Literature Circle Roles by 2Js0Tdf

VIEWS: 8 PAGES: 12

									                        Resources on Literature Circles
Topic A: Reader Response

PDF files from each chapter of Harvey Daniels’ 2nd edition on Literature Circles.
Type in Daniels for the author search to access the Daniels’ second edition. Click
link for book and the scroll down to access each chapter posted online.
http://www.stenhouse.com

Literature Circles.com:
http://www.literaturecircles.com

Lori Rog's site on Literature Circles
    http://web.rbe.sk.ca/lang/Spring%202001/literature_circles_revisited.htm
Literature Circle Roles
                                 (Harvey Daniels)
  Required Roles

  Discussion Director:
  Official responsibility for taking on the leadership role
   *Convenes Group
   *Poses some good discussion questions
   *Solicits contributions from other members

Literary Luminary
  Helps the group to revisit/ reenter the text
   *Identifies memorable sections of the texts
   *Shares these sections with group by reading them
   aloud

Connector
  Takes members from the world of the text to their own worlds
    *Connects book to:
                        *own experience
                        *other texts/stories/movies
                        *events

Illustrator
    *Creates and shares a graphic response to the text



  Optional Roles
  Researcher
  Summarizer
  Character Captain
  Vocabulary Enricher
  Travel Tracer
Key Features of Literature Circles
1. Students choose their own reading materials.

2.      Small temporary groups are formed based on book
     choice.

3.      Different groups read different books.

4.      Groups meet on a regular, predictable schedule to
     discuss their reading.

5. Kids use written or drawn notes to guide both
   their reading and discussion.

6.      Discussion topics come from the students.

7.      Group meetings aim to be open, natural
     conversations about books, so personal connections,
     digressions and open-ended questions are
     welcomed.

8.      In newly forming groups students play a rotating
     assortment of task roles.

9.     The teacher serves as facilitator, not a group
     member or instructor.

10. Evaluation is by teacher observation and student
  self-assessment.
       DISCUSSION DIRECTOR
Name:
Group:
Book:
Assignment: p                 to    p

I am the Discussion Director. My job is to write down some
important questions about what the members of the group
thought and felt about the selection. These questions will be
ones that I think the group members will really want to talk
about. I have to keep the discussion going making sure
everyone is included, and everyone does his or her special
role.

1.




2.
       Literary Luminary
Name:
Group:
Book:
Assignment: p            to   p

I am the Literary Luminary. My job is to help the
group to revisit memorable parts of the story. This
means I must identify one or two interesting, or
powerful passages in the story. I will read that
part aloud and see what the group members think
of it. I can then share why I thought it was
important to share.

I chose this part to share:
Page:
Why I selected it:



I chose this part to share:
Page:
Why I selected it:
              CONNECTOR
Name:
Group:
Book:
Assignment: p                to    p

I am the connector. My job is to find connections
between the book and the world outside. This
means connecting the reading to:

 My own life (text to life)
 Happenings at school or in the neighborhood or in the
  newspaper (text to world)
 To other books or stories (text to text)
 Other writings on the same topic (text to text)
 Other writings by the same author (text to author)
 Some of the things today’s reading reminded me of were………
           Artful Artist
Name:
Group:
Book:
Assignment: p           to   p

I am the Artful Artist. My job is to illustrate
something important in story. This means that I
might draw something that shows an important
idea, or an important event or scene, or character
in the story. I will share my artwork and ask the
group to think about why I drew what I did. I can
then share why I thought it was important to draw.
              SUMMARIZER
Name:
Group:
Book:
Assignment: p                  to    p
I am the summarizer. My job is to include a short summary of
today’s reading. I must include the important main points in a
quick (one or two minute statement) of what the reading
assignment was about. I will jot down notes on the Key Point
Guide to help me to tell about what the reading assignment was
about.
KEY POINTS GUIDE
Important Characters:




Setting:

Problem:

Important Events:
              1.
              2.
              3.
              4.

Resolution:
                 RESEARCHER
                         (FICTION AND NONFICTION)
Name:

Group:

Book:
Assignment          p                     To p
 Researcher: Your job is to find some background information related to an
 important idea in the reading. Search through available references such as library
 books, reference books such as the encyclopedia, magazines. You might even
 interview someone who knows about your topic. Ask your teacher to “bookmark”
 some websites on the Internet so that you can do your investigation on-line. Be
 prepared to share an interesting tidbit related to your reading.
               NONFICTION DISCUSSION SHEET
Name:                                      Title:
Author:
    While you are reading or after you have finished reading, please prepare for the group
    meeting by doing the following:

Connections: My job is to find connections between the book and the world outside.
This means connecting the reading to:
    My own life (text to life)
    Happenings at school or in the neighborhood or in the newspaper (text to world)
    To other books or stories (text to text)
    Other writings on the same topic (text to text)
    Other writings by the same author (text to author)
    Some of the things today’s reading reminded me of were…




    Discussion questions: My job is to pose “big questions” to the group about the
    most important ideas you read about. Don’t worry about the details. Ask questions
    about the main ideas and big understandings in your reading.
                                          Big Question Starters:
    Describe the...                        List the events..
    Tell about..                                     What are the differences...
    What are some examples of              What are the reasons why...
    Explain how..                          What were the causes...
    What are the characteristics of What were the reasons for..
    What were the results of               Tell how..




    Passages: Your job is to locate passages that are confusing. While you are reading
    identify a few passages to bring to the attention of your group to discuss and to clarify.




    Graphic Artist: Your job is to create a sketch, diagram, flow chart, a web or any
    kind of visual image that helps teach your group members about the idea or ideas in
    the selection you read. (Use back of sheet)
                     NONFICTION JIGSAW SHEET
 Name:                                      Title:
 Author:
     Everyone in your group is reading something different but related. While you are reading or
     after you have finished reading, please prepare for the group meeting by doing the
     following:


 Summary and reactions: Your job is to prepare a brief summary of your reading
 and your reaction to it. Your summary should give the gist of what your read and should
 include some key points and highlights.




 Connections: My job is to find connections between the book and the world outside.
 This means connecting the reading to:
     My own life (text to life)
     Happenings at school or in the neighborhood or in the newspaper (text to world)
     To other books or stories (text to text)
     Other writings on the same topic (text to text)
     Other writings by the same author (text to author)
     Some of the things today’s reading reminded me of were…




 Passages: Mark some lines or sections that you could read aloud to help other group
 members understand this text.




Graphic Artist: Your job is to create a sketch, diagram, flow chart, a web or any kind
of visual image that helps teach your group members about the idea or ideas in the
selection you read. (Use back of sheet)

When the group meets everyone will take turns identifying his or her book by author and title and
by providing a brief summary and personal reaction. Then, everyone will join in comparing and
connecting whatever seems valuable and interesting about your readings. Contribute your
illustrations, passages and other notes wherever they fit.
                               Open-Ended Questions
                          Fat Questions requiring Fat Answers
                                (Sloan & Vandergrift)

1.  Where and when does the story take place? How do you know? If the story took place
somewhere else or in a different time, how would it be changed?

2.    What incident, problem, conflict, or situation does the author use to get the story started?

3.   What does the author do to create suspense, to make you want to read on to find out what
happens?

4.    Trace the main events of the story. Could you       change their order or leave any of them
out? Why or why not?

5. Think of a different ending to the story. How would the rest of story have to change to fit the
new ending?

6.    Did the story end the way you expected it to? What        clues did the author offer to
prepare you to expect this ending? Did you recognize these clues as important to the story as you
were first reading/hearing it?

7.    What kind of person is the main character? How do you know?

8.     Are any characters changed during the story? If they are, how are they different? What
changed them? Did it seem believable?

9.       Some characters play small but important roles in the story. Name such a character. Why
is this character necessary for the story?

10. Who is the teller of the story? How would the story            change if someone else in the
book or an outside narrator told the story?

11. Think about the characters in the story. Are any of them the same type of character that you
met in other stories?

12.      Did you have storing feelings as you read the story? What did the author do to make you
feel strongly?

13.    What questions would you ask if the author were here? Which would be the most
important question? How might the author answer it?

14.     What idea or ideas does this story make you think about? How does the author get you to
think about this?

								
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