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					                College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
                      GUIDELINES FOR PROMOTION
Preface
        All faculty members are expected to remain current in their fields, revise their
courses as appropriate, and develop new courses when needed. All should work to
improve their instructional capabilities by participating in instructional development
activities either on campus and/or at professional meetings. Faculty members are
expected to be active scholars by staying abreast of new directions in research,
technology, and pedagogy through reading and attendance at professional meetings.
Faculty members are also obligated to be responsible citizens of the university. Faculty
will advise students when needed and participate actively in department, college, and
university governance.

        Faculty members who plan to apply for promotion in rank should first consult
Article 12 of the YSU/YSU-OEA Agreement, noting in particular contract statements on
evaluation and eligibility, to determine whether or not they are eligible for consideration.
Faculty in the College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences are promoted in rank when
they have made significant contributions, appropriate to the rank for which they are
applying, in the areas of teaching, scholarship, and service in their particular disciplines.
Though a candidate will not usually achieve an outstanding record in all three areas,
continuous activity beyond what is necessary for the fulfillment of contractual duties is
expected in each area for a candidate to be promoted (see Article 13, YSU/YSU-OEA
Agreement).

        The applicant's personnel file (See Article 14, YSU/YSU-OEA Agreement) and
the application and support materials (See Article 12.5 YSU/YSU-OEA Agreement)
serve as the primary sources of information in the promotion process. It is the
responsibility of the applicant to ensure that his/her personnel file is kept up to date and
includes a current curriculum vita. When preparing the application for promotion, the
faculty member should carefully consider the purpose of the document, which is to
present convincing evidence of quality performance in the areas of teaching, research
and scholarship, and university, disciplinary, and community service. The applicant
should keep in mind that certain activities may be evaluated in more than one of the
three areas of teaching, scholarship, and service. For example, publishing an article
about a successful strategy or approach in the classroom would be applicable to both
teaching and scholarship. It might even be applicable to service if the article grew out of
discipline-related public service with the schools.




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        The applicant should clearly explain the significance of the works or activities
included and not just list presentations, publications, committees, professional or
community service activities, courses or number of students taught. For example: How
selective is the conference? How prestigious is the journal? How frequently has the
publication been cited? What did the committee accomplish? Samples of innovative
class activities and assignments as well as assessment of students' learning will greatly
aid the evaluating bodies in recognizing excellence in teaching and could be included in
the support materials. Applicants should discuss how their performance in each area
matches their department's mission, goals and objectives, and their own assignment
within the department. The audience toward whom this information is directed consists
of the Department Promotion Committee (DPC), the department chair, the College
Promotion Committee (CPC), the Dean and the Provost. The candidate should keep in
mind that the CPC will consist largely of members of disciplines whose measures and
evaluations, especially in the area of scholarship and research, may differ greatly from
the candidate's. The DPC and the department chair will provide independent judgments
as to how well the candidate has performed compared to colleagues in the department
and the discipline. They should also be able to help clarify and explain to the CPC the
significance of the applicant's work within the discipline, but it is ultimately the
responsibility of the candidate to build a strong and effective case. The CPC evaluates
candidates from each discipline in terms of the relative extent to which they have
surpassed the norms within their respective departments. The Provost is the final judge
of whether a candidate merits promotion.

These Guidelines for Promotion have been produced in accordance with Article 12.2 of
the YSU/YSU-OEA Agreement. The Guidelines shall be reviewed annually by the
CLASS DAC.

Application Procedures:

The promotion application process is detailed in Article 12 of the YSU-YSU/OEA
Agreement. The application is available on-line at
http://www.cc.ysu.edu/hr/human_resources_forms.htm or in hard copy from the Office
of Human Resources. The application must not exceed thirty pages, but candidates
may place support materials in the Office of Human Resources. Anyone who is
evaluating a candidate for promotion is required to review the promotion application, the
candidate’s personnel file and any support materials that the candidate placed in
Human Resources. Support materials are described later in this document and in
Articles 12.5 and 14.11 of the Agreement.




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CLASS List of Representative Activities:
The following is a representative list of activities to be considered by the College
Promotion Committee (CPC). The list is not complete (e.g., see Appendix C YSU/YSU-
OEA Agreement) or precise in its categorization; rather it is intended to provide
guidelines for the CPC and to encourage applicants to consider methods of organizing
and effectively presenting their materials. In all cases, the applicant, the Department
Promotion Committee chair, and the department chair should ensure that the CPC is
aware of the importance of the activity and any extraordinary demands on time, effort,
or energy needed to accomplish the task.

TEACHING:

Below is a representative list of items that an applicant could use to demonstrate his/her
teaching accomplishments:

Advising or Mentoring Students
           Serving as mentor
           Thesis or project advisor or committee member
           Involving students in research
           Participating in EARLY and SOAR

Consulting Work (See Publications or Service, if appropriate)

Courses and Curriculum
          Significant modifications to existing courses
          New courses
          Curriculum revision
          Cooperating with other faculty in multi-section or sequential courses
          Team teaching
          Goals and objectives, e.g., teaching independent research skills
          Purpose of the course: remedial, service, major, honors
          How often various courses are taught
          Developing new syllabi
          Lab or project changes

Teaching Methods
          New methods of presentation
          Teaching innovations, including the use of new technology
          Conference and/or workshop attendance




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Pedagogy-Based Scholarship (see also Scholarship)
         Publications on pedagogy
         Conference and/or workshop participation

Student Evaluations

Teaching Beyond the Classroom
          Guest lecturing
          Advising non-YSU student's thesis, dissertation, or project
          In-service workshops
          Off-campus study tours

SCHOLARSHIP:

Below is a representative list of items that an applicant could use to demonstrate his/her
scholarly achievement. Included are examples of information the committees may need
in order to evaluate the contribution. In the case of any joint work, it is the responsibility
of the faculty member to delineate his or her particular part in the project, and the
importance to the field or discipline (e.g., the importance of electronically published
works should be well documented.)

Conferences and Workshops
          Type: professional, scholarly, or public (see Service); international,
            national, or regional
          Publication in proceedings (see Publications)
          Level of participation in the event (e.g., attendance only, invited
            presentation, serving as chair or moderator, poster presentation)
            organization and planning of scholarly conference or workshop

Consulting Work (See Publications or Service, if appropriate)

Publications: Venues for and types of publications range from the traditional print media
(e.g., books and articles) to others, such as electronic publishing, videos and films, and
software systems.
            Refereed, peer reviewed, accepted by editorial board or programming
              committee
            Work solicited for a larger edited work
            Editing of a peer-reviewed work (Documentary, translation, annotation,
              journal and reference works)
            Documents or texts prepared for the public sector subject to evaluation
              and/or review (e.g. National Register Nominations, HABS/HAER reports,
              exhibits, documentary productions, statistical projections and/or analyses)
            Texts prepared for popular rather than academic audiences that are
              relevant to the applicant’s academic field.




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Reviewing Activities
          Reviewing grants or programs
          Referee for conference or journal

Grant Activity
           Preparing and submitting a grant as a PI/PD or as a co-author
           Consultation and/pr participation in funded project
           Status of project

Fellowships
           Recipient of a research fellowship

SERVICE:

Below is a representative list of items that an applicant could use to demonstrate his/her
contributions through service.

To the Community
          Serving as judge for science fairs, essay contests, etc.
          Organizing fairs, festivals, and similar activities
          Consulting work (See Publications or Scholarship, if appropriate)
          Contributions to K-12 education
          Presentations to community groups
          Serving at the organization level for non-profit and/or community
           organizations

To the Discipline
           Outside tenure and promotion reviews
           Professional involvement (See Conferences & Workshops, Involvement in
              Professional Organizations)
           Consulting work (See Publications or Scholarship, if appropriate)

To the University
          Advising or student consultations beyond a normal level such as
             participation in EARLY and SOAR
          Efforts to increase student retention and recruitment
          Committee participation (department, college, university)
          Leadership in service activities, including administrative appointments
          Service to the Association




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Guidelines for Support Materials (Promotion Portfolio):
While faculty should maintain a personal archive with documentation of their work, the
support materials should contain only a small selection of items that highlight the
candidate’s most significant accomplishments and strengths. The portfolio will help
reviewers who work in other disciplines understand the nature, quality, and significance
of the candidate’s work, and it should be compiled with such readers in mind.
Reviewers often have to read multiple portfolios, and they will read each candidate’s
personnel file, application, and portfolio. Candidates can emphasize their strengths by
including only materials that illustrate and showcase their best work. Candidates are
encouraged to select no more than six items for each of the three areas of work. Each
portfolio should include a table of contents.

The lists below suggest the kinds of materials that are most useful. The lists are
arranged in rank order, from the most important and useful items to the least valuable.

Teaching:
   1. Copies of publications or presentations about pedagogy
   2. Copies of curriculum or course proposals that the candidate developed
   3. Syllabi for new or significantly revised courses
   4. Reflections or annotations of course syllabi that provide thoughtful explanation of
      the candidate’s approach to teaching and/or that evaluate how a course worked
      (if this is not included in the promotion application)
   5. Substantive letters from students, their employers, and/or other faculty that
      discuss how the candidate’s teaching and/or mentorship assisted a student
   6. Samples of assessments and evaluations discussed in the promotion document
   7. Samples of materials reflecting course innovations discussed in the promotion
      document
   8. Assignment sheets that illustrate the candidate’s approach to teaching and
      communicating with students
   9. Student work with comments that demonstrates the practices and outcomes of
      the candidate’s teaching

Scholarship:
   1. Copies of publications or other materials, including edited books or journals
   2. Manuscripts of works-in-progress IF they have already been accepted for
      publication; include a letter from the publisher or journal editor
   3. Copies of grant proposals and/or interim or final reports on grants
   4. Reviews of the candidate’s book(s)
   5. Excerpts from materials written by others that discuss the candidate’s work in
      some depth
   6. Letters from professional organization leaders that discuss in substantive ways
      the candidate’s contributions to the organization




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Service:
   1. Copies of reports, proposals, and other documents created by committees for
       which the candidate completed a significant amount of work
   2. Letters from people with whom the candidate worked discussing his/her
       contributions to a community, professional, or campus project (these should be
       substantive and specific)

Portfolios should NOT include the following:
     Copies of anything that is in the personnel file or statements that are in the
       application, such as course evaluations
     Any materials that simply document participation, including brief thank-you notes,
       copies of conference program pages, or flyers


GUIDELINES FOR ASSESSING PROMOTION APPLICATIONS
The following are guidelines that College Promotion Committee members use to assess
the qualifications of applications for promotion. In preparing an application, please refer
to the Representative List of Activities and remember that activities integrating teaching,
scholarship, and service should be specifically identified in making the case for
promotion.

Promotion from Assistant to Associate Professor:
For promotion to Associate Professor, faculty members must show accomplishments
exceeding those expected for tenure. It must be evident that they are on a path that, if
pursued aggressively, will lead to the rank of Professor. They must also demonstrate
that they are becoming valuable members of their discipline, and that peers who have
no interest in their promotion have respect for their abilities and expertise. Promise is
not sufficient.

According to the YSU-YSU/OEA Agreement (Article 12.4) faculty members with
consistently satisfactory performance in teaching, scholarship, and service are entitled
to consideration for promotion to Associate Professor if they meet the following criteria:
       1. have tenure or have been recommended for tenure by November 10th of the
           year in which they are applying for promotion and
       2. have a minimum of 4 consecutive years of service at YSU at the rank of
           Assistant Professor immediately before the year in which they are applying for
           promotion.
To meet the standard of consistently satisfactory performance in the three areas of
Teaching, Scholarship, and Service, an applicant must receive at least a total of 5
points with a minimum of 1 point in each area. The point scale is explained below.




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Faculty members with consistently outstanding performance in teaching scholarship,
and service may apply for early promotion as long as they are tenured or have been
recommended for tenure by November 10th of the year in which they are applying for
promotion. To meet the standard of consistently outstanding performance in the three
areas of Teaching, Scholarship, and Service, an applicant must receive at least of total
of 6 points with a minimum of 1 point in each area. The point scale is explained below.


Promotion from Associate to Full Professor:

For promotion to Full Professor, faculty members must demonstrate committed and
consistent leadership to both the University and the academic discipline beyond that
expected of an associate professor. They must also demonstrate that they are valuable
members of their discipline, and that peers who have no interest in their promotion have
respect for their abilities and expertise. Promise is not sufficient.

According to the YSU-YSU/OEA Agreement (Article 12.4) faculty members with
consistently satisfactory performance in teaching, scholarship, and service are entitled
to consideration for promotion to Professor if they have a minimum of 6 years of service
at YSU at the rank of Associate Professor immediately before the year of application for
promotion. To meet the standard of consistently satisfactory performance in the three
areas of Teaching, Scholarship, and Service, an applicant must receive at least a total
of 7 points with a minimum of 1 point in each area. The point scale is explained below.

Faculty members with consistently outstanding performance in teaching scholarship,
and service may apply for early promotion if they have fewer than 6 years of
consecutive service at YSU at the rank of Associate Professor. To meet the standard of
consistently outstanding performance in the three areas of Teaching, Scholarship, and
Service, an applicant must receive at least a total of 8 points with a minimum of 2 points
in each area. The point scale is explained below.




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Teaching:

All applicants must show evidence that courses are taught competently with regard to
material covered and academic rigor. Classes must be met as scheduled, for the
scheduled length of time, and a reasonable syllabus completed. Students must be fairly
and competently graded, and educational objectives consistently and professionally
met. See pages 3 & 4 of this document.

For Promotion from Assistant to Associate Professor:

To achieve:

A level of 1: Some innovations in teaching and evidence of teaching accomplishments
other than those for classes assigned; accomplishments should be related to
Department’s Missions and Goals

A level of 2: Evidence of student learning derived from exceptional performance in the
classroom and/or teaching innovations.

A level of 3: Recognition by professionals in the faculty member’s discipline of
contributions to the education of others in that discipline—This could include invited
teaching workshops or invited addresses on pedagogy in the discipline, awards for
excellence in teaching, editing or producing peer-reviewed educational materials with
external distribution, etc. Some external teaching activity or recognition must be shown
for this level as well as strong evidence of consistently outstanding teaching. For
example, teaching innovations must extend beyond the faculty member’s own
classroom experiences and be shown to benefit student learning.


For Promotion from Associate to Full Professor:

To achieve:

A level of 1: Some innovation in teaching, consistent work with students beyond the
classroom, assistance to colleagues in the area of teaching, and extensive work in the
area of teaching that has enhanced the Department's Missions and Goals.

A level of 2: Evidence of student learning derived from exceptional performance in the
classroom and/or teaching innovations.

A level of 3: Continued recognition by professionals in the faculty member's discipline of
contributions to the education of others in that discipline. Some external teaching
activity and recognition must be shown for this level. There must be some strong
evidence of consistently outstanding teaching. If this evidence is based on innovation,
the innovations must benefit student learning and go well beyond the faculty member's
own classroom experiences.



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Scholarship:

All applicants for promotion are expected to keep current with the profession and with
their discipline and have developed a consistent scholarly agenda that shows the strong
likelihood of continuation well into the future.

For Promotion from Assistant to Associate Professor:

To achieve:

A level of 1: Some discipline-related, peer-reviewed scholarship

A level of 2: Evidence of consistent discipline-related, peer-reviewed scholarship

A level of 3: Evidence of scholarly growth and a consistent record of peer-reviewed
publication

For Promotion from Associate to Full Professor:

To achieve:

A level of 1: Consistent discipline-related, peer-reviewed scholarship

A level of 2: Consistent and substantial discipline-related, peer-reviewed scholarship

A level of 3: Consistent and substantial record of peer-reviewed publications
accompanied by evidence of positive recognition in the field


Service:

All applicants must show evidence of consistent service to the University at any level.
There must also be evidence of a collegiality that permits the faculty member to perform
productively within the Department and the University.

For Promotion from Assistant to Associate Professor:

To achieve:

A level of 1: Consistent service to the University, discipline or the community that is
recognized as valuable to peers, some of whom should have no interest in the faculty
member’s promotion. Evidence should be provided of the effectiveness of the service.




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A level of 2: Evidence of discipline-related service at the state or national level that is
recognized as valuable to peers who have no interest in the faculty member’s
promotion, or extensive, substantial and consistent University and/or community service
that can be shown to have accomplished its goals.

A level of 3: Consistent and generous recognition by professionals in the faculty
member’s discipline of service contributions to the discipline. Rarely would this level be
obtained by an individual whose service is restricted to the University. Evidence should
be shown of service that has accomplished goals that will have a positive and lasting
effect.

Promotion from Associate to Full Professor:

To achieve:

A level of l: Consistent service to the University, discipline and community that is
recognized as valuable to peers who have no interest in the faculty member's
promotion. Evidence should be shown of service that has a positive and lasting effect.

A level of 2: Evidence of discipline-related service at the state or national level that is
recognized as valuable to peers who have no interest in the faculty member's
promotion, or extensive, substantial and consistent, University service that can be
shown to have accomplished its goals

A level of 3: Consistent and generous recognition by peers, who have no interest in the
promotion, of the value of the contribution of the faculty member to the discipline. This
might best be demonstrated by consistent service at the national or international level in
the discipline. If not at the national or international level, there should be strong
evidence of service to the discipline at the state or large regional level; for example,
chairing the most appropriate state or regional organization appropriate for tine
discipline. Rarely would this level be obtained by an individual whose primary service is
restricted to the University. Evidence should be shown of service that has accomplished
goals that will have a positive and lasting effect.



Adopted by the CLASS DAC on April 22, 2008




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