Joel Ilisevic

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Joel Ilisevic

Mr. McCardle

English III AP

20 September 2005

                 The Count of Monte Cristo: An Annotated Bibliography

“Alexander Dumas.” The Spectator 43, No. 2216 (1870): 1506-1507. Rpt. in Nineteenth

        Century Literature Criticism. Ed. Laurie L. Harris. Vol. 11. Detroit: Gale, 1986.

        60-62. In this essay, the author compares the entire story to an enormous

        daydream. He notes the lack of details in the story as being the reason for it

        having a dream-like quality, mainly the part between Dantés’ escape from the

        Chateau d’If and his arrival as a count in Italy. The actions performed by the

        Count are possible, yet the occurrence of them involving the same person would

        be uncommon. The writer blames the unrealistic actions of Dantés on the color of

        Dumas’ skin, which was “tropical”. This is a rather racist view on Dumas and the

        fact that the author blames the many problems on his skin color is a testament to

        his racist tendencies, therefore creating doubt in the fairness of the criticism.

Aubrey, Bryan. “Critical Essay on The Count of Monte Cristo.” Novels for Students. Vol.

        19. Gale Research, 2004. Literature Resource Center. Gale Group. Mayde Creek

        High School Library, Houston, TX. 9 September 2005

        <http://galenet.galegroup.com>. Aubrey is voicing how Dumas used many

        different allusions in writing The Count of Monte Cristo. The comparison of

        Dantés to a Byronic hero is just superficial, as the Count is not guilty of any

        transgression against society, which was just something to add to the “literary
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       pot”. He compared the Count to Lord Ruthven from The Vampyre, as both had

       escaped from death to exact revenge on the living. It is also apparent that Dumas

       used several of Shakespeare’s characters in developing the Count.

Marinetti, Amelita. “Death, Resurrection, and Fall in Dumas’ ‘Comte de Monte-Cristo.’”

       The French Review 50, No. 2 (1976): 260-269. Rpt. in Nineteenth Century

       Literature Criticism. Ed. Laurie L. Harris. Vol. 11. Detroit: Gale, 1986. 83-86.

       Marinetti believes that the hero, Dantés, goes through two cycles, which are

       defined as the fall and the resurrection. The first cycle began when Dantés was

       thrown into the Chateau d’If, followed by his resurrection when Faria gives

       Dantés “much knowledge, wisdom, wealth, and strength of character to make it

       possible to play the role of a god…”. The second occurred after all of the revenge

       was wrecked upon the Count’s enemies, he became corrupted in the process. He

       does his best to right his wrongs against the innocent by helping Maximilien

       reunite with his love Valentine. She briefly covers the motif of temptation and the

       main theme of the book, which is to “wait and hope” for the right moment.

Oliphant, Margaret. “Alexandre Dumas.” Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine 114, No.

       693 (1873): 111-130. Rpt. in Nineteenth Century Literature Criticism. Ed. Laurie

       L. Harris. Vol. 11. Detroit: Gale, 1986. 65-66. Oliphant argues that Dantés is a

       character with which people can identify, but that the Count is not. Dantés is a

       person similar to the reader, while the Count is absorbed with revenge that he is

       like a magician and cannot easily be identified with. She also says the book is

       framed after Arabian Nights, stating that both are tales of retribution. She reveals

       that nothing is forced in the tale of Dantés, like the agony he experiences when he
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       is separated from his family and imprisoned in the Chateau d’If. The Count’s

       desire for revenge is petty and causes the reader to lose sympathy, almost to the

       point of caring more for the victims of his deeds. This feels like an accurate

       depiction of the Count’s never-ending desire for revenge, which leads to the

       destruction of many lives, including that of his former love Mercedes.

Santsbury, George. “Alexandre Dumas.” The Fortnightly Review 24, No. 17 (1878): 527-

       542. Rpt. in Nineteenth Century Literature Criticism. Ed. Laurie L. Harris. Vol.

       11. Detroit: Gale, 1986. 69. In this essay, the author gives a strong

       characterization of Edmond Dantés. He views the novel as a waste, except for the

       narrative of Dantés. Santsbury focuses on the book’s lack of description about the

       characters and the plot. He feels as though this was written by Balzac because so

       many of his ideas for characters were incorporated in the book. This critique

       seems like a stretch because I feel that the book was very descriptive of its

       characters.

“The Chronicler of Romance: Le Comte de Monte-Cristo”. Twayne’s World Authors.

       Gale Group. Mayde Creek High School Library, Houston, TX. 9 September 2005

       <http://galenet.galegroup.com>. The author emphasizes the impact of realism in

       The Count of Monte Cristo. He points out how actual people were used as

       characters in the book. For example, he compares the character of Dantés to

       Picaud, the person who actually experienced the events of unfair imprisonment

       and then took revenge upon his enemies. But perhaps the most significant of the

       literary elements is the setting. The point of the story was to make the realistic

       imagery tangible, to make the impossible possible. The author mentions how, like
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d’Artangnan, the fictional character of the Count has become “historical”. People

traced the life of the characters as though they existed after the book’s

publication. While the characters are just a figure of the people’s imagination and

show how plausible the book’s characters can be, Dumas goes the extra mile to

incorporate the settings of the characters’ lives to make the characters seem more

life-like.

				
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