labour market report for medical imaging professionals (RTF, 133kb) by J9KRyrqG

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									ANZSCO: 2512          MEDICAL IMAGING PROFESSIONALS

… operate X-ray and other medical imaging equipment to produce images for diagnostic,
monitoring and treatment purposes under the direction of Radiologists and other Medical
Practitioners.
This Unit Group contains the following occupations included on the 2012 Skilled Occupation List
(SOL):
251211 Medical Diagnostic Radiographer
251212 Medical Radiation Therapist
251213 Nuclear Medicine Technologist
251214 Sonographer
Indicative Skill Level
Most occupations in this Unit Group have a level of skill commensurate with a Bachelor degree or
higher qualification (ANZSCO Skill Level 1).
Specialised Occupation Criteria
Long lead time
Medical Imaging Professionals meet the criteria for long lead time, as entry to this occupation
requires a substantial training commitment.
Employment as Medical Imaging Professionals requires the completion of: an accredited university
qualification of at least four years study (full-time equivalent) such as a Bachelor of Medical
Imaging; or an accredited three year undergraduate medical imaging/diagnostic radiography
bachelor degree followed by completion of the National Professional Development Program
(NPDP) of 48 weeks duration; or an accredited two year post graduate medical imaging/diagnostic
radiography bachelor degree followed by completion of the NPDP.
Employment as a Sonographer requires completion of an accredited university qualification of at
least four years such as Bachelor of Medical Sonography combined Graduate Diploma of Medical
Sonography.

High use
Medical Imaging Professionals meet the criteria for high use, showing that the skills which people
have acquired through education and training are being deployed for the uses intended.
Based on advice from Universities Australia, university courses in medical imaging have a strong
degree of match with eventual employment as a Medical Imaging Professional.
Of new graduates employed as Medical Imaging Professionals, 89% had studied in a related field,
such as radiography or medical studies (Australian Graduate Survey, 2010).
As professionals, Medical Imaging Professionals are expected to have a level of skill commensurate
with a bachelor degree or higher qualification. Of those employed as Medical Imaging
Professionals, 91.9% were found to possess this level of skill (ABS Survey of Education and Work,
2010).
High risk
Medical Imaging Professionals also meet the criteria for high risk/high disruption. This indicates
that shortage of skills causes significant cost to the community and/or economy.
Medical Imaging Professionals are required to be registered with the Medical Radiation Practice
Board of Australia.
Sonographers are not required to be registered. However, Sonographers are required to be
accredited with the Australian Sonographer Accreditation Registry.
Medical Imaging Professionals are important to meet government policy priorities. These include
meeting the recommendations of the National Health and Hospitals Reform Commission, Clinical
Training Funding Initiative, and the Clinical Supervision Support Program.
SOL Summary
There has been exceptionally strong employment growth for Medical Imaging Professionals over
the five years to November 2011, up by 83%. Employment is expected to continue to rise to
2015-16. There is almost no unemployment in this Unit Group.

Domestic student completions in Higher Education have grown at a much slower rate over the past
five years with a 12.5% increase in 2010 compared to 2005.

Medical imaging professionals are included on all state migration plans with the exception of
Queensland, indicating widespread demand. According to the Continuous Survey of Australia’s
Migrants, 93% of independent migrants who nominated this occupation were working in it
12 months after arrival, well above the average of 50% for ‘all occupations’. This indicates strong
capacity within the economy to absorb independent migrants in this occupation.

The evidence indicates that the demand for the occupations in the Unit Group Medical Imaging
Professionals is expected to exceed supply over the medium to longer term.
Occupation trends
ANZSCO: 2512          Medical Imaging Professionals

Employment level       22 000 A high proportion of workers (76.3%) are employed full-time.
6 digit employment
(2006 Census) 2512-11 Medical Diagnostic Radiographer 5980
2512-12 Medical Radiation Therapist 1310
2512-13 Nuclear Medicine Technologist 500
2512-14 Sonographer 2130
Employment growth Over the five years to November 2011, employment in this occupation
increased by 83.0% (compared with growth of 10.4% for all occupations). Employment over the
next five years is expected to increase by 15.4%.
Unemployment rate There is almost no unemployment in this occupation.
Educational profile 91.9% have a Bachelor degree or higher qualification.
Vacancies       The Internet Vacancy Index (IVI) fell by 25.1% over the 12 months to November
2011. Vacancies for all occupations fell by 7.1%.
Gender 67.5% of workers in this occupation are female (compared with 45.5% for all occupations).
Labour turnover        Annually, 11.1% of Health Diagnostic and Promotion Professionals (which
includes Medical Imaging Professionals) leave their occupation group, creating some potential job
openings (this compares with 14.2% across all occupations).
Age profile The median age is 33 years and 30.0% of workers are aged 45 years and over
(compared with 38.5% for all occupations).
Earnings        Median full-time weekly earnings (before tax) are $1600 compared with $1050 for
all occupations.
Graduate outcomes Data from Graduate Careers Australia indicate 89.1% of students completing
a Bachelor degree in the field of radiography in 2009 (and who were available for full-time work)
were in full-time employment four months after graduating. While this is well above the average for
all Bachelor degree graduates (76.2%), it is below results for students who graduated the previous
year (98.5%).
Skill shortages Shortages of Sonographers have persisted over the past decade. Shortages of Medical
Diagnostic Radiographers were not evident in 2011, the first time in over a decade. Shortages of
Medical Radiation Therapists have been patchy over the past decade.
Labour market
2512-11 Medical Diagnostic Radiographer
Shortages are no longer widespread (for the first time since 1995), although employers in some
locations continue to experience difficulty recruiting. Between 2007 and 2011, the proportion of
surveyed vacancies filled has risen from 36% to 80% and the average number of suitable applicants
per vacancy has risen from 0.7 to 1.8.
The easing labour market for Medical Diagnostic Radiographers is due, at least in part, to increased
supply from the domestic training system. More than 850 domestic students completed a
postgraduate or undergraduate university course in the field of radiography in 2010 (note, this
includes people studying across medical imaging professions, including Medical Radiation
Therapist), an increase of more than 20% compared with 2007.
Some employers commented that they received a large number of applications from recent
graduates needing to complete their professional development year (PDY), and that there is
sometimes some difficulty providing adequate placements.




Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations (DEEWR)                   January 2012
2512-12 Medical Radiation Therapist
Shortages of Medical Radiation Therapists have been patchy over the last decade. Research
undertaken in mid-2011 suggests that shortages are not widespread in this profession, although
employers in some locations continue to experience difficulty recruiting. Around 80% of surveyed
vacancies were filled and there was an average of 1.5 suitable applicants per vacancy. Employer
and industry contacts suggest that greater provision of oncology services is driving higher demand
for radiation therapists.

2512-13 Nuclear Medicine Technologist
Shortages were apparent over the early 2000s but in 2006 and 2007 shortages were not evident and
employers generally filled their vacancies with ease. However, this labour market has not been
assessed recently.

2512-14 Sonographer
Shortages have been persistent for more than a decade. In 2011 less than one-third of surveyed
vacancies were filled and there was an average of 0.4 suitable applicants per vacancy. More than a
quarter of employers did not receive any applications in response to their advertising. Recruitment
was more difficult for employers in regional locations than for those in metropolitan areas.
Around two out of every three Sonographers are female. A number of industry contacts stated that
the majority of positions advertised in the industry were replacement positions, to cover maternity
leave or part-time positions created to reduce hours for workers with caring responsibilities.

Medical Imaging Professionals Employed Persons Nov 2001 to Nov 2011 graph has been removed
to enable this document to be available to people with information accessibility needs. The image
is included in the PDF version of this publication.

Medical Imaging Professionals Internet Vacancy Index 3 monthly average Nov 2006 to Nov 2011
graph has been removed to enable this document to be available to people with information
accessibility needs. The image is included in the PDF version of this publication.




Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations (DEEWR)                    January 2012

								
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