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					                                         BLAIR HIGH SCHOOL
                                     440 NORTH 10TH STREET
                                            BLAIR, NE 68008
                                 PHONE: (402) 426-4941 FAX: (402) 426-4949
                                           www.blairschools.org

                 PRINCIPAL                             SCHOOL COUNSELING DEPARTMENT
             Thomas D. Anderson                           Karen Gengenbach (Students A - G)
         tom.anderson@blairschools.org                    karen.gengenbach@blairschools.org

          ASSISTANT PRINCIPAL                               Christine Ross (Students H - P)
                   Rex Pfeil                                 chris.ross@blairschools.org
          rex.pfeil@blairschools.org
                                                             Kathy White (Students Q - Z)
          ACTIVITIES DIRECTOR                                kathy.white@blairschools.org
                 Marty Rogers
         marty.rogers@blairschools.org

                                 DEPARTMENT CHAIRPERSONS

CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION                                      SCIENCE
        Agriculture                                                 Joe Lannan
        Business/Computer Science                                   joe.lannan@blairschools.org
        Cooperative Education
        Family and Consumer Science                                 SOCIAL STUDIES
        Industrial Technology                                       Nancy Knapp
   Pat Olson                                                        nancy.knapp@blairschools.org
   pat.olson@blairschools.org
                                                                    SPECIAL EDUCATION
   ENGLISH                                                          Tami Huff
   Ricki Wulf                                                       tami.huff@blairschools.org
   ricki.wulf@blairschools.org
                                                                    LIBRARY/MEDIA
   FINE ARTS                                                        Anne Keenan
        Art                                                         anne.keenan@blairschools.org
        Foreign Language
        Music                                                       SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGIST
   Jeff Mount                                                       Bob Richey
   jeff.mount@blairschools.org                                      bob.richey@blairschools.org

   MATHEMATICS                                                      NURSE/HEALTH SERVICES
   Brent Petersen                                                   Dana Crispin
   brent.petersen@blairschools.org                                  dana.crispin@blairschools.org

   PHYSICAL EDUCATION                                               TECHNOLOGY SPECIALIST
   Aaron McClain                                                    Scott Flynn
   aaron.mcclain@blairschools.org                                   scott.flynn@blairschools.org




                                                 1
                                                                       TABLE OF CONTENTS
Mission Statement ..........................................................................................................................................................................3
Graduation Requirements................................................................................................................................................................4
Blair High School Personal Learning Plan ...................................................................................................................................5
Preparation for College....................................................................................................................................................................6
College Credit Opportunities .........................................................................................................................................................7
General Information .........................................................................................................................................................................8
Course Offerings...............................................................................................................................................................................9
Departments ...................................................................................................................................................................................14
      Agriculture & Natural Resources ..........................................................................................................................................14
      Art............................................................................................................................................................................................16
      Business Education/Computer Science ................................................................................................................................17
      Cooperative Education ..........................................................................................................................................................20
      English ....................................................................................................................................................................................21
      Family and Consumer Science .............................................................................................................................................26
      Foreign Language ...................................................................................................................................................................28
      Industrial Technology ...........................................................................................................................................................30
      Mathematics ............................................................................................................................................................................33
      Music.......................................................................................................................................................................................36
      Physical Education ................................................................................................................................................................38
      Science.....................................................................................................................................................................................40
      Social Studies ........................................................................................................................................................................42
      Special Education ..................................................................................................................................................................45
      Special Programs ...................................................................................................................................................................47




                                                                                                    2
                        Blair Community Schools


                             Mission Statement

              The Blair Community Schools … Where All Students Learn




                              Belief Statements


We believe the following:

  * Each child is unique with special talents.
  * Human diversity is recognized and respected.
  * Each student will achieve proficiency of essential content and skills.
  * Change is necessary for continued growth.
  * Efficient and effective use of technology will improve student learning.
  * Frequent and varied assessments are essential for effective education.
  * A supportive environment nurtures, challenges and encourages students to reach
    their full potential.
  * A safe and secure environment, including mutual respect and self-discipline, is
    essential for student learning.
  * A partnership with the community, home, school, and student is necessary for
    student success.
  * Thinking and problem solving skills are essential for student learning.




                                         3
                                 GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS AT
                                      BLAIR HIGH SCHOOL

Graduation requirements for Blair High School provide each student with solid background in the core
curriculum areas along with an intensive study in several critical subjects in order to more thoroughly
prepare each student for the future after high school.


       The Blair High School graduation requirements are listed below:


       English................................................................................................................. 40 credits
            (including English 9, English 10 or World Lit., Senior Composition or English 12
            or A.P. English and enough G.R.E English credits to equal 40 credits total)



       Social Studies ..................................................................................................... 30 credits
            (including World History, American History, or A.P. U.S. History, American
            Government and one semester of a G.R.E. social studies class)



       Mathematics........................................................................................................ 30 credits
            (including Algebra or Algebra A and Algebra B, and enough G.R.E. Mathematics
            Credits to equal 30 credits total)



       Science ................................................................................................................ 30 credits
            (including Physical Science, Biology, and two semesters of G.R.E. science credits)



       Physical Education / Personal Health / Wellness ............................................. 20 credits
            (including PE 9/Health, Lifetime Sports and Weights)



       Electives............................................................................................................. 130 credits


                  Total Credit Hours .......................................................... 280



                                                                     4
       BLAIR HIGH SCHOOL FOUR-YEAR PERSONAL LEARNING PLAN

All students at Blair High School will develop four-year personal learning plans which include possible courses to take in high
school. Students will develop these plans in the fall of ninth grade. Students will learn about graduation requirements as well
as college entrance requirements. Future plans may include postsecondary institutions such as four-year colleges, two-year
colleges and specialty schools. In addition, students may enter the military or the world of work.



                        FRESHMAN YEAR                                                                                     JUNIOR YEAR
                st                                            nd                                              st                                           nd
              1 Semester                                     2 Semester                                     1 Semester                                    2 Semester

   English 9                                      English 9                                      English ______________                        English ______________

   Math _______________                           Math _______________                           American History                              American History

   World History                                  World History                                  Math _______________                          Math _______________

   Physical Science                               Physical Science                               Science _____________                         Science _____________

   Phys. Ed./Health                               Phys. Ed. 9




                     SOPHOMORE YEAR                                                                                       SENIOR YEAR
                st                                            nd                                              st                                           nd
              1 Semester                                     2 Semester                                     1 Semester                                    2 Semester

   English 10/World Lit.                          English 10/World Lit                           English _____________                         English _____________

   Math _______________                           Math _______________                           American Gov’t.

   Biology                                        Biology

   Lifetime Sports/Weights                        Lifetime Sports/Weights




                                                               GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
English..................................................................... 40 Credits       Physical Education/Health............................. 20 Credits
Social Studies ......................................................... 30 Credits           Electives ............................................................ 130 Credits
Mathematics ........................................................... 30 Credits
Science..................................................................... 30 Credits

                                                     TOTAL CREDIT HOURS ..... 280 CREDITS

                                                                                          5
                                             PREPARATION FOR COLLEGE

RECOMMENDED COLLEGE PREPARATION
Students preparing for four-year colleges will need to choose rigorous academic courses in high school.

             English: 4 years of intensive reading and writing courses
             Mathematics: 3 to 4 years of math courses starting with Algebra (4-year colleges do not consider
             Prealgebra as a college preparatory course)
             Science: 3 to 4 years of science courses including Chemistry and other advanced science courses
             Social Studies: 3 years
             Foreign Language: 2 to 4 years of the same language

Students should strive to take more than these minimum requirements if possible. Academic core courses will prepare
students for the challenging college level courses and will also better prepare them for the college entrance exams such as the
ACT and SAT.

Students who achieve grades of A and B in academic courses would also benefit from honors and advanced placement
courses.

The Nebraska University system includes the University of Nebraska at Lincoln, Omaha and Kearney. The
Nebraska system has the following requirements:



                              NEBRASKA UNIVERSITY SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS
                 English ...................................................................................................................................... 4 Units

                 Mathematics ............................................................................................................................. 3 Units
                         (Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II)

                 Social Studies........................................................................................................................... 3 Units

                 Science...................................................................................................................................... 3 Units
                            (at least two units from Biology, Chemistry, Physics and Earth Sciences)

                 Foreign Language .................................................................................................................... 2 Units
                          (Both units from the same language)

                 Additional Requirements:
                    •    UNK and UNO must have one (1) additional unit from any discipline
                    •    UNL must have one (1) additional unit in mathematics
                    •    In addition, must achieve a minimum composite score on the ACT of 20 or be ranked in the
                         upper half of their graduating class after six semesters in high school.




                                                                                              6
                              COLLEGE CREDIT OPPORTUNITIES
DUAL ENROLLMENT
Blair High School has many opportunities available to students who wish to earn college credits while they are still in high school.
When students enroll in the courses listed in the table below, they will have the option of taking each class as high school credit
only OR for high school and college credit. When students enroll in college after high school graduation, they will need to request
official transcripts from the college that sponsored the dual enrollment to show the college credit earned. Students will need to
check with the individual colleges they wish to attend to see if the college will accept the dual enrollment credit. A representative
from each college will visit the dual enrollment classes in the fall to complete necessary paperwork and explain the collection of fees .


    BHS DUAL             COLLEGE               APPROXIMATE                                  COLLEGE CREDIT
    ENROLLED                                       COST                                      INFORMATION
     COURSE


      Advanced            University of         $225 per semester                           Will receive from UNO:
      Placement           Nebraska at        (Included AP Exam Fee)                     5 credits for Math 1950 – Spring
     Calculus AB            Omaha

                                                                                             Will receive from UNO:
        Advanced          University of         $225 per semester                      3 credits for English 1010 - Fall and
        Placement         Nebraska at        (Included AP Exam Fee)                     3 credits for English 1020 – Spring
         English            Omaha                                            (If student receives a score of 4 or 5 on the AP English
                                                                                   Exam, they may earn an additional 12 credits


      Advanced            University of         $225 per semester                           Will receive from UNO:
      Placement           Nebraska at        (Included AP Exam Fee)                       3 credits PSC1 1100 - Spring
     Government             Omaha


        Advanced          University of         $225 per semester                           Will receive from UNO:
        Placement         Nebraska at        (Included AP Exam Fee)                   3 credits for History 1110 – Fall and
         History            Omaha                                                      3 credits for History 1120 - Spring



        Advanced          Metropolitan           $174 per semester                          Will receive from Metro:
        Placement         Community                                                  6 credits for Chemistry 1212 – Fall and
        Chemistry          College                                                    6 credits for Chemistry 1220 - Spring



ARTICULATION
Students who complete the following courses at Blair High School have the option of advanced placement in future coursework at
Metropolitan Community College.

    •     Accounting I & II
    •     Keyboarding
    •     Advanced Drafting Practices
    •     Advanced Mechanical Drawing
    •     Architectural Drawing I

ADVANCED PLACEMENT PROGRAM
Blair High School offers five advanced placement courses including AP U.S. History, AP English, AP Chemistry, AP Calculus AB, and
AP Government. Students who complete one or more of these courses may choose to take the AP exams at the end of the courses.
Students are scored on each exam from 1 to 5. Colleges have AP policies which indicate what score is needed in order to earn college
credit. Approximate cost to students is $85 per exam. Please see your school counselor for more information.


                                                                     7
                                              GENERAL INFORMATION
REGISTRATION

Registration conferences are held in February with students, parents and teacher advisors/AEP teachers in order to review four-year
plans, assess academic progress and make course selections for the upcoming school year. Counselors prepare students for
registration through classroom group guidance where academic advising and a review of the Course Selector is held. Students must
make careful decisions about their schedules for registration in February. The master schedule for the high school is based on the
students’ requests from registration. In order for students to be placed in the courses they want, they must be sure to reserve a space
at this time.

CLASS LOAD REQUIREMENT
All students are required to register for eight classes each semester. Students are encouraged to take a balanced schedule of core and
elective classes.

REGISTERING FOR H ON ORS AND ADVANCED PLACEMENT C OURSES

Students will be able to choose from regular Level II courses and more rigorous Level I courses for many high school academic
classes. Please refer to the individual courses for specific information. It is essential for students to realize that a Level I course is
extremely challenging and geared for students with high ability and motivation in that particular subject. Students are expected to
complete more daily homework than regular courses. These courses move at a rapid pace with less review and remediation than
regular courses. Teacher expectations in these courses are high and students may be asked to do extended research and challenging
assignments. Students and their parents should discuss these decisions carefully and make wise choices based on ability,
motivation and work ethic. Students are encouraged to consult with their teachers in specific subject areas about these decisions.

S CHEDULE CHANGES

Schedule changes are very limited once registration is complete. Students who have conflicts with their schedule choices will be
notified in May or June and given an opportunity to resolve the schedule conflict with additional choices. Schedules will be mailed
to students in grades 10 - 12 in early August and certain times will be set aside prior to the start of school where they can visit with
counselors about schedule concerns. Ninth grade student schedules will be handed out to parents at a special Ninth Grade
Orientation Night. Possible schedule changes in August would include retaking a class due to failure of a required subject, change
of elective due to a change in career interest, error on schedule, or an extenuating circumstance. Students must take care of these
requests during the schedule change days in August. All students will be expected to attend class on the first day of school and
will not have the option of changing their schedule after the start of the semester. The only changes after school begins will be for
the correction of printing errors or academic placement. Prior to 2nd semester, students will have a written procedure to follow with
requests for 2nd semester schedule changes. All students must have written permission from parents for changes after registration is
complete. (Exceptions to this policy must be approved by the principal.)

DEFINITION OF TERMS

Required Courses: All students planning to graduate from Blair High School must successfully complete these courses. These are
the minimum standards established for graduation.

Graduation Requirement Elective (G.R.E.): Students may choose from the courses listed as Graduation Requirement Electives
(G.R.E.) to fulfill credit hour requirements in a particular subject area. Keep in mind that these courses may not be substituted for
those that are required, but only offer students a number of options to complete credit hour requirements in a particular subject area.

Elective Courses: These are courses from which a student may choose to complete his/her academic schedule. Careful selection and
the establishment of a logical sequence of elective courses will aid a student greatly as preparation is made for work or post
secondary education.

Credit Hours: These are the units of value placed on a course. All semester courses receive 5 credits. Credits are tabulated on a
semester basis for all students.

Prerequisite: This is the minimum demonstrated competency, skill, or requirement needed for enrollment in a course.

Block Schedule: Blair High School operates on a A/B Block Schedule. Students enroll in 8 classes per semester taking 4 classes
per day, alternating days,

Days of the Week: P = Purple W = White


                                                                     8
     KEY: E = Elective Subject                          G.R.E. = Graduation Requirement Elective Subject
          R = Required Subject                          I.E.P. = Individualized Education Program
                         Courses that are shaded are those that are not offered during this year




                                  AGRICULTURE EDUCATION
            COURSE                  TYPE            SEM.           GRADE              PREREQUISITE            PAGE
638 – Ag. Business & Marketing       E-II             1            10-12                                       14
628 - Ag Entrepreneurship            E-II             2            10-12                                       14
626 – Agriscience                    E-II        1 and/or 2         9-12                                       14
630 – Animal Science I               E-II             1            10-12                                       15
632 – Animal Science II              E-II     2/ every other yr.   10-12                                       15
634 – Horticulture                   E-II             2             9-12                                       15
640 – Human Relations                E-II          1 or 2           9-12                                       15
636 – Plant and Soil Science         E-II             1             9-12                                       15




                                                          ART
            COURSE                  TYPE            SEM.           GRADE              PREREQUISITE            PAGE
708 – Advanced Pottery               E-II             2            10-12    Pottery                            16
702 – Art                            E-II        1 and/or 2         9-12                                       16
704 – Drawing & Painting             E-II        1 and/or 2        10-12    1 Semester of Art                  16
712 – Graphic Arts                   E-II          1 or 2           9-12                                       16
706 – Pottery                        E-II          1 or 2           9-12                                       16
710 – Sculpture                      E-II          1 or 2           9-12                                       17




                               BUSINESS/COMPUTER SCIENCE
            COURSE                  TYPE           SEM.            GRADE           PREREQUISITE               PAGE
664 – Accounting I                   E-II        Full Year         10-12                                       17
665 – Accounting II                  E-II        Full Year         11-12    Accounting I, teacher signature    17
234 – Adv. Computer Concepts         E-II             2            10-12    C or  in Computer Program         17
662 – Business Law                   E-II          1 or 2          11-12                                       18
668 – Business Procedures            E-II        Full Year          12                                         18
658 – Career Pathways                E-II          1 or 2           9-12                                       18
230 – Computer App. I                E-II          1 or 2           9-12                                       18
228 – Computer App. II               E-II          1 or 2           9-12    Computer App. I                    18
232 – Computer Programming           E-II             1            10-12    C or  in Algebra                  19
652 – Intro to Business              E-II          1 or 2           9-12                                       19
672 – Marketing & Merchandising      E-II        Full Year          12      .                                  19
660 – Personal Finance               E-II          1 or 2          10-12                                       19
231 – Web Page Design                E-II          1 or 2           9-12                                       19




                                                              9
                                  COOPERATIVE EDUCATION
              COURSE               TYPE         SEM.           GRADE          PREREQUISITE                 PAGE
668 – Business Procedures            E-II     Full Year         12                                          20
670 – Business Coop                  E-II     Full Year         12     Teacher signature                    20
678 – Occ. Relations                 E-II     Full Year         12                                          20
680 – Diversified Occ. Coop          E-II     Full Year         12     Teacher signature                    20
672 – Marketing & Merchandising      E-II     Full Year         12                                          21
676 – Marketing Coop                 E-II     Full Year         12     Teacher signature                    21




                                              ENGLISH
              COURSE               TYPE         SEM.           GRADE          PREREQUISITE                 PAGE
026 – Adv. Placement English       G.R.E.-I   Full Year         12     B or  in English                    21
012 – American Literature         G.R.E.-II   1 and/or 2       11-12                                        21
020 – Applied Communications      G.R.E.-II     1 or 2         11-12                                        22
042 – Creative Writing            G.R.E.-II     1 or 2         11-12                                        22
032 – Drama                          E-II         1             9-12                                        22
006 – English 9                      R-II     Full Year          9                                          22
008 – English 10                  G.R.E.-II   Full Year         10                                          22
016 – English 11                  G.R.E.-II   Full Year         11     Teacher or counselor signature       23
018 – English 12                  G.R.E.-II       1             12     Teacher or counselor signature       23
014 – English Literature          G.R.E.-II   1 and/or 2       11-12                                        23
030 – Forensics                      E-II     Full Year        10-12   Public Speaking, 1 semester          23
044 – Humanities I                G.R.E.-II       1             9-12                                        23
045 – Humanities II               G.R.E.-II       2            11-12                                        24
038 – Journalism                  G.R.E.-II   Full Year         9-12   B or  in English                    24
046 – Newspaper                      E-II     Full Year        10-12   B or  in Journalism                 24
039 – Photography                    E-II       1 or 2          9-12                                        24
028 – Public Speaking             G.R.E.-II   1 and/or 2        9-12                                        24
022 – Senior Comp. I              G.R.E.-II     1 or 2          12                                          25
024 – Senior Comp. II             G.R.E.-II       2             12     C or  in Senior Comp. I             25
036 – Stagecraft                     E-II         2             9-12                                        25
010 – World Literature            G.R.E.-II   Full Year         10     A in English 9, teacher signature    25
047 – Yearbook                       E-II     Full Year        10-12   B or  in Journalism                 26




                                                          10
                             FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCE
               COURSE                TYPE         SEM.           GRADE           PREREQUISITE     PAGE
690 – Adult Living                   E-II        1 or 2          11-12                             26
686 – Child Development I            E-II        1 or 2          10-12                             26
688 – Child Development II           E-II           2            10-12   Child Development I       26
682 – Family and Consumer Science    E-II      1 and/or 2         9-10                             27
692 – Clothing and Fashion I         E-II           1            10-12                             27
693 – Clothing and Fashion II        E-II   2/ every other yr.   10-12   Clothing and Fashion I    27
684 – Foods & Nutrition I            E-II        1 or 2          10-12                             27
685 – Foods & Nutrition II           E-II           2            10-12   Food & Nutrition I        27
694 – Interior Design                E-II   2/every other yr.    10-12                             28




                                      FOREIGN LANGUAGE
               COURSE                TYPE         SEM.           GRADE           PREREQUISITE     PAGE
156 – French I                       E-II      Full Year          9-12                             28
158 – French II                      E-II      Full Year         10-12   C or  in French I        28
160 – French III                     E-II      Full Year         11-12   C or  in French II       28
162 – French IV                      E-II      Full Year          12     C or  in French III      29
166 – Spanish I                      E-II      Full Year          9-12                             29
168 – Spanish II                     E-II      Full Year         10-12   C or  in Spanish I       29
170 – Spanish III                    E-II      Full Year         11-12   C or  in Spanish II      29
172 – Spanish IV                     E-II      Full Year          12     C or  in Spanish III     29




                                    INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY
               COURSE                TYPE         SEM.           GRADE           PREREQUISITE     PAGE
614 – Adv. Woods                     E-II      Full Year         10-12   Woods                     30
620 – Applied Technologies           E-II      1 and/or 2        10-12   2 semesters of NuTech     30
616 – Construction                   E-II      Full Year         10-12   Woods                     30
602 – Drafting I                     E-II      Full Year          9-12                             30
606 – Drafting II                    E-II      Full Year         10-12   Drafting I                31
608 – Drafting III                   E-II      Full Year         11-12   Drafting II               31
617 – Home Maintenance               E-II        1 or 2          10-12                             31
619 – IT Essentials                  E-II           1            11-12   NuTech or Comp. Prog.     32
624 – Metals                         E-II        1 or 2           9-12                             32
618 – NuTech                         E-II      1 and/or 2         9-12                             32
622 – Small Engines                  E-II        1 or 2           9-12                             32
612 – Woods                          E-II        1 or 2           9-12                             33




                                                           11
                                                 MATHEMATICS
             COURSE                   TYPE           SEM.           GRADE          PREREQUISITE             PAGE
213 – Adv. Algebra                   G.R.E.-II     Full Year        10-12   Geometry or Honors Geometry      33
222 – Adv. Placement Calculus AB     G.R.E.-I      Full Year        11-12   Math Analysis                    34
208 – Algebra                        G.R.E.-II     Full Year         9-12   PreAlgebra                       34
204 – Algebra A                      G.R.E.-II     Full Year        10-12   PreAlgebra                       34
205 – Algebra B                      G.R.E.-II     Full Year        10-12   Algebra A                        34
224 – Discrete Math                  G.R.E.-II     Full Year         12     Adv. Alg. or Honors Adv. Alg.    34
210 – Geometry                       G.R.E.-II     Full Year        10-12   Algebra                          35
214 – Honors. Adv. Algebra           G.R.E.-I      Full Year        10-12   Honors Geometry                  35
212 – Honors Geometry                G.R.E. I      Full Year         9-12   Algebra                          35
216 – Mathematical Analysis          G.R.E.-I      Full Year        11-12   Honors Adv. Algebra              35
206 – PreAlgebra                     G.R.E.-II     Full Year         9-12                                    36




                                                     MUSIC
             COURSE                   TYPE           SEM.           GRADE          PREREQUISITE             PAGE
520 – Band 9                         E-II          Full Year          9                                      36
521 – Band 10                        E-II          Full Year         10                                      36
522 – Band 11                        E-II          Full Year         11                                      36
523 – Band 12                        E-II          Full Year         12                                      37
506 – Bass Choir                     E-II          Full Year         9-12                                    37
510 – Concert Choir                  E-II          Full Year        10-12   Teacher signature                37
516 – Music Lessons/Theory           E-II          1 and/or 2       10-12   Teacher signature                37
503 – Treble Choir 9                 E-II          Full Year          9                                      38
504 – Treble Choir 10-12             E-II          Full Year        10-12                                    38




                                       PHYSICAL EDUCATION
             COURSE                   TYPE           SEM.           GRADE          PREREQUISITE             PAGE
112 – Advanced Weights               E-II          1 and/or 2       11-12   C or  in weights                38
116 – Fitness for Life               E-II            1 or 2         11-12                                    38
108 – Lifetime Sports and Wellness   R-II            1 or 2          10                                      39
106 - P.E. 9/Health                  R-II          Full Year          9                                      39
150 – Senior Weights                 E-II            1 or 2          12     Teacher signature                39
110 – Weightlifting/Wellness         R-II            1 or 2          10                                      39




                                                               12
                                                  SCIENCE
             COURSE                   TYPE          SEM.           GRADE          PREREQUISITE            PAGE
314 – Adv. Placement Chemistry       G.R.E.-I     Full Year         12     B or  in Chemistry             40
316 – Adv. Placement Chem. Lab       G.R.E.-I     Full Year         12     Enroll in AP Chemistry          40
308 – Biology                          R-II       Full Year         10                                     40
312 – Chemistry                      G.R.E.-I     Full Year        10-12                                   40
320 – Environmental Science          G.R.E.-II    1 and/or 2       11-12   Biology                         40
324 – Forensic Science               G.R.E.-II      1 or 2         11-12   Biology & Phys Sci. or Chem.    41
310 – Human Anatomy/Physiology       G.R.E.I      Full Year        11-12   B or  in Biology               41
322 – Meteorology/Astronomy          G.R.E.-II      1 or 2         10-12   Physical Science or Biology     41
306 – Physical Science                 R -II      Full Year          9                                     41
318 – Physics                        G.R.E.-I     Full Year        11-12                                   42




                                               SOCIAL STUDIES
             COURSE                   TYPE          SEM.           GRADE          PREREQUISITE            PAGE
414 – Adv. Placement Government      G.R.E.-I         2             12     B or  in AGT                   42
410 – Adv. Placement U.S. History    G.R.E.-I     Full Year         11     B or  in Social Studies        42
430 – American Cultural Studies      G.R.E.-II      1 or 2         10-12                                   42
412 – American Gov’t. Today            R-II         1 or 2          12                                     43
408 – American History                 R-II       Full Year         11                                     43
418 – Contemporary Affairs           G.R.E.-II      1 or 2         11-12                                   43
422 – Economic Issues                G.R.E.-II        1            11-12                                   43
428 – Japanese Home Study            G.R.E.-II     Summer           9-12                                   43
420 – Nebraska Studies               G.R.E.-II      1 or 2          9-12                                   44
426 – Psychology                     G.R.E.-II      1 or 2          12                                     44
432 – Sociology                      G.R.E.-II      1 or 2         11-12                                   44
416 – World Geography                G.R.E.-II    1 and/or 2        9-12                                   44
406 – World History                    R-II       Full Year          9                                     45




                                         SPECIAL EDUCATION
             COURSE                    TYPE         SEM.           GRADE          PREREQUISITE            PAGE
795 – Computer Concepts               I.E.P.-II   1 and/or 2        9-12                                   45
792 – Independent Living Skills       I.E.P.-II   1 and/or 2        9-12                                   45
767 – Individualized Careers          I.E.P.-II   1 and/or 2        9-12                                   45
788 – Individual Study                I.E.P.-II   1 and/or 2        9-12                                   45
790 – Individual Study/Spec. Needs    I.E.P.-II   1 and/or 2        9-12                                   46
804 – Social Skills                   I.E.P.-II   1 and/or 2        9-12                                   46
794 – Spec. Ed. Work Study Program    I.E.P.-II   1 and/or 2        9-12                                   46
     Courses at Jackson St.           I.E.P.-II   1 and/or 2        9-12                                   46




                                                              13
                                               SPECIAL PROGRAMS
             COURSE                      TYPE             SEM.           GRADE                PREREQUISITE                  PAGE
956 – AEP Mentor                        E-II            Full Year            12       Application, counselor signature        47
901 – Independent Study                 E-II           1 and/or 2            12       Teacher signature                       47
926 – Introduction to Education         E-II           1 and/or 2            12       Application, counselor signature        47
918 – Office Assistant                  E-II           1 and/or 2            12       Counselor signature                     47
902 – Teacher Assistant                 E-II           1 and/or 2            12       Teacher signature                       48




                      AGRICULTURE AND NATURAL RESOURCES

AG BUSINESS & MARKETING - #638
This course is designed for students interested in owning their own agricultural business or being employed in an ag-related
business. Students will learn agricultural selling, advertising, the United States marketing system, supply and demand, cooperative
marketing, cash marketing and futures markets. Students will also be responsible for the development and implementation of a
business and marketing plan for the sale of plants from the Blair High School greenhouse.

Writing Goal: Students will develop a local marketing plan for the high school greenhouse.

Grading Method: The student’s grade will be determined by performance on unit tests and quizzes, daily assignments, notebook
entries, marketing plan and class participation.


AG ENTREPRENEURSHIP - #628
Agricultural Entrepreneurship focuses on the diversity of local agribusinesses in Blair and surrounding communities. Students will
contact and professionally request field trips, attend those businesses, and follow up with proper correspondence. Prior to
attending, students will research the business type and then analyze the business after returning to the classroom. Students will
also be responsible for the development and implementation of a business and marketing plan for the sale of plants from the Blair
High School Greenhouse.

Writing Goal: Students will complete a number of written assignments and projects including business analysis reflections papers
and a business plan.

Grading Method: The students grade will be determined by performance on daily work, class projects, presentation, attitude &
professionalism.



AGRISCIENCE - #626
Fall Term: This course explores the science of agriculture: animal production, food science, agricultural leadership and more.
Students will explore the hundreds of dynamic career opportunities in agriculture, develop leadership through FFA and plan a
supervised agricultural experience program, and perform plant and soil experiments in the high school greenhouse. This class will
assist students in determining personal interest in various areas of agriculture as well as future career development opportunities.

Spring Term: This course explores the science of agriculture: plant production, horticulture, agribusiness, natural resources and
more. Students will keep personal finance and experience records and develop a supervised agricultural experience program, and
perform plant and soil experiments in the high school greenhouse. This class will assist students in determining personal interest in
various areas of agriculture, as well as future career development opportunities.

Writing Goal: Students will complete a number of written projects including an agricultural career research paper.

Grading Method: The students’ grades will be determined by performance on unit tests and quizzes, homework, notebooks and
class participation.

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ANIMAL SCIENCE I - #630
Animal Science is the study of reproduction and growth of animals. Students will learn breeds, determine uses, and analyze various
animal industries while studying both traditional livestock and companion animals. Special attention will be given to animal
anatomy, physiology and processing.

Writing Goal: Students will write an animal industry paper where they will choose an industry, perform research, and present their
findings to the class.

Grading Method: The student’s grade will be determined by performance on unit tests and quizzes, daily assignments, notebooks,
management plan and class participation.



ANIMAL SCIENCE II - #632
A higher level study of animal science will be performed during the advanced class. Students will learn about reproductive and
digestive systems, nutrition, and health of livestock and companion animals. They will also dissect a fetal pig in small groups.
Students will learn how to perform advance tasks in animal health while learning about introductory veterinary practices.

Writing Goal: Students will write an animal care paper that addresses nutrition and health considerations for a selected species.

Grading Method: The student’s grade will be determined by performance on unit tests and quizzes, daily assignments, notebooks,
management plan and class participation.


HORTICULTURE AND GREENHOUSE MANAGEMENT - #634
There are many dynamic career opportunities available in the horticultural industry. This course will give students an overview of
horticulture and the skills needed for employment in the industry. Areas of emphasis include landscaping, nursery and gardening,
plant identification, floriculture and greenhouse management. Students in Horticulture will have the primary responsibility for
growing the spring crop of hanging baskets and geraniums in the high school greenhouse.

Writing Goal: Students will complete a landscaping plan that includes a design, budget and implementation goals.

Grading Method: The student’s grade will be determined by performance on unit tests and quizzes, daily assignments, lab
activities, notebooks and class participation.



HUMAN RELATIONS - #640
Communicating with others, understanding yourself and meeting challenges are skills you will use for your lifetime! Human
Relations class is designed to help you develop life-long people skills that will be valuable in any career area. You will learn about
self-assessment, time management, conflict resolution, overcoming peer challenges, stress management, communication skills, goal
setting and team building. Activities will include group training sessions, selected reading, and special projects.

Writing Goal: Students will keep journals of their experience and write a personal vision statement.

Grading Method: The student’s grade will be determined by performance on unit tests and quizzes, daily assignments, journal
entries and class participation.


PLANT AND SOIL SCIENCE - #636
This course will give students an overview of plant and soil science while studying potential career areas. Areas of emphasis
include soil properties and conservation, land classification, plant processes and growth, plant diseases, insecticides, herbicides,
and fertilizers. Students in this course will have the primary responsibility for growing the fall poinsettia crop in the high school
greenhouse.

Writing Goal: Students will write an independent experiment plan and implement the plan in the classroom.



                                                                  15
Grading Method: The student’s grade will be determined by performance on unit tests and quizzes, daily assignments,
written reports, notebooks and class participation.




                                                               ART
ADVANCED POTTERY - #708
An advanced level of pottery construction, with the primary emphasis on sculpture with wheel thrown techniques. Special attention
will be given to the pottery processes and sculpture of various cultural groups.

Writing Goal: Students will write a critique on selected pottery sculpture pieces.

Grading Method: Students’ grades will be based on production, creativity, technique, craftsmanship and participation.


ART - #702
This course is designed to introduce students to new ways of seeing, to sensitivity to his natural environment, to critiquing
artwork, and to an awareness of role art plays in man’s culture. Emphasis is placed on the elements of art, line, shape, texture, form,
space, value, color and space. Second semester emphasis is placed on the principles of design, balance, graduation, repetition,
contrast, harmony, dominance and unity. Special attention will be given to include the art processes of various cultural groups, and
the art works from different periods of art history.

Writing Goal: Students will write a critique on selected art works.

Grading Method: Students’ grades based on production, creativity, technique, craftsmanship and participation.



DRAWING AND PAINTING - #704
Emphasis will be on the development of a drawing style which is expressive and unique. A variety of drawing materials and tools
will be used such as pencil, pen, chalk and charcoal. A variety of media including watercolors, acrylics, tempera and pastels will be
used. Craftsmanship, development of individual techniques and an appreciation for contemporary as well as traditional painting
will be emphasized. Special attention will be given to include art techniques of various cultural groups. Students need to supply
their own sketchbook.

Writing Goal: Students will write reports on selected artists and art movements.

Grading Method: Students’ grades based on production, creativity, technique, craftsmanship and participation.


GRAPHIC ARTS - #712
Emphasis of Graphic Arts is at a two-dimensional level along with basic fundamentals of the manipulative operations dealing with
the organization and activities of the publishing and printing industry. Students will be designing letter styles, logos, greeting
cards, packages, posters and cartooning. Special attention will be given to include graphic art techniques of various cultural groups.

Writing Goal: Students will write a short essay on the influence that advertising art has on consumer purchases.

Grading Method: Students’ grades based on production, creativity, technique, craftsmanship and participation.



POTTERY - #706
Techniques of ceramic construction will be taught, students will learn wheel throwing and hand-building. Special attention will be
given to include the pottery work processes of various cultural groups.



                                                                  16
Writing Goal: Students will write short essays on the influence of selected cultures on American pottery.

Grading Method: Students’ grades based on production, creativity, technique, craftsmanship and participation.


 SCULPTURE - #710
This course is designed for students who are interested in making something with their hands. This class is focused on 3-D works
and looks at various artists, media, and cultures to get inspiration. An appreciation of good design and craftsmanship will be
emphasized.

Writing Goal: Students will write short essays on selected craft techniques.

Grading Method: Students’ grades based on production, creativity, technique, craftsmanship and participation.




                                          BUSINESS EDUCATION
ACCOUNTING I - #664
Basic accounting principles and concepts are taught in Accounting. Students perform accounting duties for businesses organized as
proprietorships, partnerships and corporations. Each student will learn to maintain a checking account and will acquire knowledge
of taxes and procedures associated with payrolls. Units of computerized accounting are included to prepare students for entry-level
jobs. This course also helps students prepare for other business classes. Any student who plans to major in business at the post-
secondary level should register for this course. This course will articulate at Metro Community College. Students who receive an
“ A” or “B” will receive credit at Metro for the course and will not have to pay tuition fees for the course.

Writing Goal: Students will complete vocabulary exercises and written questions in each chapter to improve their writing skills.

Grading Method: Students will be graded on chapter and unit tests as well as daily assignments and computerized accounting
problems.



ACCOUNTING II - #665
The advanced accounting course prepares students for post-secondary accounting education and/or positions in accounting-related
employment. Students review principles and practices learned in the first-year course and then perform duties for businesses
organized as partnerships and corporations. Business simulations are used to give students time to master learned procedures.
Students also receive an introduction to cost and management accounting. Students will use the computer extensively to complete
their accounting work.

Writing Goal: Students will complete vocabulary exercises and written questions in each chapter to improve writing skills.

Grading Method: Students will be graded on chapter and unit tests as well as daily assignments and computerized accounting
problems.



ADVANCED COMPUTER CONCEPTS - #234
Students will be exposed to a variety of programming languages during the semester. JAVA, HTML, and Java Script are languages
that will be used. Students will also continue working on advanced Visual BASIC language. A limited amount of time will be
spent on various computer concepts. Problem-solving skills will be enhanced during this course. This class is geared for students
with a sincere interest in a career in computer science.

Writing Goal: Students will be able to develop Windows-based applications effectively.

Grading Method: Grades will be based on daily assignments, quizzes, tests and programs created.



                                                                17
BUSINESS LAW - #662
The purpose of this course is to enable the student to understand the use of law and the courts in their personal, civic and business
affairs. The course teaches the student what their legal rights are, how to protect their own interests, to recognize the legal
implications of situations as they arise, and to know when professional legal aid is needed. The major units of study include law
and its effects on different groups of our society, criminal law, civil law, and juvenile law.

Writing Goal: Students will be tested in each unit of study. As a part of the tested area students will be required to write answers
to short essay questions.

Grading Method: Grades will be based on workbook assignments, worksheets, quizzes/tests.



BUSINESS PROCEDURES - #668
This course integrates knowledge and skills learned previously and introduces new skills, concepts, and applications needed by
entry-level administrative-support personnel. Units on word processing, spreadsheets, data bases, Internet, multimedia, and
desktop publishing are included. In addition, filing and job application procedures are covered. This class is required for those
students enrolled in Business Co-op.

Writing Goal: Composition exercises and a grammar review will be included to enhance the student’s writing skills.

Grading Method: Students will be graded on daily assignments, chapter and unit tests, and projects.


CAREER PATHWAYS - #658
This course is for all students who are interested in learning more about careers and how to prepare for the career of their choice.
Emphasis is placed on career opportunities, career preparation, and how to successfully make the transition from the classroom to the
work force. Units of study will include career clusters, career exploration, preparing for the work force, and how to be successful on
the job. This course is designed to be activity based and will include field trips, career speakers, and an opportunity to shadow in a
career field of the student’s choice. This course is recommended for students who plan to enroll in cooperative education (Coop).

Writing Goal: Students will complete a variety of writing activities which will enhance their career skills. Resume writing, letters
of application, and a Power Point project will be included.

Grading Method: Students will be graded on daily assignments, projects and class participation.



COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I - #230
Students will briefly examine the history and basic operations of a computer and will become proficient in their use of basic computer
software, particularly Google Docs and Office 2003 Software. Multidisciplinary projects will involve using various applications such as
word processing, spreadsheets, databases, graphics, and presentation software. Students will also have an opportunity to conduct research
on the Internet, explore new technological innovations, examine technology-related careers, and speculate about future computer
applications. This course is recommended for all students as many core classes require the use of Google Docs and Office software.

Writing Goal: Students will create and write a variety of business-related documents including e-mails, letters, newsletters, and
presentations.

Grading Method: Students will be graded based on exercises, daily work, quizzes/tests and classroom projects.


COMPUTER APPLICATIONS II - #228
This course introduces students to a variety of new and emerging technologies used in today's online environment as well as the application
environment. It covers various social networking platforms, content and learning management tools, web conferencing, and other trends in
social computing. Various technologies will be explored in this course. Some of these include: I-Movie, GarageBand, podcasts, wikis,
blogs, and other Internet software.

Writing Goal: Students will create and write a variety of business-related documents including e-mails, letters, newsletters, and
presentations.

                                                                    18
Grading Method: Students will be graded based on exercises, daily work, quizzes/tests and classroom projects.


 COMPUTER PROGRAMMING - #232
Students will use Microsoft Visual BASIC programming software. They will build applications and Windows-based programs.
Student will be taught the basics of Visual Basic programming. Problem solving skills will be exercised and developed. This class
is geared for students with a sincere interest in a career in computer science.

Writing Goal: Students will be able to develop Windows based applications effectively.

Grading Method: Grades will be based on daily assignments, quizzes, tests and programs created



INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS - #652
The primary objective of this course is to introduce students to the world of business. It offers a practical presentation of the factors
that comprise our national economy and it incorporates topics and concepts needed to help students deal with and become part of
the contemporary business world. The major units of study are the stock market, the private enterprise system, the nature of American
business, wise consumer buying, banks and banking services, credit, money management, and keeping financial records.

Writing Goals: Students will create a presentation program on a business they would like to start.

Grading Method: Students grades will be based on daily homework assignments, workbook assignments and quizzes/tests.


MARKETING & MERCHANDISING - #672
This course is concerned mainly with informing the student of the importance of the field of marketing and distribution and how it
functions to serve our American private enterprise system. The main areas of study are: Marketing in our economy , history of
retailing, career opportunities in retailing, and the customer in retailing. In second semester, the students study the principles of
salesmanship, cash register operation, and areas which will prepare the student in the skills necessary for securing a beginning job.

Writing Goal: First semester - Students will be required to create a presentation on how they would market a product, service, or
event. Second semester - Students will be required to write a resume for themselves, which may be used to apply for a job.

Grading Method: Students grades will be based on daily homework assignments, workbook assignments and quizzes/tests.


PERSONAL FINANCE - #660
This course will introduce students to personal financial planning concepts. This will include credit, budgeting, insurance,
banking and entrepreneurship. Students will learn the importance of managing credit and dealing with financial decisions they will
encounter throughout life. Emphasis will be placed on consumer responsibilities, earning potential, and wise financial management
strategies.

Writing Goal: Students will complete vocabulary exercises and written questions in each chapter to improve writing skills.

Grading Method: Students will be graded on tests, daily assignments, projects, and participation.



WEB PAGE DESIGN - #231
This course will utilize Windows as a tool for advanced software concepts. Macromedia software will be utilized during this class.
Students will learn how to design Web pages, create animated graphics, and utilize various software available. Digital cameras,
scanners, and other multimedia applications will be used during the course.




                                                                  19
Writing Goal: Students will complete business simulation requiring them to write, design and present professional multimedia
documents and Web pages.

Grading Method: Students will be graded on daily work, quizzes, tests and projects created.




                                       COOPERATIVE EDUCATION

BUSINESS PROCEDURES - #668
This course integrates knowledge and skills learned previously and introduces new skills, concepts, and applications needed by
entry-level administrative-support personnel. Units on word processing, spreadsheets, databases, Internet, multimedia, and desktop
publishing are included. In addition, filing and job application procedures are covered. This class is required for those students
enrolled in Business Coop.

Writing Goal: Composition exercises and a grammar review will be included to enhance the student’s writing skills.

Grading Method: Students will be graded on daily assignments, chapter and unit tests, and projects.



BUSINESS COOPERATIVE EDUCATION - #670
The purpose of business coop is to learn how to secure employment, how to work cooperatively with others, and how to apply those
skills and knowledge learned in the classroom to the business offices under the supervision of the teacher coordinator. Students
receive pay in addition to school credit and must be enrolled in Business Procedures, as well as work a minimum of 10 hours per
week. Students must dedicate two blocks in their schedule when enrolling for coop.

Grading Method: Students will be graded based on the written and verbal evaluation completed by the employer. Good work
habits as well as participation in the related class will be considered when the final grade is assigned.



 OCCUPATIONAL RELATIONS - #678
This is a related class required for students enrolled in Cooperative Education in Trades & Industry, Health Careers, and
Agriculture. Essential information related to the world of work is given. Students will study job applications, interviews, work
relations between employer and employee, taxes, legal problems of workers, unions, management and other related information.

Writing Goal: Students will do several writing assignments: resume, letter of application, and a report that will be the basis for a
speech.

Grading Method: The completion of the review questions, activities from the workbook, special projects and chapter tests will be
used to determine a student’s grade.



DIVERSIFIED OCCUPATIONS COOPERATIVE EDUCATION - #680
Students must register for the Occupational Relations class in order to take part in the Diversified Occupations Program. Students
are involved in actual job situations in their selected area for pay and credit. The employer, school and student enter into a training
agreement whereby the student is released for part of the regular school day for employment. Programs are supervised and graded by
the Vocational Coordinator. Students must work a minimum of 10 hours per week at agreed wage scales. This course serves those
students seeking employment in the areas of agriculture, trades and industry and health occupations. Students must dedicate two
blocks in their schedule when enrolling for coop.

Grading Method: An evaluation form will be completed by the student’s supervisor and combined with an on-site interview with
the supervisor.




                                                                  20
MARKETING & MERCHANDISING - #672
This course is concerned mainly with informing the student of the importance of the field of marketing and distribution and how it
functions to serve our American private enterprise system. The main areas of study are: Marketing in our economy, history of
retailing, career opportunities in retailing, and the customer in retailing. In second semester, the students study the principles of
salesmanship, cash register operation, and areas which will prepare the student in the skills necessary for securing a beginning job.

Writing Goal: First semester - Students will be required to create a presentation on how they would market a product, service, or
event. Second semester - Students will be required to write a resume for themselves, which may be used to apply for a job.

Grading Method: Students grades will be based on daily homework assignments, workbook assignments and quizzes/tests.


MARKETING COOPERATIVE EDUCATION - #676
The purpose of Marketing Coop is to coordinate the classroom learning with on-the-job-training. Students are involved in actual
job situations in their selected area of marketing. Students receive a regular wage equivalent to any other part-time worker on that
particular job site in addition to school credit. Students are required to work 10 hours minimum per week. Individuals in the
program are trying to obtain a saleable skill in the field of retail sales and other related areas of marketing. Students must also be
enrolled in Marketing and Merchandising while enrolled in this course. Students must dedicate two blocks in their schedule when
enrolling in Marketing Cooperative Education. Marketing and Merchandising is recommended but not required.

Grading Method: Grading will strongly be based on an evaluation plan set up specifically for each student. The evaluation plan
will be based on competencies decided upon by the employer and the Marketing Coop Internship Coordinator. Students will be
formally evaluated by the employer. Students will be assigned a grade by the coordinator based on the verbal and written
evaluation from the employer.




                                                          ENGLISH

ADVANCED PLACEMENT ENGLISH - #026
Advanced Placement English is a course for the college-bound student which allows the student to test out of college classes and to
receive college English credit from various institutions. The course of study will prepare students to take the Advanced Placement
English Literature and Composition Examination. Students will follow the course of study set up by The College Board, Princeton,
New Jersey, in preparation for college experience and for taking the exams. Students accepted to this program may use this course to
satisfy the senior composition requirement. This course may be taken by juniors on a space-available basis. This course is available
for dual enrollment. See page 8.

Writing Goal: Students will complete several essays to develop important critical thinking skills: a definition essay, college
application essay, argumentative essay, comparison/contrast essay, character analysis essay, etc.

Grading Method: The student’s grade will be based on the scores received on homework assignments, quizzes, tests, vocabulary
and grammar assignments, major essays, student presentations, and special projects.


AMERICAN LITERATURE - #012
In this course, the literature of America is surveyed from its beginnings to modern times. Units of study include the Colonial
Period, Revolutionary Period, Romanticism, American Renaissance, Realism, and the Moderns. Students will read a variety of
novels, short stories, poetry and drama.

Writing Goal: Students will complete three extended writing projects.

Grading Method: Student ’s grade will be based on unit tests, writing projects and daily work.




                                                                  21
APPLIED COMMUNICATIONS - #020
Applied Communications is a course that allows students to apply skills they have learned in the classroom. In addition to this,
students will be involved in activities that use electronic communication such as various computer programs, cameras and the
Internet. This course is intended for the student who will enter a trade/technical school or the world of work following graduation.
Some four-year institutions may not count this course as an English credit.

Creative Writing is a semester course for juniors and seniors that will provide experience in preparing, writing and
critiquing case histories, Students will be graded on daily assignments, weekly writing activities, unit tests, and a variety of major
communication projects.



CREATIVE WRITING - #042
Creative Writing is a semester course for juniors and seniors that will provide experience in preparing, writing and critiquing case
histories, character sketches, reviews, poetry, short stories and essays. Special units will be included on theories of creativity and
on the application of imaginative writing skills to college writing experiences. This class will be conducted as a writing workshop
with students participating in writing groups. An anthology of student work will be produced at the end of each school year.

Writing Goal: Using the five-step writing process, students will compose several imaginative works: poetry, a short story, essays,
etc.

Grading Method: The student’s grade will be based on appropriate completion of required assignments as well as periodic writing
notebook assignments of free-write entries.



DRAMA - #032
This course is an introduction to dramatic art and its development. The techniques of acting and the practical aspects of play
production will be explored and put into application by the class. Scenes from plays will be performed. Production work beyond
class time will be required.

Writing Goal: All students will write a character analysis in preparation for a final duet acting scene which will be performed
before the class.

Grading Method: Student’s grade will be based on a point total system using quizzes, daily worksheets, essays, performances, and
tests.



ENGLISH 9 - #006
English 9 is a two-semester course emphasizing the study of literature along with written and oral communication. Students will
keep a writing notebook of original work and responses to the literature read. Informal and formal essays will be evaluated. Second
semester students will deliver several speeches in a unit emphasizing oral communication.

Writing Goal: Students will keep a writing notebook of original work and responses to the literature read. Informal and formal
essays will be evaluated.

Grading Method: Student’s grade will be based on quizzes, tests and written work.



ENGLISH 10 - #008
This course emphasizes basic genres of world literature: short stories, essays, the novel, drama, poetry and composition (the
sentence, the paragraph, the essay and the research report). The study of several literary examples from these genres will be included.
Spelling and vocabulary development will be included in this program.

Writing Goal: Students will write a formal research paper along with formal and informal essays.



                                                                  22
Grading Method: A student’s grade will be based on averages received on homework assignments, quizzes, tests, vocabulary
assignments, essays, supplementary readings and major projects. The student must pass the research paper component in order to
pass the first semester of this course.



ENGLISH 11 - #016
Designed for students who are in need of more assistance, English 11 gives students a sampling of major literary writers with
a strong emphasis on American literature. Students will read novels, short stories, poetry and plays. In addition to literature,
emphasis will be given to grammar, composition and journal writing.

Writing Goal: Students will write a personal narrative and a persuasion essay.

Grading Method: Student’s grade will be based on reading quizzes, spelling/vocabulary quizzes, tests over novels, and
daily assignments.


ENGLISH 12 - #018
This course fulfills the graduation requirement for senior composition. It is a reading and writing course for those seniors who need
extensive practice with written communication. Emphasis is placed on the writing process, critical thinking and use of reading
strategies. Time will also be allotted for personal reading.

Writing Goal: Students will write journals, paragraphs, and complete a research project on a career.

Grading Method: The student’s grade will be based on writing assignments, daily work, quizzes and tests.


ENGLISH LITERATURE - #014
English Literature is a survey of major literary periods in England from the Middle Ages through the Modern. Special emphasis is
placed on the role literature plays in society, the development of the English language, and the influence of English history and
literature on American history and literature. Students will independently read a novel each semester.

Writing Goal: Students will write essays, research reports, and make oral presentations.

Grading Method: Student’s grade will be based on daily activities, quizzes, tests and essays. Independent reading will be
encouraged.



FORENSICS - #030
Speech and/or Debate contest participation is a requirement of this class. Students will practice and polish their public speaking
skills. Speeches and interpretations will be delivered both in and out of class.

Writing Goal: Students will write and deliver speeches, interpretations and debates, both in and out of class.

Grading Method: Student’s grade will be based on a compiled portfolio of all activities which demonstrate their speech activities.
All speeches are expected to be of contest quality.


HUMANITIES I - #044
Humanities I is a course for grades 9-12. This class is offered first semester only and focuses on the Academic Decathlon curriculum.
A student need not be on the Decathlon team to take the class. The material changes yearly, but focuses on art, music, literature and
social sciences. Students will take a field trip to Joslyn Art Museum. (Due to content, this course can be taken for credit more than
once).

Writing Goal: Students will write two research papers related to Humanities.

Grading Method: Student’s grade will be based on research compositions, quizzes and tests.

                                                                 23
HUMANITIES II - #045
Humanities II will provide an interdisciplinary study of art, music, architecture, history, philosophy, and literature. The arts will
not be studied in isolation but as interrelated forms of human creativity. The course will explore the relationship between the arts
and society and will introduce the student to an historical and cultural survey of important epochs of Western civilization: the
Mesopotamian Period, the Egyptian Period, the Greek and Roman Period, the Medieval Period, the Renaissance, the Romantic
Period, and the Modern Era. Special presentations, guest lecturers, examples of representative works of music and art, and special
activities/projects will be included within the program.

Writing Goal: Two writing projects related to the humanities will be completed during the semester.

Grading Method: A student’s grade will be based on the scores received by the student on homework assignments, chapter notes,
quizzes, tests on the epochs of Western civilization, two writing projects, student presentations, and one culminating project.


JOURNALISM - #038
This class gives students a comprehensive picture of high school publications and the media. During 1st semester students are
taught the rights and responsibilities of journalists and learn how to write news stories, feature stories, opinion pieces and sports
stories. During 2nd semester students polish their writing skills by writing for publication. They also learn yearbook and
newspaper layout design principles. In addition, a unit is presented on the basics of 35mm photography.

Writing Goal: Students will write for school publications to polish their writing skills.

Grading Method: A student’s grade will be based on chapter quizzes, lecture/presentation quizzes, current events quizzes, daily
assignment grades, newspaper stories, class projects and adherence to deadlines.


NEWSPAPER - #046
Newspaper is designed to provide students with practical experience in all phases of newspaper production. As members of the
newspaper staff, students will produce 9-12 issues of Bear Tracks. Opportunities also exist for students to gain experience in digital
imaging, desktop publishing, advertising, and layout and design. Leadership positions are available by application. This class can
be repeated for credit.

Writing Goal: Students will write articles for the school newspaper and the community newspaper.

Grading Method: The student’s grade will be based on assigned writing, adherence to deadlines and other production activities.



PHOTOGRAPHY - #039
This course is developed for students who want to learn the basics of photography. Emphasis will be on digital photography, photo
manipulation, and photo composition. Students will learn about exposure, lenses, lighting, and the rules of good composition.
Upon completion of this course, students may apply for photography membership on the newspaper and/or yearbook staffs.

Writing Goal: Students will complete a research project related to their studies in Photography.

Grading Method: Student’s grade will be based on quizzes and unit tests, writing assignments, class projects and daily work.


PUBLIC SPEAKING - #028
Fall Semester (1st semester): This course emphasizes the research, organization and delivery involved in effective public speaking.
Participation in contest speaking will be encouraged.

Spring Semester (2nd semester): The student will select, cut, and deliver interpretations of prose, poetry and drama.
Individual and group interpretations will be prepared and presented for a variety of real audiences. Students interested in literature,
drama, or performance should consider this class. Speech contest participation will be encouraged.



                                                                  24
Writing Goal: Fall Semester: Students will write informative, entertainment and persuasive speeches.
              Spring Semester: Students will write literary analyses and introductions to the selections. Students will
              create analysis of poetry.

Grading Method: Student’s grade will be based on quality of speeches delivered in class, quizzes and class participation.


 SENIOR COMPOSITION I - #022
This writing course is required for graduation. Emphasis will be placed on improving individual student’s writing and preparing
the student to meet the expectations for written communication in college and in the working world. Numerous papers and projects
will be completed.

Writing Goal: Students will write papers for a variety of purposes including reflection, persuasion, and critical analysis. Projects
and presentations will involve the use of computer technology.

Grading Method: The student’s grade will be based on daily work, writing assignments, projects and presentations.



 SENIOR COMPOSITION II - #024
In this course students will develop advanced rhetorical knowledge; practice critical reading, thinking, and writing; and use a
writing process to draft, revise, and edit texts in a variety of genres with an emphasis on thesis-driven essays and research
assignments. The work of this course will help students become effective communicators, including the use of cutting edge-
technologies, who can express thoughts and feelings in both written and oral modes to be successful in education and the
workplace.

Writing Goal: Students will write papers for a variety of purposes including reflection, persuasion, and critical analysis. Projects
and presentations will involve the use of computer technology.

Grading Method: Students will be assessed on daily work, writing assignments, projects and presentations.



 STAGECRAFT - #036
Stagecraft is a one-semester course which introduces the student to the various aspects of technical theatre. The areas to be explored
will be: set construction, painting, lighting and sound, costumes, props and makeup. Fifteen (15) hours of practical experience in
technical theatre will be required.

Writing Goal: Students will select one area of technical theatre (set construction, painting, lighting, sound or props) in which to
do extended research and complete a 2-3 page report on procedures used for a specific aspect of that technical area.

Grading Method: Student ’s grade is based on a point total system using quizzes, daily worksheets, essays, papers and tests.


WORLD LITERATURE - #010
This course is a world literature and composition class, college preparatory in nature, which is open to students who have
maintained a 90% average in English 9. This course emphasizes accelerated reading in the basic genre forms: short stories, essays,
the novel, drama and poetry. The course includes the writing of compositions inspired by these readings and the completion of a
research project. Vocabulary study, two book reports per semester, and two extended writing projects per semester are required.
This course satisfies a student ’s English 10 requirements.
Writing Goal: The course includes the writing of compositions inspired by the above readings and the completion of a formal
research project.

Grading Method: The student’s grade will be based on the scores received on homework assignments, quizzes, tests,
vocabulary assignments, major essays, supplementary readings and special projects. During the second semester of the course, the
grade received on an individual research project will also be used to determine a student’s grade.




                                                                 25
YEARBOOK - #047
Yearbook is designed to provide students with practical experience in all phases of yearbook production. As members of the
yearbook staff, students will produce Blair High School’s yearbook, The Tattler. Opportunities also exist for students to gain
experience in digital imaging, desktop publishing, advertising, and layout and design. Leadership positions are available by
application. This class can be repeated for credit.

Writing Goal: Students will write copy for the school yearbook and complete an individual project that demonstrates their mastery
of copy and design.

Grading Method: The student’s grade will be based on assigned yearbook spreads, adherence to deadlines and other
production activities.




                                      FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCE

ADULT LIVING - #690
This course addresses concerns which students face as they enter adulthood. Units of study may include heredity and environment,
decision making and problem solving with application to real-life situations, understanding adult relationships, mate and life-style
selections, parenting, and ways to deal with family crisis. Students are encouraged to express and justify their own ideas and look at
situations from a variety of points of view.

Writing Goal: The writing process is incorporated throughout this course when completing projects, essay questions, and
notebook entries.

Grading Method: Students will be graded on various activities throughout the course. Included in the determination of their grade
will be daily work, quizzes, tests, and projects.


CHILD DEVELOPMENT I - #686
Child Development I includes an introduction to children and parenting. A study of pregnancy and childbirth and the developmental of the
infant from birth through the first month is covered in this course. The real baby, fetal alcohol syndrome, and shaken baby curriculums are
a part of this course.

Writing Goal: The writing process is incorporated throughout this course when completing projects, essay questions, and
notebook entries..

Grading Method: Students will be graded on various activities throughout the course. Included in the determination of their grade
will be daily work, quizzes, tests, and projects.


CHILD DEVELOPMENT II - #688
Child Development I is a prerequisite to this course. This course will begin with the baby’s first year through the first seven years of a
child’s life. The physical, emotional and social development will be investigated for each age group. Infant care and childcare skills will
be highly emphasized in this course.

Writing Goal: The writing process is incorporated throughout this course when completing projects, essay questions, and
notebook entries..

Grading Method: Students will be graded on various activities throughout the course. Included in the determination of their grade
will be daily work, quizzes, tests, and projects.




                                                                     26
FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCE - #682
Fall Semester (1st semester): This class is designed as an overview of the different aspects of the Family and Consumer Science field.
Units are completed on character, responsibility, relationships, health and wellness, and food and nutrition. Students are given lab
opportunities in the second term with minimal food preparation.

Spring Semester (2nd semester): This class is a continuation of the first semester course with an overview of the Family and
Consumer Sciences. Units are completed in child development, clothing and clothing care, housing and interior design, and basic
sewing techniques.

Writing Goal: The writing process is incorporated throughout this course when completing projects, essay questions, and
notebook entries.

Grading Method: Students will be graded on various activities throughout the course. Included in the determination of their grade
will be daily work, quizzes, tests, labs, and projects.


CLOTHING AND FASHION I - #692
This course offers the student an introduction to the design and construction of fashion and apparel. Classic elements of
clothing design are studied along with trends and fashions. Strategies for becoming more personally fashionable and
consumer-wise are emphasized. Students will have hands-on experience using the sewing machine, serger, and embroidery machine.

Writing Goal: The writing process is incorporated throughout this course when completing projects, essay questions, and
notebook entries.

Grading Method: Students will be graded on various activities throughout the course, including daily work, quizzes, tests,
projects, and class participation.


CLOTHING AND FASHION II - #693
This course covers the design and construction of clothing and the use of accessories, Classic elements of clothing design will be
used in conjunction with design construction techniques. Students will become acquainted with careers in the field of clothing and
fashion. Students will complete more advanced projects using the sewing machine, serger, and embroidery machine. Students who
have completed Fashion Merchandising I are eligible for enrollment in Fashion Merchandising II.

Writing Goal: The writing process is incorporated throughout this course when completing projects, essay questions, and
notebook entries.

Grading Method: Students will be graded on various activities throughout the course. Included in determination of their grade
will be daily work, quizzes, tests and projects.


FOODS & NUTRITION I - #684
This course covers issues and concerns related to food and nutrition. Kitchen equipment, food safety, recipe skills, cooking methods,
and nutrition are included in the course. Various recipes prepared in labs give students the opportunity to practice food preparation
methods covered in the course. Students who have already taken Foods & Nutrition I should register for Foods & Nutrition II.

Writing Goal: The writing process is incorporated throughout this course when preparing and evaluating food labs, and when
doing class activities and journal entries.

Grading Method: Students will be graded on various activities throughout the course. Included in the determination of their grade
will be daily work, tests, lab work, and journal entries.



FOODS & NUTRITION II - #685
This is a course that will build on information learned in Foods & Nutrition I, and is designed to give students information that they
can use in everyday life. Topics covered include meal planning, shopping for food, meats, nutrition, garnishes, seasonings, cultures,
                                                                 27
and food customs. Numerous recipes prepared in labs give students the chance to practice food preparation and to build on their
skill level.

Writing Goal: The writing process is incorporated throughout this course when preparing for and evaluating food labs,
worksheets, tests and journal writing.

Grading Method: Students will be graded on various activities throughout the course. Included in the determination of their grade
will be daily work, tests, lab work, and journal entries.


INTERIOR DESIGN - #694
This course covers a study of types of housing. Room and furniture arrangements are studied as well as decorating and
selecting and buying home furnishings and equipment. Tours of businesses and homes may be included.

Writing Goals: The writing process is incorporated throughout this course when completing projects, essay questions, and
notebook entries.

Grading Method: Students will be graded on various activities throughout the course. Included in the determination of their grade
will be daily work, quizzes, tests, and projects.




                                             FOREIGN LANGUAGE
FRENCH I - #156
First year French builds a base of language and grammar in both written and spoken French. Instruction and practice in elementary
vocabulary, grammar, pronunciation and sentence structure coupled with an emphasis on spoken and written fluency form the core of
this course. Cultural studies follow the text themes of the vocabulary, geography, history, music and literature of the French-
speaking world.

Writing Goal: Targets the composition of grammatically correct whole sentences and paragraphs following the test themes.

Grading Method: The student’s grade will be based on daily grade average (composed of quizzes, orals, daily assignments) and
chapter test averages.


FRENCH II - #158
French II aims to develop the student’s ability in French in its written and oral forms to the lower-intermediate level. Instruction
and practice in basic and intermediate vocabulary, grammar, pronunciation and sentence structure are coupled with an emphasis on
spoken and written fluency in this course. Cultural studies center around the text themes of the music, art, family life and customs,
literature and leisure of the Francophone world.

Writing Goal: Targets an intermediate level of composition of grammatically correct whole sentences and paragraphs
following the test theme.

Grading Method: The student’s grade will be based on daily grade average (composed of quizzes, orals, daily assignments) and
chapter test averages.


FRENCH III - #160
The grammar review comprises a deepening of knowledge and facility with verb forms, pronouns, sentence structure and vocabulary,
and enables students who successfully complete this level to converse, read and write competently at an upper-intermediate level in
readiness for the advanced level. The cultural component follows the test vocabulary themes, which highlight French youth
cultures, attitudes and issues in addition to a nice selection of literary texts.

Writing Goal: Targets the application of the student ’s knowledge by self-expression in written reports, stories, drama and poetry.

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Grading Method: The student’s grade will be based on daily grade average (composed of quizzes, orals, daily assignments) and
chapter test and project averages.


FRENCH IV - #162
French IV targets an advanced level in written and spoken fluency. Building on their language background, students will develop
their ability to communicate orally, their vocabulary, and their cultural acuity through reading French literature, listening to French
radio broadcasts, and producing written and oral responses to current issues and events.

Writing Goal: Students will write a book report over a French novel. This report will be two pages in length incorporating
appropriate vocabulary, grammar structures, and information on characters and plot.

Grading Method: The student’s grade will be based on daily grade average (composed of quizzes, orals, daily assignments) and
chapter test and project averages.


 SPANISH I - #166
The first year of Spanish is an introduction to the simple structure of the Spanish language. Students will be taught the basic skills
of language learning; listening (students have the opportunity to hear native speakers on audio CD’s), speaking (dialogues),
reading and writing through simple conversations and cultural situations relative to the Spanish speaking world. Both oral and
written work are necessary elements in learning a foreign language and will be stressed the first year. Multicultural elements are
interwoven through the study of the Hispanic culture which includes the diverse races and peoples that make up Hispanic society
worldwide.

Writing Goal: Writing skills are promoted through writing short paragraphs about school, family, and self.

Grading Method: Grading will be based on tests, quizzes, projects and daily work/participation.


 SPANISH II - #168
The second year of Spanish will increase the students’ listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills as well as expand the
grammatical understanding of the language. Increased verb study and everyday life situations will be explored. Cultural information
is woven throughout the course to give students the needed understanding and appreciation of all Hispanic society and how it
complements our society.

Writing Goal: Writing skills are promoted through units on sentence building, short essay answers and descriptive paragraphs.

Grading Method: Grading will be based on daily participation, written assignments, vocabulary quizzes and tests. Projects and
conversations will occasionally count as a quiz or test grade.


 SPANISH III - #170
The third year of Spanish students will be introduced to more complex grammatical construction and verb tenses. Improving fluency,
accuracy and understanding will be stressed as well as original expression in oral and written form. Hispanic short stories will be
studied. CD’s are coordinated with the text to improve the students’ understanding of spoken Spanish by native speakers. The
Hispanic culture continues to be an important addition to class work.

Writing Goal: Frequent short essays and summaries increase abilities in the written language.

Grading Method: Grading will be based on increased daily participation including oral response, oral comprehension,
translations, written assignments, vocabulary quizzes and tests.

 SPANISH IV - #172
Fourth year Spanish will emphasize improvement in oral fluency, grammar usage/structure accuracy, and vocabulary build-up.
Studies in Spanish literature will be included. Completion of the 4-year program will provide students with a solid foundation of
the language for personal use and offer options for college bound students in the areas of foreign language requirements and/or

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advanced placement. Multicultural elements are interwoven in the course through the study of the history, literature, customs, the
arts, and the geography of Hispanic countries and their contributions to our society.

Writing Goal: Frequent short essays and summaries increase abilities in the written language.

Grading Method: Grading will be based on daily oral participation, written assignments, quizzes, tests, translations, projects, and
oral presentations.




                                      INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY
ADVANCED WOODS - #614
Advanced Woods is a two-semester class that is offered every other year. Students will learn the basics of cabinet and furniture
making, learn about and use multiple types of power tools, and create two projects, one during first semester (instructor selected) and
the other during second semester (student selected). Students are required to pass all power tool safety tests with a 100% as well as
pass each power tool parts test with a minimum of 85% before being allowed to use any power tools.

Writing Goal: Students will complete a research paper on woodworking tools, processes, and technology used in today’s
woodworking lab.

Grading Method: Students’ grades are determined using total points earned on assignments such as class work, homework,
quizzes, tests, and lab work.


APPLIED TECHNOLOGIES - #620
This course is designed for motivated students interested in problem solving, research and development, critical thinking, and
hands-on activities dealing with areas of technology. Students will follow a 8-day activity guide as they work in groups of two in
the following areas of technology: NC Manufacturing, Electronics, Computer Aided Design (CAD) Desktop Publishing, Digital
Photography, Digital Design, Vinyl Sign Production, DVD Production, Video Editing, Computer Animation, Digital Audio
Production, Flight Trainer, Web Page Design, Digital Music, CNC Lathe and Global Positioning.

Writing Goal: Each student will complete a three-page written or typed report on an occupation related to each module they
participate in and the regional outlook of that occupation.

Grading Method: Each module (area of study) will have a final grade, which will be averaged at each grading period to determine
the student’s grade. Daily participation, written work, activities, experiments, quizzes and tests will be used to determine a
student’s grade.


CONSTRUCTION - #616
Construction is a course designed to expose students to the fundamentals of residential (home) construction. Students will learn the
basics of blueprint reading, wall framing, concrete work, rafter construction, and other aspects of residential construction methods
and techniques. Students are required to pass all power tool safety tests with a 100%, as well as pass each power tool parts test with
a minimum of 85% before being allowed to use any power tools.

Writing Goal: Students will complete a research paper over new technologies being used in the construction industry, the
importance of OSHA on the job site, and types of hazards at the job site.

Grading Method: Students will be graded on written assignments, tests and participation in the lab. Students are required to take a
safety test and parts test on all power tools that will be used in the lab.


DRAFTING I - #602
Fall Semester (1st semester): This course covers fundamentals of the use of drafting equipment, procedures and techniques. Students
will complete drawing projects in the areas of sketching, drafting techniques, geometric construction, lettering techniques, multi

                                                                 30
view drawings, dimensioning practices, sectional views, auxiliary views, pictorials, pattern development, welding drawings, charts
and graphs, and fasteners. Students will primarily use manual drafting equipment and will be introduced to computer aided drafting.

Spring Semester (2nd semester): Students will utilize computer equipment to complete a series of problem-solving drawing
assignments. Drawing units will be divided into three major sections: two-dimensional drawings, three-dimensional drawings and
special projects. Drafting areas covered will be careers in drafting, sketching, geometry for technical drawings, multi view drawing,
dimensioning, auxiliary views & revolutions, sectional views & conventions, fasteners, working drawings, understanding
computer-aided drafting, and drawing with AutoCAD. This course will articulate at Metro Community College. Students who
receive an “A” or “B” will receive credit at Metro for the course and will not have to pay tuition fees for the course.

Writing Goal: Fall Semester: Each student will complete a three-page written or typed report on an occupation related to drafting
and the characteristics of that occupation. Spring Semester: Each student will complete a three-page written or typed report on the
contributions made by an engineer of a minority race in the engineering field.

Grading Method: The final grade will be determined by an average of scores earned on chapter questions, textbook questions,
worksheets, quizzes, chapter exams, drawing assignments, an assigned writing project and the final exam.


DRAFTING II - #606
This course deals with fundamental building processes and construction details of wood frame buildings. Units studied include
planning, construction materials, detail drawings, floor plans, elevations, door and window specifications, exterior wall coverings,
roofing materials and topographical drawings. Students will use IBM computers and CAD software to complete a set of construction
drawings. CAD fundamentals and software applications will be covered. These include drawing commands, dimensioning, symbols,
templates, 2-D and 3-D drawings, and presentation drawings.

Second semester each student will complete his/her set of residential working drawings. Framework for these drawings will be set
up in first semester. Included in this set will be a plot plan, foundation and footing plans, floor plans, window and door schedules,
wall and ceiling sections, and electrical plans. All drawings will be completed using the computer and AutoCAD. This course will
articulate at Metro Community College. Students who receive an “A” or “B” will receive credit at Metro for the course and will not
have to pay tuition fees for the course.

Writing Goal: First semester each student will complete a three-page handwritten or typed report on the influence of one of the
early home designs outlined in the textbook. Second semester each student will complete a three-page report on the contributions
made by an architect of a minority race in the field of architecture.

Grading Method: The final grade will be determined by an average of scores earned on chapter questions, chapter exams,
worksheets, drawing assignments, an assigned writing project and the final exam.


DRAFTING III - #608
This course is designed for students who have a true interest in a mechanical drawing, drafting, design, engineering or architectural
field of study. This course will introduce students to sensitivity to design, skills in drawing techniques, design management, and
real-life problem solving skills. Students will utilize technology both in drawing and performing presentations. This course will
articulate at Metro Community College. Students who receive an “A” or “B” will receive credit at Metro for the course and will not
have to pay tuition fees for the course.

Writing Goal: Students will be required to write detailed three-page reports on each project completed. Students will be required
to write one short research paper on a drafting- related topic.

Grading Method: A student’s final grade will be determined by an average, based on a composite score of drawing assignments,
projects, computer exercises, writing projects and final exam.


HOME MAINTENANCE - #617
Home Maintenance is a class that is designed to teach the basics in home repair. Topics that are covered include drywall wall repair,
electrical fixture replacement, painting, as well as other simple home repair jobs. Students are required to pass all safety tests with a
100% and all power tool parts tests with an 85% before being allowed to use any power tools. Student will also build a small
woodworking project to demonstrate their skills using a variety of power tools.

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Writing Goal: Students will complete a research paper on a variety of energy-efficient home building materials, designs, and
manufacturing processes of a home.

Grading Method: Students’ grades are determined using total points earned on assignments including class work, homework,
quizzes, tests, and lab work.


IT ESSENTIALS - #619
This course is the first course of the Cisco Networking Academy. Topics covered in this class include the internal components of a
computer used to successfully assemble a system, installing an operating system, and trouble shooting using system tools and
diagnostic software. This course is for students who wish to explore or pursue a career in information technology or computers.

Writing Goal: Students will write for selected journal and workbook assignments.

Grading Method: Evaluation of this course will be on attendance, lab completion and participation, testing (including midterm and
final) and notebooks. Grades will be figured on a total point basis.


METALS - #624
Metals is an introductory course designed to expose students to the basics of welding and sheet metal work. The course covers basic
sheet metal fabrication, oxygen/acetylene welding, shielded metal arc welding, gas metal arc welding, and plasma cutting. Students
are required to provide appropriate clothing for working in the welding lab. Students are required to pass all safety tests with a
100% and all welding equipment parts tests with a minimum of 85% before being allowed to use any welding equipment.

Writing Goal: Students will complete a research paper on various processes and techniques of the metal fabrication industry.

Grading Method: Students’ grades are determined using total points earned on assignments including class work, homework,
quizzes, tests, and lab work.



NUTECH - #618
In this course, students work in groups of two and follow a 10-activity curriculum guide that allows them to explore areas of
technology. This class is unique in that it prepares students to become responsible for what they learn as they work to meet daily
goals. There are approximately 18 units of study available for students to choose from as students complete seven different units of
study in a semesters time. The technology areas of study include: Computer Aided Design (CAD). CAD/CAM Mill, Desktop
Publishing, Electronics I & II, Non-Linear Video, Robotics, Auto Research and Design, Plastics Technology, Digital Photography,
Computer Animation, DVD Production, Vinyl Sign Production, Digital Audio Production, Digital Design, Flight Trainer, Web
Page Design, Digital Music, CNC Lathe and Global Positioning. Students may only take Nutech for two semesters.

Writing Goal: All students will complete a written evaluation of each unit of study.

Grading Method: Each module (area of study) will have a final grade, which will be averaged at each grading period to determine
the student’s grade. Daily participation, written work, activities, experiments, quizzes and tests will be used to determine a
student’s grade.



 SMALL ENGINES - #622
This course covers the basic principles of how four stroke engines operate. Students will learn, through a variety of classroom and
lab setting lessons, the basic theories behind the small gas engine. Precision measuring tools such as micrometers will also be used
to assist students in maintaining and repairing small gas engines. Students will be required to pass all safety tests through written
and performance assessments.

Writing Goal: Students will be required to write short essays dealing with small engine repair and maintenance.

Grading Method: Grades are determined by the following: test scores, homework grades and assigned shop activities. Students
will be required to demonstrate the safe operation of power tools used in the lab.


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WOODS - #612
This is an introductory woodworking class that exposes students to the use of hand tools, measuring practices, and limited power
tool use. Projects will be used to develop and apply skills and knowledge of basic woodworking processes. Safety is a major topic
of any Industrial Technology course and will be enforced at all times while students are working in the lab. Students will be
required to pass all safety tests with a 100% and all power tool parts tests with an 85% before being allowed to use power tools.

Writing Goal: Students will develop a written plan for building the assigned project.

Grading Method: Daily participation, written reports, tests, quizzes, activities and projects will be used to determine the student’s
grade.




                                                    MATHEMATICS
                                                   MATH INFORMATION
The following mathematics courses at Blair High School are listed in order from the least difficult to the most difficult:

    •    Prealgebra
    •    Algebra A and Algebra B OR Algebra
    •    Geometry OR Honors Geometry
    •    Advanced Algebra OR Honors Advanced Algebra
    •    Discrete Mathematics OR Math Analysis
    •    Advanced Placement Calculus AB

To graduate from Blair High School, students must complete three years of mathematics. All math courses listed in the Course
Selector may be used to meet Blair High School math graduation requirements. Students planning to attend four-year colleges
after high school will need to take a minimum of three math courses beginning with Algebra. Some colleges, such as the
University of Nebraska at Lincoln, require four years of math beginning with Algebra.

Students performing well in their math courses are encouraged to take the honors level of mathematics. These honors courses
provide challenging curriculum at a faster pace than the regular courses. Students receive recommendations for math placement at
registration time in February from their math teachers. These recommendations are based on performance in the classroom and
grades in math courses.

                                                      MATH SEQUENCE

   PreAlgebra              Algebra A            Algebra B


                             Algebra             Geometry               Adv. Algebra                Discrete Math


                                     Honors                    Honors Adv.                   Math                  AP Calculus
                                    Geometry                    Algebra                    Analysis




ADVANCED ALGEBRA - #213
This course is designed as a follow-up to either Geometry or Honors Geometry. This course consists of the study of real numbers,
solving equations and inequalities, graphs and functions, polynomials and factoring, rational expressions, irrational and complex
numbers, quadratic equations and functions, systems of linear equations and numerical methods, analytic geometry, sequences and
series, matrices and determinants.

Writing Goal: Students will write a paragraph of justification for the solution to an application problem.

Grading Method: Grades are comprised of quizzes, tests, daily work and state standards. A semester exam may be given.
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ADVANCED PLACEMENT CALCULUS (AB) - #222
This course will cover limits and continuity, Slopefields, differentiation rules, the Chain Rule, optimum problems, Mean Value
Theorem, definite integrals, antiderivatives, Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, areas between curves, transcendental functions,
integration formulas, and partial and multiple derivatives. Students will follow a course of study that will ultimately prepare them to
take the Advanced Placement Calculus, (AB Test) administered by The College Board in May of the year.

This course is available for dual enrollment. See page 8.

Writing Goal: Students will write informal proofs for the major theorems of the Calculus.

Grading Method: Grades are comprised of quizzes, tests and daily work. A semester test may be given.


ALGEBRA - #208
Algebra is required of most students for graduation. The student is expected to work out daily assigned problems and exercises. The
content of this course includes formulas, simple equations, directed or signed numbers, polynomial computations, problems solved
by equations, irrational numbers, real numbers, inequalities, systems of linear equations, factoring, algebraic fractions and fractional
equations, square roots, quadratic equations and complex numbers.

Writing Goal: Students will create application problems using given facts.

Grading Method: Grades are comprised of quizzes, tests and daily work.


ALGEBRA A - #204
Algebra A is the first year of a two-year basic Algebra course. Algebra A is designed for students who are achieving at near grade
level with emphasis given to basic components of algebra.

Topics covered in Algebra A will be the use of variables, equations, inequalities, solving multiple step equations, graphing linear
equations and linear inequalities.

Writing Goal: Students will create application problems using given facts.

Grading Method: Grades are comprised of quizzes, tests and daily work.



ALGEBRA B - #205
Algebra B is the second year of a two-year basic Algebra course. Algebra B is designed for students who are achieving at near grade
level with emphasis given to basic components of algebra.

Topics covered in Algebra B will be systems of equations, exponents, quadratic equations, polynomials, factoring, rational
equations and radicals.

Writing Goal: Students will create application problems using given facts.

Grading Method: Grades are comprised of quizzes, tests and daily work.



DISCRETE MATH - #224
This course can fulfill the four-year math requirements that some colleges and universities require. The course will build on the
concepts that were learned in Advanced Algebra. First semester will feature an emphasis on trigonometry. Other topics that may be
covered during the year include: polynomials, functions, logarithms, solving equations, sequence and series, counting and
probability, election theory, fair division, matrices, graphs, number theory, and recursion.

Writing Goal: Students will write a paragraph of justification for the solution of an application problem.

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Grading Method: Grades are comprised of quizzes, tests and daily work. A semester exam may be given.



GEOMETRY - #210
This course will satisfy the Geometry requirement for students needing this for graduation. This course will have the basic geometry
content, but without formal proofs. Concepts covered in this course would include:

        1.    A review of basic Algebra concepts.
        2.    Points, lines, planes, segments, rays, distance and angles.
        3.    Angles of polygons, Pythagorean theorem and special right triangles.
        4.    Circles and related arcs, angles and segments.
        5.    Constructions and congruence of triangles.
        6.    Parallel lines and properties of all types of quadrilaterals.
        7.    Perimeter, area and volume.
        8.    Ratios and similar polygons.
        9.    Applications of similar polygons and trigonometry.
        10.   Coordinate systems and linear equations.

Writing Goal: Students will be able to practice their writing skills by composing a paragraph describing a building or
specific place that uses many geometrical shapes in its design.

Grading Method: Grades are comprised of quizzes, tests and daily work. A semester exam may be given.



HONORS ADVANCED ALGEBRA - #214
This course consists of the study of functional relations, systems of equations, radicals, quadratic equations, exponents, powers,
roots, logarithms, sequences, equations of higher degree, matrices and determinants. Students can expect to spend one hour daily in
preparation for this class.

Writing Goal: Students will write a paragraph of justification for the solution to an application problem.

Grading Method: Grades are comprised of quizzes, tests, daily work and state standards. A semester exam may be given.



HONORS GEOMETRY - #212
This course consists of the writing of deductive proofs and the solving of linear and quadratic equations and systems of linear
equations. Topics covered include points, lines, planes, segments, rays, distance, angles, perpendicular and parallel lines, polygons,
congruent triangles, similar triangles, right triangles and circles. Other topics include radicals, perimeter, area, and volume of plane
figures and solids and coordinate geometry.

Writing Goal: Students will be able to practice their writing skills by writing deductive proofs explaining each theorem.

Grading Method: Grades are comprised of quizzes, tests and daily work. A semester exam may be given.


MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS - #216
This course consists of the study of the following trigonometric and calculus topics: (Trigonometry) - trigonometric functions,
circular functions, graphing in rectangular and polar coordinates, solutions of right and oblique triangles, hyperbolic functions and
series. (Calculus) - Cartesian coordinate systems, polynomial equations, limits, maxima and minima, logarithmic and exponential
functions, derivatives and integrals. Students must satisfactorily complete semester one to continue on with the second semester of
this course.

Writing Goal: Students will write a short paragraph describing different functions that represent the behaviors of different
quantities.

Grading Method: Grades are comprised of quizzes, tests and daily work. A semester test may be given.

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PREALGEBRA - #206
This course is designed as a bridge between arithmetic and algebra. The students will progress from working problems that are
mostly numerical to solving those that require more advanced reasoning skills. Topics covered include: working with integers,
rational numbers and variables, solving and graphing equations and inequalities, working with proportions and percents, factoring,
problem solving, graphing and applying algebra to geometry.

Writing Goal: Students will create application problems using given facts.

Grading Method: Grades are comprised of quizzes, tests and daily work. A semester test may be given.




                                                          MUSIC
BAND 9 - #520
Ninth grade band will meet on alternating days throughout the school year. The ninth grade band is designed to strengthen the
fundamentals of band members using primarily grade 2 and 3 music. Members are required to participate in all scheduled
performances. This group will perform in all parades and football pre-game performances as well as pep band during the volleyball
and basketball seasons. Concerts include Winter Concert, Soup/Salad Supper, Spring Concert and graduation. Marching rehearsals
are scheduled before school as needed.

Writing Goal: There will be several writing assignment in which the student will be required to write short answers, reviews,
evaluations and essays,

Grading Method: Grading will be based on an accumulation of points earned for class participation, performances, music accuracy,
equipment care, rehearsal habits and performance evaluations.


BAND 10 - #521
Tenth grade band will meet on alternating days throughout the school year. The tenth grade band is designed to further develop the
skills of band members using primarily grade 3 music. Members are required to participate in all scheduled performances. The group
will perform in all parades and football performances as well as pep band during the volleyball and basketball seasons. Concerts
include Winter Concert, Soup/Salad Supper, Spring Concert and graduation. Marching rehearsals are scheduled before school as
needed.

Writing Goal: There will be several writing assignments in which the student will be required to write short answers, reviews,
evaluations and essays.

Grading Method: Grading will be based on an accumulation of points earned for class participation, performances, music accuracy,
equipment care, rehearsal habits and performance evaluations.



BAND 11 - #522
Eleventh grade band will meet on alternating days throughout the school year with sophomores and seniors during the first
semester and seniors during the second semester. The Eleventh Grade Band studies advanced concert band literature using primarily
grade 4 and 5 music. Members are required to participate in all scheduled performances as well as pep band during the volleyball
and basketball seasons. Concerts include Winter Concert, Soup/Salad Supper, Spring Concert and district music contest. Marching
rehearsals are scheduled before school as needed.

Writing Goal: There will be several writing assignments in which the students will be required to write short answers, reviews,
evaluations and essays.

Grading Method: Grading will be based on an accumulation of points earned for class participation, performances, music accuracy,
equipment care, rehearsal habits and performance evaluations.




                                                               36
BAND 12 - #523
Twelfth grade band will meet on alternating days throughout the school year with sophomores and juniors during first semester and
juniors during second semester. The twelfth grade band studies advanced concert band literature using primarily grade 4 and 5
music. Members are required to participate in all scheduled performances. This group will perform in all parades and football
performances as well as pep band during the volleyball and basketball seasons. Concerts include Winter Concert, Soup/Salad
Supper, Spring Concert and district music contest. Marching rehearsals are scheduled before school as needed.

Writing Goal: There will be several writing assignments in which the student will be required to write short answers, reviews,
evaluations and essays.

Grading Method: Grading will be based on an accumulation of points earned for class participation, performances, music accuracy,
equipment care, rehearsal habits and performance evaluations.



BASS CHOIR - #506
Bass Choir is a non-auditioned group and is open to students in grades 9-12. Highlights of the year may include a Fall Concert, a
Winter Concert, Pops Concert, the Spring Concert, music contests, participation at various civic events and for community
organizations. Special attention will be given to include music of various cultural groups and the music from different periods of
music history. As participants in the vocal music program, all performers are required to participate in all scheduled activities. All
participants are required to take private lessons with the instructor each semester.

Writing Goal: There will be several assignments each semester in which the student will be required to write short answers, long
essay questions, reviews and evaluations. Students will also be expected to complete an essay during one of the two semesters on a
given topic.

Grading Method: Grading will be based on points accumulated based on class participation, performances, individual music
performance, rehearsal habits, written assignments, and other class projects.



CONCERT CHOIR - #510
The Concert Choir is a select group. To be enrolled in the class, a student must first audition and be selected by the director.
Concert Choir is composed of experienced upperclassmen. Highlights of the year include the Fall Concert, the Winter Concert, the
Spring Concert, the Pops Concert, music contests, participation in various festival groups and honor choirs, performances for
various civic and religious organizations and the Spring Musical. Special attention will be given to include the music of various
cultural groups and the music from different periods of music history. Students in Concert Choir are required to take private lessons
with the instructor each semester. As participants in the Vocal Music Program, all singers are required to participate in all
scheduled activities.

Writing Goal: There will be several assignments each semester in which the student will be required to write short answers, long
essay questions, reviews and evaluations. Students will also be expected to complete an essay during one of the two semesters on a
given topic.


Grading Method: Grading will be based on points accumulated based on class participation, performances, individual music
performance, rehearsal habits, written assignments, and other class projects.


MUSIC LESSONS / THEORY - #516
Students who enroll in this block will be taking lessons both individually and in small groups on their chosen instrument or
vocally. Students will be exposed to music fundamentals (theory) and will have the opportunity to explore extra opportunities in
music including preparation for honor choirs/bands, computer/Midi projects, keyboard study, music appreciation and peer coaching.
Students will prepare for individual and group performances throughout the semester.

Writing Goal: Students will record daily activities in a journal. Journal entries will be assessed at least four times a year.




                                                                  37
Grading Method: Grading will be determined through participation and based on performance evaluations, lesson preparation, and
meeting the set standards.



TREBLE CHOIR 9 - #503
The Treble Choir is a non-auditioned group composed of 9th grade students who sing treble music. Highlights of the year include
the Fall Concert, the Winter Concert, the Spring Concert, the Pops Concert, participation in various festival groups, and the Spring
Musical. Special attention will be given to include the music of various cultural groups and the music from different periods of music
history. As participants in the Vocal Music program, all singers are required to participate in all scheduled activities.

Writing Goal: There will be several assignments each semester in which the student will be required to write: short answers, long
essay questions, reviews and evaluations. Students will also be expected to complete an essay during one of the two semesters on a
given topic.

Grading Method: Grading will be based on points accumulated based on class participation, performances, individual music
performance, rehearsal habits, written assignments, and other class projects.


TREBLE CHOIR 10-12 - #504
The Treble Choir is a non-auditioned group composed of 10th, 11th and 12th grade students who sing treble music. Highlights of
the year include the Fall Concert, the Winter Concert, the Spring Concert, the Pops Concert, participation in various festival groups,
and the Spring Musical. Special attention will be given to include the music of various cultural groups and the music from different
periods of music history. As participants in the Vocal Music program, all singers are required to participate in all scheduled
activities.

Writing Goal: There will be several assignments each semester in which the student will be required to write: short answers, long
essay questions, reviews and evaluations. Students will also be expected to complete an essay during one of the two semesters on a
given topic.

Grading Method: Grading will be based on points accumulated based on class participation, performances, individual
music performance, rehearsal habits, written assignments, and other class projects.




                                           PHYSICAL EDUCATION

ADVANCED WEIGHTS - #112
This course is an elective class open to any student who has completed two semesters each of freshmen and sophomore physical
education. The class is designed for the student who has developed an interest in weightlifting and who shows a desire to continue
on after completing Wellness/ Weightlifting at the 10th grade level. Class activities include review of proper nutritional habits,
review of proper weightlifting techniques, anatomy and kinesiology, advanced weightlifting techniques, measuring strength,
endurance, flexibility and percent body fat. The greatest portion of class time is spent participating in advanced systems of
weightlifting.

Writing Goal: Each student will complete two reflections from Current Health Magazine.

Grading Method: Grades will be based on participation, tests and quizzes.



FITNESS FOR LIFE - #116
This course is an elective class open to any student who has completed two semesters each of freshman and sophomore Physical
Education. The class is designed for the students who show an interest in maintaining wellness as they move on into adult life.
Class activities include: monitoring body fat percentage, cardiovascular wellness through regular aerobic activities and
recreational activities. These activities will include tennis, bowling, badminton, ping-pong, pickle ball, archery, biking, fishing,
aerobics and circuit training.
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Writing Goal: Each student will complete two or three reflections from Current Health.

Grading Method: Grades will be based on participation.



LIFETIME SPORTS/WELLNESS - #108
This class emphasizes total body health with prevention of disease through proper nutritional practices, cardiovascular exercise and
positive mental health as a way of achieving maximum wellness. Lifetime sports activities include flag football, advanced archery,
tennis, bowling, volleyball, softball and fitness testing. Time will also be devoted to health issues in Current Health. All students
will take one semester of Lifetime Sports/Wellness and one semester of Weightlifting/Wellness.

Writing Goal: Each student will complete two or three reflections from the Current Health Magazine.

Grading Method: Grades will be based on participation, written test, written work and quizzes.


P.E. 9/HEALTH - #106
P.E: This course is a coeducational class which includes the following activities: table tennis, pickle ball, badminton, fitness
testing, beginning archery, basketball, speedball, scooter hockey, beginning bowling, flag football, ultimate frisbee, softball and
recreational games, time will be devoted to health issues in Current Health.

Personal Health: Health is a course which meets in conjunction with P.E. 9. The topics covered are: physical fitness, healthy
decisions, nutrition, and tobacco, drug and alcohol education.

Writing Goal: Each student will complete two or three reflections from the Current Health Magazine.

Grading Method: Grades will be based on participation, written tests, written work. quizzes and group projects.


 SENIOR WEIGHTS - #150
This course is an elective class open to any senior student who has successfully completed two semesters of Advanced Weights in
addition to two semesters each of freshman and sophomore physical education. The class is designed for the student who has
developed a genuine interest in weightlifting as an avenue toward total body wellness. It is an extension of the Advanced Weights
class and is based on advanced systems of weightlifting as well as an understanding of nutrition for athletes and general
kinesiology. The successful student will have demonstrated the ability to work independently in the weight room and act as a
leader and mentor for younger students.

Grading Method: Grades will be based on participation.


WEIGHTLIFTING/WELLNESS - #110
The course emphasizes total body health through proper nutrition, systems of exercise for muscular strength and cardiovascular
wellness, flexibility, and kinesiology. The goal of the class is to develop fitness and healthful living habits that will carry over into
adult life. Each class is broken down into: stretching and running; participating in weightlifting, and lecture over the wellness
concepts. The wellness concepts included are the cardiovascular system, introduction to wellness, anatomy, kinesiology, and
nutrition. All students will take one semester of Weightlifting/Wellness and one semester of Lifetime Sports/Wellness.

Writing Goal: Each student will complete two reflections from Current Health Magazine.

Grading Method: Grades will be based on participation, tests and quizzes.




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                                                          SCIENCE
ADVANCED PLACEMENT CHEMISTRY - #314
Advanced Placement Chemistry is a course for the college-bound student. The main goal and focus of this course is to prepare the
student for the A.P. Chemistry exam administered by the College Board, Princeton, New Jersey. The student will follow the course of
study set up by the college board. Topics include atomic structure, stoichiometry, gas laws, thermochemistry, chemical bonding and
chemical kinetics and equilibrium. It is recommended, but not required, that students have taken Advanced Algebra and received a
grade of “B” or higher. This course is available for dual enrollment. See page 8.

Writing Goal: Students will perform various first-year college chemistry labs (approximately 25) and maintain an extensive lab
manual. Each lab will require a section on theory and a 1/2 to 1 page conclusion.

Grading Method: Grades are based on total points earned from the following: tests, quizzes, daily work, labs/projects and semester
exam.


ADVANCED PLACEMENT CHEMISTRY LAB - #316
Advanced Placement Chemistry Lab is a required part of the Advanced Placement Chemistry Program and will meet two mornings a
week 0 hour (7:00). Students will complete all assigned labs as required. Each student will maintain a well-organized and complete
lab manual. Each lab write-up will contain a section on theory, data and observation, table(s), and a section with the necessary
calculations. In addition, a well thought out conclusion will be completed at the conclusion of each lab. Lab topics will be the
same as lecture topics discussed in the previous section.

Writing Goal: Students will perform various first year college chemistry labs (approximately 25) and maintain an extensive lab
manual. Each lab will require a section on theory and a 1/2 to 1 page conclusion.

Grading Method: Grades are based on total points earned from lab and maintaining a lab notebook.


BIOLOGY - #308
Biology is the study of life. Class work will consist of lecture, discussion, experiments, and observations. The first semester is
composed of the study of biological principles, ecology, cell biology and genetics. The second semester consists of the evolution
examination of the protist, fungi, monera plant and animal kingdoms and human biology.

Writing Goal: Students will be required to write reflective responses to various mediums throughout the year.

Grading Method: Grades are based on total points earned from tests, quizzes, daily work and labs/projects, and semester exam.


CHEMISTRY - #312
Chemistry is a study of the materials around us, their composition and structure, and the changes they undergo. Students
will explore such topics as atomic structure, chemical bonding, chemical reactions, phrases of matter and solutions. Laboratory
activities are an important part of this course and a heavy reliance is placed on the lab work. It is recommended, but not required,
that students have successfully taken Physical Science prior to taking Chemistry.

Writing Goal: Students will be assigned a compound or element and complete a four-page research paper. In addition, each student
will construct a poster and model of their topic. Electronic presentation will also be an option.

Grading Method: Grades are based on total points earned from the following: tests, quizzes, daily work, labs/projects and semester
exam.


ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE - #320
This course is designed to accomplish the following goals: promote students understanding of the relationship between humankind
and the environment, develop students ability to identify problems and initiate action to solve them, promote an understanding of

                                                                  40
the complexity of issues and the difficulty of their resolution, an awareness of different points of view, and develop students’
processing skills and knowledge of selected science topics.

Writing Goal: The students will be asked to write several short papers expressing their viewpoints and opinions on issues
discussed in class. One computer project per semester.

Grading Method: Grades are based on total points earned from tests, quizzes, daily work and labs/projects.



FORENSIC SCIENCE - #324
Forensic Science will be designed around authentic performance assessments with students working to solve crimes using scientific
knowledge and reasoning. This class will incorporate the use of all areas of science (biology, anatomy, chemistry, physics, and earth
science), math, social studies, language arts, as well as technology and communication skills.

Writing Goal: The students will be asked to write several short papers expressing their viewpoints and opinions on issues
discussed in class.

Grading Method: Students will be graded using various methods, including, but not limited to: tests, quizzes, daily work, and
labs/projects.



HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY - #310
Human Anatomy and Physiology will consist of a complete study of the human body. Such dissection aids as the cat or fetal pig,
sheep brains, cow eyes, cow hearts, and others will contribute to the students knowledge and understanding of the human body.
This course is designed for college-bound students, especially those entering science and medically related fields of study, but is
open to any student who is interested in further studies in these areas. Each student will be given an Anatomy coloring book for the
course. If it is lost, the student will be required to purchase a new one. It is recommended but not required that students have
successfully taken or are concurrently taking Chemistry.

Writing Goal: Each student will be required to research and write a report on an assigned medical disorder. The report will
include cause, prognosis, cure (if any) and any significant research done on the disorder.

Grading Method: Grades are based on total points earned from the following: tests, quizzes, daily work and labs/projects and
semester exam.



METEOROLOGY/ASTRONOMY - #322
This will involve the study of weather and space. Students will make weather observations and will learn to interpret weather data.
Students will learn how topography influences weather and climate. Students will study the planets of the solar system and their
placement in the universe.

Writing Goal: Students will research and write a summary of major weather events.

Grading Method: Homework, labs, tests, quizzes



PHYSICAL SCIENCE - #306
This class serves as an introduction to basic concepts of both Chemistry and Physics. Chemistry topics covered include, scientific
method and measurement, the structure of matter, its properties and classification, chemical reactions and bonding. Physics topics
include motion, forces, energy, electricity, light and sound, and how physical science is related to today’s technology. Students
who have taken Physics or Chemistry should not take Physical Science.

Writing Goal: Students will write a brief summary on a science article out of a Discovery or other science magazine.
This will take place once each semester.

Grading Method: Grades in Physical Science are based on tests, daily work, labs, projects and semester exam.

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PHYSICS - #318
Physics includes instruction in the use of the metric system of measurement, use of force in relation to motion, structure of matter,
heat, sound and light. This course is very important to those who plan to go to college in any phase of engineering or occupations
related to it. Problem assignments in Physics are usually given two days in advance. There is laboratory work included in all units.
It is recommended, but not required, that students have completed Advanced Algebra and Math Analysis.

Writing Goal: Students will be assigned a physics topic and complete a four-page paper. In addition, each student will
present this topic to the class.

Grading Method: Grades are based on total points earned from the following: tests, quizzes, daily work, labs/projects and semester
exam.




                                                  SOCIAL STUDIES
ADVANCED PLACEMENT GOVERNMENT - #414
Advanced Placement Government is designed to build on content that students learned first semester in AGT. This course will
require students to apply general concepts already learned to interpret both historical and current political events and policy. The
course will develop students’ familiarity with various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that make up the American political
reality. At the conclusion of the course, students will be encouraged to take the College Board Advanced Placement Test. This test
has the potential to qualify the student for typically three hours, but up to six hours, of college credit at a cost of about $90.
Students may wish to purchase a used textbook for this class at the cost of approximately $50. This course is available for dual
enrollment. See page 8.

Writing Goal: Students will be asked to analyze, compare, and synthesize current news articles from professional journals and
books in a variety of writing activities.

Grading Method: Grades will be based on exam, writing performance and a project.



ADVANCED PLACEMENT U.S. HISTORY - #410
Advanced Placement U.S. History (APUSH) is a rigorous course designed to be the equivalent of a college freshman survey course
worth six credit hours. As such, the course will stimulate collegiate expectations and requirements in which students will devote
considerable time to outside work in terms of reading, writing and planning presentations. Emphasis will be placed on the adequate
preparation of students to take the AP exam the first week in May (cost is approx. $90). Students will be challenged to think
critically, write effectively, interpret primary sources accurately and present information professionally to their peers. Successful
students will manage their time effectively, form study groups, and organize and maintain study materials. Students may wish to
purchase a used textbook for this class at the cost of $50 or less.

Students will also be required to complete a summer assignment that will be due during the first week of the fall semester. Registered
students will be required to attend a meeting in May to receive the assignment. This course is available for dual enrollment. See
page 7.


Writing Goal: Students will be asked to analyze, compare, and synthesize primary sources and historical events in a variety of
writing activities.

Grading Method: A.P. U.S. History grades are based on unit tests and numerous written assignments such as summaries,
worksheets, free-response questions, document-based questions, term papers and book reviews. A semester evaluation will be
given.



AMERICAN CULTURAL STUDIES - #430
This course will include a general overview of numerous cultures, their values, beliefs, customs and rituals, as well as provide an in-
depth examination of our ever-changing American culture. Students will study the cultural traits, trends and topics, from music and
entertainment to government and religion, that have and continue to influence our beliefs and behavior. Special emphasis will be
                                                                  42
given to the contributions various ethnic groups have made in shaping and molding our culture, from the traditional age to the post-
modern age.

Writing Goal: Students will be required to write reports on issues and events concerning specific ethnic or social groups.

Grading Method: Unit tests, quizzes and daily work will account for the student’s grade.


AMERICAN GOVERNMENT TODAY - #412
The goals of AGT are: (1) to provide factual knowledge of the institutions and political activities of American government at the
national, state and local levels (2) to provide content for students to understand the dynamics of political decision making, and (3)
to give students an appreciation for effective participation in the political process.


Writing Goal: Students will be expected to find and summarize articles about Congressional acts, Supreme Court decisions, and/or
historical figures in government.

Grading Method: AGT grades will be determined by chapter tests and a semester exam. A minimum of two community service
activities must be completed for credit.



AMERICAN HISTORY - #408
In this course we explore the growth and development of the United States from the early Americans (Indians) to the present. We
endeavor to teach the traditions of our great American Heritage.

Writing Goal: Students will be asked to express and support opinions on historical facts through writing during certain
assessments.

Grading Method: Grades will be determined by unit and chapter tests, individual student notebooks, a semester exam, and
occasional activities. These activities may include essays and presentations.



CONTEMPORARY AFFAIRS - #418
This class deals with current issues facing Americans today. The class is set up to create or enhance an awareness of political,
economic and social events. Typical topics include U.S. foreign policy, crime and punishment, political events, elections,
investigations, economic events, taxes, supreme court decisions, medicine, environment and a variety of others. “Newsweek”
magazine and the “60 Minutes” television program are regular supplements to class. Other forms of media are used: i.e. newspapers,
and T.V. specials when appropriate. This course can be taken for credit more than once.

Writing Goal: Some tests will include short answer questions and occasionally short essay questions.

Grading Method: Grades in Contemporary Affairs are determined by weekly quizzes and daily assignments .



ECONOMIC ISSUES - #422
The main objective of this course is to introduce materials and experiences which will help the student make intelligent economic
decisions. Possible topics include being a wise consumer, saving and investing, using credit, the free enterprise system, and
different types of business organizations.

Writing Goal: Students will research and write about different aspects of the American or global economy.

Grading Method: Tests, worksheets, and projects may be used to determine the grade in Current Economic Issues.


JAPANESE HOME STUDY - #428
Each summer students from the Blair High School have the opportunity to become involved in a three-week “Home Study Program”
with the Seishin Jr./Sr. High School of Okayama, Japan. The Seishin School is a 1600 student Catholic Girls School that
                                                                  43
concentrates on a college preparatory curriculum. Students from Blair spend three weeks, staying with host
families, attending classes and going on various cultural trips while at Seishin. A teacher sponsor accompanies the students on this
trip. Likewise, students from Seishin spend three weeks in Blair during the same summer. Students will register for this class and
receive credit after going on the program. This class does not count as one of the eight classes that a student must take each semester.
This class will count as a social studies graduation requirement elective.

Writing Goal: Students will maintain a journal to be turned in upon completion of the program.

Grading Method: Students granted credit for the Japanese Home Study will receive a grade of “P” (Pass) upon completion and
submission of their journals.


NEBRASKA STUDIES - #420
The course will include a combination of Nebraska history, geography, economics and culture. It is hoped that students will acquire
a better understanding of Nebraska’s heritage. Materials from the Nebraska Historical Society, the Nebraska Game and Parks
Commission, Olson’s “A History of Nebraska”, videos, projects, and supplemental handouts will be used. Students will also study
Washington County history.

Writing Goal: Tests will include short answer and short essay questions.

Grading Method: Homework, quizzes, tests, and projects will determine class grade.


PSYCHOLOGY - #426
Psychology is a study of human behavior. Some areas of study in this course will be psychology of behavior, sensation
and perception, personality development, abnormal behavior, learning, motivation and emotion, If you are interested in knowing
more about yourself and other people, you will enjoy this class. Strong reading ability and college-level study
skills are recommended for students taking this course.

Writing Goal: Students will complete a term paper on a topic of their choice, using appropriate writing style.

Grading Method: Grades are based on daily work, chapter tests, an opinion paper, and a semester exam.



 SOCIOLOGY: INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY - #432
Basic principles of Sociology are introduced: social behavior, culture, institutions, social interaction, social inequality, and social
change. This course is designated to be a college transferable course, Strong reading ability and college-level study skills are
recommended for students taking his course. You will learn about how individuals are influenced by the groups and society around
them and how we fit into society. Available for dual enrollment with Metropolitan Community College.

Writing Goal: Students will complete a term paper on a topic of their choice, using appropriate writing style.

Grading Method: Research paper, chapter unit and semester tests, and daily work will all be assigned points that determine grade.



WORLD GEOGRAPHY - #416
Fall semester (1st semester) topics studied include climate, land surface, mineral and natural resources of the world. Areas covered
during the fall semester are North and South America and Europe. Group and individual projects are part of this course..

Spring Semester (2nd semester) topics studied include urban geography, Asia, Africa, Australia, and Oceania. Group and
individual projects are part of this course.

Writing Goal: Students will write current events reports and construct written and pictorial projects over countries, Nature’s Fury,
urban geography, and other geographic topics. A variety of formats will be used, written reports, slide shows, posters and oral
reports.



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Grading Method: Tests, daily work, and projects will be used to determine grade.



WORLD HISTORY - #406
This course will cover world history from late Medieval to Modern times. Video tapes, audio tapes, etc. will be used when
appropriate. This is an overview of World history and includes the study of many cultures and lands. Geography and economic
skills are periodically reinforced.

Writing Goal: Through a variety of writing experiences students will show knowledge of significant historical events that have
shaped world governments and cultures.

Grading Method: Written chapter tests, quizzes, and various graded homework assignments will be used to determine World
History grades. There will be a semester exam.




                                               SPECIAL EDUCATION
COMPUTER CONCEPTS - #795
This course is geared for students with limited experience in using the keyboard. Students will learn how to use the keyboard and computer
to the best of their capabilities. The class will allow students to work at their current level. The instructor will develop lessons and goals
for each student based on their ability.

Writing Goal: Students will be assessed on the assignments they complete based on their ability.

Grading Method: Grades will be determined by the number of assignments completed by the student.



INDEPENDENT LIVING SKILLS - #792
This is a class designed to promote skills needed to live independently. Curriculum includes vocational, social and daily
living skills, but varies depending on the needs outlined in the student’s MDT.

Writing Goal: Writing will be addressed on an individual basis in the student’s IEP.

Grading Method: Grades are determined on an individual basis in each student’s IEP.



INDIVIDUALIZED CAREERS - #767
Individualized Careers is a class which allows students to work at their current level. The instructor will develop goals based on
the student’s MDT.

Writing Goal: Writing will be addressed on an individual basis in the student’s I.E.P.

Grading Method: Grades are determined by the number of assignments completed per semester.


INDIVIDUAL STUDY - #788
Individual Study is a time to work on improving study skills and organization, pupil-teacher relations, reading, writing, math,
memory and test taking skills.

Writing Goal: Writing will be addressed on an individual basis in the student’s IEP.

Grading Method: Grades are determined on an individual basis in each student’s IEP.




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INDIVIDUAL STUDY SPECIAL NEEDS - #790
The students in individual study special needs work on improving study skills and organization, pupil-teacher relations,
reading, writing, math, memory and test taking skills.


Writing Goal: Writing will be addressed on an individual basis in the student’s I.E.P.

Grading Method: Grades are determined on an individual basis in each student’s IEP.



 SOCIAL SKILLS - #804
This is a class designed to promote the social skills necessary to live a more independent, successful and fulfilling life. Curriculum
includes a focus on social skills at home, school, work and in other social settings. The specific curriculum varies depending on the needs
outlined in the student’s I.E.P.

Writing Goal: Writing will be addressed on an individual basis in the student’s IEP.

Grading Method: Grades are based on total points earned from activities, role-playing, and other assignments throughout the semester.



 SPECIAL EDUCATION WORK STUDY PROGRAM - #794
Students are involved in a competitively paid job situation or as a volunteer. Students will be supervised and evaluated as part of
the course requirement.

Grading Method: Grades are determined on an individual basis in each student’s IEP.



INDIVIDUALIZED ENGLISH - #766 Jackson St.
Individualized English is a class which allows students to work at their current level. The instructor will develop goals based on
the student’s MDT.

Writing Goal: Writing will be addressed on an individual basis in the student’s I.E.P.

Grading Method: Grades are determined by the number of assignments completed per semester.


INDIVIDUALIZED MATHEMATICS - #760 Jackson St.
Individualized Mathematics is a class which allows students to work at their current level. The instructor will develop goals based
on the student’s MDT.

Writing Goal: Writing will be addressed on an individual basis in the student’s I.E.P.

Grading Method: Grades are determined by the number of assignments completed per semester.



INDIVIDUALIZED SCIENCE - #762 Jackson St.
Individualized Science is a class which allows students to work at their current level. The instructor will develop goals based on
the student’s MDT.

Writing Goal: Writing will be addressed on an individual basis in the student’s I.E.P.

Grading Method: Grades are determined by the number of assignments completed per semester.




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INDIVIDUALIZED SOCIAL STUDIES - #764 Jackson St.
Individualized Social Studies is a class which allows students to work at their current level. The instructor will develop goals
based on the student’s MDT.

Writing Goal: Writing will be addressed on an individual basis in the student’s I.E.P.

Grading Method: Grades are determined by the number of assignments completed per semester.




                                              SPECIAL PROGRAMS

AEP MENTOR - #956
This course is designed for seniors who wish to tutor and work with freshman students during AEP. Twenty-four seniors are selected
through an application process. Seniors must have a 3.5 cumulative grade point average to apply to this program.

Writing Goal: Writing will be assigned individually as needed.

Grading Method: Grading will be based on a rubric.



INDEPENDENT STUDIES – #901
Students may take one Independent Study course per semester. Independent Study is offered only to those students who have taken
all of the courses available in a particular curriculum area and who wish to study further a specific aspect of the selected curriculum.
An Independent Study Curriculum Course Outline must be completed by the supervising teacher and given approval by the
Department Chairman and Principal before a student can be enrolled in an Independent Study course. Independent studies can be
taken in any subject area, but students may take no more than one Independent Studies course during a semester.

Writing Goal: Writing will be assigned individually by Instructors.

Grading Method: Grades will be based upon computation of individualized goals and objectives.



INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATION - #926
Seniors who are considering a career in education may sign up for one block in which they work with an elementary or middle
school teacher and class.

Writing Goal: Students will journal their classroom experiences and complete assignments related to educational topics.

Grading Method: Students will be evaluated on journals, writing assessments and classroom participation.



 OFFICE ASSISTANT - #918
This course is designed for students who wish to work for the Front Office and Guidance Office, assisting with various tasks assigned by
office staff. Eight students are selected by the office through an interview process.

Writing Goal: Writing will be assigned individually as needed.

Grading Method: Grading will be based on completion of daily tasks and projects.




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TEACHER ASSISTANT - #902
This course is designed for students who wish to work for a teacher, assisting with various tasks assigned by the teacher depending
on the area in which they aide. Each teacher is allowed only one student assignment.

Writing Goal: Writing will be assigned individually by the assigned teacher.

Grading Method: Grades will be based on completion of daily tasks and projects.




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