Vicious Verbs by VEZfoS

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									Vicious Verbs



 Designed by
Elisa Paramore
               Vicious Verbs

   A verb is a word that expresses one of
    three things:
     an action
     an occurrence
     a state of being
             3 Classes of Verbs

   Verbs may be divided into 3 different classes:
   transitive verbs, which require an object to
    complete their meaning as in the sentence:
    Mary admires him.
   intransitive verbs, which are complete in
    themselves as in the sentence: John
    trembled.
   and, linking verbs, which link a subject to its
    complement as in the sentence: Phyllis is a
    beauty.
            Linking Verbs

 Although most verbs show action,
  linking verbs do not. They simply give
  information about the subject
 The most common linking verbs are: is,
  am, are, was, were, feel, appear, look,
  become and seem
                 “to be” Verbs

   “to be”
       – Singular present forms- “am”- use with “I” only,
         use “is” with all singular subjects, except “you”
       – Past singular form- use “was” with all singular
         subjects, including “I”, but not with “you”
       – Plural form- “are”- use with all plural subjects &
         with “you”
       – Past Plural form- “were”- use with all plural
         subjects and with “you”
       – Hint: do not use “be” by itself with any subject
      Examples of “to be” Verbs

   Present Singular form examples:
    I  am tired.
     It is late.
     The wind is blowing.

   Past Singular form examples:
    I was awake early.
     He was seated in the rear
   Present Plural form examples:
     You are attractive.
     The students are busy.
     They are all outside.

   Past Plural form examples:
     They were singing.
     You were lucky to miss being drafted
           “to have” Verbs

 Present Singular form- “has”- use with
  all singular subjects except “I’ and “you”
 Plural form- “have”- use with all plural
  subjects and “I” and “you”
     examples of “to have” verbs

   Singular form examples:
     He  has a cold.
     The book has a torn page.
     It has a bright red cover.

   Plural form examples:
    I have five dollars.
     You have a cold.
     The women have new cars.
             “to go” Verbs

 Singular form- “goes”-use with all
  singular subjects except “I” and “you”
 Plural form- “go”- use with all plural
  subjects and “I” and “you”
      Examples of “to go” Verbs

   Singular form examples:
     She  goes to sleep early.
     The dog goes out before dinner.
     It goes to its favorite tree.

   Plural form examples:
    I go to the garage daily.
     The men go this way.
     You go too far when you drive.
             “to do” Verbs

 Singular form- “does”- use with all
  singular subjects except “I” and “you”
 Plural form- “do”- use with all plural
  subjects and “I” and “you”
      Examples of “to do” Verbs

   Singular form examples:
     She  does important work.
     It does not look right.

   Plural form examples:
     You  do the work!
     I do too much driving,
                   Verb Tense
   Verb tense indicates the relationship between an
    action or a state of being and the passage of time
   There are 6 principle tenses:
   Present tense indicates that something is now.
    Example: He is talking to the gun club.
   Past tense indicates that something has happened in
    the past. Making the past tense of most verbs is most
    widely accomplished by simply adding “d”, “ed”
    Example: He talked to the gun club yesterday.
   Future tense indicates that something will happen. It
    is expressed by adding the word “will” in front of a
    present tense verb. Example: He will talk to the gun
    club.
   Present perfect tense expresses a past action that extends to the
    present but is not yet completed. It is expressed by simply
    placing the words “have” or“has” in front of a past tense verb.
    Example: He has talked to the gun club everyday.
   Past perfect tense expresses a past action that was completed
    before some other past action. It is expressed by simply adding
    the word “had” to a past tense verb. Example: This morning I
    saw the speaker who had talked to the gun club.
   Future perfect tense expresses an action that will be completed
    before some future time.This tense is expressed by adding the
    words “will have” in front of a past tense verb. Example: He will
    have talked to the gun club before next Thursday.
     Subject/ Verb Agreement

 It is very important to remember that a
  verb should agree with its subject in
  person and in number.
 Hint: In most cases if a subject uses an
  “s” form, the verb will not have an “s”
  and visa versa.
    Finding the Subject & Verb

 To find the subject ask who or what the
  sentence is about
 To find the verb, ask what the sentence
  says about the subject
 A second way to find the verb is to put I,
  you, he, she, it or they in front of the
  word that is thought to be the verb
    Subject/Verb Agreement Rules

   When a phrase comes between a subject and
    its verb, make sure that the verb agrees with
    the subject of the sentence and not with a
    noun found in the phrase.
   In the sentence, “The car with new tires costs
    more than other cars”, the subject is singular
    (car), therefore the verb also needs to be
    singular (costs)
                Rule # 2

 Phrases beginning with “In addition to”
  or “As well as” do not change a subject’s
  number:
 In the sentence “ Her car, as well as the
  other two, was broken into.” the subject
  is singular (car), therefore the verb is
  also singular (was).
                 Rule # 3

 A compound subject joined by the word
  “and” usually takes a plural verb. One
  exception occurs when parts of the
  subject refer to a single entity.
 In the sentence “Ice cream and cake is
  my favorite dessert,” ice cream and cake
  is one entity, therefore “is” is the correct
  verb tense.
                Rule # 4

 Another exception occurs when a
  compound subject is preceded by the
  word “Each” or “Every”
 In the sentence: “Every car and truck on
  the lot was sold,” both car and truck are
  singular, therefore the verb “was” is
  correct.
                Rule # 5

 Indefinite pronouns such as “Each” and
  “Everyone” tend to be singular.
 In the sentence “Each of them is right,”
  the verb “is” must be used because it is
  also singular.
 In the sentence “Everyone is doing it,”
  the verb “is” is used because it needs to
  agree with the singular subject
  “Everyone”
                    Rule # 6

   The words “all”, “any”, “none” and “some” may
    be either singular or plural.
   In the sentence “Some of his time is spent at
    home,” the subject “some” is singular,
    therefore it requires a verb with an “s”
   In the sentence, “When they get home at
    night, some of them watch television,” some is
    plural, therefore a verb without “s” is needed.
                Rule # 7

 Two singular subjects joined by “or” or
  “nor” take a singular verb.
 In the sentence, “Either Ann or Al is
  going to pick up pizza” both and Ann
  and Al are the subjects, but they are
  singular so a verb with an “s” is required.
                 Rule # 8

 Two plural subjects joined by “or” or
  “nor” take a plural verb.
 In the sentence, “Either the girls or the
  boys are going.” Girls and boys are
  plural, so the plural verb “are” is
  required.
                    Rule # 9

   If one of the subjects in the sentence is
    singular and one is plural, the verb should
    agree in number with the subject closest to
    the verb.
   In the sentence, “Ann or the boys are going”
    the plural verb “are” is used because the
    plural subject “boys” is closest to it.
   In the sentence, “The boys or Ann is going,”
    the singular subject Ann is closest to the verb
    so the singular verb “is” is required.
                   Rule # 10

   When a sentence begins with “there”, the
    subject tends to follow the verb.
   In the sentence, “There was one hole in the
    muffler, there were two holes in the tire,” the
    singular subject “hole” requires the use of the
    singular verb “was” in the first part of the
    sentence. In the second part of the sentence
    the plural subject “holes” requires a plural
    verb, “were”.
                Rule # 11

 When “there” precedes a compound
  subject, the verb is singular if the first
  part of the subject is singular.
 In the sentence, “There is a hole in the
  muffler and two flat tires,” the words
  “hole” and “tires” are the subjects,
  however the singular verb “is” is
  required because the first subject (hole)
  is singular.
                    Rule # 12

   When a subject complement such as “my”
    follows a linking verb, make sure that the verb
    agrees with the subject.
   In the sentence, “Cars and trucks are my
    hobby,” the subject is cars and trucks, which
    is plural, therefore the plural verb “are” is
    required.
   In the sentence, “My hobby is cars and
    trucks,” the singular word “hobby” is the
    subject, so the singular verb “is” is required.
                      Rule # 13

   A collective noun, which names a group of individuals,
    takes a either a singular or plural verb, depending on
    whether the group is acting as a unit or as separate
    individuals.
   In the sentence, “The team is traveling to the game by
    bus”, the subject “team” is acting as a single unit,
    therefore the singular verb “is” is required.
   In the sentence, “The team are traveling to the game
    in their own cars,” the team is acting individually, as
    seen by the adding of “their own cars” so it is plural,
    therefore the plural verb “are” is required.
                Rule # 14

 A singular verb is used when it follows a
  title, a word that is being defined, a word
  denoting some form of measurement
  (either weight or money) or a period of
  time.
 In the sentence, “Forty-thousand miles
  is a lot to put on a car in a year,” the
  singular verb “is” is required for the
  singular subject forty-thousand miles.
              Rule # 15
 When a relative pronoun such as “who”
  is the subject of a clause, the verb
  should agree in number with the word
  that is modified.
 In the sentence, “She is one of those
  drivers who never get a ticket,” the
  subject of the sentence is plural,
  (drivers) and not the singular word “who”
  which means that the plural verb “get” is
  required.
                     Conclusion


   I hope that this presentation has been helpful
    to you in regard to the use of verbs in your
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