EN1001 Unit 02 by 4kGN8IE

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									    English 1001




Western University
          Writing




Writing
      UNIT 2
WRITING PERSONAL
   STATEMENT
       WRITING PERSONAL
          STATEMENT
Writing -your personal statement can be one of the most
satisfying—or frustrating--writing experiences you'll ever
have.
      The personal statement is an important part of your
application package. Depending on the topic you choose, the
essay you write provides additional evidence of your
intellectual and creative achievement. The essay is also the
only opportunity for the readers of your application to get a
feel for you as a person as well as for you as a student. The
essay is also the place where you can put your academic
record into the context of your opportunities and obstacles.
    There is no one correct way to write a personal
statement, but in general those who will read your
essay are looking for two important things:

HOW - the essay provides evidence of your
achievements that isn't reflected in other parts of
your application

HOW and WHY - the events that you describe have
shaped your attitude, focus, and, most of all, your
intellectual vitality.
     This information will help you think about and
craft a personal statement by taking you step by
step through a process of brainstorming, drafting
and revising. At the end, we hope that you will
produce a personal statement that you are proud of
and that will provide admissions officers with an
accurate portrait of whom you are and why a college
education is important to you.
           A. Getting Started

The personal statement, your opportunity to sell
yourself in the application process, generally falls
into one of two categories:

1. The general, comprehensive personal
    statement: This allows you maximum freedom
    in terms of what you write and is the type of
    statement often prepared for standard medical
    or law school application forms.
2. The response to very specific questions:
    Often, business and graduate school applications
    ask specific questions, and your statement
    should respond specifically to the question being
    asked. Some business school applications favor
    multiple essays, typically asking for responses to
    three or more questions.
      B. Questions to ask yourself
           before you write

1.   What's special, unique, distinctive, and/or
     impressive about you or your life story?

2.   What details of your life (personal or family
     problems, history, people or events that have
     shaped you or influenced your goals) might help
     the committee better understand you or help set
     you apart from other applicants?
3. When did you become interested in this field and
   what have you learned about it (and about yourself)
   that has further stimulated your interest and
   reinforced your conviction that you are well suited to
   this field? What insights have you gained?

4. How have you learned about this field—through
  classes, readings, seminars, work or other
  experiences, or conversations with people already in
  the field?
5. If you have worked a lot during your college years,
   what have you learned (leadership or managerial
   skills, for example), and how has that work
   contributed to your growth?

6. What are your career goals?
7. Are there any gaps or discrepancies in your
  academic record that you should explain (great
  grades but mediocre LSAT or GRE scores, for
  example, or a distinct upward pattern to your GPA
  if it was only average in the beginning)?

8. Have you had to overcome any unusual obstacles
   or hardships (for example, economic, familial, or
   physical) in your life?
9. What personal characteristics (for example. integrity.
  compassion. persistence) do you possess that would
  improve your prospects for success in the field or
  profession? Is there a way to demonstrate or
  document that you have these characteristics?

10. What skills (for example, leadership, communicative,
  analytical) do you possess?
11. Why might you be a stronger candidate for
  graduate school—and more successful and effective
  in the profession or field than other applicants?

12. What are the most compelling reasons you can give
  for the admissions committee to be interested in you?
           C. General Advice

1. Answer the questions that are asked
   If you are applying to several schools, you may
    find questions in each application that are
    somewhat similar.
 Don't be tempted to use the same statement for all
  applications. It is important to answer each question
  being asked, and if slightly different answers are
  needed, you should write separate statements. In
  every case, be sure your answer fits the question
  being asked.
2. Tell a story
 Think in terms of showing or demonstrating through
  concrete experience. One of the worst things you
  can do is to bore the admissions committee. If your
  statement is fresh, lively, and different, you'll be
  putting yourself ahead of the pack. If you distinguish
  yourself through your story, you will make yourself
  memorable.
3. Be specific

 Don't, for example, state that you would make an
  excellent doctor unless you can back it up with
  specific reasons. Your desire to become a lawyer,
  engineer, or whatever should be logical, the result of
  specific experience that is described in your
  statement. Your application should emerge as the
  logical conclusion to your story.
4. Find an Angle

 If you're like most people, your life story lacks
  drama, so figuring out a way to make it interesting
  becomes the big challenge. Finding an angle or a
  "hook" is vital.
5. Concentrate on your opening paragraph

 The lead or opening paragraph is generally the most
  important. It is here that you grab the reader's
  attention or lose it. This paragraph becomes the
  framework for the rest of the statement.
6. Tell what you know
  The middle section of your essay might detail your
  interest and experience in your particular field, as
  well as some of your knowledge of the field. Too
  many people graduate with little or no knowledge of
  the nuts and bolts of the profession or field they
  hope to enter. Be as specific as you can in relating
  what you know about the field and use the language
  professionals’ use in conveying this information.
 Refer to experiences (work, research, etc.), classes,
  conversations with people in the field, books you've
  read, seminars you've attended, or any other source
  of specific information about the career you want
  and why you're suited to it. Since you will have to
  select what you include in your statement, the
  choices you make are often an indication of your
  judgment.
7. Don't include some subjects

 There are certain things best left out of personal
  statements. For example, references to experiences
  or accomplishments in high school or earlier are
  generally not a good ideas. Don't mention potentially
  controversial subjects (for example, controversial
  religious or political issues).
8. Do some research, if needed
 If a school wants to know why you're applying to it
  rather than another school, do some research to find
  out what sets your choice apart from other
  universities or programs. If the school setting would
  provide an important geographical or cultural change
  for you, this might be a factor to mention.
9. Write well and correctly
 Be meticulous. Type and proofread your essay very
  carefully. Many admissions officers say that good
  written skills and command of correct use of
  language are important to them as they read these
  statements. Express yourself clearly and concisely.
  Adhere to stated word limits.
10. Avoid clichés
   A medical school applicant who writes that he is
    good at science and wants to help other people is
    not exactly expressing an original thought. Stay
    away from often-repeated or tired statements.
     D. Example of Successful
           Statement
                  Statement #1

    My interest in science dates back to my years in
high school, where I excelled in physics, chemistry,
and math. When I was a senior, I took a first-year
calculus course at a local college (such an advanced-
level class was not available in high school) and
earned an A. It seemed only logical that I pursue a
career in electrical engineering.
      When I began my undergraduate career, I had
the opportunity to be exposed to the full range of
engineering courses, all of which tended to reinforce
and solidify my intense interest in engineering. I've
also had the opportunity to study a number of
subjects in the humanities and they have been both
enjoyable and enlightening, providing me with a new
and different perspective on the world in which we
live.
    In the realm of engineering, I have developed
a special interest in the field of laser technology
and have even been taking a graduate course in
quantum electronics. Among the 25 or so students
in the course, I am the sole undergraduate ate.
Another      particular   interest   of   mine    is
electromagnetics, and last summer, when I was a
technical assistant at a world-famous local lab, I
learned about its many practical applications,
especially in relation to
microstrip and antenna design. Management at this
lab was sufficiently impressed with my work to ask
that I return when I graduate. Of course, my plans
following completion of my current studies are to
move directly into graduate work toward my
master's in science.
     After I earn my master's degree, I intend to
start work on my Ph.D. in electrical engineering.
Later I would like to work in the area of
research and development for private industry.
It is in R & D that I believe I can make the
greatest contribution, utilizing my theoretical
background and creativity as a scientist.
     I am highly aware of the superb reputation of
your school, and my conversations with several of
your alumni have served to deepen my interest in
attending. I know that, in addition to your
excellent faculty, your computer facilities are
among the best in the state. I hope you will give
me the privilege of continuing my studies at your
fine institution.
                 Statement #2

     Having majored in literary studies (world
literature) as an undergraduate, I would now like to
concentrate on English and American literature.
    I am especially interested in nineteenth-
century literature, women's literature, Anglo-
Saxon poetry, and folklore and folk literature. My
personal literary projects have involved some
combination of these subjects. For the oral
section of my comprehensive exams, I specialized
in nineteenth century novels by and about
women.
     The relationship between "high" and folk
literature became the subject for my honors
essay, which examined Toni Morrison's use of
classical, biblical, African, and Afro-American folk
tradition in her novel. I plan to work further on
this essay, treating Morrison's other novels and
perhaps preparing a paper suitable for
publication.
     In my studies toward a doctoral degree, I
hope to examine more closely the relationship
between high and folk literature. My junior year
and private studies of Anglo-Saxon language and
literature have caused me to consider the question
of where the divisions between folklore, folk
literature, and high literature lie. Should I attend
your school, I would like to resume my studies of
Anglo-Saxon poetry, with special attention to its
folk elements.
     Writing poetry also figures prominently in my
academic and professional goals. I have just
begun submitting to the smaller journals with
some success and am gradually building a working
manuscript for a collection. The dominant theme
of this collection relies on poems that draw from
classical, biblical, and folk traditions, as well as
everyday experience, in order to celebrate the
process of giving and taking life, whether literal or
figurative. My poetry draws from and influences
my academic studies. Much of what I read and
study finds a place in my creative work as subject.
At the same time, I study the art of literature by
taking part in the creative process, experimenting
with the tools used by other authors in the past.
     In terms of a career, I see myself teaching
literature, writing criticism, and going into editing
or publishing poetry. Doctoral studies would be
valuable to me in several ways. First, your
teaching assistant ship program would provide me
with the practical teaching experience I am eager
to acquire. Further, earning a Ph.D. in English and
American literature would advance my other two
career goals by adding to my skills, both critical
and creative, in working with language.
     Ultimately, however, I see the Ph.D. as an end
in itself, as well as a professional stepping stone; I
enjoy studying literature for its own sake and
would like to continue my studies on the level
demanded by the Ph.D. program.
        E. PERSONAL STATEMENT
             TOP 10 Rules and Pitfalls


Writing the Personal Statement: Top 10 Rules

   1. Strive for depth rather than breadth. Narrow
     focus to one or two key themes, ideas or
     experiences

   2. Try to tell the reader something that no other
     applicant will be able to say
3.   Provide the reader with insight into what
     drives you
4.   Be yourself, not the 'ideal' applicant
5.   Get creative and imaginative in the opening
     remarks, but make sure it's something that
     no one else could write
6.   Address the school's unique features that
     interest you
7.  Focus on the affirmative in the personal
    statement; consider an addendum to explain
    deficiencies or blemishes
8. Evaluate experiences, rather than describe them
9. Proofread carefully for grammar, syntax,
    punctuation, word usage, and style
10. Use readable fonts, typeface, and conventional
    spacing and margins
Writing the Personal Statement: Top 10 Pitfalls

1.   Do not submit an expository resume; avoid
     repeating information found elsewhere on the
     application
2.   Do not complain or whine about the "system" or
     circumstances in your life
3.   Do not preach to your reader. You can express
     opinions, but do not come across as fanatical or
     extreme
4.   Do not talk about money as a motivator
5.   Do not discuss your minority status or
     disadvantaged background unless you have a
     compelling and unique story that relates to it.

6.   Do not remind the school of its rankings or tell
     them how good they are.
7.   Do not use boring clichéd intros or conclusions

     –   "Allow me to introduce myself. My name is..."
     –   "This question asks me to discuss..."
     –   "I would like to thank the admissions committee
         for considering my application."
     –   "It is my sincere hope that you will grant me
         the opportunity to attend your fine school."
     –   "In sum, there are three reasons why you
         should admit me..."
8.   Do not use unconventional and gimmicky formats
     and packages

9.   Do not submit supplemental materials unless they
     are requested

10. Do not get the name of the school wrong and
    don’t incorporate technical language or very
    uncommon words.
 Now it’s your turn to write your personal statement
     based on the following guidelines above.

     _______________________________________________________
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     F. Application of Learned Skills in
                  Writing:
I.    Writing Main Idea & Details:

     A. Getting Ready:
        The main idea - is what an article/ selection is about.
          Details - tell more about the main idea.

     B. Guide Tips in Writing Main Idea
       and Details.
         1. Read the heading before each paragraph.
         2. Look for details in each clue paragraph.
         3. Sometimes the main idea is shown in the
            end of an article/selection.
C. Reading Motive Questions:

  1. What do you know about dinosaurs?
  2. How can you learn animals from
     long ago?
  3. Why do scientists think
     Duke hunted for food?
  4. Why did Duke need long and
     sharp teeth?
  5. What food do scientist
    think Duke ate?
    D. Vocabulary Development.
discovered   - (di SKUV uhrd) found
skeleton     - (SKEL uh tuhn) all the bones in the body.
fossils      - (FOSS uhlz) traces of animals or plants
                that lived long ago.
skull        - (SKUL) the bones that make up the head
distance     - (DISS tuhnss) the space between two
                things
brain        - (BRAYN) the part of the body that helps
                animals move, think and sense.
  E. The Selection
               “Duke, The Great”
      Duke is a dinosaur that live long ago. He
  is named for a person who discovered his
  bones. Duke’s bones gives clues about the
  past.

                   All About Duke

 Height        Length    Head       Weight    Age

               58 feet   8 feet     25,000   80 million
18 feet high
                long      long      pounds   years ago
Looking for Clues:

       It is hard to find a dinosaur’s skeleton with all
  its bones. That is why Duke is special. Very few of
  his bones are missing.
       Long ago, Duke’s body was buried in the
  ground. Over the years, his bones turned into
  fossils. Now scientists can look at these fossils to
  learn about the life of Duke.
       Scientists carefully dug Duke’s fossils out of
  rock.
Duke Clue 1:
       Duke teeth were long and sharp. They looked
  like saws. Scientist looked at animals today that
  have the same kind of teeth, These animals bite
  and tear food. They eat meat. Because of this
  clue, scientists think that Duke ate meat, too.

Duke Clue 2:
      Scientist looked at Duke’s skull. They saw that
  the eyes faced to the front. Scientist looked at
  animals today with the same kind of eyes. These
  animals can think how far away something is. They
  can tell distance. Scientists know these animals
  are good hunters. Because of this clue, Scientist
  think that Duke was a good hunter , too.
Duke Clue 3:

    Scientist looked inside Duke’s skull.       They
looked where his brain once was. A brain has part
to help animals see, hear, smell, taste, and feel.
They found that one part of Duke’s brain was very
large. Scientist looked at animals today that have
the same kind of brain. These animals have a good
sense of smell. Because of this clue, scientists
think that Duke had a good sense of smell, too.
    Scientist are still learning more about Duke and
other dinosaurs like him. Duke will keep giving us
clue about the past.
F. Comprehension Check-up:
Answer the given blanks:
1. What do you know about dinosaurs?
   _________________________________
2. How can you learn animals from long ago?
  _________________________________
Choose the letter of the best answer.
3. Why do scientists think Duke hunted for food?
   a. His eyes faced to the side.
   b. His eyes faced to the front
   c. He looked hungry.
   d. His eyes faced to the back.
4. Why did Duke need long, sharp teeth?
    a. To bite         c. To taste
    b. To talk         d. To smell

5. What food do scientist think Duke ate?
    a. Meat             c. Plants
    b. Vegetables       d. Leaves

6.What would be another good title for this article?
   a. All About Skeletons
   b. What Dinosaurs
   c. Dinosaurs Clues
   d. Dinosaurs Teeth
G. Vocabulary Builder:
     Write a word from the box to complete each sentence.
     Brain            discovered             distance
     fossils          skeleton               skull

1.   Sam went into the museum. He saw dinosaurs room way
     ahead in the ______.
2.   All of the bones were put together. The big ______ showed
     the dinosaur’s shape.
3.   The head of the dinosaur was large. The bony ________ was
     bigger than Sam.
4.   Sam looked at the head. He could see the space for the
     dinosaur’s _______.
5.   Sam meet the man who ________ the bones. The man told
     Sam how he found them.
6.   The man said the bones were like rocks. All dinosaur bone
                are _________.
H. Writing Main Idea and Details:
       Complete the given chart. Write two details to tell how
 fossils give clues about the past.


                    Main Idea:
    Duke bones give clues about the past.
   Details:

   Details:
   Use the article and your chart to write the
   answer.
   What is this article mostly about?
         _____________________________
         _____________________________
I. Your Turn to Write:

A. Choose a cat or a dog. In the chart write the main
   idea about the animal you chose. Then write the
   details that tell more about the animal.

  Main Idea:

  Details:


  Details:
B. On a separate sheet of paper, write one sentence
   that tells the main idea about your animal. Then
   write two sentences that give details. Use your
   chart.

Answer:

Main Idea: __________________________________

Details:
  1._________________________________________
  ___________________________________________
  2._________________________________________
  ___________________________________________
II. Writing summary of a given selection.
  A. Getting Ready:
      When you summarize, you tell just the
  important ideas. As you read each letter (as the
  given selection) think about its most important idea.

  B. Guide tips in writing the summary.
  1. As you read, think about what each letter is
      mostly about. This will help you how to write the
      summary of the story.
  2. Use only the important ideas in a summary.
C. Reading the Motive Questions:
 Think about the place you have visited. Then look at the places in
 the photos.

 1. Would you like to go there?
    Which place would you most like to visit?
    Tell why?
 2. Which place did Shaira visit last?
 3. What might happen to a treehouse that is
    in the rotting tree?
 4. How did Shaira stay warm at the ice hotel?
 5. How is the weather important to the ice hotel.
D. Vocabulary Development:

 scrape   - (SKRAYP) to scratch
 bark     - (Bark) the covering on the
           outside of a tree
 rot      - (ROT) to spoil and get weak
 sway     - (SWAY) move from
             side to side
 thick    - (THIK) not thin
 cases    - (KAYSS es) boxes
E. Selection:

Letter 1:

Dear Anna,
        We just started our trip today. Mom says that we’ll visit
  all kinds of interesting places. She says we’ll go to a forest, a
  place that is covered in ice, and then to the ocean. Dad says he
  has some surprises, too. He says the nights will be as much
  fun as the days.
                                                   Your friend,
                                                     Shaira
Letter 2:

  Dear Anna,

        Dad really surprised us last night.
  We stayed in a treehouse hotel! The rooms were small, but
  they had lights, heat and a bathroom.
        We met the man who built the treehouse. He told us that
  treehouses need to be built in strong trees. He also said that it
  was important not to scrape the bark. If the bark is harmed,
  bugs and water can get inside the tree. Then the tree might
  rot.
        Sleeping in a treehouse was fun. When the wind blew, we
  felt the treehouse sway from side to side.

                                                Your friend,
                                                  Shaira
Letter 3:


  Dear Anna,
        We are in a hotel that is really COOL! The whole building is
  made of ice and snow. Even the chairs are made of ice. It is
  freezing inside! I wear my coat during the day. But at night, we
  are warm and cozy. Thick, heavy sleeping bags cover the beds.
        A hotel worker said the building would melt this spring. She
  said the owner would build a whole new hotel next winter.

                                               Your friend,
                                                 Shaira
Letter 4:
  Dear Anna,
       Today we flew to Florida. After our stay in an ice hotel, we
  were ready for the warm beach. Once again, Dad had a
  surprise. We are staying in an underwater hotel!
       We checked in on land. Then we put on diving suits. We
  put our dry clothes in special cases. Then we swam to our
  room. The best part is the huge window. I can watch the fish
  swim by!
       We will be home soon and I’m ready. We have stayed in
  some strange places. But, I still like my home the best!

                                                Your friend,
                                                  Shaira
F. Comprehension Check-up:
Answer the questions in complete sentences.
  Think about the place you have visited.
  Then look at the places in the photos.

  1. Would you like to go there?
    ______________________________________
    ______________________________________
    Which place would you most like to visit?
      Tell why?
    ______________________________________
    ______________________________________
  2. Which place did Shaira visit last?
    ______________________________________
    ______________________________________
3. What might happen to a treehouse that is
     in the rotting tree?
   _________________________________________
   _________________________________________

4. How did Shaira stay warm at the ice hotel?
   _________________________________________
   _________________________________________

5. How is the weather important to the ice hotel?
   _________________________________________
   _________________________________________
G. Vocabulary Builder:
Choose the letter of the best answer.

1. A word that rhymes with thick is ________.
    a.   lick    b. pack         c. sock          d. talk
2. It is important not to scrape the bark of a tree to protect them
       from bugs and water.
    a.   cut     b. put          c. free          d. scratch
3. The leaves sway as the wind blows.
    a.   Fall                    c. move from side to side
    b.   Fly away                d. gets wet
4. The fruits were rotten due to heat and moisture.
    a.   Spoil   b. fresh        c. new           d. good for eating
5. Shaira puts her clothes in a special cases.
    a. cabinets b. shelves        c. boxes        d. bags
H. Writing the Summary of the Selection:
A. Use the information from the story to complete the web.
                                     Ice Hotel
                                 ________________
    Fun                          ________________
   Hotels

  Treehouse Hotel
  It is a hotel in the      Underwater Hotel
  branches of a tree
                            ____________________
                            ____________________
                            ___________
B. Use the story and your web to write a summary of
   Shaira’s letters to Anna.

_______________________________________________
_______________________________________________
_______________________________________________
_______________________________________________
_______________________________________________
_______________________________________________
_______________________________________________
_______________________________________________
_______________________________________________
_______________________________________________
I. Your Turn to Write:
A. Think about toys that you think is fun. Write
     the most important ideas in the web.


                      What the toy is like?
                      _________________________________
                      _________________________________
                      _________________________________
 Fun Toys



            Why it’s fun to play with?
B. On a separate sheet of paper, write two sentences
   that give a short summary about the toys. Use your
   web.
   __________________________________________
   __________________________________________
   __________________________________________
   __________________________________________
   __________________________________________
   __________________________________________
   __________________________________________
   __________________________________________
   __________________________________________
III. Writing the plot of a story.

   A. Getting Ready:

      The plot is what happens in a story. Every plot
    has a beginning, a middle, and an end.
      As you read, pay attention to what happens, in
    each part of the story.
      Take notes in every events.
B. Guide Tips in Writing the Plot
  1. As you read, look for the order of events in a
      story. Look for time words, such as the names
      of days, months and years.

  2. A timeline can help you track the order of
      events in the story.
C. Reading Motive Questions:

1.   Have you ever had a pet?
     How did you care for it?
     How did you feel about your pet?
2.   What happens first in the story?
3.   How is Brownie different from most puppies?
4.   What does Earl do after Brownie follows directions?
5.   Where will Brownie goes after Earl leaves?
D. Vocabulary Development:

  raise     - (RAYS) to look after children or
                  young animals
  guide     - (GYD) one who shows the way
  commands - (kuh MANDZ) orders that must
             be followed
  obey      - (oh BAY) to follow direction
  neighborhood - (NAY buhr hud) a part of a
            town or city where people live
  confident - (KON fuh duhnt) believing in
             yourself
E. The Selection/Story:


             “ The Great Dog, Brownie”

      Mr. Rhom handed a brown Lab puppy to Earl.
  “This is Brownie,” he said. “He is eight weeks old.”
      “Hello, Brownie,” Earl said.
      “I’m glad you and your family will raise
  Brownie.” said Mr. Rhom. “You have to take care
  Brownie for twenty weeks. Then bring him back.”
      “We will train him to be a guide dog. He will
  lead someone who can’t see.”
      “I’ll take care of him,” said Earl.

(Working with Brownie)
      Earl began working with Brownie to teach him
  important commands. Earl taught him to obey
  and to follow directions. By July, Brownie had
  learned to sit. By August, Brownie had learned to
  stay.
    “A great dog, Brownie,” Earl said.
He rubbed his ear. Brownie wagged her tail.
    All summer long, Earl showed Brownie the
sights, sounds and smells of busy places. He wore
a special coat to show that he was learning to be a
guide dog.
    By September, Brownie was ready to go on a
longer trips outside. Earl took him on longer walks
around the neighborhood. They practiced the
commands he had learned.
   “Great dog, Brownie,” Earl said to him.
    By October,, Brownie had visited many places.
He even went to the zoo. Brownie stopped when
he heard strange animal noises there. But Earl
rubbed his ear. He needed to be confident. He
couldn’t be afraid when he was a guide dog. Soon
Brownie walked on.
    “Great dog, Brownie,” said Earl.
Goodbye, Brownie!
      It was November, Earl and Brownie sat in Mr.
  Rhom’s office. Earl felt sad.
      “Can I keep Brownie?” Earl asked.
      Mr. Rhom sighed.       “The hardest part of
  raising a puppy is saying goodbye.” Mr. Rhom said.
  “But Brownie is happy and confident. You have
  done a good job raising him. Now he is ready to go
  to guide dog school.”
    Earl felt better. He knew Brownie would soon
help someone who really needed him.
    “Goodbye, Brownie!” he said. “I know that
you’ll make the best guide dog ever.!” Brownie
wagged his tail. Earl was proud. He could tell that
Brownie was proud, too.
  Study the following sequence of events:

    Earl gets Brownie.
                                              June
Brownie learns to
sit.
                    July
                      Brownie learns to       August
                      stay.
     September           Brownie visits the
                         zoo.
                                          October
 Brownie goes to
 longer trips.

             Earl takes Brownie      November
             back.
F. Comprehension Check-up:

1.    Have you ever had a pet?

      _______________________________________
      _______________________________________
     How did you care for it?
      _______________________________________________
      _______________________________________________
     How did you feel about your pet?
      _______________________________________
      _______________________________________
2. What happens first in the story?
   a.   Earl   gets Brownie.
   b.   Earl   cares for Brownie.
   c.   Earl   returns Brownie.
   d.   Earl   goes to the zoo.

3. How is Brownie different from most puppies?
   a.   He   will be a guide dog.
   b.   He   follows command
   c.   He   lives with family.
   d.   He   can sit and stay.
4. What does Earl do after Brownie follows
   directions?
   a. He gives him a treat.
   b. He says, “Great dog.”
   c. He goes to the park.
   d. He lets him wear a special coat.


5. Where will Brownie go after Earl leaves?
   a. To a dog park.
   b. To an office.
   c. To a zoo.
   d. To guide dog school.
G. Vocabulary Builder:
Write words from the box complete the paragraph.

      Commands                 confident              guide
       neighborhood            obey                   raise


     A (1)________ dog is trained to lead people who cannot see. A
family will (2) _____ the dog while it is still a puppy. The puppy goes
for walks around the (3)________. It learns to be (4)_______ and not
to be scared by other people or animal. The puppy learns(5)
________ such as “sit.” It learns to _________ and follow directions.
Re-read the story then be ready to answer the following
  exercises:

                   “ The Great Dog, Brownie”

       Mr. Rhom handed a brown Lab puppy to Earl. “This is
  Brownie,” he said. “He is eight weeks old.”
       “Hello, Brownie,” Earl said.
       “I’m glad you and your family will raise Brownie.” said
  Mr. Rhom. “You have to take care Brownie for twenty weeks.
  Then bring him back.”
“We will train him to be a guide dog. He will lead someone
who can’t see.” “I’ll take care of him,” said Earl.
(Working with Brownie)
     Earl began working with Brownie to teach him
important commands. Earl taught him to obey and to follow
directions. By July, Brownie had learned to sit. By August,
Brownie had learned to stay.
“A great dog, Brownie,” Earl said.
He rubbed his ear. Brownie wagged her tail.
     All summer long, Earl showed Brownie the sights,
sounds and smells of busy places. He wore a special coat to
show that he was learning to be a guide dog.
     By September, Brownie was ready to go on a longer
trips outside. Earl took him on longer walks around the
neighborhood.    They practiced the commands he had
learned.
     “Great dog, Brownie,” Earl said to him.
     By October,, Brownie had visited many places. He even
went to the zoo. Brownie stopped when he heard strange
animal noises there. But Earl rubbed his ear. He needed to
be confident. He couldn’t be afraid when he was a guide dog.
Soon Brownie walked on.
     “Great dog, Brownie,” said Earl.
Goodbye, Brownie!
     It was November. Earl and Brownie sat in Mr. Rhom’s
office. Earl felt sad.
     “Can I keep Brownie?” Earl asked.
     Mr. Rhom sighed. “The hardest part of raising a puppy
is saying goodbye.” Mr. Rhom said. “But Brownie is happy and
confident. You have done a good job raising him. Now he is
ready to go to guide dog school.”
      Earl felt better. He knew Brownie would soon help
someone who really needed him.
     “Goodbye, Brownie!” he said. “I know that you’ll make
the best guide dog ever.!” Brownie wagged his tail. Earl was
proud. He could tell that Brownie was proud, too.
H. Writing the Plot of the story.

A. Use the events of the story to complete the chart.


   Beginning:
       Earl gets a puppy.


           Middle:_____________________________
           ___________________________


                 End:_________________________________
                 ___________________________
B. Use the story and your chart to write your answer.

   1.   What does Earl have to do to raise Brownie?
        _____________________________
        _____________________________

   2. What is the story mostly about?
        _____________________________
        _____________________________
C. Sequence the following event in a given story.
   Write numbers on the space provided before the
   sentence.

  _____Brownie goes to longer trips.
  _____Brownie learns to sit.
  _____Brownie visits the zoo.
  _____Earl gets Brownie.
  _____Brownie learns to stay.
  _____Earl takes Brownie back.
 I. Your Turn to write a Plot.
     A. Think about a pet you would like to
        have. Use the chart to help you plan a
        real story about it.


           ____________
Beginning:
           ____________
                        ___________________
                       Middle:
                        __________________

                   ______________________
              End:
                   ______________________
B. On a separate sheet of paper, write a real story
   about a pet. Use the information from your chart.

  ________________________________________
  ________________________________________
  ________________________________________
  ________________________________________
  ________________________________________
  ________________________________________
           Review the following


A. Questions to ask oneself before writing
B. General Advice in Writing
C. Example of Successful Statements in
     Writing
D. Personal Statement: Top 10 Rules and
     Pitfalls
E. Application of Learned Skills in Writing
END of UNIT 2

								
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