HOM 5306 SYL SP09 by Sk6813Vm

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									    HOM 5306 / HOM 1: Introduction to Health Systems Management
Professor: Dr. Timothy Huerta
Semester: Spring 2009
Meeting Room: ACB 240
Class Time: T 5:30 - 8:20
                                         COURSE INFORMATION

COURSE DESCRIPTION
    1.     The course presents selected concepts and methods from management practices that are useful in
         healthcare settings. Topics concerning policy, organizational structure, finance, budgeting, managerial
         epidemiology, human resources, negotiation and others are presented.
COURSE OBJECTIVES
    1.     The objective of this course is to provide students interested in healthcare organizations an opportunity to
         learn fundamental concepts and methods from management practices. In addition, the course provides an
         opportunity for the student to practice the use of these methods for leadership decision making.
COURSE TEXTS
    1.     Required reading assignments are available through WebCT.



                                      COURSE CONTENT ONLINE
1.Professions, Careers and Sectors
  a.Doctors/Physicians
    i.Primary Care Physicians (Family Practice)
    ii.Specialty Care/Specialists
    iii.Medical Education and Workforce issues
  b.Nurses
    i.Nursing Licensure (DNP/MSN/BSN/RN/LVN)
    ii.Nurse Practitioner
    iii.Medical Education and Workforce issues
  c.Allied Health professionals
    i.Physical Therapists/Occupational Therapists
    ii.Speech/Language Therapists
  d.Administrative Professions
    i.Operations
    ii.Materials management (GPOs)
    iii.Finance and accounting (billing and coding)
    iv.Information technology
  e.Other healthcare careers
    i.Pharmaceuticals
    ii.Medical Equipment Specialists/Durable Medical Goods
    iii.Insurance
     iv.Complementary and Alternative Medicine
2.Introduction to Healthcare Policy
  a.Ethical and moral basis for public health
  b.US health system history
  c.Health policy
  d.Types of Healthcare Organizations
     i.In-patient
     ii.Ambulatory
     iii.Ancillary
3.Managerial Epidemiology
  a.Epidemiological trends since the 19th century and into the future – Their impact on the health care system
(comprehension).
  b.Basic concepts and methods of managerial epidemiology (comprehension and application).
  c.Metrics in Managerial Epidemiology
4.Healthcare Finance and Economics
  a.Spending workforce and structure
  b.Payment sources and the changing environment
5.Emerging and current issues in healthcare
  a.Community medical school


                                      HOM 5306 Course Time Expectation Policy
      Professor Contact hours:             22 hours lecture
                                            14 hours Community Medical School

      Professional Contact Hours       12 hours one-on-one contact (Nurse shadowing)
      Professional Development Hours   8 hours Fellowship Training
      Non-contact hours:             17.5 hours Computer-based Training
                                       60 hours Homework


OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT (grading)
  15%        Computer Based Training
  15%        Nurse Shadowing
  15%        Fellowship Training
  25%        Final Exam and Co-creation
  20%        Homework / Writing Assignments
  10%        Instructor discretion (class engagement, etc.)
 100%       Total
Computer Based Training (15%): All-or-nothing Achievement Assessment
Due Date: April 7
Notes: Students are required to submit proof of completion to the HOM office. Additionally, students must complete
an online evaluation of the content for each session (7 for this class) within 24 hours of completing each module. The
evaluation can be found at:


http://ttu.qualtrics.com/SE?SID=SV_9RLOSzsJKG5ZOja&SVID=Prod
  Introduction to CBT and e-Learning: Complete all (5 hrs total)
     BSC/e-Learning Curricula/e-Learning Foundations/
       SkillSoft Guided Tour (2.0 hrs)
       e-Learning Foundations/e-Learning (3.0 hrs)


  Introduction to the Industries: Complete all (7 hrs total)
     BSC/Industry Foundation Curriculum/Industry Overviews: Version 2/
       The Health Care Industry Overview: Version 2 (1.5 hrs)
       The Pharmaceutical Industry Overview: Version 2 (2.5 hrs)
       The Insurance Industry Overview: Version 2 (3.0 hrs)


  Working Across Silos: Choose two (5 hrs total)
     BSC/Communication Curriculum/Building Improved Work Relationships/
       Effective Interfunctional Relationships (2.5 hrs)
       Effective Intercultural Relationships (2.5 hrs)
       Effective Intergender Relationships (2.5 hrs)
       Effective Relationships with Customers (2.5 hrs)
Nurse Shadowing (15%): Qualitative Assessment
Due Date: See subnote


Students will be assigned to shadow a nurse for a 12 hour period. The conclusion of that process will require that the
student:
   1. 1.AHPQ Survey
   2. 2.Write a thank you note to their nurse sponsor. The note must be submitted to the HOM office for credit within
      2 business days of shadow
   3. 3.A three page reflection paper on the lessons learned from the experience due within 1 week of shadow, but
      not later than the last day of classes.

It should be noted that students must obtain several clearances, dress appropriately and, as a result of shadowing for
a full shift, go to the event well rested.
Fellowship Training (15%): Achievement Assessment
Due Date: April 28


Being successful required that you be prepared. We take a moment to cover some necessary executive skills
focused on preparing for fellowship applications. This process consists of:
   1. 1.A complete and professional portfolio. This consists of a resume, a letter of transmittal, a personal statement,
      a professional statement, and three reference letter drafts.
   2. 2.Three one to two page fellowship assessments. Using the fellowship directory, students must identify three
      fellowship opportunities they will apply to. The assessments should provide a discuss the strengths of each
      fellowship opportunity, some background information on the organization and some detailing on the nature of
      the fellowship.
   3. 3.Complete a phone interview to be scheduled with Brandy Dalton at the the Career Management Center
   4. 4.Complete a one-on-one professional interview to be scheduled with Brandy Dalton at the the Career
      Management Center
   Final Exam and co-creation (25%): Objective (exam) and Qualitative (co-creation) Assessment
   Due Date: co-creation due 2 weeks before exams


   Exams are 80% co-created content and 20% professor-authored content.
      1. 1.Co-creation requires the submission of 25 multiple-choice questions.
      2. 2.Exams are 75 - 50 multiple choice
   Homework (20%): Qualitative Assessment
   Due Date: TBD


   The specifics of these assessments will be identified through the semester and defined by the professor. Many of
   these will be linked to the Community Medical School.
   Instructor discretion (10%): Qualitative Assessment
   Due Date: TBD


   These assessments will be made by the professor based on participation, active listening and engagement.


                                               COURSE OUTLINE
   The Course Outline provides a roadmap for the content to be discussed during the course and allows students to
   more effectively grasp the volume of information expected upon completion and in future courses.


   1.Healthcare Professions: Understand and manage the roles, authority, and responsibilities of healthcare
   professionals.
      a.Health administration competency model
      b.Administrative professions
        i.Operations
        ii.Materials management (GPOs)
        iii.Finance and accounting (billing and coding)
        iv.Information technology
      c.Clinical professions
        i.Physicians
        ii.Nurses
        iii.Allied health professions


   2.Healthcare Organizations: The organization healthcare systems, including provider categories, payer groups, users
   of health care services, types of organizations, and market trends.
1. a.Public health (knowledge).
2. b.Ethics and the moral bases for public health (comprehension).
3. c.The legal bases of public health (comprehension).
4. d.Spending, work force, and structure (comprehension).
5. e.Payment sources and the changing environment (analysis)
6. f.Types of healthcare organizations
        i. In-patient, ambulatory, and ancillary service organizations
        ii. Focused factories versus Vertical integration (synthesis)
   3.Health Policy:
1. a.U.S. health system history (comprehension).
2. b.International health system comparisons (knowledge).
3. c.The use of political and legal systems to effect change (application)
4. d.The 2008 Presidential Election


   4.Managerial Epidemiology: To understand the concepts and values of epidemiology including key terminology,
   history, and its managerial implications.
1. a.Epidemiological trends since the 19th century and into the future – Their impact on the health care system
   (comprehension).
2. b.Evidence-based medicine (application).
3. c.Basic concepts and methods of managerial epidemiology (comprehension and application).
4. d.Population health status assessment (analysis).
5. e.To develop the skills needed to manage programs designed to impact population health and health risk (synthesis).
6. f.Calculate and interpret key rates, ratios and proportions including, but not limited to prevalence, incidence, mortality,
   SMR, odds ratios and relative risk (application).
7. g.Key statistical concepts including, but not limited to confidence intervals, confounding, reliability, validity, hypothesis
   testing and to critique peer reviewed studies (application).
8. h.Describe and evaluate screening and surveillance programs including, but not limited to, sensitivity, specificity and
   predictive values (comprehension).


                                                        COMPETENCIES
   The HOM Program has adopted a simplification of the competency model, based on the Saint Louis University model
   for Graduate Healthcare education, that students can use to assess and improve their management skills. These
   competencies are continually assessed to continuously improve the quality of the HOM Program.


             Competencies are assessed on the following scale:
             X:No competency expected or demonstrated
             A:Not Competent: I need to be taught about this or I can do this with help
             B:Competent: I can do this
             C:Highly Competent: I can do this with ease and teach it to others


                                          2009 COURSE SCHEDULE
      Tuesday, January 13
          Course and Program Introduction
          Introduction to the HOM Sequence
          Online Syllabus review
          Introduction to Computer-Based Training (CBT)
          Introduction to the Community Medical School

           Introductory Assessments
           SLU Competency Survey
           AHPQ Survey

           Course Content
    The Lingo of Medicine and Healthcare

    Time Certains
    Nurse Shadowing Scheduling - 6:00 PM
    Fellowship Training Scheduling - 6:30 PM
    HOMSA - 8:00 PM
    Meeting: ACB 240, 5:30 – 8:20

Tuesday, January 20
    Nurse Shadowing Credit – No Classes Scheduled

Tuesday, January 27
    Classes Cancelled due to Weather

Tuesday, February 3
    Allergies: Nothing to Sneeze About!
    Suzanne Beck, M.D., Department of Pediatrics, Allergy and Immunology

    Presentation: ACB 100, 5:30-7:30 p.m.
    Post-presentation debrief: ACB 240, 7:40 – 8:20

Tuesday, February 10
    Obesity: The Coming Epidemic
    Patti Patterson, M.D., Department of Pediatrics

    Presentation: ACB 100, 5:30-7:30 p.m.
    Post-presentation debrief: ACB 240, 7:40 – 8:20

Tuesday, February 17
    Is it Aging? Or is it Menopause?
    Carol K. Felton, M.D., Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology

    Presentation: ACB 100, 5:30-7:30 p.m.
    Post-presentation debrief: ACB 240, 7:40 – 8:20

Tuesday February 24
    Class Business: ACB 240, 5:30 – 5:45 p.m.

    Eating, drinking and other strategies to prevent Alzheimer's disease
    Paula Grammas, Ph.D., Garrison Institute for Aging
    Presentation: ACB 100, 6:00-7:00 p.m.

    Professions, Careers and Sectors from a Competency Perspective
    Meeting: ACB 240, 7:00 – 8:20

Tuesday, March 3
    Class Business: ACB 240, 5:30 – 5:45 p.m.

    Snoring: To Sleep or Not, that's the Question?
    Joe Cordero, M.D., Department of Surgery
    Presentation: ACB 100, 6:00-7:00 p.m.

    A History of Health Systems
    Meeting: ACB 240, 7:00 – 8:20

Tuesday, March 10
    Class Business: ACB 240, 5:30 – 5:45 p.m.

    Bugs and Drugs
    Rick Lampe, M.D., Department of Pediatrics, Infectious Diseases
      Presentation: ACB 100, 6:00-7:00 p.m.

      International Healthcare
      Meeting: ACB 240, 7:00 – 8:20

  Tuesday, March 17
      Spring Break – No Classes Scheduled

 Tuesday, March 24
     Collaborative Work Day I: ACB 240, 5:30-8:20 p.m.

 Tuesday, March 31
     Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine: "Gentlemen, we can rebuild him, we have the technology"
     Simon Williams, Ph.D., Department of Cell Biology and Biochemistry
     Presentation: ACB 100, 6:00-7:00 p.m.

      Collaborative Work Day II: ACB 240, 7:00-8:50 p.m.
      Studer Professions (part 1) Report Due

  Tuesday, April 7
      Ethics and Law
      Managerial Epidemiology and Decision-making
      Meeting: ACB 240, 5:30 – 8:20

 Tuesday, April 14
     Collaborative Work Day III: ACB 240, 5:30-8:50 p.m.

 Tuesday, April 21
     Introduction to Healthcare Policy
     Healthcare Trends

      Meeting: ACB 240, 5:30 – 8:20

      Co-creation Submissions Due
      Studer Practices (part 2) Report Due
      CBT Completion Deadline

 Tuesday, April 28
     Fellowship Training Credit – No Classes Scheduled

      Fellowship Training must be Completed

 Tuesday, May 5
     Comprehensive Final Examination – No Classes Scheduled
     Meeting: ACB 240, 5:30 – 8:20

                                           RELIGIOUS HOLY DAYS
A student who intends to observe a religious holy day should make that intention known to the instructor prior to the
absence.

A student who is absent from classes for the observance of a religious holy day shall be allowed to take an
examination or complete an assignment scheduled for that day within a reasonable time after the absence. In such
cases, it is the student’s responsibility to make alternate arrangements no less than one week prior to the actual date
of the religious holy day.

                                         EMERGENCY SITUATIONS
Exceptions to the syllabus are on a case-by-case basis and must be authorized by the instructor. The program
operates under the following axiom:
The Faculty accept reasons. The Faculty does not accept excuses. A reason is something you inform the professor
about before the deadline and an excuse is something you address after.

There are moments where such notice cannot be offered. In these cases, the students shall inform the professor with
all possible dispatch. In these cases, the professor shall have the ability to arbitrate these issues.


There will be no makeup exams for any other reason.

                                               COURSE GRADING
Course grades are issued in accordance with the following scale:

                                                        A ≥ 90%
                                                    90% > B ≥ 80%
                                                    80% > C ≥ 70%
                                                    70% > D ≥ 60%
                                                        60% > F
Final course scores are truncated after tabulation to result in a final grade assessment.
The HOM program does not use plus and minus designations.

                                     ASSIGNMENT GRADING RUBRIC
Grading of course material occurs using three systems
1. • Objective Assessments
2. • Achievement-Oriented Grading
3. • Qualitative Assessment

Objective Assessments:
An assignment in which questions requiring a very short answer are posed can be assessed using an objective
assessment measure. These assessments are often in the form of multiple choice, true/false, fill-in-the-blank,correct
and incorrect answers put in a multiple choice or selection format that can be graded using an objective assessment
criteria.

The most common form of this assessment will be an examination or quiz.

Achievement-oriented Assessments:
Assignments that are assessed by degree of completion are deemed achievement-oriented assessments. These
assessments come in two varieties.
1. •The all or nothing assessment requires completion of material to obtain credit. Partial credit is not allowed. For
   example, an assignment requiring the completion of a certain computer-based training (CBT) module.
2. •The sliding scale assessment allows the student to determine their grade by establishing a benchmark for full
   credit and then evaluating participation based on that assessment. For example, an assignment requiring the
   completion of a certain number of hours of CBT training. Extra credit does not accrue for exceeding the
   benchmark.

Qualitative Assessments
An assignment in which detailed information is obtained about complex issues, sensitive topics or life experiences are
posed are generally posed in qualitative format. The answer provides a deeper understanding than can be assessed
through a simple objective assessment.
The most common form of this assessment will be a paper or essay exam.


Qualitative submissions are graded according to the following rubric:

100%
Content is insightful. It addresses the assignment in a way that indicates comprehension and control over the
assignment as well as an understanding of the underlying issues. Major concepts as present in the literature are
addressed. Message is communicated clearly, concisely, and directly with occasional faculty assistance. There is a
confidence in the presented evidence. Meets deadline.
THIS IS A PASSING GRADE FOR GRADUATE STUDY.

80%
Content meets and, at times, exceeds the basic requirement of the assignment. It addresses the assignment in a way
that indicates comprehension of the assignment and a basic understanding of the underlying issues. Some of the
major concepts present in the literature are missing. Message, for the most part, is communicated clearly, concisely,
and directly. Frequent faculty assistance required. There is confidence in the presented evidence. Meets deadline.
THIS IS A PASSING MARK FOR GRADUATE STUDY.

60%
Content offers little insight into the greater issues of the assignment, meeting only the very basic requirements. Major
concepts in the literature are missing. Message, for the most part, is communicated clearly, concisely, and directly.
Constant/continued faculty assistance required. There is doubt about the presented evidence. Fails to meet deadline
by greater than 72 hours.
THIS IS A FAILING MARK FOR GRADUATE STUDY.

40%
Content offers no insight into the greater issues of the assignment, only partially meeting the very basic requirements.
Major concepts in the literature are missing. Additional revision required to clearly communicate the message.
Constant/continued faculty assistance required. Student fails to initiate or maintain contact with faculty. There is doubt
about the presented evidence. Fails to meet deadline by greater than one week.
THIS IS A FAILING MARK FOR GRADUATE STUDY.

Less than 40%
Content offers no insight into the greater issues of the assignment. Basic requirements are not met. Major concepts in
the literature are missing. The message is not communicated clearly, concisely, or directly. Constant/continued
faculty assistance required. Student fails to initiate or maintain contact with faculty. There is doubt about the
presented evidence. Fails to meet deadline by greater than one week.
THIS IS A FAILING MARK FOR GRADUATE STUDY.

                                      MINIMUM TECHNOLOGY SETUP
The HOM program has a required computer specification:

A Intel Core 2 Duo processor-enabled laptop
  Recommended: Apple MacBook or MacBook Pro

A high resolution webcam
  Built-in on the Mac
  Logitech QuickCam Pro 9000 for Windows

A Skype account
Microsoft Office 2007/2008
Built-in wireless networking

                                     STUDENTS WITH SPECIAL NEEDS
The university is committed to the principle that in no aspect of its programs, shall there be differences in the
treatment of persons because of race, creed, national origin, age, sex, or disability and that equal opportunity and
access to facilities shall be available to all. If you require special accommodations in order to participate, please
contact the instructor at (806) 742-1236. Students should present appropriate verification from Student Disability
Services. No requirement exists that accommodations be made prior to completion of this approved university
process.

                                       ACADEMIC INTEGRITY POLICY
The integrity and reputation of the Texas Tech University and Texas Tech University Health Science Centers depend
on the honesty of the entire academic community in all of its endeavors. This implies that the Institutions’ faculty,
students, administration and staff are willing to adhere to and uphold the code of academic conduct.

Students are expected to represent themselves honesty in all work submitted for academic purposes. When a
student puts his or her name on any material submitted as an academic assignment, he or she vouches that both the
content of the assignment and the process through which the assignment was produced conform to the standards of
the code of academic conduct. This principle applies to all forms of academic assignments including, but not limited
to, papers, tests, homework assignments, artistic productions, laboratory reports, presentations, and computer
programs.

Any action that indicates a lack of academic honesty and integrity shall be considered a violation of the code of
academic conduct. Examples of violations include:

Cheating: Unauthorized giving, receiving, or use of material or information in academic assignments, or the attempt
to do so.

Plagiarism: Use of ideas, data or specific passages of another person’s work that is unacknowledged or falsely
acknowledged. Any paraphrasing or quotation must be appropriately acknowledged.

Falsification of Research: Fraudulent or deceptive generation of data or the knowing use of data gathered in such a
manner.

Unauthorized Collaboration: Unauthorized collaboration in the performance of course assignments.

Multiple Submissions: Presentation of the same assignment for credit in two distinct courses without prior approval.

Misrepresentation: Performance of an academic assignment on behalf of another student.

Falsification of Academic Records: Forging the signature of either an instructor or advisor on registration, course
waiver, capstone, or change of grade forms.

False Testimony: Knowingly presenting false accusations or false testimony before the honor board or its
representatives.
Improper Disclosure- Failure of an Honor Board member to maintain the strict confidentiality of honor board
proceedings
The Academic Integrity policy is from the Texas Tech Student Handbook. For more information, go to the Texas
Tech Student Handbook, 2008-2009, Code of Student Conduct, Part IX, Section B, Item Number 3.If you have
questions about the academic integrity policy/honor code, speak with:
•your faculty advisor, or
•the course instructor.

                                 COURSE TIME COMMITMENT POLICY
The HOM program has adopted a course time expectation policy. A unit in the HOM curriculum, based on adapted
university policy. In courses with a CBT component, credit is only offered for complete sections or complete sub-
sections where authorized.

General HOM Course Time Expectation Policy (based on a 3-unit course)
Contact hours:43.5 in-course contact hours
Non-contact hours:115 out-of-course hours

Specific courses may have altered expectations. For example:
HOM 5308 Course Time Expectation Policy
Contact hours:30 hours lecture
Non-contact hours:51.5 hours

Mandatory Computer-based Training
  Business Certifications/Six Sigma
    /Six Sigma Green Belt Certification (SSGB)/ (35 hrs.)
  BSC/Project Management Curriculum
    /Project Management for Non-Project Managers (12.5 hrs)
  BSC/Desktop Curriculum/Microsoft Visio: Getting Started (2 hrs)
  BSC/Desktop Curriculum/Microsoft Visio: Up and Running (2 hrs)

Selective Sections (100% = 25 hours)
  BSC/Communication Curriculum
    /Effective Use of Feedback for Business (20 hrs)
    /The Effective Business Meeting (11 hrs)
    /Working with and Managing Difficult People (9 hrs)
    /How to Write an Effective Internal Business Case (8 hrs)

  BSC/Management Curriculum
    /Advanced Management Skills (17 hrs)
    /Effective Delegation (7 hrs)

  BSC/Team Building Curriculum
    /Participating in Teams (11 hrs)

60 hours Homework
  Desk Audit and Relationship Budgeting
  Key Performance Indicators
  Change Program
  Exam Co-creation
  Mid-term and Final Examination
                                            HOM CORE COVENANT
A Core Covenant articulates the central values of a team, and drive expectations for action and interaction.
Covenants are promises. A Core Covenant is a promise made among individuals of mutual expectations.
Good covenants bind people together, create an equal footing, help people take care of their responsibilities and
create the foundation for teamwork. Every team that has accomplished great things has decided, very consciously,
what it wants to be, what values it wants to represent. Teams with negative values can be successful, but only for a
short period of time.

This covenant defines a mutually developed, consensus-built contract that defines minimum standards for individuals
in the program. It subscribes to the idea that problems should be dealt with personally, first; interpersonally, second;
and by higher authority as a last resort. Dissension, subversion, tirades and drama have no place in a profession or in
the cadre of tools used by a professional.

This covenant recognizes that one of the most significant resource this program will provide is the opportunity to build
relationships with individuals who knows you by your work, who have experience with you in a team and who are in
your profession. Each of you can be each other’s greatest reference – such is the power of professional networks. As
a result, you should perceive each other as clients, colleagues and, in the best of cases, friends.

The essence of a positive core covenant is an affirmative approach to peer pressure. This replaces blame and finger
pointing with mutual monitoring and mutual reinforcement. The HOM MBA candidates have created these standards
to support the kind of environment that will provide a foundation for future success.

								
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