task of marketing research is to provide information which reduces uncertainty in the decision making process.
Its goal is to shift the basis for decision making from intuitive information gathering to systematic and objective
investigation.

GENERAL COURSE OBJECTIVES: The general objective of this course is to help you become a wise
"consumer" or user of marketing research. General student objectives include the following; more specific
objectives for each topic are provided separately.

Upon successful completion of the course:

1. You will be able to explain what marketing research is; how, and in what situations, the kind of information
it can provide is employed.

2. You will be able to explain how marketing research contributes to a marketing information system or
decision support system.

3. You will be able to describe the research process and the interrelationships between the steps. You will be
able to evaluate the research process undertaken by others.

4. You will know the characteristics, types, and uses of exploratory, descriptive, and causal designs. You will
be able to suggest and defend appropriate applications of each.

5. You will be familiar with the strengths, weaknesses, and basic application of secondary research.

6. You will be familiar with the strengths, weaknesses, and basic applications of standardized marketing
information services.

7. You will know the two basic methods of collecting data--communication and observation--and be able to
articulate the basic advantages and disadvantages of each method. You will be able to suggest and defend
appropriate applications of each.

8. You will be able to evaluate a questionnaire and suggest improvements.

9. You will understand the basic scales of measurement and the analytical operations appropriate to each. You
will be able to identify the level of measurement associated with a variety of data sets and specify statistical tests
appropriate to it.

10. You will be able to discuss the process and evaluative criteria used in developing valid measures of
marketing constructs.

11. You will be capable of evaluating the alternative ways of measuring attitudes and other self-report
techniques across research contexts.
12. You will be able to distinguish between probability and nonprobability sampling, describe how common
examples of each are implemented, articulate the strengths and weaknesses associated with each example, and
determine appropriate applications of each example.

13. You will know how to use sample size determination formulae. You will be able to characterize the
tradeoffs inherent in sample size determination and incorporate into sample size determination factors other than
those explicitly considered in the formulae.

14. You will be able to distinguish between sampling and nonsampling error; you will be able to
suggest/defend methods to reduce both.

15. You will be able to explain the general considerations that underlie the choice of statistical method by
which to analyze data. You will be able to explain how one actually chooses statistical tests and defend actual
choices.

16. You will strengthen your basic understanding of the concepts associated with hypothesis testing. You will
be able to apply these concepts in marketing contexts.

17. You will review, apply, and interpret some of the more important statistical tests for examining differences.

18. You will review, apply, and interpret some of the more important statistical tests for examining association.

19. You will be familiar with industry guidelines. You will be able to identify and understand the complexities
of some of the ethical dilemmas in marketing research.

ATTENDANCE: Students are expected to attend and participate in all class meetings. Please notify the
instructor by e-mail if you are going to be absent. My e-mail address is dringold@willamette.edu.

CLASS FORMAT: Each class period is comprised of a formal presentation by the instructor. Nonetheless,
students are expected to question, challenge, and clarify the material as it is being presented. You might think
of this as a "participatory lecture" format. Thoughtful interaction in class is necessary to the success of the
course.

CLASS PREPARATION: Each student is expected to have read the assigned material prior to its coverage in
class. Lectures WILL NOT completely or exactly replicate the material and/or its presentation in the texts. You
are responsible for all material in the assigned chapters except where noted by the instructor.

EXAMINATIONS: There will be two in class exams. The second is NOT cumulative. Each exam will
consume the entirety of a class period. Each exam will consist of two or three short essays. Please note that an
absence from an exam will be excused only when arrangements for such an absence have been made prior to the
exam and approved by the instructor and/or with a written excuse from a physician. Each in class exam will
constitute 25% of your final grade. Exams and exam keys will be returned and discussed in class. Students
have one week following receipt of graded exams to raise any concerns regarding the score. After one week, I
will not discuss exam scores.

CASE ASSIGNMENTS: These exercises are designed to motivate the integration and application of the major
concepts in the course. The instructor will provide a detailed assignment sheet for each. Students are expected to
strictly adhere to the manuscript guidelines provided. Each case will constitute 25% of your final grade.
While you are encouraged to form case study groups to discuss each case, actual case assignments are to be
completed individually. Upon completion of each case you should be prepared to explain your analysis and
defend your conclusions in class. Each of you will be asked to present your views, in class, one or more times
during the semester.

No case extensions will be granted.

No late cases will be accepted.

COURSE EVALUATION:

First In Class Exam           25%
Second In Class Exam          25%
First Case Write-Up           25%
Second Case Write-Up          25%

The following scale will be used in grading work and in the assignment of the final letter grade:

A              93-100
A-             90-92
B+             87-89
B              83-86
B-             80-82
C              70-79
F              Below 70

CAVEAT: This syllabus provides a general plan for the course. Deviations may be necessary.
                                          COURSE SCHEDULE

Week of                     Topics                                             Assignment

08/27/07                    Course Overview
                            Introduction to Marketing Research                 Chapter 1
                            Alternative Approaches to Marketing
                            Intelligence                                       Chapter 2
                            Ethics in Marketing Research                       Articles from
                                                                               universityreaders.com

09/03/07                    NO CLASS—Labor Day

09/10/07                    Research Process/Problem Formulation               Chapter 3

09/17/07                    Exploratory Designs                                Chapter 4
                            Descriptive Designs                                Chapter 5

09/24/07                    Causal Designs                                     Chapter 6

10/01/07                    Causal Designs Continued                           Chapter 6

Chapter 7 and Appendix 7A in Churchill and Iacobucci (2005) will NOT be addressed in class. You are
however, responsible for the material in this chapter and appendix.

10/08/07                    Primary Data Collection                            Chapter 8
                            Data Collection Instruments                        Chapter 9

                            Review and Synthesis

10/15/07                    EXAM ONE IN CLASS

10/22/07                    NO CLASS—AMA BOARD MEETING

10/29/07                    Written Case Submission
                            Case Discussion

Yips, G.S. and J.R. Williams (1985), "Vicks Health Care Division: Project Scorpio (B and B1)," Harvard
Business School case numbers 9-582-040 and 9-582-041, 18p and 4p, respectively.

11/05/07                    Scales and Attitude Measurement                    Chapter 10, 10A
                            Sampling Procedures                                Chapter 11

11/12/07                    Sampling Procedures                                Chapter 11
                            Sample Size Determination                          Chapter 12

11/19/07                    Field Procedures,                                  Chapter 13
                            Nonsampling Errors,
                            Data Preparation, and                              Chapter 14
                            Preliminary Analysis
11/26/07                    Choice of Analytical Technique     Chapter 15, 15A
                            Examining Differences              Chapter 16
                            Examining Association              Chapter 14A, Chapter 17

12/03/07                    Written Case Submission
                            Case Discussion

Lovelock, C.H. and P.P. Merliss (1983), "American Repertory Theatre," Harvard Business School case number
9-580-133, 28p.

12/08/07                    EXAM TWO Review Session            9:00 to 12:00 a.m.

12/10/07                    EXAM TWO IN CLASS

				
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