S10 Service

Document Sample
S10 Service Powered By Docstoc
					Service industry
Service Skills Australia (SSA) is responsible for the development and review of training
packages in this industry.

The service industry comprises the following sectors:

    •   retail services and floristry
    •   tourism, hospitality and events
    •   sport, fitness, outdoor recreation and community recreation
    •   personal services (including hairdressing, beauty and funeral services)

They employ a quarter of Australia’s workforce (2.4 million people) and contribute significantly to
Australia’s gross domestic product. One in five Autralian workers begin their working life as a
sales assistant or sales person. Generally business sales in retail, wholesale and personal
services are cyclical with consumers reacting to economic trends and changes.

Retail and floristry
These industries are covered by the following training packages:

• SIR07: Retail Services Training Package Version 1.2
• WRF04: Floristry Training Package

National context

According to the Service Skills Australia Environmental Scan 2010:

    •   employees lack industry qualifications in retail (59.6%) and wholesale (48.4%)
    •   entry to these sectors is generally at certificate II or certificate III level
    •   higher level qualifications are needed to cover business management skills
    •   skill shortages will occur with ageing population
    •   employee skill sets will need to include computer literacy to cope with the introduction
        of technological changes such as the growth of online retail and subsequent move to
        web-based customer service
    •   career pathways need to be enhanced to maximise retention and improve job
        satisfaction

In the four years to 2013-14, SSA projects that employment in the retail trade will grow at an
average rate of 1.1 percent per annum, which equates to 67,600 new jobs. With growth in this
sector, the requirement for skilled, knowledgeable, qualified retail managers is critical for
effective planning and budgeting to secure the retail workforce into the future. There is growing
demand from customers for better trained staff and improved customer service.

The pharmacy industry, one of the larger sectors of the retail industry, covers the retailing of
pharmaceutical goods such as prescription drugs, other medicines, toiletries and cosmetics. .
Industry feedback reports a growing number of people choosing to consult with a pharmacist
initially, rather than making an appointment with a doctor. This puts further emphasis on the
need for vocational education and training of pharmacy assistants. The Service Skills Australia
Environmental Scan 2010 indicates that in 2005-2008 most community pharmacy training with
public providers was in the Certificate II in Community Pharmacy. Research reveals that the
majority of the workforce is at this level. The increasing uptake of certificate III qualifications in
more recent years mirrors the growing up-skilling of the workforce. The community pharmacy
sector has also identified a need to develop articulation pathways to higher education to support
changes in the industry, and this will be taken up in the review of the industry’s qualifications.


1                                                                                          19 January 2011
Further, the Service Skills Australia Environmental Scan 2010 indicates there is an ongoing
demand for florists. Aside from traditional services, floristries have diversified into the broader
gift and homeware markets, as well as niche markets such as the commercial and wedding
sectors. WRF04: Floristry Training Package is currently under review and its replacement
(SFL10) will include sustainability skills, including knowledge of the environmental impact of
constructing and maintaining floristry products and ways to minimise energy use. Successful
completion of the floristry qualifications will require knowledge of environmentally sound
disposal methods for all types of waste and in particular for hazardous substances, spoiled and
diseased flower and plant materials, and those that have a propensity to propagate weeds. Safe
use of hazardous substances such as cleaning and conditioning agents and preservatives is
also required.

Retail services and floristry qualifications in demand at a national level have been identified by
SSA and are presented in Table 1.

Table 1: Retail services and floristry occupations and qualifications in demand at the
        national level

Occupation                                    Qualification

Retail Manager 142111                         Cert IV Retail Management
                                              Dip Retail Management
Retail Supervisor 621511                      Cert III Retail

Sales Assistant 621111                        Cert II Retail

Florist 362111                                Cert III Floristry

Pharmacy Sales Assistant 621411               Cert II Community Pharmacy
                                              Cert III Community Pharmacy
                                              Cert IV Community Pharmacy




2                                                                                        19 January 2011
Local context

No retail services or floristry occupations for were shortlisted by industry as prioritised
VET-related occupations for 2009-13 in the 2009 ACT Skill Demand Survey. On the other
hand, the occupations Florist and Pharmacist Retail are included on the current ACT State
Migration Plan Occupation List, indicating skill shortages in these occupations in the ACT.

ACT stakeholder consultation indicated that:

    •   there are few problems attracting employees (both younger people and mature age)
        into this industry
    •   entry level training at certificate II is appropriate with provision of fast tracking into
        certificate III and further
    •   negotiations are taking place locally with the University of Canberra for tailored
        programs for pharmacy assistants who have completed pharmacy certificate courses,
        for a seamless transition into university courses at University of Canberra
    •   part- time pharmacy employees receive training conducted by an ACT Guild Registered
        Pharmacist.

As shown in Table 2, Australian Apprenticeship commencements reveal a significant and
growing demand for traineeships in Certificate II in Retail and Certificate III in Retail. The next
highest demand for traineeships is in Certificate IV in Retail. The most popular Australian
School-based Apprenticeship (ASBA) in this sector is the Certificate II in Retail. There is
demand at levels II, III and IV for traineeships in Community Pharmacy, but with the exception
of the Certificate IV in Community Pharmacy and the ASBA, demand for these traineeships
decreased in 2009-10 compared with 2008-09. Traineeships in Floristry at Certificate II, III, and
IV level are available under the User Choice program. However, there is very little indication of
demand for these traineeships in 2008-10. There is one ACT-based RTO registered to deliver
floristry qualifications in the ACT.

In 2010, under the Productivity Places Program (PPP), 160 training places were allocated for
job seekers wishing to enroll in a Certificate II in Retail before 31 December 2010.

Retail services and floristry qualifications were not included on the Priorities Support Program
(PSP) Training Priorities List during 2008-10.

The National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER) Students and Courses
Database reveals a demand for training in floristry qualifications outside of the funded VET
programs administered by the ACT Department of Education and Training. In 2009, 13 students
commenced in Certificate II in Floristry, two in Certificate III in Floristry and eight in Certificate IV
in Floristry.




3                                                                                             19 January 2011
Table 2: ACT Australian Apprenticeship commencements in retail services and floristry
        qualifications, 2008-10


Qualification                         Type          Year      Commencements
Cert II Community Pharmacy SIR20107   ASBA          2009-10   2

                                                    2008-09   1
Cert II Community Pharmacy SIR20107   Traineeship   2009-10   8
                                                    2008-09   18

Cert II Retail SIR20207               ASBA          2009-10   13
                                                    2008-09   21

Cert II Retail SIR20207               Traineeship   2009-10   192
                                                    2008-09   146
Cert II in Floristry WRF20104         ASBA          2009-10   1
                                                    2008-09   0
Cert III Retail SIR30207              Traineeship   2009-10   192
                                                    2008-09   172
Cert III Community Pharmacy           Traineeship   2009-10   11
SIR30107
                                                    2008-09   32
Cert IV Community Pharmacy            Traineeship   2009-10   4
SIR40107
                                                    2008-09   1
Cert IV Retail Management SIR40207    Traineeship   2009-10   30

                                                    2008-09   33




4                                                                             19 January 2011
Conclusion

The following qualifications have been identified as priority industry-specific training needs for
the ACT retail services and floristry industry in 2011-12. These qualifications, and associated
occupations, have been identified using the combined evidence of past demand for Australian
Apprenticeships and PPP training places, ACT industry feedback, and evidence of skill
shortages presented in the ACT State Migration Plan Occupation List, and SSA Environmental
Scan 2010.



            Retail services and floristry occupations and qualifications for the
                         ACT Industry Training Needs List 2011-12

    Occupation                                Qualification

    Pharmacy Sales Assistant 621411           Cert II Community Pharmacy SIR20107
                                              Cert III Community Pharmacy SIR30107
                                              Cert IV Community Pharmacy SIR40107
    Sales Assistant 621111                    Cert I Retail SIR10107
                                              Cert II Retail SIR20207
    Retail Supervisor 621511                  Cert III Retail SIR30207

    Retail Manager (General) 142111           Cert IV Retail Management SIR40207
    Florist 362111                            Cert II Floristry W RF20104




5                                                                                        19 January 2011
Tourism, hospitality and events
This industry sector is covered by the training package SIT07: Tourism, Hospitality and Events
Version 2.2.

National context

The tourism, hospitality and events sector currently employs over 480 000 Australians and
contributes approximately 3.7 percent to Australia’s gross domestic product (ABS 2008).

According to the Service Skills Australia Environmental Scan 2010:

    •   as of May 2008, 62.3 percent of workers in the accommodation and food service
        sectors did not have post-school qualifications.
    •   attracting and retaining workers is an ongoing challenge with competition for skilled
        labour coming from other industries such as mining and construction
    •    the restaurant and café business is growing and the available labour market is ageing
    •   there is a discrepancy between the required supply of skilled labour to the tourism,
        hospitality and events industry and that which is being delivered.

Further, recruitment, retention and motivation of skilled employees are vital tasks of supervisors
and managers which will gain importance for continued growth and productivity of the tourism,
hospitality and events industry. The development of flexible career pathways and progression
opportunities for employees will increase retention rates and improve job satisfaction.

Industry feedback to the Service Skills Australia Environmental Scan 2010 emphasised the
importance of high quality customer service as a main factor for continued business success
While the economic downturn alleviated labour shortages in the hospitality, tourism and events
industry in the short term, the industry still struggles to attract sufficient high quality workers.
Industry feedback also indicates that the availability of staff at junior or frontline levels continues
to be of great concern.

Tourism, hospitality and events occupations and qualifications in demand at a national level
have been identified by SSA and are presented in Table 3.

The occupations Cook, Pastry Cook, and Baker are identified on the Australian Apprenticeships
National Skills Needs List as trades in demand.

Between 2005-08 the qualifications Certificate III in Hospitality (Operations), Certificate IV in
Hospitality (Supervision) and Certificate II in Tourism (International Retail Travel Sales) were
identified by the Australian Government as ‘skills shortages areas other than traditional trades’
and targeted under the Skilling Australia’s Workforce (SAW) Agreement (see Table 6).




6                                                                                           19 January 2011
Table 3: Tourism, hospitality and events occupations and qualifications in demand at the
        national level

Occupation                                              Qualification

Bar Attendant 431111                                    Cert II Hospitality
Barista 431112                                          Cert II Hospitality (Kitchen Operations)
Café Worker 431211
                                                        Cert II Hospitality (Asian Cookery)
Waiter 431511
Hotel Receptionist 542113                               Cert III Hospitality
Cook 351411                                             Cert III Hospitality (Commercial Cookery)
Pastry Cook 351112                                      Cert III Hospitality (Asian Cookery)
                                                        Cert III Hospitality (Catering Operations)
                                                        Cert III Hospitality (Patisserie)
                                                        Cert III Events
Tourist Information Officer 451611                      Cert II Tourism
Travel Consultant 451612                                Cert III Tourism
                                                        Cert III Tourism (Retail Travel Sales)
                                                        Cert III Tourism (Wholesaling)
                                                        Cert III Tourism (Visitor Information
                                                        Services)
                                                        Cert III Tourism (Guiding)
Café or Restaurant Manager 141111                       Cert IV Hospitality
Caravan Park & Camping Ground Manager                   Cert IV Hospitality(Commercial Cookery)
141211
                                                        Cert IV Hospitality (Asian Cookery)
Hotel or Motel Manager 141411
Licensed Club Manager 141911                            Cert IV Hospitality (Catering Operations)
Bed & Breakfast Operator 141911                         Cert IV Hospitality (Patisserie)
Accommodation & Hospitality Managers 141999             Dip Hospitality
Amusement Centre Manager 149111                         Adv Dip Hospitality
Conference & Event Organiser 149311
                                                        Dip Events
Hospitality, Retail & Service Managers 149999
Chef 151311                                             Adv Dip Events


Local context

The tourism, hospitality and events sector represent the front line of service in building a
national and international reputation among visitors.

In the 2009 ACT Skill Demand Survey, the occupations Chef, Cook, and Café or Restaurant
Manager were shortlisted by industry stakeholders as priority VET-related occupations for 2009-
13. The occupations Hotel or Motel Manager, Baker, Pastry Cook, Chef and Cook are included
in the current ACT State Migration Plan Occupation List, indicating that these are occupations in
demand in Canberra. Nomination places for the occupation Hotel or Motel Manager, however,
are currently closed.

The outcomes of the ACT stakeholder consultation indicated that the industry:

    •   is experiencing increased competition from other industries affecting their ability to
        attract staff. Low pay and irregular work hours compete with higher wages and salaries,
        better work conditions and superannuation which exist in sectors such as the public
        service
    •   expects to require more trained workers to cope with the increase in tourism in 2013 for
        the Centenary of Canberra Celebrations


7                                                                                        19 January 2011
    •   expects that the expansion of the Belconnen W estfield Retail complex will generate
        additional positions in hospitality. This will also result in increased demand for staff at
        other locations as businesses move existing experienced staff to the new Belconnen
        operations. In particular, the W oden Westfield anticipates increased staffing needs as
        a result.
    •   finds that many of the new workers are entering the industry while at university or other
        training institution as a way of supplementing their income while studying
    •   might need to look to look for additional workers from mature age groups to make up
        the expected shortfall
    •   identifies demand by employers for workers with tourism qualifications additional to
        Australian Apprenticeships in 2011-12.

The ACT Tourism Industry Council (TIC) has identified a need for training and upskilling in the
retail travel sales sector. The Canberra Centre, in particular, has been identified as an
attraction for visitors to the ACT region. TIC has raised concerns that the industry may not be
ready to cope with the large increase in the numbers of tourists expected during the centenary
celebrations in 2013. Issues anticipated to create problems in delivering a positive visitor
experience include:

    •   hotels and restaurants having difficulty in finding staff
    •   a poor customer service culture within the industry.

Organisations expanding their operations in the conference and entertainment sectors are
reporting chronic shortage of kitchen hands, mainly due to the work being menial and low paid.
However, such organisations are also reporting high levels of interest in training from existing
casual staff and staff from equity groups.

Group training organisations are reporting difficulty in finding placements for Australian School-
based Apprentices in tourism, particularly for students who wish to eventually progress from an
ASBA in Certificate II in Tourism to a full traineeship in Certificate III in Events once they leave
school. Many of the large National Capital tourist attraction organisations (e.g. War Memorial,
National Gallery) in the ACT are delivering their own ‘in-house’ (mostly unaccredited) training.

Table 4 shows the highest demand for traineeships specific to the tourism, hospitality and
events sector during 2008-10 was in Certificate III in Hospitality, followed by apprenticeships in
Certificate III Hospitality (Commercial Cookery). Australian School-based Apprenticeships
(ASBAs) in both these qualifications also showed significant increases in commencements in
2009-10 when compared with 2008-09. Demand for ASBAs in Certificate II in Hospitality
remained steady while demand for ASBAs in Certificate II in Hospitality (Kitchen Operations)
dropped by 23 percent in 2009-10 compared with 2008-09. Commencements in traineeships in
Certificate IV in Hospitality more than doubled in 2009-10 compared with 2008-09. There were
no commencements in Certificate III in Hospitality (Asian Cookery) or Certificate III in Hospitality
(Catering Operations) despite these being eligible qualifications under the User Choice program
and there are ACT-based RTOs able to deliver these qualifications. There are no ACT-based
RTOs registered to deliver the Certificate III in Hospitality (Patisserie).

The highest demand for tourism traineeships during 2008-10 was seen in the Certificate III in
Tourism (Retail Travel Sales). There was only limited demand for ASBAs in Certificate II in
Tourism during this period. There were no commencements in traineeships in Certificate III in
Tourism or Certificate III in Tourism (Visitor Information Services) despite these being eligible
qualifications under the User Choice program and there are ACT-based RTOs able to deliver
these qualifications. There are no ACT-based RTOs registered to deliver the Certificate III in
Tourism (Wholesaling) or Certificate III in Tourism (Guiding).

There was no demand for traineeships in Certificate III in Events in 2009-10.

Table 5 shows commencements in the training places specific to the tourism, hospitality and
events industry allocated in 2009 under the Productivity Places Program (PPP). Job seekers

8                                                                                         19 January 2011
commenced in Certificate II in Hospitality. Existing workers undertook training in Certificate IV in
Hospitality and Diploma of Hospitality.

In 2010, demand was met under PPP by the allocation of training places for job seekers wishing
to commence in Certificate II in Hospitality, Certificate II in Hospitality (Kitchen Operations),
Certificate III in Hospitality, or Certificate III in Tourism (Retail Travel Sales) before 31
December 2010. Training places were allocated for existing workers seeking to commence
before 31 December 2010 in Certificate III in Hospitality, Certificate IV in Hospitality and
Diploma of Hospitality. There was no demand for training places in Advanced Diploma of
Hospitality. Qualifications in events were not eligible under PPP in 2010.

In 2010, the Priorities Support Program (PSP) funded skill-set training for existing casual
workers to assist in meeting legislative and specific service standard requirements.
Competencies were funded from Certificate II in Hospitality (Kitchen Operations) and Certificate
III in Hospitality relating to Responsible Gaming Services (RGS) and responsible service of
alcohol (RSA), workplace hygiene, OH&S and security procedures. Tourism and events
qualifications were not included on the Priorities Support Program (PSP) Training Priorities List
during 2008-10.

Two hospitality qualifications and one tourism qualification were identified as skills shortage
areas under the SAW Agreement 2005-2008. During this period the ACT agreed to achieve
specific commencement targets for these qualifications. Table 6 sets out the ACT targets over
the four years and the actual commencements achieved. Commencement targets were
exceeded for Certificate III in Hospitality (Operations) by 121 percent, Certificate IV in
Hospitality (Supervision) by 619 percent and Certificate II in Tourism (International Retail Travel
Sales) by 166 percent.

The NCVER Students and Courses Database reveals 38 students commenced training in the
Advanced Diploma of Hospitality outside of the funded VET programs administered by the ACT
Department of Education and Training in 2009.




9                                                                                        19 January 2011
Table 4: ACT Australian Apprenticeship commencements in tourism, hospitality and
        events qualifications 2008-10.

Qualification                                 Type             Year           Commencements
Cert II Tourism SIT20107                      ASBA             2009-10        1
                                                               2008-09        1
Cert II Hospitality SIT20207                  ASBA             2009-10        8
                                                               2008-09        9
Cert II Hospitality SIT20207                  Traineeship      2009-10        2
                                                               2008-09        4
Cert II Hospitality (Kitchen Operations)      ASBA             2009-10        17
SIT20307                                                       2008-09        22
Cert II Hospitality (Kitchen Operations)      Traineeship      2009-10        3
SIT20307                                                       2008-09        1
Cert III Tourism (Retail Travel Sales)        Traineeship      2009-10        56
SIT30207                                                       2008-09        44
Cert III Events SIT SIT30607                  Traineeship      2009-10        0
                                                               2008-09        1
Cert III Hospitality SIT30707                 ASBA             2009-10        54
                                                               2008-09        5
Cert III Hospitality SIT30707                 Traineeship      2009-10        432
                                                               2008-09        528
Cert III Hospitality (Commercial Cookery)     ASBA             2009-10        14
SIT30807                                                       2008-09        3
Cert III Hospitality (Commercial Cookery)     Apprenticeship   2009-10        246
SIT30807                                                       2008-09        257
Cert IV Hospitality SIT40307                  Traineeship      2009-10        46
                                                               2008-09        19

Table 5: ACT PPP commencements in tourism, hospitality and events qualifications,
        October 2009 to June 2010

Qualification                                   Commencements

                                                Job Seekers              Existing Workers

Cert II Hospitality SIT20207                    18                       0

Cert IV Hospitality SIT40307                    0                        14

Diploma Hospitality SIT50307                    0                        3



Table 6: ACT targets and commencements in identified skills shortage areas in
        Hospitality and Tourism under the SAW Agreement 2005-08.

Qualification                     Target 2005-2008          Actual commencements
Cert III Hospitality
(Operations)                                         285                          631
Cert IV Hospitality
(Supervision)                                         16                          115
Cert III Tourism (International                       96                          255
Retail Travel Sale)

10                                                                                  19 January 2011
Conclusion
The following qualifications have been identified as priority industry-specific training needs for
the ACT tourism, hospitality and events industry in 2011-12. These qualifications, and
associated occupations, have been identified using the combined evidence of past demand for
Australian Apprenticeships, PPP and PSP training places, ACT industry feedback, and
evidence of skill shortages presented in the 2009 ACT Skill Demand Survey, ACT State
Migration Plan Occupation List, SSA Environmental Scan 2010 and Australian Government’s
PPP Priority Occupations and Qualifications List.

         Tourism, hospitality and events occupations and qualifications for the
                      ACT Industry Training Needs List 2011-12

     Occupation                               Qualification

     Kitchenhand 851311                       Cert II Hospitality (Kitchen Operations) SIT20307

     Cook 351411                              Cert II Hospitality (Kitchen Operations) SIT20307
                                              Cert III Hospitality (Commercial Cookery) SIT30807

                                              Cert II in Hospitality SIT20207
     Bar Attendant 431111
     Waiter 431511                            Cert III Hospitality SIT30707

     Chef 151311                              Cert IV Hospitality SIT40307
     Café or Restaurant Manager 141111        Cert IV Hospitality SIT40307
     Hotel or Motel Manager 141411
                                              Dip Hospitality SIT50307
     Tourist Information Officer 451611       Cert III Tourism (Retail Travel Sales) SIT30207
     Travel Consultant 451612




11                                                                                       19 January 2011
Sport, fitness, outdoor recreation and community recreation
This industry sector is covered by the following training packages:

•    SRS03: Sport Industry Training Package
•    SRF04: Fitness Industry Training Package
•    SRC04: Community Recreation Industry Training Package
•    SRO03: Outdoor Recreation Industry Training Package.

National context

The community recreation, fitness, outdoor recreation and sport sectors contribute to
maintaining and improving the physical health of the community. In addition, the sport and
recreation industry assists in fostering social inclusion, psychological wellbeing and stress
reduction.

According to the Service Skills Environmental Scan 2010:

     •   leadership and professionalism are two critical issues facing the sector
     •   Certificate III is a prerequisite for qualified registered fitness instructors and certificate
         IV for qualified registered fitness trainers.
     •   Certificates II and III are the entry level qualifications in the sport industry
     •   Certificate II level is entry level qualification in the community recreation industry
     •   in outdoor recreation, the number of enrolments at certificate II level is declining,
         mirroring an increased focus on the certificate III as an entry-level qualification for this
         industry
     •   most community recreation qualification enrolments are at certificate II level. This is
         partly based on industry requirements for the Royal Life Saving Society Australia
         (RLSSA) Pool Lifeguard and AUSTSWIM Swimming Teacher industry accreditation
         schemes, which can be achieved through these qualifications.
     •   the lack of staff in key positions, such as swimming coaches, becomes an access issue
         as leisure facilities are unable to program a sufficient number of classes to keep up with
         demand, resulting in large waiting lists for classes and providing a barrier to
         participation
     •   members on the boards and committees within sporting clubs and associations would
         benefit from training (such as competencies from the Diploma of Facilities
         Management) to increase their professionalism in these roles, particularly their
         knowledge of duties and governance
     •   it is vital for future workforce development that the status and work of volunteers are
         recognised and that training, including RPL, is appropriately funded to allow access for
         volunteers that reflects their high importance and values their contribution to the
         workforce.

The Community Recreation, Fitness, Outdoor Recreation and Sport Training Packages are
undergoing a full review, with all four packages being reduced into one SIS09: Sport, Fitness
and Recreation Training Package. The Certificate III in Community Recreation has been
divided into the Certificate III in Aquatics and Certificate III in Community Activity Programs.

The RLSSA warns that as many as one in five children will leave primary school in 2010 not
even having the skills to swim the length of an Olympic swimming pool. In response to this
issue RLSSA is calling for a greater focus on swimming and water safety skills. RLSSA
predicts participation in learn to swim programs will need to increase to one million children a
year in order to respond to this problem.

Sport, fitness, outdoor recreation and community recreation occupations and qualifications in
demand at a national level have been identified by SSA and are presented in Table 7.


12                                                                                         19 January 2011
Table 7: Sport, fitness, outdoor recreation and community recreation occupations and
        qualifications in demand at the national level


Occupation                                                      Qualification

Swimming Coach or Instructor 452315                             Cert III Aquatics
Lifeguard 452414
Other Sports Coach or Instructor 452317                         Cert II Sport (Coaching)
                                                                Cert III Sport (Coaching)
                                                                Cert IV Sport (Coaching)
                                                                Dip Sport (Coaching)
Fitness Instructor 45211                                        Dip Fitness
Sports Development Officer 452321                               Cert IV Sport (Development)
Sports Administrator 139915                                     Dip Sport (Development)
                                                                Cert III Sport and Recreation
                                                                Cert IV Sport and Recreation
                                                                Dip Sport and Recreation
Amusement Centre Manager 149111                                 Cert III Aquatics
Fitness Centre Manager 149112
                                                                Dip Facility Management
Sports Centre Manager 149113
Sports Umpire 452322                                            Cert IV Sport (Coaching)
Chief Executive or Managing Director (board and                 Dip Facility Management
committee members) 111111
Sports Administrator (high/mid-level manager) 139915            Dip Fitness
                                                                Dip Outdoor Recreation
                                                                Dip Sport (Development)
                                                                Dip Facility Management
                                                                Dip Sport and Recreation


Local context

The ACT has many sporting, fitness, and outdoor and community recreation providers that often
rely heavily on volunteers who are to responsible for the organisational structures including
finance and team management as well as corporate governance and risk assessment. According
to the 2009 ACT Skill Demand Survey, Fitness Instructors has been identified by industry as a
‘VET prioritised occupation’ for 2009 -2013. The current ACT State Migration Plan Occupation
List includes the occupations Swimming, Gymnastics, Horse Riding, Tennis and Other Coaches
or Instructors, Sports Development Officer, and Sports Administrator, indicating these
occupations are in demand in Canberra.

According to the Service Skills Environmental Scan 2010 Sports Administrators require higher
level VET qualifications such as Certificate IV in Sport and Recreation, Diploma of Fitness,
Diploma of Sport (Development) and Diploma of Outdoor Recreation to support increased
professionalism and improved management skills, including business planning, budgeting and
human resource management. Sports Development Officers are often promoted to their
position from within leisure facilities and frequently do not have appropriate qualifications.
Sports Development Officers would benefit from qualifications such as Certificate III in Sport
and Recreation, Certificate IV in Sport and Recreation, and Diploma of Sport (Development).

The outcomes of the ACT stakeholder consultation indicated that:

     •   safety issues are of prime importance in this sector

13                                                                                     19 January 2011
     •   traineeships in Certificate III in Fitness and ASBAs in Certificate II in Sport and
         Recreation are a high priority for the industry in the ACT
     •   Certificate II and III provide appropriate entry level into this area
     •   fitness for older adults is expected to be an area of future need in the local community
     •   industry identified a need for personnel trained in administration and supervision
     •   Diplomas of Fitness, Outdoor Recreation, and Sport (Development) are additional
         future training needs for the ACT
     •   career prospects can be realised in twelve to eighteen months
     •   the community recreation, fitness, outdoor recreation and sport sectors contribute to the
         prevention of poor health. Highly skilled fitness professionals will leave good impressions
         with clients and help grow participation
     •   there is good gender balance in the industry, with approximately equal proportions of
         male and female employees
     •   there is a career pathway in the industry going right through to a university degree
     •   trainees going into sports medicine through a university course find that the ASBA
         qualification demonstrates commitment
     •   there is a low dropout rate for trainees and the majority complete the qualification. This
         is because they are very sport oriented and it's a fun and active occupation.

Table 8 shows the highest demand for traineeships during 2008-10 was in Certificate IV in
Outdoor Recreation, followed by Certificate III in Fitness, the Certificate IV in Fitness. Demand
for both full traineeships and Australian School-based Apprenticeships (ASBAs) in Certificate III
in Sport and Recreation decreased in 2009-10 compared with 2008-09. Certificate II in Sport &
Recreation was the most popular ASBA during 2008-10, while ASBA commencements in
Certificate II in Community Recreation increased dramatically in 2009-10 compared with 2008-
09. This increase was due to the 18 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students who
commenced in a specifically targeted program delivering ASBAs in Certificate II in Community
Recreation that began in February 2010.

There was no indication of demand for traineeships under the Australian Apprenticeships
program in Certificate III in Community Recreation, which is linked to the in demand occupation
of Swimming Coach or Instructor, or the Certificate IV in Sport and Recreation, which is linked to
the in demand occupations Sports Development Officer and Sports Administrator. These
qualifications were not eligible under the Productivity Places Program (PPP) in 2009-10. The
ACT Government use the national priority list of eligible qualifications to be targeted under PPP.
If a qualification not on the list is identified by industry as a priority for the ACT, a business case
providing evidence supporting its addition to the national priority list can be submitted by
industry to the Australian Government, through the ACT Department of Education and Training.

Between 2005-08 the Certificate IV in Sport and Recreation was identified by the Australian
Government as a ‘skill shortage area other than traditional trades’ and targeted under the Skilling
Australia’s Workforce (SAW) Agreement 2005-08. During this period the ACT agreed to achieve
specific commencement targets for this qualification. Table 10 sets out the ACT target over the
4-year period and the actual commencements achieved. Commencements fell short of the
target by 13 percent. There is currently only one ACT-based RTO registered to deliver the
Certificate IV in Sport and Recreation in the ACT.

Table 9 shows commencements in training places allocated in 2009 under PPP that are relevant
to the sport, fitness, outdoor recreation and community recreation sector. Job seekers
commenced in Certificate III in Fitness. Further demand by job seekers wishing to commence in
a Certificate III in Fitness before 31 December 2010 was meet by the 2010 PPP allocation
rounds. In 2010, existing workers were also allocated training places in Certificate III in Fitness,
as well as Certificate IV in Fitness. The Diploma of Outdoor Recreation was eligible under PPP
but there have been no applications for training places in this qualification in 2009-10.

There is evidence of a limited demand for Certificate III and IV in Community Recreation under
the Priorities Support Program (PSP). Participants in these courses were of a mature age (40


14                                                                                         19 January 2011
years and over) reflecting a need for personnel who aspire to work with older adults and
promote healthy lifestyles in the local community (see Table 10).

The Diploma of Fitness and Diploma of Sport (Development) were not eligible qualifications
under the Australian Apprenticeships through User Choice Program, PPP or PSP. However,
the NCVER Students and Courses Database reveals 15 students commenced training in a
Diploma of Fitness and 37 in a Diploma of Sport (Development) outside of the funded VET
programs administered by the ACT Department of Education and Training in 2009. According to
the National Training Information Service (NTIS) there are currently no ACT-based RTOs
registered to deliver the Diploma of Sport and Recreation in the ACT.


Table 8: ACT Australian Apprenticeship commencements in sport, fitness, outdoor
        recreation and community recreation qualifications, 2008-10

Qualification                                    Type             Year         Commencements
Cert II Community Recreation SRC20206            ASBA             2009-10      20
                                                                  2008-09      1
Cert IV Community Recreation SRC40206            Traineeship      2009-10      0
                                                                  2008-09      1
Cert III Fitness SRF30206                        Traineeship      2009-10      12
                                                                  2008-09      22
Cert IV Fitness SRF40206                         Traineeship      2009-10      7
                                                                  2008-09      7
Cert II Sport & Recreation SRO20106              ASBA             2009-10      24
                                                                  2008-09      5
Cert III Sport & Recreation SRO30106             ASBA             2009-10      0
                                                                  2008-09      1
Cert III Sport & Recreation SRO30106             Traineeship      2009-10      1
                                                                  2008-09      5
Cert IV Outdoor Recreation SRO40206              Traineeship      2009-10      23
                                                                  2008-09      18
Cert III Sport (Athlete support services)        Traineeship      2009-10      1
                                                                  2008-09      0



Table 9: ACT PPP commencements in sport, fitness, outdoor recreation and community
        recreation qualifications October 2009 to June 2010



Qualification                                    Commencements
                                                 Job seekers       Existing workers

Cert III Fitness SRF30206                        3                 0



Table 10: ACT PSP commencements in sport, fitness, outdoor recreation and community
       recreation, by qualification*, 2008-10

Qualification                                            Commencements
Cert III Community Recreation SRC30206                2
Cert IV Community Recreation SRC40206                 1
*Note: These qualifications may have been delivered as skills sets or full qualifications


15                                                                                      19 January 2011
Table 11: ACT targets and commencements in identified skills shortage areas in sport,
       fitness, outdoor recreation and community recreation under the SAW Agreement
       2005-08.


 Qualification                                                                 Target         Actual
 Cert IV Sport and Recreation SRO40103                                              23               20


Conclusion

The following qualifications have been identified as priority industry-specific training needs for
the ACT sport, fitness, outdoor recreation and community recreation industry in 2011-12.
These qualifications, and associated occupations, have been identified using the combined
evidence of past demand for Australian Apprenticeships, PPP and PSP training places, ACT
industry feedback, availability of training courses in the ACT, and evidence of skill shortages
presented in the 2009 ACT Skill Demand Survey, ACT State Migration Plan Occupation List,
SSA Environmental Scan 2010 and Australian Government’s PPP Priority Occupations and
Qualifications List.



                 Sport, fitness, outdoor recreation and community recreation
                             occupations and qualifications for the
                           ACT Industry Training Needs List 2011-12

     Occupation                               Qualification

     Fitness Instructor 452111                Cert III in Fitness SRF30206
                                              Cert IV Fitness SRF40206
     Outdoor Adventure Instructor 452215      Cert IV Outdoor Recreation SR040206
     Sports Development Officer 452321        Cert II Sport & Recreation SRO20106
     Sports Administrator 139915              Cert II Community Recreation SRC20206
                                              Dip Fitness SRF50206
                                              Dip Sport (Development) SRS50506




16                                                                                        19 January 2011
Personal services
This industry sector is covered by the following training packages:

•    WRH06: Hairdressing Training Package
•    WRB04: Beauty Training Package
•    SIF08: Funeral Services Training Package.

Hairdressing

National context

According to the Service Skills Australia Environmental Scan 2010:

     •   many businesses have faced shortages of labour in the last few years because of
         competition from other industries
     •   poor perception by sections of the general public of the hairdressing and beauty
         industries as viable career choices further hinders entry into these industries by young
         people
     •   better career advice needs to be provided about the career opportunities the industries
         offer
     •   industry has indicated there is a limited role for Certificate II in Hairdressing in the future
         because graduates are often not work ready and so struggle to find employment
     •   nationally in 2008, most enrolments in hairdressing qualifications were in the
          Certificate III in Hairdressing
     •   Certificate IV in Hairdressing is not well understood by employers – participation is
         frequently initiated and paid for by the candidate.

The hairdressing qualifications in demand at a national level have been identified by SSA and
are presented in Table 1.

Table 12: Hairdressing qualifications in demand at a national level

Occupation                          Qualification

Hairdresser 391111                  Cert III Hairdressing WRH30109

                                    Cert IV Hairdressing WRH40109

                                    Dip Hairdressing Salon Management W RH50109


The occupation Hairdresser is on the Australian Government’s Australian Apprenticeships
National Skills Needs List indicating it is a trade in demand at a national level.
Local context
The occupation Hairdresser was identified as a priority occupation by ACT industry
stakeholders in the 2009 Skill Demand Survey. It is also included on the ACT State Migration
Plan Occupation List, indicating it is an occupation in demand in Canberra.




17                                                                                           19 January 2011
The outcomes of ACT industry consultation indicated that:

     •   while attracting employees into the industry is not difficult, retaining them is because of
         competition from other sectors with better conditions and pay ( such the public service)
     •   the lack of competent, qualified staff is seen as a major impediment to business growth
         and profitability in hairdressing
     •   industry research shows that assisting qualified hairdressers to access enabling
         qualifications in management, marketing and sales would provide incentives for
         individuals to stay in the industry
     •   an emerging issue is the number of international students from non-English speaking
         backgrounds whose English levels are not up to industry standard when they graduate
         – employers are concerned that they will have to contribute significant funds to get
         international students’ communication skills to required level
     •   there is a high attrition rate for those entering with a Certificate II in Hairdressing –
         perceived as entry point for equity groups as hairdressing assistants

As seen in Table 13, the majority of demand for Australian Apprenticeships training in the
hairdressing industry is at Certificate III level. Demand for this apprenticeship has remained
similar to the 2008-09 levels. Demand is also seen for Australian School-based
Apprenticeships (ASBAs) at Certificate II and Certificate III level. Demand for Certificate II in
Hairdressing, however, has dropped when compared to 2008-09 commencements. On the
other hand, demand for ASBAs at the certificate III level rose in 2010 compared to 2008-09
commencements.


Table 13: Australian Apprenticeship commencements in Hairdressing qualifications,
        2008-10
Qualification                       Type         Year          Commencements
Cert III Hairdressing WRH30109            Apprenticeship    2009-10         224

                                                            2008-09         246
Cert III Hairdressing WRH30109            ASBA              2009-10         25
                                                            2008-09         11
Cert II Hairdressing WRH20109             ASBA              2009-10         10
                                                            2008-09         21



Under the Productivity Places Program (PPP), 28 places have been allocated for existing
workers seeking to commence training in the Certificate IV in Hairdressing before December
2010 and complete their qualification by December 2012. According to ACT employers, salons
require staff that can design and perform creative haircuts, coordinate work teams, work as a
session stylist, solve complex colour problems and maintain store safety. Further, employers
have expressed interest in having their workers’ existing skills in these areas recognised
against national qualifications.

ACT Industry stakeholders indicated that there may be future demand under the Priorities
Support Program for training at a certificate II level for people in equity groups, and for skills
sets in enabling qualifications at a certificate IV level for small business employers and their
employees. Some stakeholders suggested that there are significant numbers of mature-age
qualified hairdressers who have left the industry. Targeted training opportunities and the
engagement of employers through industry associations may assist them in returning to the
workforce. Further, opportunities for qualified hairdressers and employers to access training in
management, marketing, sales, team management skills would enhance the productive
capacity of enterprises and provide incentives for individuals to stay in the industry.

18                                                                                        19 January 2011
An analysis of the NCVER Students and Courses Database indicates a growth in
commencements in the Diploma of Hairdressing Salon Management in the ACT over the last
two years. This demand has been met by programs that are not funded through the ACT
Department of Education and Training.

Conclusion

The following qualifications have been identified as priority industry-specific training needs for
the ACT hairdressing industry in 2011-12. These qualifications, and associated occupations,
have been identified using the combined evidence of past demand for Australian
Apprenticeships and PPP training places, ACT industry feedback, and evidence of skill
shortages presented in the 2009 ACT Skills Demand Survey, ACT State Migration Plan
Occupation List, Australian Apprenticeships National Skills Needs List, SSA Environmental
Scan 2010, and Australian Government’s PPP Priority Occupations and Qualifications List.



                      Hairdressing occupations and qualifications for the
                           ACT Industry Training Needs List 2011-12

     Occupation                                          Qualification

     Hair or Beauty Salon Assistant 451812               Cert II Hairdressing WRH20109

     Hairdresser 391111                                  Cert III Hairdressing WRH30109

                                                         Cert IV Hairdressing WRH40109




19                                                                                        19 January 2011
Beauty

This industry sector is covered by WRB04: Beauty Training Package.

National context

According to the Service Skills Australia Environmental Scan 2010 the growing affluence of the
population, especially among women, has led to many people having greater levels of
discretionary income and a desire to spend more of it on their personal appearance and
wellbeing. The ageing of the population also encourages some to expend more in these areas.
As a result, there is a steeply growing demand for beauty services.

The SSA also reports that the major demand in beauty is for beauty therapists trained at
certificate IV and diploma levels. There is also an ongoing demand for training in beauty
services and nail technology.

SSA is proposing an increase in the number of units to address emerging trends within the
beauty industry. These include intimate waxing for females and males, spray tanning and the
associated skills for the use of intense pulsed light and lasers for hair reduction.

The specific beauty occupations and qualifications in demand at a national level have been
identified by SSA and are presented in Table 14.

Table 14: Beauty occupations and qualifications in demand at the national level

 Occupation                         Qualification

 Beauty Therapist 451111            Cert II Nail Technology

                                    Cert III Beauty Services

                                    Cert IV Beauty Therapy

                                    Dip Beauty Therapy


The occupation Beauty Therapist is not included in the Australian Government’s Australian
Apprenticeships National Skills Needs List indicating it is not a trade in demand at a national
level.

Local context

The ACT beauty industry consists of small independent businesses competing with each other
and with other associated sectors for trade. Locally the industry has experienced a tightening in
its turnover and sees the need for direction through the possible formation of an ACT Beauty
Industry Association to stay on top of industry innovation, lobby for recognition and address
training and staffing needs.

Feedback from industry to the 2009 ACT Skills Demand Survey did not identify occupations in
the Beauty industry as being in demand in 2009-13. Beauty Therapist is also not included in the
current ACT State Migration Plan Occupation List.

According to industry feedback to the ACT Department of Education and Training, the beauty
industry is experiencing shortages of fully qualified staff. This is similar to all other industries in
the ACT which has one of the lowest levels of unemployment in Australia. Bringing in school
and college students as Australian School-based Apprentices (ASBAs) has been adopted by
many sectors as a way of bringing new workers into industry and involving mature age workers


20                                                                                           19 January 2011
in the industry is another alternative. In the beauty industry, ASBA training is seen as being in
its early stage of development and needs further support to realise its potential.

Further, the beauty industry would like to see additional support and prioritisation of training in
its field extending through to certificate IV and diploma levels to lift its professionalism and
standing in the ACT community.

The industry recognises the need for entry level qualifications as a way of growing its market
penetration and improving its image. Trained staff should come into the industry with a good
understanding of client needs, OH&S and responsibilities to the business. W hile any one of the
beauty qualifications at certificate II level is seen as a pathway into the industry, staff with
certificate IV and diploma level qualifications are seen as having a dedication to the industry
which employers desire. At higher levels of training, new staff should come into a business with
competency in management and leadership, innovation, buying and merchandising, using the
latest technology, awareness of client needs and responsibilities, OH&S issues, current business
developments and ways of growing the enterprise through improved productivity and
participation in the industry.

Under the Australian Apprenticeships program there has been no demand for new traineeships
or ASBAs in 2008-09 or 2009-10 despite User Choice funding being available for:

     •   Certificate II Nail Technology
     •   Certificate II Makeup Services
     •   Certificate II Retail Cosmetic Services
     •   Certificate III in Nail Technology
     •   Certificate III Beauty Services
     •   Certificate IV Beauty Therapy

User Choice funding was not available for existing workers to take up a traineeship during this
period.

In 2009-10 no beauty qualifications were included on the PPP priority qualifications list
However, evidence of a skill shortage provided by the beauty industry has resulted in the
Department putting forward a business case to the Australian Government to have the
Certificate III in Beauty Services, Certificate III in Nail Technology, Certificate IV in Beauty
Therapy and Diploma in Beauty Therapy made available under PPP in the ACT. In September
2010 PPP training places were allocated for 12 job seekers wishing to commence in a
Certificate III in Beauty Services before 31 December 2010.

In 2008-10 PSP funded entry level qualifications at certificate II level and skills sets in Diploma of
Beauty Therapy. Participants included people with a disability, Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander students, small business employers and employees, early school leavers, youth at risk,
mature age workers, and people seeking to return to work after child-rearing (see Table 15)..

Table 15: ACT PSP commencements in beauty, by qualification* in 2008-10

Qualification                                              Commencements
Cert II Nail Technology W RB20104                     22
Cert II Make-up Services WRB20204                     22
Cert II Retail Cosmetic Services WRB20304             22
Dip Beauty Therapy W RB50105                          13
*Note: These qualifications may have been delivered as skills sets or full qualifications

The NCVER Students and Courses Database reveals a demand for additional training in
Diploma of Beauty Therapy outside of the funded VET programs administered by the ACT
Department of Education and Training.


21                                                                                        19 January 2011
Conclusion

ACT industry feedback indicates a shortage of qualified workers in the occupation Beauty
Therapist, particularly in the qualifications listed in the table below.


                                Beauty qualifications for the
                          ACT Industry Training Needs List 2011-12


Occupation                      Qualification

Beauty Therapist 451111         Cert III Nail Technology WRB30204

                                Cert III Beauty Services WRB30104

                                Cert IV Beauty Therapy WRB40105

                                Dip Beauty Therapy W RB50105




22                                                                                  19 January 2011
Funeral services

This industry sector is covered by the SIF08: Funeral Services Training Package.

National context

The funeral services industry is a small industry that includes businesses such as cemeteries
and crematoriums. The funeral services industry consists of four broad sectors that are: funeral
directing, cemetery and crematoria operations, coffin and casket manufacture, and monumental
stonemasonry.

The national body overseeing funeral services is the Australian Funeral Directors Association.
Approximately 50 percent of the funeral services workforce nationally is made up of mature
aged workers. It is not an industry that younger people are readily drawn to.

According to the Services Skills Australia Environmental Scan 2010 the number of new
graduates entering the industry is limited by the:

     •   small target groups (feedback to SSA indicated that training providers are reluctant to
         offer vocational education and training to small target groups found in some sectors,
         such as operators of crematoria)
     •   high cost of courses
     •   the fact that a significant component of practical assessment while studying requires
         employment in the funeral industry
     •   geographical restrictions on availability of training courses

The SIF08: Funeral Services Training Package will be updated in 2010 to ensure that current
policy directives relating to sustainability and flexibility are met. An analysis of the training
package will ensure that it meets the requirements for sustainability on all levels: environmental,
business, and socioeconomic. SIF08: Funeral Services Training Package will also be
evaluated to determine if the seven qualifications, ranging from certificate II to diploma, meet
the recent policy changes promoting flexibility in qualifications.

According to the Australian Institute of Embalming (cited in SSA Environmental Scan 2010),
there are 173 qualified and registered embalmers in Australia. Due to the current lack of
qualified embalmers, the Australian industry is recruiting from overseas to meet ongoing
demand. This has been achieved in some measure by employing New Zealand citizens who do
not have visa restrictions.

The funeral services occupations and qualifications in demand at a national level have been
identified by SSA and are presented in Table 16 below.


Table 16: Funeral services occupations and qualifications in demand at the national level

Occupation                        Qualification

Funeral worker 451399             Certificate IV in Embalming SIF40208

Funeral worker 451399             Certificate IV in Funeral Services SIF40108


The occupation Funeral Workers is not included on the current Department of Immigration and
Citizenship Skilled Occupation List (SOL), or the Australian Government’s Australian
Apprenticeships National Skills Needs List.




23                                                                                      19 January 2011
Local context

Within the ACT there are five funeral services operators who organise and conduct
approximately 1700 funerals each year. Industry in the ACT reports that typically new recruits
either stay for a long time or leave very quickly. Whilst staff turnover is not high, there is always
a need for workers in this industry so employers recruit as required. Currently, there are no
qualifications required for entry into the funeral services industry. Staff learn in the workplace
with training generally delivered ‘in-house’.

The occupation Funeral Worker was not identified as a priority VET-related occupation by ACT
industry stakeholders in the 2009 ACT Skill Demand Survey and is not included on the current
ACT State Migration Plan Occupation List.

The ACT funeral services industry is looking to formalise staff training by accessing nationally
recognised qualifications, particularly certificate III and IV level qualifications. The nature of
funeral service work, such as arranging and conducting funerals and dealing with grief and
trauma, requires considerable sensitivity. While staff are not required to learn actual counselling
skills, the training does deliver highly transportable skills for moving into other people-oriented
occupations.

Quality assurance and professionalism are paramount, therefore the ACT funeral services
industry indicated that Certificate III in Funeral Operations is expected to be a priority in this
sector in 2011. Graduates with this qualification who undertake the specialist mortuary
administration stream could work in a mortuary carrying out support activities and body
preparation procedures under supervision. Graduates with this qualification who undertake the
specialist funeral stream could work in a funeral home carrying out funeral and burial sales
activities and assisting with the conduct of funerals.

In 2009-10 User Choice funding was available for traineeships in the funeral services industry
ranging from certificate II through to certificate IV. There was, however, no evidence of a
demand for traineeships during this period. Only one RTO is currently registered to deliver
funeral services qualifications in the ACT. These qualifications are the Certificate III in Funeral
Operations and Certificate III in Cemetery and Crematorium Operations.

Funeral services qualifications were not eligible under the Productivity Places Program (PPP) in
the ACT during 2009-10. In 2010-11, the Certificate IV in Embalming is included as an eligible
qualification. However, there are no RTOs registered to deliver this qualification in the ACT.
The ACT Government uses the national priority list of eligible qualifications to be targeted under
PPP. If a qualification not on the list is identified by industry as a priority for the ACT, a
business case providing evidence supporting its addition to the national priority list can be
submitted by industry to the Australian Government, through the ACT Department of Education
and Training.

Funeral services qualifications or skill sets have not been offered on the Priorities Support
Program (PSP) Training Priorities List in recent years.




24                                                                                         19 January 2011
Conclusion

The following qualification has been identified as a priority industry-specific training need for the
ACT funeral services industry in 2011-12. This qualification, and associated occupation, has
been identified using the combined evidence of ACT industry feedback, the availability of
training courses in the ACT, and skill shortages presented in the SSA Environmental Scan
2010.

                     Funeral services occupation and qualification for the
                          ACT Industry Training Needs List 2011-12

     Occupation                                           Qualification

     Funeral worker 451399                                Cert III Funeral Operations SIF30308




25                                                                                        19 January 2011

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:4
posted:10/1/2012
language:English
pages:25