Hearth, Patio & Barbecue Association Searches by 9bN92am

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									      Hearth, Patio & Barbecue Association Searches
                     February 2, 2007
Barbeque Trends
Grilling Out Is In For Super Bowl Sunday **HPBA**
LivinLaVidaLoCarb.blogspot.com
 CarbWire.com and The Common Voice - Greenville, SC
Jimmy Moore
February 2, 2007

Woodstove Changeout
Rebates given on wood stoves Shasta County hopes to cut pollution by providing
incentive to upgrade **HPBA**
Record-Searchlight- Redding, CA
February 2, 2007
Dylan Darling

Outdoor Wood-fired Hydronic Heaters
East Millinocket Company Creates A More Environmentally Friendly Wood Boiler
WCSH-TV - Portland, ME
February 1, 2007
Brian Yocono

Woodstove, burning ordinance considered by city of Shady Cove Council may vote
on issue Feb. 15; county public hearing set
Mail Tribune - Medford, OR
February 2, 2007
Bill Miller

Athens Township: Supervisors discuss future of outdoor furnaces
Sayre Evening Times - Sayre, PA
January 31, 2007
Warren Howeler

Burn Ban
Save the Dunes calls for boiler ban
MICHIGAN CITY: Outdoor heaters release harmful pollution, board says
nwitimes.com - Munster, IN
February 2, 2007
Brian Williams
Grilling Out Is In For Super Bowl Sunday
LivinLaVidaLoCarb.blogspot.com, CarbWire.com and
The Common Voice - Greenville, SC **HPBA**
Jimmy Moore
February 2, 2007

If you are livin' la vida low-carb, then you probably are among the tens of millions of
Americans who proudly own a grill and is firing it up this Sunday just in time for the big
game between the Indianapolis Colts and the Chicago Bears. Are you ready for some
football and food?! Yeah, baby!

Although fans down in Miami at Dolphin Stadium won't be allowed to use a grill for
tailgating this year since it's been outlawed (go figure on that one!), that won't stop
some 62 percent of grill owners from putting some snacks and appetizers on the
barbie, according to the Hearth, Patio & Barbecue Association's (HPBA) State of the
Barbecue Industry Report released this week.

"With millions of Americans cooking on the grill, this popular Sunday is the perfect
occasion to cook up delicious grilled food," HPBA Communications Director Leslie
Wheeler said. "We are seeing year-round grilling as a major trend among Americans. In
2006 alone, grill shipments reached an industry record high, supporting the fact that
more than 60 percent of grillers are grilling year-round."

With a record-breaking 17 million grills sold in 2006 alone, representing a greater than
15 percent increase over 2005, it seems people are rediscovering the joy that comes from
cooking sizzling steaks, vivacious veggies, and just about any other food to throw on the
barbecue! I suppose you can partially credit the sustained popularity of the low-carb
lifestyle for showing people meat is very healthy for you to eat and a grill makes that
meat taste so much better than a skillet ever will.




The Hearth, Patio & Barbecue Association knows grilling

The Arlington, VA-based HPBA is an organization of 2,700 members who are
tirelessly dedicated to providing information, education, and advocacy for anything
and everything dealing with grilling and barbecue. They have certainly taken note
that Super Bowl Sunday is hands down the most popular day for grilling during the
winter months and one of the Top 10 days for grilling all year!

Another reason grilling on Super Bowl Sunday has become more popular in recent years
is convenience, the HPBA has found. It's a fast way to get a delicious and nutritious meal
for your entire family or for a house full of hungry football fans. Now, grilling is one of
the most preferred methods for making dinner in the United States all year long.
"When you factor in the 70 percent of Americans who cite easy clean-up as a huge perk,
grilling for the big game at home is a convenient, no-mess way to pull together a feast big
enough for a football team or a pack of die-hard fans," Wheeler added.

The Hearth, Patio & Barbecue Association has these six tips and suggestions for making
your grilling experience on Sunday afternoon a pleasurable one:

1. PRE-GAME PREPARATION

Plan ahead to ensure that you'll be watching the game instead of still preparing the food.
Prepare the food ahead of time by marinating meats on Saturday. On game day simply
remove from the refrigerator and throw on the grill.

2. EQUIPMENT CHECK

Eliminate a last minute run to the local store for charcoal or propane by checking levels
on Saturday.

3. TRY SOMETHING NEW TO GRILL

Burgers, steaks, and chicken are the most popular foods for the grill, but try some other
appetizing ideas to feed your friends like grilled pizza, grilled veggies and even grilled
fruit (can you say honeydew and cantaloupe?!). Click here and here to find some
amazing tailgate and grilling recipes from the HPBA.

4. GRILLING RECI-TIPS

- Using skewers? Soak bamboo skewers in water for at least 30 minutes to prevent
veggies from sticking.

- Before grilling, trim the excess fat from meat to avoid flare-ups.

- Place vegetables and fruits at the outer edge of the grill to prevent burning.

- When grilling, use tongs or spatulas to move or turn meats instead of a fork to minimize
the loss of juices.

5. FIRE UP THAT GRILL WISELY

Before lighting up the grill, apply non-stick spray on the grates. The protective spray cuts
down the clean-up time afterwards.

6. CLEAN-UP IS A SNAP

For charcoal grills, line the bowl with aluminum foil. After grilling, and once the grill and
coals are cool (as a rule of thumb, always allow coals to burn out completely and let
ashes cool at least 48 hours before disposing), simply discard the foil with the coals and
ash, then wash and reline with foil for the next time.

FIRE HAZARD NOTE: If you must dispose of coals and ashes before they are
completely cooled, then place them in heavy duty aluminum foil and soak with water
completely before disposing in a non-combustible container.

Get even more tips, recipes, and other advice for grilling out on Super Bowl Sunday and
every other day you decide to cook out on the barbecue for your family and friends by
visiting HPBA.org.
Rebates given on wood stoves
Shasta County hopes to cut pollution by providing incentive to upgrade **HPBA**
Record-Searchlight- Redding, CA
February 2, 2007
Dylan Darling


Shasta County will chip in $200 toward the cost of upgrading old wood stoves in hopes
of getting people to switch to less pollution-producing models.

The county Air Quality Management District is offering the rebate to county residents
who replace their old stove with a new gas, pellet or wood stove that is certified by the
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The district also is offering a $50 rebate for the
purchase of gas logs -- ceramic pieces made to look like logs that are set aglow by natural
gas -- for existing fireplaces.

The district has $40,000 to spend on the program, which runs until March 31, said Ross
Bell, district manager. "(It's) a little bit of an incentive to push people toward upgrading
their wood stoves," Bell said.

Wood stoves and fireplaces are the second-biggest source of particulate air pollution --
tiny pieces of dirt, ash or other material, Bell said. The main source is unpaved roads,
which eject plumes of dust when cars and trucks roll over them.

About 10,000 people in Shasta County have wood stoves or fireplaces in their homes,
according to the U.S. Census' American Housing Survey done in 2005.

The newer, EPA-certified wood stoves produce half the pollution of their older
counterparts, he said. While old models would spew about 30.5 pounds of pollution per
ton of wood burned, the newer stoves emit 15 pounds per ton burned. And, stoves that
burn wood pellets or natural gas are even more efficient, Bell added.

There might also be more incentive offered by dealers to get a more-efficient stove, he
said. "Quite a few of the dealers also have rebates similar (to the district's)," Bell said.

The Hearth, Patio and Barbecue Association, an international trade association, also is
offering $150 to $200 to homeowners who turn in an uncertified wood stove or upgrade
their fireplaces, according to the district. Those looking to get the rebates must register
with the district.

New wood stoves cost between $999 and $2,500, said Danielle King, a sales worker at
California Stove and Supply in Redding.

"It all depends on the looks and the heat output," she said.
East Millinocket Company Creates A More Environmentally Friendly Wood Boiler
WCSH-TV - Portland, ME
February 1, 2007
Brian Yocono

Outdoor wood boilers are getting a lot of attention, both as an alternative for home
heating and because of their air pollution levels. Black Bear Boilers, LLC helped shape
new emissions standards for outdoor wood boilers.

Black Bear Boilers in East Millinocket has created an outdoor wood boiler producing as
much as one-thirtieth the amount of pollution as other outdoor wood boilers. The
company worked with the EPA to create a voluntary to encourage more companies to
build cleaner burning boilers.

"The bottom chamber looks like an inferno," says Daniel Cram, Black Bear Boilers
Marketing Director. "What that's doing is burning the wood gas and smoke that normally
goes up the chimney, where 40 percent of the heat is lost."

The Maine Lung Association and several other environmental agencies are interested in
the Black Bear product.
Woodstove, burning ordinance considered by city of Shady Cove Council may vote
on issue Feb. 15; county public hearing set
Mail Tribune - Medford, OR
February 2, 2007
Bill Miller

SHADY COVE — The city is considering an ordinance that would ban all open burning
within city limits and require wood-burning stoves to be certified.

Councilman Gary Hughes, who proposed the ordinance in mid-January, said this is a vital
step toward improving the environment and protecting the city from a potentially
devastating fire.

"We live in the middle of a forest," he said. "We need to be proactive and do the best that
we can to keep our city safe, and we need to be able to breathe good air."

Hughes invited Anna Kemmerer, environmental specialist with the Department of
Environmental Quality, and Daniel Hough, Jackson County environmental health
specialist, to provide information to the council during its Thursday study session.

"Open burning is a huge contributor to air pollution in our valley," said Kemmerer, "and
even though Shady Cove isn't within the DEQ's Medford pollution boundaries, what you
do in your air contributes to the entire area's problem."

She added, "Medford and Jacksonville have had ordinances on the books for quite some
time now, and nearly all of the other cities within the county are considering a ban."

Another part of Hughes' proposal is a requirement that non-certified woodstoves be
removed and replaced with certified stoves whenever a home is sold within the city. The
Jackson County Board of Commissioners is considering a similar ordinance.

"Remember," said Kemmerer, "the county's ordinance may not have jurisdiction within
your city limits, and so that's why you need to adopt your own."

All cities in Jackson County except Shady Cove, Eagle Point and Ashland have already
adopted similar ordinances, she said.

"The point is that we need to get rid of these inefficient non-certified stoves and replace
them with a certified or pellet stove."

Council member Lois Holland turned the discussion toward enforcement and wondered
how someone could tell from the outside whether a stove was not certified.

"There wouldn't be smoke coming out of a certified woodstove except at startup," said
Hough. "Once a certified woodstove is hot it's almost completely combusting smoke
particles. All you'll see is heat waves."
Hough said the county can fine up to $600 per day for violations of open burning or
woodstove violations, but that didn't apply within a city limit.

"We're trying to work with cities and address these kinds of violations. Obviously, it's
common air and we need to get everyone on board," he said.

Former Shady Cove Mayor Tom Anderson said he supported an open-burning ban and
noted that the city already has a burning ordinance on the books.

"It doesn't go so far as to prohibit it," he said, "but it is pretty restrictive and has fines of
$500 per incident."

Hughes said he hopes to have an ordinance ready for a vote by the council's next meeting,
6:30 p.m. Feb. 15 at Shady Cove City Hall.

The county's public hearing on a woodstove ordinance will begin at 9:30 a.m. Wednesday
at the Jackson County Courthouse auditorium, 10 S. Oakdale Ave., Medford.
Athens Township: Supervisors discuss future of outdoor furnaces
Sayre Evening Times - Sayre, PA
January 31, 2007
Warren Howeler

ATHENS TOWNSHIP - The Athens Township Supervisors Wednesday directed
Township Attorney Jeffrey Osmond to draft a proposed ordinance that, if adopted, would
ban the installation of new outdoor furnaces within the residential-suburban zoned area of
the township.

Any outdoor furnaces that are currently within that zoned area of the township would be
grandfathered in within the proposed ordinance.

That specific area of the township consists of the residential housing located between the
Chemung and Susquehanna rivers.

In addition, the proposed ordinance would also create setback limits for the installation of
any outdoor furnace as 50 feet from any neighboring structure in the remaining areas of
the township; and the height of the furnace's stack needs to be 20 feet from the ground.

The proposed ordinance would also call for any homeowner who currently utilizes an
outdoor furnace to heat their home to retrofit their existing stack to 20 feet.

The proposed ordinance would also call for residents who wish to install a new outdoor
furnace to acquire a building permit and have it inspected, and residents would only be
allowed to burn what the manufacturer allows within these devices.

The subject of outdoor furnaces was discussed by the supervisors for nearly an hour
Wednesday night.

The board was joined by over 30 local residents, many of which commented on this
issue.

Several residents noted that they rely on their outdoor furnace as a source of heating their
homes and didn't believe that the township should be regulating how a person heats their
residence.

Only one resident stated during Wednesday's session that they were in favor of a ban on
these devices within the highly populated areas of the township.

Art Kocen - who has appeared before the supervisors before to criticize outdoor furnaces
- stated that these devices are a large source of pollution.

Several other municipalities have banned the installation of outdoor furnaces within their
boundaries and Canton Borough has made it so restrictive for residents to install one of
these devices that the municipality has essentially banned them.
Supervisor Jack Walter voiced his displeasure regarding this entire situation regarding
outdoor furnaces, stating that he has not heard any complaints from residents about these
devices.

“If I felt that this was more of a problem in the area, I would be more excited than I am,”
said Supervisor Jack Walter. “But honest to gosh, I think we're doing a lot to do about
nothing sometimes. I mean every one of us here drove in a car. There isn't a damn
polluting thing worse than those cars out there, only the trouble is you don't see it, but
you're breathing it and it is carbon monoxide, which is more (poisonous) than wood
smoke is, and we're not doing a damn thing about the cars out there.”

Osmond said he would have a draft ordinance to present to the supervisors for their
review at their Feb. 28 meeting.
Save the Dunes calls for boiler ban
MICHIGAN CITY: Outdoor heaters release harmful pollution, board says
nwitimes.com - Munster, IN
February 2, 2007
Brian Williams


MICHIGAN CITY | Outdoor wood-fired boilers should not be permitted to fill the
region's air with unregulated emissions, the Save the Dunes board of directors said.

The board voted Wednesday to call for a ban on the distribution and use of new and
existing boilers in municipalities across Northwest Indiana.

"Clean air is essential to the health and economic vitality of Northwest Indiana residents
and business interests," board President Susan MiHalo said.

Short-term exposure to smoke from the boilers can cause shortness of breath, coughing,
and eye, nose, throat and lung irritation, according to a board statement. Long-term
exposure could lead to asthma, cancer and heart and lung disease.

Emissions from the boilers contain particulates, benzene, carbon monoxide, chlorinated
dioxins and other substances, the board said.

A model rule released this week by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency intends to
help states and local agencies in adopting requirements to reduce emissions from the
equipment, which the agency refers to as "outdoor hydronic heaters."

The Dunes board cited a March 2006 study that concluded that outdoor wood-fired
boilers could put almost 900,000 tons of particulate matter into the atmosphere by 2010.

								
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