INTERTEXTUALITY IN ASTLEY

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					                        INTERTEXTUALITY IN ASTLEY

In page order:

p.3 Shakespeare - Hamlet

p.8 Cyclops (The Cyclops were almost like human beings but of a gigantic size and
with only one eye in the middle of their heads. Essentially there were three of them:
Brontes (thunderer), Steropes (Lightener), and Arges (Bright). They were born to
Gaea and Uranus. They were the first smiths. Volcanos were believed to be the
aftermath of their underground work.

p8 Crusader Rabbit, p. 65, 165 Mutant Lobe from Outer Space

p.9 Laurence Sterne 1713–68, English author, b. Ireland. He wrote Tristram Shandy
p.10 Mozart, Beethoven
p.13 Cecil B deMille Director, Producer, Editor, Writer, even Actor: one of the silver
screen's greatest talents. Though throughout his multi-faceted he made an invaluable
contribution to movie making,. Three of his films were nominated for Best Picture of the year
(CLEOPATRA (1934), THE GREATEST SHOW ON EARTH (which won in 1952), and THE
TEN COMMANDMENTS (1956).
p.13 Authorised Version of Bible (King James)
p.14 Lawrence (D.H.?)
p.15 Dorothea McKellar: My Country (I Love a Sunburnt Country)
p.15 Captain Cook (The Great Gatsby??); p. 165
p. 15 The Flying Dutchman is a ghost ship that can never go home, but must sail "the
seven seas" forever. The Flying Dutchman is usually spotted from afar, sometimes
glowing with ghostly light. If she is hailed by another ship, her crew will often try to
send messages to land, to people long since dead.
p. 15 caracoles- half turns performed by horse and rider
p.16 Tennyson The Bugle Sounds
p.20 Lotos-eaters; Lotos Land – Tennyson, The Lotos Eaters
p.25 Ogden Nash (1902 –1971) was an American poet best known for writing pithy
and funny light verse.
p.43 Biblical quotes
p.47 Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice (‘gentle rain from heaven’ – mercy)
p.82 Mendelssohn
p.84 Isadora Duncan (1877 - 1927) was an American dancer believed to be founder of
modern dance.
p.97 Ella Fitzgerald
p.97 gaucho – Jorge Luis Borges. 1899- 1986 Argentine poet, essayist, and short-story
writer, whose tales of fantasy and dreamworlds are classics of the 20th-century world
literature.
p.102 Recamier. Mme., in painting by David, 1800.
p.104,106,107 Johnny Hodges. Born 1906 in Cambridge, Massachusetts, d. May 11,
1970 in New York City) was an alto saxophonist and lead player of Duke Ellington's
saxophone section. He spent more than 40 years with Ellington.
p.104 Tennyson The Lotos Eaters
p.106 Tennyson The Lotos Eaters
p106 Coleridge The Ancient Mariner (glittering eye)
p.106 Rupert Brooke The Soldier (‘If I should die …’)
p.110 Tennyson - petals
p.110 ‘Did yo hear dat mockin’ bird sing las’ night’
p.114 fugue; Appassinata
p.130 Rousseau
p.140 Mozart
p.149 Hamelin Pied Piper (Browning)
p.161 Gang of One (Joh Bjelke-Peterson) Golden Circle
p.162 Dvorak, New World Symphony
p.165-166; 175 Aboriginal myth
p.167 Plato’s Republic

Music
14 fortissimo
p. 97 Ella Fitzgerald
107 Johnny Hodges and his sax
109 Mussorgsky's BORIS GODOUNOV
p.110 ‘Did yo hear dat mockin’ bird sing las’ night’

p. 128 arpeggios
140 Mozart
142 music of nature, symphonies of squall
82 Mendelssohn
162 Dvorak, new world symphony
14 Beethoven
114 Appassionata sonata (Beethoven)

Art
p. 130 Rousseau; The Frenchman Henri (Le Douanier) Rousseau b. May 21, 1844, d.
Sept. 2, 1910, having spent most of his life as a customs inspector (or douanier),
devoted himself to painting upon his retirement and became the most distinguished
primitive artist of the modern era. His gifts included an exceptional sense of design
and feeling for color, but it was his exotic and sometimes bizarre vision of a purely
imaginary tropical world that made his works unique and unforgettable.
(cf Jean-Jacques Rousseau Philosopher 1712 – 1778)
p.102 Recamier




Madame Recamier by David
French
p. 5 sera comans iris
p. 10 longueurs
p. 10 the sweet awakening (Catullus?)
18 couchant
p. 19 nostalgie de la boue
22 distraite
66 in-front-of-the-guests bonhomie
p. 73 double entendre, specialite de la muh-haison
82 non, ma mere
84 ne (negation)
86 fin de siecle

127 degage
149 entrechats
150 grand jete
98 objet juste

Latin, Greek, grammar
p. 8 cyclops
p. 10 conjugate that verb
p. 64 sameness of semantic signals
p. 40 absolvo te
41 per minutias ad coelum
74 conjugate all forms of envy



Literature references

p.3 Shakespeare - Hamlet
p. 9 Sterne
10 Arthur Rimbaud, rebel poet
p.14 Lawrence (D.H.?)
p.15 Dorothea McKellar: My Country (I Love a Sunburnt Country)
p.15 Captain Cook (The Great Gatsby??); p. 165
p.16 Tennyson The Bugle Sounds
p.20 Lotos-eaters; Lotos Land – Tennyson, The Lotos Eaters
p. 25 Ogden Nash
p.47 Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice (‘gentle rain from heaven’ – mercy)
81 Helen of Troy
p.97 gaucho – Jorge Luis Borges
p.104 Tennyson The Lotos Eaters
p.106 Tennyson The Lotos Eaters
p106 Coleridge The Ancient Mariner (glittering eye)
p.106 Rupert Brooke The Soldier (‘If I should die …’)
p.110 Tennyson - petals
149 Gerard Manly Hopkins ‘Spring’, “What is all this juice and all this joy?”
167 Plato’s Republic




Popular culture, contemporary references

p. 8 Crusader rabbit
Last episode: Crusader VS. The State Of Texas (1-15)

Inspired by the example of the great Knights of the Round Table, Crusader Rabbit
steps forward to heroically help the oppressed citizenry of the world. Although he is
small in stature and his character design is based on that of a child – reports are that
Alex Anderson fashioned CR's walk on his small son's waddle, and the rabbit's facial
characteristics on child actor, Butch Jenkins – Crusader Rabbit is chock full of
righteous energy and aggressiveness. One of the Crusader's first crusades is to rescue
a hapless tiger, Ragland T. Tiger from his circus cage. Although Rags is much larger
physically and obviously is biologically a tiger (and therefore supposedly a fierce
predator), his personality is as docile and meek as Crusader Rabbit is insistent and
assertive. This makes the duo a wonderfully ironic and compatible pair. With his new
found sidekick by his, uh….side, Crusader Rabbit learns that his Jackrabbit cousins
are being persecuted in the titular State of Texas. It seems that the Jackrabbits are
eating far too many carrots and thus depleting the state's carotene supply. Apparently
this carrot-depletion is to the point where the Texans, fearing that the eyesight of their
cowboy sharpshooters is being damaged, have hired famed hunter Frank Sawbuck
(known as the "Chief Hare Remover") to deport the jackrabbits to the North Pole.
Crusader Rabbit with Rags in tow, rides to the rescue in order to fight for the equal
rights for his oppressed cousin Jackrabbits. Any subtle civil rights overtones in the
script are open to interpretation, of course, but seem highly likely considering the
climate of the times and the nature of the animators involved. Ultimately, Crusader
Rabbit resolves the situation by offering a détente of sorts when he converts all the
carrot-eaters into cream puff-eaters instead.
Aired: August 1, 1950
p. 13 Cecil B de M
P.84 Isadora (Duncan)
p. 106 Alfred Fatha Hodges
(p. 15 captain cook, endeavour)
P.161 Gang of One (Joh Bjelke-Peterson) Golden Circle, virge the ripper

Biblical
p.13 Authorised Version of Bible (King James)
p. 43- 44 James 1 v. 26, St John the Divine, Solomon
p. 48 “whosoever putteth away his wife and taketh another committeth adultery”.
p. 54 holy of holies
p. 100 Christ’s birth
p. 108 Jahveh-like ego

Botanical (important?? – lushness, visual, context both emotional and physical)
p. 58-9 Hibiscus, poinsettia
p. 86 gladioli
88 acalypha
alamander vines
101 guinea vine
Magnolia
138 papaw trees
144 blown passion vine

				
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