MODULE SPECIFICATION TEMPLATE

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					                                      UNIVERSITY OF KENT

                                       Module Specification


1        The title of the module:
         Human Ecology (SE542)

2        The School which will be responsible for management of the module:
         Anthropology and Conservation

3        The Start Date of the Module:
         1968

4        The cohort of students (onwards) to which the module will be applicable:
         2009-10 entry

5        The number of students expected to take the module:
         35

6        Modules to be withdrawn on the introduction of this proposed module and
         consultation with other relevant Schools and Faculties regarding the withdrawal.
         None

7        The level of the module (eg Certificate [C], Intermediate [I], Honours [H] or
         Postgraduate [M])
         H (FHEQ Level: 6)

8        The number of credits which the module represents:
         15

9        Which term(s) the module is to be taught in (or other teaching pattern):
         Spring

10       Prerequisite and co-requisite modules:
         SE301: Introduction to Social Anthropology or equivalent

11       The programmes of study to which the module contributes:
         BA: Social Anthropology; Joint Honours; with a Language; with a Year Abroad; BSc
         Anthropology; Biological Anthropology; Medical Anthropology

12       The intended subject specific learning outcomes and, as appropriate, their
         relationship to programme learning outcomes (PLO for BA Social Anthropology)
        acquire a broad outline knowledge of the comparative human ecology of different kinds of
         subsistence systems (PLO: A1. Principles relevant to the study of human biology, evolution
         and sociality; A2. Human diversity and an appreciation of its scope; ).
        be able to competently assess evidence and articulate theories concerning the relationship
         between culture, social organisation and ecology (PLO: A1. Principles relevant to the study
         of human biology, evolution and sociality; C2. Ability to identify the relationship between
         environmental and cultural influences in human ecology)
        evaluate critically arguments and data in the field of environmental anthropology (PLO A8.
         The relevance of anthropology to understanding everyday processes of social life
         anywhere in the world; A10. Specific themes in social anthropology )

13       The intended generic learning outcomes and, as appropriate, their relationship to
         programme learning outcomes
         The generic learning outcomes for this course are as follows:
        To compare and contrast natural and social science approaches to the understanding of
         human environment relations (PLO C2. Ability to identify the relationship between
         environmental and cultural influences in human ecology; B2. Critical and analytical skills)
        Ability to locate relevant sources of data (using library holdings and electronic sources) for
         particular assignments: essay writing, seminar presentation, note taking (PLO B1. General
         Learning and Study Skills; B2. Critical and analytical skills).
        Ability to summarise, interpret, and present data in oral and written form (essays, seminars)
         (PLO B1. General Learning and Study Skills; B2. Critical and analytical skills).
        Ability to relate ideas and material in one context (lectures) to material in another
         (seminars).(PLO B1. General Learning and Study Skills; B2. Critical and analytical skills).

14       A synopsis of the curriculum
         This is an introduction to environmental anthropology, and a critical exploration of theories
         concerning the relationship between culture, social organisation and ecology. The topics
         covered will include problems in defining nature and environment, environmental
         determinism and cultural ecology, biological models and the concept of system, negative
         and positive feedback, ethnoecology, the description of subsistence, the concept of cultural
         adaptation, the ecology of hunting and gathering peoples, low intensity agriculture,
         intensification, environment, culture and development, and the anthropology of the
         environmental movement.

15       Indicative Reading List
         Bates DG and Lees SH (eds.) Case Studies in Human Ecology
         Milton K                    Environmentalism and Cultural Theory
         Moran E                     Human Adaptability
         Ellen R                     Environment, Subsistence and System

16       Learning and Teaching Methods, including the nature and number of contact hours
         and the total study hours which will be expected of students, and how these relate to
         achievement of the intended learning outcomes
         The total study hours are 120. There will 12 x 1hr lectures and 12 x 1 hr seminars.
         Students will achieve subject specific learning outcomes a-c in lectures and seminars, and
         general learning outcomes in seminars and through coursework.

17       Assessment methods and how these relate to testing achievement of the intended
         learning outcomes
         Assessment: One essay and one course test; one one-and-half hour examination paper in
         which students are required to answer two out of eight questions set. Assessment will
         comprise 20 percent and the final examination 80 percent of total marks awarded. The
         essay contributes to the achievement of module aims and objectives by allowing students
         to explore in depth one topic of interest, while the course test ensures a broad range of
         understanding of key concepts and facts relating to the syllabus in general.

18       Implications for learning resources, including staff, library, IT and space
         As the content and reading will be identical to the first half of the current SE501, no
         additional library impact is expected. There is no change in the impact on computing
         resources, and no special requirements. SE501 is to be withdrawn, and it is proposed that
         the new unit will occupy half of the already-timetabled space. Therefore, no additional slots
         will be required. The proposed change will have no impact on teaching loads as such,
         though the creation of one-unit modules will increase flexibility in planning teaching.

19       A statement confirming that, as far as can be reasonably anticipated, the
         curriculum, learning and teaching methods and forms of assessment do not present
         any non-justifiable disadvantage to students with disabilities
         Given appropriate support, no student with a disability should be at any disadvantage in
         either learning or assessment for this module.
Statement by the Director of Learning and Teaching: "I confirm I have been consulted on the
above module proposal and have given advice on the correct procedures and required content of
module proposals"


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 Director of Learning and Teaching                                   Date

 …………………………………………………
 Print Name


Statement by the Head of School: "I confirm that the School has approved the introduction of the
module and, where the module is proposed by School staff, will be responsible for its resourcing"


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 Head of School                                                      Date

 …………………………………………………….
 Print Name

				
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