ELEMENTS OF FICTION by jlOY3V

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									ELEMENTS OF FICTION
            EXPOSITION:

   THE PART IN A STORY OR WORK OF
    DRAMA IN WHICH THE CHARACTERS ARE
    INTRODUCED AS WELL AS THE SETTING
    AND BASIC SITUATION.
      RISING ACTION (Conflict)

   THE PART OF THE PLOT WHEN THE
    CENTRAL CONFLICT IS INTRODUCED…
    TENSION IS BUILDING
                CLIMAX

   THE TURNING POINT IN THE PLOT. THE
    MOMENT OF GREATEST INTENSITY OR
    WHEN THE MAIN ACTION HAPPENS
          FALLING ACTION

   FOLLOWED BY THE CLIMAX- WHEN THE
    INTENSITY BEGINS TO LIGHTEN AND
    THE CONFLICT IS ON ITS WAY TO A
    RESOLUTION
            RESOLUTION

   THE PART OF THE PLOT IN WHICH THE
    CONFLICT HAS BEEN RESOLVED AND THE
    STORY COMES TO AN END.
       Inciting Incident

   the event that introduces
 Is
 the central conflict.
                 SETTING

   TIME AND PLACE IN WHICH A STORY
    TAKES PLACE. (Past, present, future, or
    specific year, season, time of day)
    (Region, country, town, or social,
    economic, or cultural environment)
              SUSPENSE

   UNCERTAINTY OF WHAT WILL COME.
    AUTHOR DOES THIS BY WITHOLDING
    DETAILS OR HINTING AT WHAT MIGHT
    HAPPEN.
                 THEME

   THE KEY MESSAGE OR INSIGHT INTO
    LIFE THAT THE STORY REVEALS. IN
    SOME STORIES, IT IS STATED DIRECTLY.
    HOWEVER, IN MOST STORIES, IT IS
    SUGGESTED OR IMPLIED.
               SYMBOL

   SOMETHING THAT STANDS FOR ITSELF
    AND REPRESENTS SOMETHING ELSE.
             FLASH BACK

   A LITERARY DEVICE IN WHICH AN
    EARLIER ACTION “FLASHES BACK” OUT
    OF CHRONOLOGICAL ORDER
          FORESHADOWING

   A HINT AT WHAT WILL COME LATER IN
    THE STORY
           IN MEDIAS RES

   BEGINNING A STORY IN THE MIDDLE OF
    THE PLOT

“By the Waters of Babylon”
               ALLUSION

   A REFERENCE TO A WELL-KNOWN
    PERSON, PLACE, EVENT, LITERARY
    WORK, OR WORK OF ART

“By the Waters of Babylon” (biblical
  allusion)
“The Sound and the Fury” (literary allusion)
              CHARACTERS:
     (round, flat, dynamic, static, and foil)

   ROUND/THREE DIMENSIONAL- Possesses
    many different character traits, appears
    realistic to the reader.
                     FLAT

   Has only one basic trait.
       STOCK CHARACTER

 Is one found again and again
  in literary works.
 For example, Cinderella, the
  wicked stepmother, or the
  wicked queen in “Snow White
  and the Seven Dwarfs.”
                DYNAMIC:

   A character who experiences some major
    change by the end of the story
   STATIC: A               FOIL: A character
    character who            intended to stand
    stays the same           in contrast of
    regardless of what       another character
    he experiences
   INDIRECT CHARACTERIZATION-
    Showing a character’s personality through
    his/her actions, thoughts, feelings, words,
    appearance, or through another
    character’s observations.

   DIRECT CHARACTERIZATION- The
    narrator directly tells a character’s traits.
         EXTERNAL CONFLICT-

   THE MAIN CHARACTER STRUGGLES
    AGAINST AN OUTSIDE FORCE

   (man vs. man, man vs.
    nature/(supernatural force)
        INTERNAL CONFLICT

   INVOLVES A CHARACTER IN CONFLICT
    WITH HIM/HERSELF
             DIALOGUE

   CONVERSATION BETWEEN CHARACTERS.
    OFTEN IT REVEALS IMPORTANT HINTS
    INTO A CHARACTER’S PERSONALITY
           POINT OF VIEW

   THE PERSPECTIVE COMING FROM
    WHOEVER IS TELLING THE STORY
   1ST PERSON- Narrator is a character in the
    action

   3rd PERSON OMNISCIENT- “All-knowing”
    narrator. Knows more about the situation and
    characters then the characters themselves.

   3RD PERSON LIMITED- Narrator who only tells
    the thoughts and feelings of one character
                IRONY

   GENERAL TERM FOR LITERARY
    TECHNIQUES THAT PORTRAY
    DIFFERENCES BETWEEN APPEARANCE
    AND REALITY, EXPECTATION AND
    RESULT, OR MEANING AND INTENTION
          DRAMATIC IRONY

   CONTRADICTION BETWEEN WHAT A
    CHARACTER THINKS AND WHAT THE
    AUDIENCE KNOWS TO BE TRUE

   (“The Open Window”)
        SITUATIONAL IRONY

   AN EVENT OCCURS THAT DIRECTLY
    CONTRADICTS THE EXPECTATIONS OF
    THE CHARACTERS, THE READERS, OR
    THE AUDIENCE.
   “Contents of a Dead Man’s Pockets”
             VERBAL IRONY

   WORDS ARE USED TO SUGGEST THE
    OPPOSITE OF WHAT IS MEANT

   (Ex. Sarcasm, puns)
                GENRE

   CATEGORIES OR TYPES OF LITERATURE
            PROTAGONIST

   THE MAIN CHARACTER- MUST APPEAR
    REAL TO THE READER. (Usually has some
    kind of flaw or imperfection)
            ANTAGONIST

   THE CHARACTER WHO OPPOSES THE
    PROTAGONIST
                 MOOD

   THE FEELING CREATED IN THE READER
    BY A LITERARY WORK OR PASSAGE
               IMAGERY

   DESCRIPTIVE LANGUAGE USED IN
    STORIES TO RE-CREATE SENSORY
    EXPERIENCES.

								
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