CREATOR-TO-CONSUMER (C-2-C) INDUSTRY WORKSHOP by Zh4AKU

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									   CREATOR-TO-CONSUMER (C-2-C) INDUSTRY WORKSHOP
                   DEFINING NEW PATHWAYS
            TECHNOLOGY CHANGE IN THE BOOK TRADE
                      Melbourne – Tuesday October 2, 2001
                      Sydney – Wednesday October 3, 2001


                            WORK GROUP SESSIONS

                                   GROUP FOUR

        DRM HAS SETTLED, HIGH PROTECTION COMES AT A PRICE


The C-2-C research revealed that a number of problems are still to be solved by
organisations currently developing Digital Rights Management Systems for the
publishing/multimedia industry. Firstly, there needs to be a universal standard, or
at least a standard of interoperability, that allows systems to interact seamlessy
for the tracking of IP. Secondly, regardless of the technology used, it is virtually
impossible to completely guard against system penetration by ‘hackers’. And
thirdly, there is a need to balance the rights of the creator to due reward for effort,
against the consumer’s rights for access to certain kinds of cultural and
educational materials.

Assume in this scenario that by January 2005 the technological problems have
been overcome to an extent that offers publishers sufficient security to allay their
current fears of infringement in the digital domain. Use the following questions as
starting points for discussion about the effect on the cost of secure transmission
in both financial and social terms.

1. The creator deserves protection for their IP and a due reward for their effort.
   Why should this be balanced against the needs of the consumer?
2. Should we really worry about each and every infringement of rights. Why/why
   not?
3. What types of content are most suited to digital dissemination in a not
   completely secure DRM environment?
4. What effect will DRMS have on the existing book trade business?
5. On a scale of one to ten, what is the likelihood that Digital Rights
   Management Systems will be used by 50% of Australian publishers (both
   small and multinational) by 2010?

								
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