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									I did a search on JSTOR for “Chaucer” and “Gender” and found this full-text source.
              Citing Sources




This is what the scholarly article looked like when I pulled it up.
This provides all of the information that I need to write a complete MLA citation.
Author’s last name, first name. “Title of
    Essay.” Name of Journal Vol.Issue (Year):
    Inclusive page numbers. Medium.




This is all of the information that you need to cite an essay from a scholarly
journal—if it isn’t electronic.
Hanning, first name. “Title of Essay.” Name
    of Journal Vol.Issue (Year): Inclusive page
    numbers. Medium.




The last name goes first only for alphabetizing purposes; therefore, second
authors and other names within the citation are in the normal order: the first
name goes first.
Hanning, Robert H. “Title of Essay.” Name
    of Journal Vol.Issue (Year): Inclusive page
    numbers. Medium.




The first name goes second followed by any initial. Titles such as “Dr.” are not
included.
Hanning, Robert H. “From Eva to Ava to
    Eglentyne to Alisoun: Chaucer’s Insight
    Into the Roles Women Play.” Name of
    Journal Vol.Issue (Year): Inclusive page
    numbers. Medium.
The full title of the essay is next, in quotation marks. If there is a title (of a play,
for example) within the essay title, it is underlined or in italics. Capitalize the
significant title words even if that is not the case in the original. Do not put it in
capitals even if it is all in capitals in the original.
Hanning, Robert H. “From Eva to Ava to
    Eglentyne to Alisoun: Chaucer’s Insight
    Into the Roles Women Play.” Signs
    Vol.Issue (Year): Inclusive page numbers.
    Medium.

The name of the journal is capitalized and put in italics or underlined (be
consistent throughout the citation and the works cited page). There is no
punctuation between the name of the journal and the volume—just a space.
Hanning, Robert H. “From Eva to Ava to
    Eglentyne to Alisoun: Chaucer’s Insight
    Into the Roles Women Play.” Signs
    2.Issue (Year): Inclusive page numbers.
    Medium.

The volume number is listed before the issue number. There is no “V” or “vol”;
we know what it is by its placement in the citation.
Hanning, Robert H. “From Eva to Ava to
 Eglentyne to Alisoun: Chaucer’s Insight
 Into the Roles Women Play.” Signs 2.3
 (Year): Inclusive page numbers. Medium


     A period is placed between the volume and issue number.
Hanning, Robert H. “From Eva to Ava to
    Eglentyne to Alisoun: Chaucer’s Insight
    Into the Roles Women Play.” Signs 2.3
    (1977): Inclusive page numbers. Medium.


The year only is placed in parenthesis after the issue (there is a space between
the issue number and the first parenthesis). It is followed by a colon.
Hanning, Robert H. “From Eva to Ava to
    Eglentyne to Alisoun: Chaucer’s Insight
    Into the Roles Women Play.” Signs 2.3
    (1977): 350-99. Print.

There is a space after the colon and then the full page numbers are listed; this
is not the page that you use but the first page of the essay to the last page of
the essay. The page that you cite within the essay or annotated text will, of
course, fall within the pages listed on your works cited page. Put “Print” as the
medium if it is a printed source. If this were not an electronic source, this would
be a complete citation for a scholarly journal essay.
Hanning, Robert H. “From Eva to Ava to
    Eglentyne to Alisoun: Chaucer’s Insight
    Into the Roles Women Play.” Signs 2.3:
    350-99. Database. Date of access.
    Medium.

This information needs to be added to any full text source that is found in an
electronic database.
Hanning, Robert H. “From Eva to Ava to
   Eglentyne to Alisoun: Chaucer’s Insight
   Into the Roles Women Play.” Signs 2.3:
   350-99. JSTOR. Medium. Date of
   access.

JSTOR is both the name of the database and the name of the service. I found
this out from Lauren Jensen, our public services librarian.
Hanning, Robert H. “From Eva to Ava to
    Eglentyne to Alisoun: Chaucer’s Insight
    Into the Roles Women Play.” Signs 2.3:
    350-99. JSTOR. Web. 13 Oct. 2010.



Put “Web” for electronic sources. The date of access is when you found it. Put
the day first, the abbreviated month next (with period) and the year last.
                Citing (Gale) Literature
                   Resource Center
Rozga, Margaret. "Threatening Places, Hiding Places:
        The Midwest in Selected Stories by Joyce Carol Oates."
        Midwestern Miscellany 18 (1990): 34-44. Reprinted in
        Contemporary Literary Criticism. Literature Resource Center.
        Web.13 Oct 2010.




Several of you are using the Gale Literature Resource Center, which reprints
essays published elsewhere. Here is a model citation for that source, which I
took from their site. It has the original citation, the electronic information, and in
between, acknowledges that it has been reprinted.
            Citing (Gale) Literature
               Resource Center
                                                       Acknowledgement
                                                        that it has been
Rozga, Margaret. "Threatening Places, Hiding Places:
                                                           reprinted
     The Midwest in Selected Stories by Joyce Carol Oates."
     Midwestern Miscellany. 18 (1990): 34-44. Reprinted in
     Contemporary Literary Criticism. Literature Resource Center.
     Web.13 Oct 2010.
            Citing (Gale) Literature
               Resource Center
Rozga, Margaret. "Threatening Places, Hiding Places:
     The Midwest in Selected Stories by Joyce Carol Oates."
     Midwestern Miscellany. 18 (1990): 34-44. Reprinted in    Database

     Contemporary Literary Criticism. Literature Resource Center.
     Web. 13 Oct 2010.
                       Citing Books

Goldberg, Jonathan, ed. Queering the
  Renaissance. Durham: Duke U P,
  1994. Print.




 This is a citation for an entire book that was edited by Jonathan Goldberg.
                          Citing Books

Goldberg, Jonathan, ed. Chapter.
    Queering the Renaissance. Durham:
    Duke U P, 1994. Page numbers.
    Print.

If you are only citing or annotating a chapter of the book then clarify that by
adding the name of the chapter and the inclusive page numbers for that
chapter. A chapter is the smallest unit of a book that can be cited.
           Citing Books

Goldberg, Jonathan, ed. Chapter Two.
 Queering the Renaissance. Durham:
 Duke U P, 1994. Page numbers.
 Print.


           I’m citing the second chapter.
                 Citing Books

Goldberg, Jonathan, ed. Chapter Two.
 Queering the Renaissance. Durham:
 Duke U P, 1994. 40-62. Print.




   The second chapter begins on page 40 and ends on page 62.
                         Citing Books
   Goldberg, Jonathan, ed. Chapter
       Two. Queering the Renaissance.
       Durham: Duke U P, 1994. 40-62.
       Print.


While Goldberg is the editor (and wrote a chapter) of this book, he did not write
the second chapter. The editor’s name moves to after the name of the book.
          Citing Books
Chapter Two. Queering the
 Renaissance. Goldberg, Jonathan,
 ed. Durham: Duke U P, 1994. 40-62.
 Print.
                        Citing Books
  Chapter Two. Queering the
      Renaissance. Jonathan Goldberg,
      ed. Durham: Duke U P, 1994. 40-62.
      Print.


Because it is no longer needed for alphabetizing purposes, his last name goes
last, etc.
                Citing Books

Bray, Alan. Chapter Two. Queering
 the Renaissance. Jonathan
 Goldberg, ed. Durham: Duke U P,
 1994. 40-62. Print.


   Alan Bray actually wrote the second chapter in this book.
                         Citing Books

   Bray, Alan. “Homosexuality and the
      Signs of Male Friendship.” Queering
      the Renaissance. Jonathan
      Goldberg, ed. Durham: Duke U P,
      1994. 40-62. Print.
If the essay has a title beyond just “Chapter Two,” include the more descriptive
title in quotation marks and capitalize it as you would any essay.
Laqueur, Thomas. Making Sex: Body
 and Gender From the Greeks to Freud.
 Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 1990.
 Print.



  This book by Thomas Laqueur was completely written by Laqueur.
Laqueur, Thomas. Chapter Four. Making
    Sex: Body and Gender From the Greeks
    to Freud. Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP,
    1990. 114 – 148. Print.



If I wanted to cite a chapter only, I would add the chapter and page number
information.
Laqueur, Thomas. “Representing Sex.”
    Making Sex: Body and Gender From the
    Greeks to Freud. Cambridge, MA:
    Harvard UP, 1990. 114 – 148. Print.



Chapter Four of Laqueur’s book has a specific title, however, so I go with the
more descriptive chapter title.
Laqueur, Thomas. “Representing Sex.”
    Making Sex: Body and Gender From the
    Greeks to Freud. Cambridge, MA:
    Harvard UP, 1990. 114 – 148. Print.



This is the full citation for a chapter in a book in which each chapter is written
by the same author without an editor.
  Citing Paraphrases and
         Summaries
of More Than One Sentence
In The Tempest, Prospero is a
figure of colonialism. Shakespeare
culled source materials from an
essay on the New World for his
description of Prospero’s island,
and the descriptions and treatment
of Caliban echoes and reflects the
behavior of colonists of the New
World.
This is a summary or paraphrase of two sentences that I made up for
demonstrative purposes.
In The Tempest, Prospero is a
figure of colonialism. Shakespeare
culled source materials from an
essay on the New World for his
description of Prospero’s island,
and the descriptions and treatment
of Caliban echoes and reflects the
behavior of colonists of the New
World (Greenblatt 145).
Citing this way is the most common citation problem that I see with students. It
is a good attempt but it is not a complete citation.
In The Tempest, Prospero is a
figure of colonialism. Shakespeare
culled source materials from an
essay on the New World for his
description of Prospero’s island,
and the descriptions and treatment
of Caliban echoes and reflects the
behavior of colonists of the New
World (Greenblatt 145).
As it is cited, only the green text is cited; the first sentence is from the source
but is not cited.
In his essay on the language and
education of Caliban, Stephen
Greenblatt explains that in The
Tempest, Prospero is a figure of
colonialism. Shakespeare culled
source materials from an essay on the
New World for his description of
Prospero’s island, and the descriptions
and treatment of Caliban echoes and
reflects the behavior of colonists of the
New World (Greenblatt 145).
You must put the author’s name in the first sentence of a multi-sentence summary or
paraphrase—with no page number until the summary/ paraphrase is completed.
In his essay on the language and
education of Caliban, Stephen
Greenblatt explains that in The
Tempest, Prospero is a figure of
colonialism. Shakespeare culled
source materials from an essay on the
New World for his description of
Prospero’s island, and the descriptions
and treatment of Caliban echoes and
reflects the behavior of colonists of the
New World (Greenblatt 145).
In his essay on the language and
education of Caliban, Stephen
Greenblatt explains that in The
Tempest, Prospero is a figure of
colonialism. Shakespeare culled
source materials from an essay on the
New World for his description of
Prospero’s island, and the descriptions
and treatment of Caliban echoes and
reflects the behavior of colonists of the
New World (Greenblatt 145).
If you have the author’s name within the summary/ paraphrase, you do not put
his or her name in the parenthesis—only the page number).
In his essay on the language and
education of Caliban, Stephen
Greenblatt explains that in The
Tempest, Prospero is a figure of
colonialism. Shakespeare culled
source materials from an essay on the
New World for his description of
Prospero’s island, and the descriptions
and treatment of Caliban echoes and
reflects the behavior of colonists of the
New World (145).
This is the full and correct citation for a summary or paraphrase of more than

								
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