Cardinal Stritch University by 7Hwfk9

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									                                   Cardinal Stritch University
                        Mathematics and Computer Science Department
                MT 103 Mathematics for Elementary/Middle School Teachers, II – 3cr.
                                          Spring 2004

Instructor: Catherine Kiaie
Email: clkiaie@stritch.edu or ckiaie@wi.rr.com
Phone: 414-410-4026 (Stritch) or 414-517-8880 (Home)
Office Hours: by appointment – see sign-up sheet in BH 44

Text: Mathematical Reasoning for Elementary Teachers, Musser, et al, 2001

Required Materials: Calculator with square root and yx keys, crayons/markers, ruler, scissors, tape.

MT 102 Course Description
This is a mathematics content course that is designed for teachers who will be teaching in the
elementary/middle grades 1-8. The content of this course will reflect the Wisconsin State Guidelines, the
Wisconsin Model Academic Standards for Mathematics and the National Council of Teachers of
Mathematics Curriculum and Evaluation Standards. Students will study mathematical processes, number
operations and relationships, geometry, measurement, statistics and probability, and algebraic relationships.

Program Outcomes/Indicators developed in this course
The students will:
     identify key points of a problem;
     implement a variety of appropriate problem-solving strategies;
     communicate verbally to different audiences – individuals, small group, entire class;
     express ideas in mathematical language using written notation;
     write explanations in grammatically correct English;
     demonstrate active listening skills;
     make appropriate decisions about technology in problem solving situations;
     be an active member of a group; and
     be able to read, write, and speak using mathematics in several curricular areas.

Requirements
Class participation and attendance is important. If you miss a class, you are responsible for making up all
of the work both in and out of class. Class discussion and in-class cooperative activities may be difficult to
make up. Assignments must always be complete, well-written, handed in on time and presented in an
organized manner. Late assignments will be penalized or not accepted at the discretion of the instructor.

Grading
Benchmarks – Benchmarking is the department’s way of being sure students demonstrate basic
elementary/middle level mathematical skills. If a student does not fulfill the benchmark, the highest
semester grade a student can attain in the course is a C. In this course, benchmarking will be done as
follows. Throughout the semester, up to 10 quizzes/benchmarks will be given that are clearly marked as
quizzes/benchmarks on which the student must achieve a minimum of 90%. If 90% is no attained on the
benchmark, the student will have the opportunity to retake the benchmark twice in order to achieve 90%.
The retake benchmark will not be the exact quiz/benchmark as the original. Improving a benchmark grade
will not change the grade of the original classroom quiz. Benchmarks are minimal skill competencies but
do not address mastery of all course content.

Grades will come from the following:

Activity                                      Points
Quizzes/benchmarks                  up to     250
Attendance                                    50
Participation                                 50
Graded assignments                  up to     200
Homework                            up to     100
Exams                                         200
Group projects                      up to     300
Final Exam                                    200
Total possible points               up to    1350
Compliance with the Rehabilitation Act of 1973
Cardinal Stritch University and this instructor wish to positively affirm the intent of Federal law, the
Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Sec. 504. Any person in this course who may require alternative instruction
and/or evaluation procedures due to a handicapping condition should feel free to discuss these needs with
me so that appropriate arrangements can be made.

Academic Integrity – refer to your Student Handbook.

Measurable Course Objectives for Mathematics and Methods of Assessment
(All objectives also include Wisconsin Model Academic Standards for Grade 4 and Grade 8)
Upon successful completion of this course the student will:
     1. Apply a variety of mathematical skills and strategies when solving mathematical real world and
         nonroutine problems
              Objective 1: use reasoning abilities (A.8.1)
                   Assessment: group problem solving activities, use the graphing calculator to solve
                   advanced problems, write reflections on problem solving strategies
              Objective 2: communicate logical arguments clearly (A.8.2)
                   Assessment: internet problems, worksheets, exams/quizzes
              Objective 3: analyze nonroutine problems (A.8.3)
                   Assessment: express and interpret problems in mathematical terms on worksheets,
                   exams/quizzes
              Objective 4: explain mathematical concepts, procedures, and ideas to others (A.8.5)
                   Assessment: cooperative group discussion, cooperative group evaluation form
     2. Use numbers effectively for various purposes
              Objective 1: develop knowledge and have an experience with the meaning and development
              of: (B.8.1-8.7)
              a. number sense and numeration,                           g. measurements,
              b. number operations and computations,                    h. rational numbers,
              c. estimation strategies,                                 i. probability and statistics,
              d. geometry,                                              j. algebra, and
              e. ratios, proportions and percents,                      k. order relationships
              f. number theory,
                   Assessment: Exams/quizzes, spreadsheets, calculator/internet problems, cooperative
                   group activities, problem solving worksheets.
     3. Use geometric concepts, relationships and procedures to interpret, represent and solve problems.
              Objective 1: describe, identify and use two- and three-dimensional figures (C.8.1-C.8.2)
                   Assessment: Geometer’s Sketchpad project, compass and protractor activity
              Objective 2: identify and draw two- and three-dimensional figures (C.8.3)
                          Assessment: Geometer’s Sketchpad project, compass and protractor activity

             Objective 3: perform, describe and analyze transformations on two-dimensional figures
             (C.8.4)
                  Assessment: transformation drawing using Geometer’s Sketchpad, compass and
                  protractor
             Objective 4: use the rectangular coordinate system (C.8.5)
                  Assessment: worksheets, graphing calculator and Maple activities
    4.   Select and use appropriate tools and problem solving techniques for measuring
             Objective 1: demonstrate, identify and describe and understanding of basic measurement
             facts, principles and techniques (D.8.1-8.2)
                  Assessment: problem solving measurement task (group activity), exam/quizzes, internet
                  problems
             Objective 2: determine measurement directly and indirectly using standard and nonstandard
             units (D.8.3-8.4)
                  Assessment: problem solving measurement task (group activity)
    5.   Use data collection and analysis, statistics and probability in problem solving situations
             Objective 1: extract, interpret, analyze, organize and display data from statistical
             investigations (E.8.1-8.4)
                  Assessment: worksheets, exam/quizzes, internet problems, statistics group activity
             Objective 2: compare, evaluate and determine likelihood of events (E.8.5-8.7)
                  Assessment: statistics project using the computer
    6.   Discover, describe and generalize simple and complex patterns and relationships using algebraic
         techniques.
             Objective 1: work with algebraic expressions and recognize and use their properties and
             relations ((F.8.1, F.8.5)
                  Assessment: worksheets, exam/quizzes, internet problems
             Objective 2: recognize, describe and analyze functional relationships (F.8.3)
                  Assessment: cooperative group assignment
             Objective 3: use linear equations and inequalities in a variety of ways (F.8.4)
                  Assessment: cooperative group assignment
             Objective 4: work with linear and nonlinear patterns and relationships
                  Assessment: worksheets, exams/quizzes, problem-solving

In addition to the Course Objectives listed above, the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science
has Program Outcomes that students become problem solvers, effective communicators, users of
technology, and team players.

Program Outcomes/Indicators developed in this course
The students will:
     identify key points of a problem;
     implement a variety of appropriate problem-solving strategies;
     communicate verbally to different audiences/individuals, small group, entire class;
     express ideas in mathematical language using written notation;
     write explanations in grammatically correct English;
     demonstrate active listening skills;
     demonstrate proficiency with the computer programs Maple V and ISETL;
     make appropriate decisions about technology in problem solving situations; and
     be an active member of a small group.

Letter Grade Equivalences:         A    97-100                C 74-77
                                   A-   93-96                 C- 70-73
                                   B+   90-92                 D+ 66-69
                                   B    86-89                 D 63-65
                                   B-   82-85                 D- 60-62
                                   C+   78-81                 F 59 or below
Internet Problems
This instructor will be giving you mathematics problems via email that will extend your knowledge beyond
what you learn in class. You will have one week to complete each problem and will receive partial credit
for problems tried but not solved. You are not to work on these problems with anyone else. You must be
able to write clearly and communicate the way you solved each problem. All students must have a working
email address. Late problems will not be accepted.

Topics to be covered in MT 102
Introduction to problem solving (Ch. 1)                 Rational numbers and fractions (Ch.6)
Sets, whole numbers, and functions (Ch. 2)              Decimals, ratios, proportions and percents (Ch. 7)
Numeration systems (Ch. 3)                              Statistics and data analysis (Ch. 8)
Number theory (Ch. 4)                                   Elementary probability (Ch. 9)
Integers (Ch. 5)
Note: Most topics will be covered in this class at a basic level, some more in-depth than others. More in-
depth coverage of the remaining topics will take place in MT 103. The pace of the class will be
determined by the students and instructor alike. This instructor believes that all students can learn
mathematics, therefore, more time may be taken with some topics. There will be many in-class activities
that may take more than one class period to accomplish, please make sure you are in attendance as your
absence could hurt your group grade. Quizzes/benchmarks and exams will be announced one week in
advance and must be taken at the time scheduled. If for some reason you cannot take the exam/quiz at that
time, it must be worked out in advance with this instructor or you will receive a score of 0.
Group Projects
There will be three group projects on the topics listed below. Each project will be handed out with
directions and due dates. The projects will extend your knowledge of the content learned in the course.
Each project will be content specific but will also integrate other subjects such as science, art, social
studies, art and language arts. Lesson planning will be expected. All students are expected to know the
Madeline Hunter Lesson Plan format.
          Numeration systems         Rational numbers             Decimals, ratios, and proportions

								
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