1-10 Goal Statement by HC121002134039

VIEWS: 4 PAGES: 5

									1−10 Goal Statement
Establish a baseline on the number of people served through coordinated
transportation systems, especially rural, and develop strategies to increase the
number served and the number of rides provided for increased access to health care
and other services in Iowa. Baseline: To be identified.

Rationale
Transportation was identified as a barrier to access by the Community Health Needs
Assessment and Health Improvement Plan at the Iowa Department of Public Health.
According to the executive summary of the National Academies Transit Cooperative
Research Program, many rural communities are faced with meager transportation
funding, multiple funding sources and service objectives, limited services, and in-
adequate public interest and transportation in-vestments.

The report indicates that the best strategy is to do the best possible with available
resources while seeking additional resources. Coordination offers strategies to improve
the performance of diverse individual transportation services and overall mobility within
a community. Therefore, this goal addresses rural and urban areas. Coordinated services
may achieve economies of scale not available to smaller providers.

Iowa will address this problem with the development of the state-level Transportation
Coordination Council. This council will facilitate coordination among publicly funded
programs providing passenger transportation services (Iowa Department of
Transportation (DOT) Administrative Rules: 761-910.3 (324A) State-wide
Transportation Coordination Advisory Council). In 2001, the coordination council added
the Iowa Department of Public Health as a member and began discussions on
transportation and access to health care. Transportation is also addressed in Chapters 4
and 12 of the Healthy Iowans 2010.

1−10.1 Action Step
By 2005, complete a survey of transit pro-grams in Iowa to assess transit and generate a
baseline to measure Healthy Iowans 2010 goal 1−11. (An Iowa Department of
Transportation and Iowa Department of Public Health action step.)

1−10.2 Action Step
By 2010, develop and implement strategies to better coordinate public and private
agencies that provide or buy transportation services. The strategies should use or adapt
national coordination models such as the “Toolkit For Rural Community Coordinated
Transportation Ser-vices,” a report of the Transportation Research Board of the National
Academies and/or “Framework for Action: Building the Fully Coordinated
Transportation System” developed by the federal Department of Transportation. (An
Iowa Department of Transportation and Iowa Department of Public Health action step.)

1−10.3 Action Step
By 2006, increase public health providers’ awareness of the state’s transportation system
and the role of the health infrastructure in coordinating services through continuing
education and health-care worker associations. (An Iowa Department of Transportation
and Iowa Department of Public Health action step.)

1−10.4 Action Step
By 2006, revise the brochure, “Health Care and Public Transit: An Introduction”
published by the Iowa Department of Transportation and Iowa Department of Public
Health in 2002. (An Iowa Department of Transportation and Iowa Department of Public
Health action step.)

1−10.5 Action Step
By 2006, distribute the revised “Health Care and Public Transit: An Introduction” and ac-
companying training through public health conferences and workshops. (An Iowa
Department of Public Health action step.)

1−10.6 Action Step
By 2010, create a comprehensive plan to coordinate transportation services with all
stakeholders and demonstrate efficiencies through local best practices. (An Iowa
Department of Public Health, Iowa Department of Transportation, State Transportation
Coordination Council action step.)

4−22 Goal Statement
Expand the role of the State Level Transportation Coordination Council to coordinate
among publicly funded pro-grams that provide transportation. Base line: See Rationale.

Rationale
Agencies that fund transportation need to work together to encourage the enterprises they
fund to coordinate their efforts so the funds can be spent more effectively and the benefits
of public spending can reach all Iowans, including persons with disabilities. For this
reason, a State Level Transportation Advisory Council was established in 1993, but
became inactive sometime after 1996. In April 2001, partially as a result of Healthy
Iowans 2010, the Council was reactivated, but lasted for only about 18 months be-fore
falling into inactivity again.

While the council was active, it met quarterly to discuss transportation coordination, deal
with institutional or regulatory barriers to coordination, and assist the Iowa Department
of Transportation in reviewing compliance with the coordination mandates in Chapter
324A of the Code of Iowa.

Membership originally included the Iowa departments of transportation, human services,
elder affairs, and education, plus the Iowa State Association of Counties. When the
council was reactivated in 2001, the Iowa Department of Public Health, Workforce
Development, and the Iowa League of Cities were added. In addition, the rules
establishing the council provide that additional public or private sector members could
participate. Interest was also expressed in adding consumer representation and the Iowa
Department of Human Rights’ Division of Per-sons with Disabilities to the council, even
though the Division does not administer any transportation funding.
4−22.1 Action Step
Through 2010, continue a minimum of quarterly meetings of the State Level
Transportation Coordination Council. (An Iowa Department of
Transportation/Coordination Council action step.)

4−22.2 Action Step
By July 2005, review council membership and attendance policies. (A Coordination
Council action step.)

4−23 Goal Statement
Expand availability of publicly funded transportation for persons with disabilities
and all others throughout Iowa. Baseline: See Rationale.

Rationale
Increasing the hours of transit service is critical to improving access to participation in
society by people who rely on public transit, which includes a large percentage of persons
with disabilities. In 2000, Healthy Iowans 2010 identified the welfare reform and/or
welfare-to-work programs as providing the best prospect for funding expansion of transit
hours. Eleven transit systems successfully applied for the first round of funding under the
Federal Transit Ad-ministration's (FTA) Job Access/Reverse Com-mute (JARC) program
in 1999, using Temporary Aid to Needy Families (TANF) funds as a partial match. The
number of transit systems establishing new services under these programs increased by
50% as a result of information sessions held by the departments of transportation and
human services, which is consistent with the original Healthy Iowans 2010 work plan.

Every effort was made to ensure that the services provided during the additional hours are
available to all citizens – not just those coming off welfare. This is consistent with Iowa’s
man-date for coordination of publicly funded transportation and the concept of creating
long-term solutions to the transportation problems of former welfare recipients.

Similar efforts would be appropriate to en-sure that the maximum possible number of
citizens benefit from transportation funds through other state and federal programs.

A recent report from the federal government identifies 62 federal programs that can fund
transportation. The majority of these programs typically focus on a single clientele, but
can also be used to help support coordinated public transportation. Transportation
benefits for people are the same whether their transportation is provided by a public
transit system or by a human services agency. However, more members of the
community are likely to benefit from public expenditures on transportation if the services
are provided by, or at least coordinated through, public transit.

An opportunity to improve mobility for all Iowans is lost each time a grant application
for one of these programs is submitted with no transportation component. Maximization
of overall transportation benefits to Iowans that are allowable under the programs falls
short when transportation funding is obtained but used only to establish exclusive
services for the clients of a single program.

4−23.1 Action Step
By December 2005, meet with each state agency that administers funding under federal
programs with the ability to support transportation to discuss the need for expanded
transportation opportunities and to explore the mechanics of using program funds to
support coordinated public transit. (An Iowa Department of Transportation/Coordination
Council action step.)

4−23.2 Action Step
By December 2006, establish a mechanism to anticipate applications under selected
federal programs and to bring program applicants and transit systems together to develop
transportation components which will result in increased availability of transit services.
(An Iowa Department of Transportation/ Coordination Council action step.)

4−24 Goal Statement
Establish a central repository for information on availability of public transit and
human service transportation throughout Iowa. Baseline: See Rationale.

Rationale
Iowa cities over 20,000 population are served by an urban transit system, while rural
counties are part of a regional system where levels of service vary from 21 hours a day/7
days-a-week to one day every other week or less. The web site for the Iowa Department
of Transportation gives hours of service in the largest communities, but there is no central
source of information about the level of service available in smaller communities and
rural areas. Many regional transit systems do not publish schedules in the communities
they cover. A centralized source of such information would assist the public, who may
wish to include transit services when deciding on a community in which to live or when
planning a visit to another community.

The information would also be a baseline to measure trends in the availability of transit
ser-vices, and possibly help in designing programs to increase the availability of services
in selected areas. If information on the availability of transportation services from human
services agencies were also included, the value would be increased several-fold. It might
also assist in securing further coordination between human service and public
transportation providers.

4−24.1 Action Step
By July 2005, survey Iowa transit systems and human services agencies to document the
services available in each Iowa incorporated city. (An Iowa Department of
Transportation/ Coordination Council action step.)
4−24.2 Action Step
By December 2005, survey human service agencies that provide transportation services
to collect targeted transportation information. (An Iowa Department of Transportation/
Coordination Council action step.)

4−24.3 Action Step
By April 2006, publish transit availability data on the Internet. (An Iowa Department of
Transportation/Coordination Council action step.)

4−24.4 Action Step
By December 2005, establish a procedure for periodic review and updating of transit
avail-ability data. (An Iowa Department of Transportation/Coordination Council action
step.)

4−25 Goal Statement
Provide consumer training on requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act
(ADA) for public transit. Baseline: See Rationale.

Rationale
The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) guarantees consumers of public
transportation several rights. To ensure compliance with this provision of the law, people
with disabilities must understand their rights.

4−25.1 Action Step
By December 2006, develop an educational program on public transportation rights in
collaboration with transportation consumers. (An Iowa Department of Transportation/
Coordination Council action step.)

4−25.2 Action Step
By December 2007, present the disability education program in each of Iowa's
metropolitan areas. (An Iowa Department of Transportation/Coordination Council action
step.)

4−25.3 Action Step
By December 2008, develop a customized version of the educational program for rural
audiences and present to at least six rural audiences. (An Iowa Department of
Transportation/Coordination Council action step.)

								
To top