WssA Survey

Document Sample
WssA Survey Powered By Docstoc
					Language Teaching in
    Social Work
  Looking into Latino Growth
   Presentation to WSSA,
        Calgary,2007
               The Survey
• A pilot study conducted in 2004 showed that few
  schools of social work took special steps to
  prepare their students for practice in a multi-
  lingual environment.
• The 2006 survey aimed to assess whether the
  situation had changed.
• The 2004 study included "the old Spanish
  states“ in the Southwest. The 2006 study
  included those states which according to the
  2005 Census data, had over 250,000 Hispanics
  in the population.
                The Survey
• The 2004 survey was sent to BSW and MSW
  programs. The 2006 survey addressed only
  MSW programs.
• In 2004, email letters with an attached survey
  instrument were sent to 84 U and G program
  directors listed in the CSWE web-site.
• In 2006, email letters and questionnaires were
  sent to 121 program deans or directors. The
  survey was broadened to capture the growth of
  the Latino/Hispanic population.
• Responses were received anonymously in a
  web-site.
   Hispanic Population Growth
   2000-2006 in the Selected
             States
• (Pew Hispanic Center Reports, 2006)
State            2005         2000         Change 2000-2005   Percent change
                                                              2000-2005
California       12,534,628   10,741,711   1,792,917          16.7
Texas            7,882,254    6,530,459    1,351,795          20.7
Florida          3,433,355    2,623,787    809,568            30.9
New York         1,807,908    1,509,763    298,782            8.8
Illinois         1,807,908    1,509,763    298,145            19.7
Arizona          1,679,116    1,267,777    411,339            32.4
New Jersey       1,312,326    1,098,209    214,117            19.5
Colorado         895,176      718,956      176,220            24.5
New Mexico       827,940      746,555      81,385             10.9
Georgia          625,382      425,305      200,077            47.0
Nevada           557,370      389,336      168,034            43.2
Washington       546,209      434,747      111,462            25.6
North Carolina   544,470      367,390      177,080            48.2
Massachusetts    489,662      412,496      77,166             18.7
Pennsylvania     488,144      381,159      106,985            28.1
Virginia         440,988      324,314      116,674            36.0
Michigan         378,232      318,285      59,947             18.8
Connecticut      372,718      309,798      62,920             20.3
Oregon           360,000      267,017      92,983             34.8
Maryland         311,191      227,586      83,605             36.7
Indiana          273,004      210,189      62,815             29.9
Utah             264,010      197,315      66,695             33.8
Ohio             253,014      212,007      41,007             19.3
States Surveyed and Responses in
       2004-05 and 2006-07
    2004               2006




                      Responses Received = Numerator
                      Surveys Sent = Denominator
              The Responses
• The response level for the 2007 survey was
  disappointedly low (19.83%). It had been 49% in 2005.
• By state, the following responses were received:
• AZ- 2          NJ- 1
• CA- 1           NM- 2
• CO- 2           NY- 3
• FL- 1           OR- 1
• GA- 1           PA- 1
• IL- 1           TX-3
• MI- 4           UT-1
                  Responses by State
                          UT, 1   AZ, 2
                                            CA, 1
          TX, 3
                                                    CO, 2              AZ
  PA, 1                                                                CA
                                                                       CO
OR, 1                                                          FL, 1   FL
                                                                       GA
                                                                       IL
                                                                       MI
                                                                       NJ
                                                                       NM
                                                                       NY
                                                               GA, 1   OR
                                                                       PA
  NY, 3                                                     IL, 1      TX
                                                                       UT

                  NM, 2                   MI, 4
                          NJ, 1
Respondents by Position
         1
     2




                                     13
8




             Dean, Director, Chair
             MSW Coordinator
             Both
             No Answer
     Importance of Spanish Language
     Competency for Practice by State
    Very Important       Important       Somewhat Important     Unimportant
•    AZ              •   IL          •    MI                  • MI
•    AZ              •   MI          •    NJ
•    CA              •   NY          •    NY
•    CO              •   OR          •    UT
•    CO              •   TX
•    FL
•    GA
•    MI
•    NM
•    NM
•    NY
•    PA
•    TX
•    TX
   Explanations offered for the
importance of Spanish competency
• Large numbers of immigrants with Spanish as primary
  language.
• Border state.
• Frequency of Spanish use for professional practice and
  daily living.
• Pervasiveness of Spanish in the context of the state, the
  county or the specific area.
• Spanish speakers will be the majority in a few decades.
• The context of South Fl, where Spanish “is almost the
  first rather than a second language”.
• High percent of Hispanic families receiving social
  services.
• Increasing recognition of Spanish speakers’ social
  service needs.
                                                      Percentage Range of Agencies Reportedly Serving Primarily
                            10
                                                                   Spanish Speaking Populations

                                          9
Number of Programs Reporting Percentage




                                          8


                                          7


                                          6


                                          5


                                          4


                                          3


                                          2


                                          1


                                          0
                                              0-10   11-20   21-30   31-40   41-50   51-60   61-70   71-80   81-90   91-100   Unknow n

                                                                              Percentage Range
  How do programs respond to the
    needs of Spanish speaking
             agencies
• Connecting students who have language skills
  with agencies that need those skills
• Offering a range, from a course in Spanish for
  social workers, to a certificate, to a full program
• Agencies are obviously already bilingual and
  bicultural in that area and so are students
• Not able to respond because of lack of Spanish
  speaking students in program
• Unable to guess agencies’ needs or having
  nothing to do with field agencies
                                          Amount of Programs Reporting Percentage




                                      0
                                            1
                                                 2
                                                       3
                                                            4
                                                                 5
                                                                       6
                                                                            7
                               0-                                                   8
                                  5
                              6-
                                10
                            11
                               -1
                                  5
                            16
                               -2
                                  0
                            21
                               -2
                                  5
                            26
                               -3
                                  0
                            31
                               -3
                                  5
                            36
                               -4
                                  0
                            41
                               -4
                                  5
                            46
                               -5
                                  0
                            51
                               -5
                                  5
                            56
                               -6
                                  0
                            61
                                                                                                            Spanish




                               -6
                                  5
                            66
                               -7
                                  0

Percentage of Students
                            71
                               -7
                                  5
                            76
                               -8
                                  0
                            81
                               -8
                                  5
                            86
                               -9
                                  0
                            91
                               -9
                                  5
                           96
                                                                                        Reported Percentage Ranges of Students Fluent in




                             -1
                         U      0
                          nk 0
                            no
                                w
                                  n
     Do you have a language
requirement and what percentage
   of the students satisfy it with
             Spanish?
• 3 programs have a        • 100 % of students in 2
  language requirement       programs satisfy it with
                             Spanish. No students are
                             reported to use Spanish
                             in the other.


• 21 one programs do not
  have a language
  requirement
What programs do to capitalize on
Spanish language skills of students
• Re-affirm the value of language skills, to include
  advising, luncheon events, Spanish
  conversation sessions, etc.
• Placing students with language skills in Spanish
  speaking agencies. Some respondents stress
  the importance of choice on part of students and
  some express concern about “exploitation”
• Offering immersion or single courses in Mexico
  or Central America
• Offering a total bi-lingual/bi-cultural social work
  concentration
    Steps taken by program to
  encourage Spanish competency
• Offering ½ graduate credit for UG Spanish
  courses
• Many types of immersion and technical Spanish
  offerings, ranging from single courses to full
  exposure in Spanish speaking countries
• Offering a limited number of full tuition
  scholarships for bi-lingual/bi-cultural social work
• Pointing out the marketability of language skills
• Offering a full bi-lingual/bi-cultural concentration
  which includes content courses taught in
  Spanish and field placement in Mexico
                                      Reported success of the steps taken
                                                  Reported Success of Steps Taken

                                      10
Number of Responses Reporting Level




                                      9

                                      8

                                      7

                                      6

                                      5

                                      4

                                      3

                                      2

                                      1

                                      0
                                           High           Moderate                Low   N/A; D/K; N/R

                                                               Level of Success
Reported impediments to language
      teaching and learning
• Low priority given to language learning in the programs or to
  language entrance requirements in social work
• Scarcity of Spanish speaking faculty
• Faculty conservatism and administrative lack of force
• Languages are not amenable to the fast learning results students
  expect and reluctance to second language learning common in
  social work
• Foreign language departments’ teaching methods and time span
• Incorrect assumptions from some faculty and students regarding the
  effectiveness of short language courses or short study abroad
  offerings
• Conflicting demands for students’ time in a very structured
  curriculum
• No impediments
  Innovations in Spanish language
            competency
• Requesting a faculty member to learn Spanish to
  coordinate the Spanish language and culture
  project
• Three programs reported a full bi-lingual/bi-
  cultural graduate program (or concentration),
  two with a clinical focus, and one with a
  development one
• It was reported that the state legislature in NM
  funds a bi-lingual/bi-cultural program as a
  commitment to the state’s heritage
  Observations and Reflections
• In spite of the growth of the Hispanic
  population in the states surveyed, and the
  expressed concern about language issues
  by educators, the rate of response to the
  survey was very poor.
• In the 2005 survey, BSW programs
  responded with greater interest and
  enhanced the response rate.
  Observations and Reflections
• By far, the most innovative policy is the one reported for
  NM, where the legislature funds the bi-lingual/bi-cultural
  program
• Very impressive are the programs that offer full
  concentrations at the graduate level, particularly those
  that do not report a high level of Spanish speaking
  students in the program (CO)
• Very interesting is a FL report, which highlights the
  pervasiveness of Spanish among students, agencies
  and in the milieu
• The specific regional context of a program seems to
  have made a difference more than the average growth of
  the SS population recorded for the state.
  Observations and Reflections
• The programs that report the most intense type of
  offerings (whether immersion of concentrations) report
  the highest level of success in terms of student interest
  and follow up
• One state with a fairly recent Spanish population reports
  good movement forward
• One program reports students coming from all over the
  country to do their full bi-lingual/bi-cultural curriculum
• In reporting impediments to giving languages high
  priority, programs frequently mention the rigidity and lack
  of room for electives in social work

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:1
posted:10/1/2012
language:English
pages:23