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Diversity Forum Op Ed
August 27, 2007

Fannie Mae Duncan would not have been surprised at the joyous celebration of diversity and culture in
downtown Colorado Springs on August 18. After all, it was the sign in the window of her establishment,
the Cotton Club, which inspired the name of the event: Everybody Welcome.

Many people were surprised, however, at the depth and breadth of the effort. Sixty volunteers
contributed; almost sixty different organizations exhibited. The diversity of talent on every stage was
rivaled only by the diversity of those who came to enjoy. The precision, perfection and exuberance of so
many different cultural performances must be specially noted. No one need leave Colorado Springs to
find excellence and no one need doubt the richness of our cultural diversity.

The Colorado Springs Diversity Forum recognizes our major sponsors for their vision in contributing to
something that will strengthen our community for the future. In particular, we recognize the City of
Colorado Springs for partnering with the Forum and the Festival Committee to make a statement about
the importance of diversity and inclusion within Colorado Springs. Mayor Rivera opened the festival from
the steps of City Hall; Vice Mayor Larry Small and Council member Jerry Heimlicher served as
ambassadors throughout the day. Other City officials were present in support; some moderated events.
State Senator John Morse also attended, along with countless business and civic leaders.

For leaders and laity alike, Everybody Welcome was an opportunity to get out and meet neighbors you
didn’t know you had; it was a way to experience and celebrate how differences can be educational and
fun. It was also a true family event, providing our next generation with an opportunity to learn and
appreciate the value of living in a diverse community and a global extended family. Colorado Springs took
a big step forward.

As in all things new, the Diversity Forum learned much. We have great success on which to build and
many opportunities for improvement. We encourage each person and each institution to be a positive
influence for inclusiveness. Join us. Diversity is essential to our community’s economic health and
prosperity. Everyone must be involved in continuing to move forward.

Everybody Welcome gave everyone in Colorado Springs a chance to be part of the Forum mission. The
Forum works to create opportunity for our citizens to appreciate the rich diversity in our community and
communicate that appreciation to those inside and outside our community.
With Everybody Welcome, Colorado Springs said to all that we are eager to reclaim the proudest aspects
of our heritage as an enlightened and welcoming community.

Celebrating differences is one part of reclaiming our heritage; correcting inequity is also required. The
Diversity Forum congratulates the City of Colorado Springs on its new non-discrimination policy which
adds sexual orientation and religion to Colorado’s employment nondiscrimination laws. This is an
important step in making sure that all members of our community have access and opportunity – no
matter their age; gender; race; ethnicity; sexual orientation; ability; national origin; religious belief; marital,
parental or military status; life or work experience; economic or educational background and more. The
Forum will continue to provide leadership and we welcome participation by all.

Everybody Welcome is the legacy left by entrepreneur, business owner and community leader, Fannie
Mae Duncan. These words reflected Duncan’s business philosophy through decades of civil rights
struggles. Today, as some members of our community still seek fundamental, equal rights, it is up to each
of us to carry forth Duncan’s legacy for all people. Everyone is welcome here.

Jeff Murrell, Jay Patel
Co-Chairs
Colorado Springs Diversity Forum

                                                                                                                  1
               DIVERSITY FORUM KICKS OFF WORKSHOP SERIES
                 Engaging Diverse Talent to take place on October 4
COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo., October 2, 2007 -- The Colorado Springs Diversity Forum is announcing a
series of workshops over the next year to address topics such as cultural sensitivity and implementing
diversity in the workplace. The Forum was established in 2005 by a small group of civic leaders to
explore the contribution diversity makes to the workplace. Today, the Diversity Forum is comprised of
representatives from public, private, non-profit and education sectors.


The first workshop will take place at the Leon Young Service Center on Thursday, 10:00-11:30 am,
October 4, 2007. It is entitled, “Engaging Diverse Talent” and will be presented by Alberta Lloyd,
cofounder and vice president of Coleman Management Consultants, based in Atlanta Georgia. Topics of
the workshop are Engaging Diverse Talent, understanding filters, determining the underwritten rules of
the environment, assessing the impact of perceptions and stereotypes, and becoming and remaining
effective team members.


Coleman Management Consultants was established in 1980 to assist organizations manage diversity and
build cohesive teams in order to compete nationally as well as internationally.


The cost of the workshop is $10.00 for Colorado Springs Diversity Forum members and $15.00 for non-
members. RSVP to sstohlmann@comcast.net or 719-331-7588.




                                                                                                         2
Media Alert from Colorado Springs Diversity Forum – January 31, 2008




                                                                       3
PRESS RELEASE                                                                     For Immediate Release
9/30/2008                                                                                         Contact:
                                                                                          Sue Stohlmann
                                                                                           719-331-7588
                                                                         Colorado Springs Diversity Forum

                 AMENDMENT 46
   "Does it End Discrimination or Threaten Equal
                   Opportunity?"
       The Colorado Springs Diversity Forum and Colorado Technical University present a:


                                Moderated Panel Discussion
                                   September 30, 2008
                              Colorado Technical University
                  4435 North Chestnut Street, Colorado Springs, CO 80907

                                             Presentation
                                            6:00p.m. - 7:00p.m.
                                             Followed by Q&A

                                                 Panelists
                   Amendment Proponent: Kate Melvin, Colorado Civil Rights Initiative
                  Amendment Opponent: Melissa Hart, Coloradans for Equal Opportunity


                                  Moderated by: Betty Sexton, KKTV-11

Amendment 46 the Civil Rights Initiative sponsored by the American Civil Rights Initiative reads
as follows:
An amendment to the Colorado constitution concerning a prohibition against discrimination by the state,
and, in connection therewith, prohibiting the state from discriminating against or granting preferential
treatment to any individual or group on the basis of race, sex, color, ethnicity, or national origin in the
operation of public employment, public education, or public contracting; allowing exceptions to the
prohibition when bona fide qualifications based on sex are reasonably necessary or when action is
necessary to establish or maintain eligibility for federal funds; preserving the validity of court orders or
consent decrees in effect at the time the measure becomes effective; defining "state" to include the
state of Colorado, agencies or departments of the state, public institutions of higher education, political
subdivisions, or governmental instrumentalities of or within the state; and making portions of the
measure found invalid severable from the remainder of the measure.


Panelist Bio's:
Kate Melvin. American Civil Rights Initiative
Kate Melvin serves as the Assistant Director for the Colorado Civil Rights Initiative and is a senior at the
University of Colorado, Denver. She is currently studying economics and political science and has been
selected as a Chancellor's Scholar and Leader. As a first generation college student and a woman, she


                                                                                                               4
understands the importance of a color and gender blind system for higher education, public contracting,
and public hiring. Her passion for civil rights comes from a deep-seeded, first hand understanding that
women can make it on their own, without the assistance of the government and taxpayer dollars. Her
future plans include a Master's degree in Public Affairs and a continued fight for our basic civil liberties
in the public arena.
Melissa Hart, Coloradans for Equal Opportunity
Melissa Hart has been an Associate Professor at the University of Colorado Law School since 2001,
teaching Employment Discrimination, Legal Ethics and Professionalism and Civil Procedure. Her
scholarship focuses on employment discrimination. Professor Hart graduated from Harvard Law School
in 1995. After clerking for Judge Guido Calabresi of the Second Circuit and for Justice John Paul
Stevens on the United States Supreme Court, Professor Hart practiced law for several years in
Washington, D.C., including as a Trial Attorney at the U.S. Department of Justice. In the spring of 2008,
Professor Hart became the president of Coloradans for Equal Opportunity, an organization committed to
preserving equal opportunity initiatives in Colorado.
 Moderator: Betty Sexton, 11 News Anchor
Before joining the 11 News Team, Betty worked for KCTV, CBS Affiliate in Kansas City as an
Anchor/Reporter for 15 years.
She has won numerous awards for her Crime Stoppers segments, including an Emmy, Missouri
Broadcasters and Kansas Broadcasters award. Also, was specially recognized by the Kansas City
Crime Commission for efforts in helping police solve hundreds of criminal cases.
Betty came to KKTV in October of 1999 working as Noon Anchor/Investigative Reporter.
When not doing live shots, she enjoys tennis, running, biking, skiing, traveling, and spending time with
her husband and two children.


                             ____________________________

                                General Membership Meeting
                                      Friday, November 7, 2008
                                 1:00p.m. - 2:30p.m (hard start time)
                             Memorial Health System Administrative Center
                              2420 E. Pikes Peak Avenue, CS CO 80909

                                   RSVP info@cospdiversityforum.org


         "Hateful Rhetoric Surrounding the Debate on Immigration Reform"
 Information regarding the increase in hateful rhetoric in the debate on immigration reform, including the
 use of such rhetoric in mainstream media and by hate groups followed by question and answer session

                                               Presented by:
Joyce Rubin, the Senior Associate Director of the Anti-Defamation League's Mountain States Office in
  Denver, where she has worked for the past six years. The Anti-Defamation League, founded in 1913,
 fights hatred and bigotry through advocacy and education. ADL's mission is "to stop the defamation of
   the Jewish people to secure justice and fair treatment to all." Joyce is a graduate of the University of
                                  Rochester and Harvard Law School.




                                                                                                               5
 Colorado Springs Diversity Forum encourages you to attend
the release of the Innaugural Issue of the Inclusion Magazine

                                Inaugural issue of Inclusion Magazine
    The Pikes Peak region is comprised of many ethnic, faith-based and demographically-diverse
 components - all of which will enrich our community. Their faces and stories highlight the pages of an
                                           historic publication.


                                       What: Press Conference
                                       Where: Fine Arts Center
                                      When: Wednesday, Dec. 17
                                          Time: 10:30 a.m.


                     Multi-faceted Colorado Springs featured in new magazine
 A publication designed to showcase the multicultural components - and strengths -- of the Pikes Peak
                                 region will debut on December 19.

Inclusion Magazine is a full-color 64-page glossy magazine that features representatives from each of 10
diverse communities-within-a-community and their contributions to the region. Chapters include: African-
     American, American Indian, Asian, Hispanic, LGBT, Military, Disabled, Faith-based, Women and
                                         Workplace perspectives.

  Available through the Colorado Springs Regional Economic Development Corporation, the Greater
 Colorado Springs Chamber of Commerce, the Colorado Springs Business Journal and the Pikes Peak
  Library District, Inclusion was born of the need "to make a difference and to help our local business
                           community grow," said CSBJ Publisher Lon Matejczyk.

  Support for the inaugural issue came from many sectors, including the business community and the
 Diversity Forum of Colorado Springs. Underwriting sponsors included Booz Allen Hamilton, Heuberger
            Motors, the Gay & Lesbian Fund of Colorado and the Pikes Peak Library District.

             Colorado Springs' business leaders were united in their support for the project.

"Publication of Inclusion Magazine is an important step forward in more accurately reflecting the diverse
groups that make up our community and contribute to our quality of life," said Mike Kazmierski, president
   and chief executive officer of the Colorado Springs Regional Economic Development Corporation.

       "Inclusion magazine sets the state for many positive outcomes in our community," said
Chamber of Commerce CEO David Csintyan. "A diverse workforce is essential to the future well-being of
                                      the Pikes Peak region."

Jay Patel, co-chairman of the Colorado Springs Diversity Forum agreed, adding said his organization "is
                  proud to be part of this collaborative effort that is Colorado Springs."

Six thousand copies have been printed and will be distributed by Inclusion stakeholders and sponsors.

  "This is an idea whose time has come - and it's just good business to embrace the talents of all our
                                     residents," Matejczyk said.




                                                                                                          6
                      General Membership Meeting
                          Date: Friday, January 9, 2009
                            Time: 1:00p.m. - 2:30p.m.
                    Location: Gay & Lesbian Fund for Colorado
                 315 E. Costillo Ave., Colorado Springs, CO 80903

                     1:00p.m. Welcome and Introductions

                              1:15p.m. - 1:45p.m.
                         2010 Census
Presented by Dana Batey, U.S. Census Bureau Denver Regional Census Center
                     What is the Census?
  How the accurate collection of Census data affects Diverse
                         Populations?
            How is the information collected used?
                     How you can help!
                   1:45p.m. - 2:00p.m. Colors of Community
        Presented by Denise Wisdom, Urban League of the Pikes Peak Region

                    2:00p.m. - 2:30p.m. The Forum in 2009
                           Presented by CSDF Board




                                                                            7
For Immediate Release


                    8
PRESS RELEASE                                                                                         Contact: Sue Stohlmann
2/26/2009                                                                                                       719-331-7588
                                                                                              Colorado Springs Diversity Forum


                              "A Sense of Wonder"
                                   National Women's History Project 100 City Tour

                                    Film Screening & Panel Discussion
                                    Celebrate Women's History Month

                   Presented by: Colorado Springs Diversity Forum &
       The Matrix Center for the Advancement of Social Equity and Inclusion, UCCS
                                                  Thursday, Mar 5, 2009


                      5:30pm - 6:30pm "A Sense of Wonder" Film Screening


                  6:30pm -7:00pm Panel Discussion: Local "Green Initiatives"


                                                             Panelists:
Linda Kogan, UCCS Campus Sustainability
Richard Skorman,
Colorado Springs Conservation Corps
Alicia Archibald, BETTR Recycling
Eric Cefus, Catamount Institute - Sustainable Business Network
                               RSVP info@cospdiversityforum.org

                      Upper Lodge University of Colorado-Colorado Springs
                                                   1420 Austin Bluffs Parkway

                                               Tea and Cookies will be served

        Campus map Visitors parking in garage #34 on the map / the Upper Lodge #28 on the map
 Directions: From Austin Bluffs Parkway, turn North on Stanton Rd., then right onto Mountain Lion Way. When you reach Regents Circle,
you will see the Lodge ahead on your right. For parking, turn right onto Regents Circle and follow to Parking garage, on the left, which has
        a visitors section (fee based). Additional visitors parking is in Lot 1. For disabled parking access, please contact Daryl Miller
                                                               (dmiller4@uccs.edu)




When pioneering environmentalist Rachel Carson published Silent Spring in 1962, the backlash from

her critics thrust her into the center of a political maelstrom. Despite her love of privacy, Carson's

convictions and her foresight regarding the risks posed by chemical pesticides forced her into a very




                                                                                                                                           9
public and controversial role.

Using many of Miss Carson's own words, Kaiulani Lee embodies this extraordinary woman in a

documentary style film, which depicts Carson in the final year of her life. Struggling with cancer, Carson

recounts with both humor and anger the attacks by the chemical industry, the government, and the

press as she focuses her limited energy to get her message to Congress and the American people.



The film is an intimate and poignant reflection of Carson's life as she emerges as America's most

successful advocate for the natural world. A Sense of Wonder was shot in HD by Oscar-winning

cinematographer Haskell Wexler at Carson's cottage on the coast of Maine.

Press Kit




Presented by:




                                                                                                         10
Colorado Springs Diversity Forum is comprised of representatives from public, private, non-profit, and
education sectors. We build on the positive work and influence of the diverse cultures that contribute to
the social and business structure of our city. We recognize that positive diversity practices enhance
economic vitality, promote business success, and improve the quality of life for current and future
citizens of Colorado Springs. Our work represents a visible commitment to helping our community
achieve its full potential. www.cospdiversityforum.org




The Matrix advances research, curriculum, and faculty development examining the dynamics of
oppression and privilege in the United States and around the globe. Our central focus is on the
intersections of gender, race/ethnicity, and sexuality, as they interact with each other and with other
dimensions of inequality. We strive to foster an intellectual climate that supports inclusion and
collaboration among our faculty, students, and the community. www.uccs.edu/~matrix/

                                                   ###




                                                                                                          11
12
PRESS RELEASE                                                                                          For Immediate Release
2/26/2009                                                                                             Contact: Sue Stohlmann
                                                                                                                719-331-7588
                                                                                              Colorado Springs Diversity Forum


                              "A Sense of Wonder"
                                   National Women's History Project 100 City Tour

                                    Film Screening & Panel Discussion
                                    Celebrate Women's History Month

                   Presented by: Colorado Springs Diversity Forum &
       The Matrix Center for the Advancement of Social Equity and Inclusion, UCCS
                                                  Thursday, Mar 5, 2009
                       5:30pm - 6:30pm "A Sense of Wonder" Film Screening
                  6:30pm -7:00pm Panel Discussion: Local "Green Initiatives"


                                                             Panelists:
                                           Linda Kogan, UCCS Campus Sustainability
                                           Richard Skorman,
                                           Colorado Springs Conservation Corps
                                           Alicia Archibald, BETTR Recycling
                                           Eric Cefus, Catamount Institute - Sustainable Business Network
                                          RSVP info@cospdiversityforum.org

                      Upper Lodge University of Colorado-Colorado Springs
                                                   1420 Austin Bluffs Parkway

                                               Tea and Cookies will be served

        Campus map Visitors parking in garage #34 on the map / the Upper Lodge #28 on the map
 Directions: From Austin Bluffs Parkway, turn North on Stanton Rd., then right onto Mountain Lion Way. When you reach Regents Circle,
you will see the Lodge ahead on your right. For parking, turn right onto Regents Circle and follow to Parking garage, on the left, which has
        a visitors section (fee based). Additional visitors parking is in Lot 1. For disabled parking access, please contact Daryl Miller
                                                               (dmiller4@uccs.edu)




When pioneering environmentalist Rachel Carson published Silent Spring in 1962, the backlash from

her critics thrust her into the center of a political maelstrom. Despite her love of privacy, Carson's

convictions and her foresight regarding the risks posed by chemical pesticides forced her into a very

public and controversial role.




                                                                                                                                          13
Using many of Miss Carson's own words, Kaiulani Lee embodies this extraordinary woman in a

documentary style film, which depicts Carson in the final year of her life. Struggling with cancer, Carson

recounts with both humor and anger the attacks by the chemical industry, the government, and the

press as she focuses her limited energy to get her message to Congress and the American people.

The film is an intimate and poignant reflection of Carson's life as she emerges as America's most

successful advocate for the natural world. A Sense of Wonder was shot in HD by Oscar-winning

cinematographer Haskell Wexler at Carson's cottage on the coast of Maine.

Press Kit




Presented by:




Colorado Springs Diversity Forum is comprised of representatives from public, private, non-profit, and education
sectors. We build on the positive work and influence of the diverse cultures that contribute to the social and
business structure of our city. We recognize that positive diversity practices enhance economic vitality, promote



                                                                                                                    14
business success, and improve the quality of life for current and future citizens of Colorado Springs. Our work
represents a visible commitment to helping our community achieve its full potential. www.cospdiversityforum.org




The Matrix advances research, curriculum, and faculty development examining the dynamics of oppression and
privilege in the United States and around the globe. Our central focus is on the intersections of gender,
race/ethnicity, and sexuality, as they interact with each other and with other dimensions of inequality. We strive to
foster an intellectual climate that supports inclusion and collaboration among our faculty, students, and the
community. www.uccs.edu/~matrix/



 Articles about CSDF

Group creates business diversity guide
Booklet part of effort to improve citys image
By PERRY SWANSON THE GAZETTE
June 2, 2007 - 12:32AM


Colorado Springs companies could do more to combat discrimination against minorities and ensure that people
from all backgrounds feel welcome here.

That’s the idea behind the “Diversity Resource Guide,” a publication being prepared by a group of area
business and cultural leaders.

The free 34-page guide is aimed at helping businesses evaluate behavior toward employees and customers
who are members of minority groups. It recommends activities including soliciting reaction from workers to
statements such as “I sometimes feel awkward dealing with people who have a physical disability,” and “We
offer bilingual services to our customers.”

The guide will be available in about two weeks, and then organizers will launch a campaign to help businesses
use it, particularly small and medium-size businesses. Those companies often lack the resources and know-
how to start a diversity program without help, said Glen Bruels, co-chairman of the Colorado Springs Diversity
Forum, which is producing the guide.

“They want to do the right thing, but knowing what the right thing is and the ability to pull it off is what it’s all
about,” Bruels said Friday.

The Colorado Springs Diversity Forum started in 2005 to address concern that the area’s reputation for
intolerance is hampering economic growth. Forum members include many high-profile companies and nonprofit
agencies.

The guide is among the first tangible results of the group’s efforts. Organizers also are planning a downtown
festival Aug. 18 to celebrate the city’s diverse cultures.

Bruels said efforts like the Diversity Resource Guide could help recruit companies to set up operations here,
counteracting the perception residents are intolerant.


                                                                                                                        15
The guide will be available on the forum’s Web site, www.cospdiversityforum.org

Festival will showcase diversity
PERRY SWANSON THE GAZETTE

The "Everybody Welcome" festival, celebrating cultural diversity in Colorado Springs on Aug. 18, will feature
music and dance performances, food and other activities all day in the area of Acacia Park downtown. The free
event features samplings of cultures from around the globe. There's the Talking Tree Drummers, belly dancing,
country- western dancing, a hip-hop group called L.I.F.E, and Hawaiian hula, among many other performers.

This is the first year for the festival, which organizers hope will be an annual event. The Colorado Springs
Diversity Forum is putting on the event. Details are online at www.cospdiversityforum.org.

The performances include a dance presentation by the Colorado Springs India Community Dance Group. Jay
Patel, a co-chairman of the diversity forum, helped organize the dance group soon after he moved to Colorado
Springs 30 years ago. At that time, only about 10 Indian families lived in the city, he said, and several of them
got together to put on a small show.

"It was a way to bring culture to the kids who grew up here," he said. "Now it's become a Broadway-style
production. We've got a very large American audience that follows us."

The Indian performance at the Everybody Welcome festival will include a children's group putting on a classical
Indian dance, and adults will do a folk dance demonstration. The dance group is one way Colorado Springs
residents who trace their roots to India maintain and celebrate their culture, Patel said.

"It's such a visual delight, especially when you see the children performing," he said. "We're hoping to pass a
little of that on with the diversity fair."


denver & the west
Festival promotes Springs diversity
Some residents said the city, often viewed as a bastion of white conservatives, is far more
open to other lifestyles.
By Tom McGhee
Denver Post Staff Writer
Article Last Updated: 08/21/2007 03:45:31 PM MDT


Colorado Springs - A diversity festival here that had a controversial beginning ended up more of a typical street
fair. But it is still a starting point to change this city's conservative, white image, attendees said.

"We are normally the butt-end of sound bites," Jay Patel, a co-chair of Colorado Springs Diversity Forum, said
of the city's reputation. "Today, I am hoping that the media will find us doing something right."

Patel has lived here for 28 years after fleeing the civil war in Zimbabwe in the 1970s.

The Springs population is far more diverse than its reputation as a white, conservative stronghold would
indicate, he said.



                                                                                                                16
And diversity and acceptance of different cultures helps attract global business, he added.

When the festival was first proposed this spring, some City Council members objected to waiving costs for park
rental, police service and barricades.

They were concerned that gay and lesbian groups would make it a forum to tout a political agenda.

Politicians were convinced that the event would not be a sounding board for any particular agenda and their
opposition evaporated, said Susan Saksa, who co-chaired the event.

The council unanimously voted to sponsor the festival, which included cultural dancers, ethnic food and music.

"We explained that diversity can be fun, that it is a celebration, the concern seemed to melt away," she said of
the festival, which included entertainment on three stages.

At a booth manned by members of the Pikes Peak Gay and Lesbian Community Center, Ryan Acker said
members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transsexual community come from different races and backgrounds.
"LGBT people are a diverse community, so we felt it was important to be here," he said.

Carol Buchholz, a retired teacher who attended the festival, said Colorado Springs needs more activities like
the fair to increase acceptance of those who are different.

The city's reputation as a conservative bastion is well-deserved, said Buchholz, who has lived here for 50
years.

"There are subtle pressures to assume that there is one way of doing things," said her husband, Jerry.

Walt Palmer, 57, said Colorado Springs really needed to have an event celebrating diversity.

Palmer, a professional photographer who moved from Dallas seven years ago, said one of the things that
attracted him to Colorado Springs is the mix of racial and cultural diversity that actually exists here.

"Colorado Springs has more than just an evangelical community and a military community," he said. "There is
actually an art scene and a music scene starting to happen. I am glad to see the city celebrating something that
can be good for all." Staff writer Tom McGhee can be reached at 303-954-1671 or tmcghee@denverpost.com.




Festival of many flavors

Diversity celebration welcomes a few
thousand to downtown
By PERRY SWANSON
THE GAZETTE
August 19, 2007 - 8:28AM

“Badia” (Renee Larrabee) performed a nontraditional Oriental sword dance
Saturday as part of the “Everybody Welcome” diversity festival at Acacia Park.
(KIRK SPEER, THE GAZETTE)



A few thousand people attended the “Everybody Welcome” diversity festival Saturday in downtown Colorado
Springs. The event featured music and dance performances, cooking demonstrations and dozens of
information booths.

                                                                                                                17
Dance performances alone were a showcase for a variety of cultures. Some of the dance styles included hip-
hop, hula hoop, American Indian, Latin American, Hawaiian, Gypsy, Japanese, Irish and belly dancing.

WHAT IS DIVERSITY?
Diversity comes in many flavors, said several people who attended the festival. Here are some of their answers
to the question: “What’s diverse about you?”

- “I really think my family,” said Ally Koerber, who attended with her mom and a few nieces and nephews.
Koerber, who’s Hispanic, said she grew up in a family that went out of its way to learn about different cultures.
She said she views the festival as a positive development for the city.

“This is so cool that we don’t have to travel too far for things like this,” she said.

- Hearing loss is a form of diversity for Bob Knox, an organizer for the Hearing Loss Association of America
Southeastern Colorado Chapter.

- “What we’re down here talking about is about 10 percent of the population that’s impacted by hearing loss,”
he said.

People with diminished hearing sometimes become isolated because they can’t participate in social situations,
but it doesn’t have to be that way, Knox said.

- “Being black, of course, is diverse,” Ellen Wilkerson said. “Just being female is diverse. Being a mother is
diverse. Being a stay-at-home mom, now that’s very diverse.”

Wilkerson said she keeps busier as a stay-at-home mom than she did in the professional world. Still,
sometimes she tells people at parties she’s a stay-at-home mom and gets the response: “Oh, really? What do
you do?”

- “A way I’m diverse is that I can relate to a lot of people,” said Katrina San Luis, a high school student who
visited the festival with her friend, Lauren Nikolas.

Nikolas had a different take: “I’m diverse by my goals in life and my opinions,” she said. “I’m looking for
success, but it’s not like I want to be rich or have fame.”

- “I’m a mutt,” Dave Schmitt said about his background. “I’m German, there’s Dutch, there’s Welsh, there’s all
kinds of stuff in there. Colorado — you can’t get any more diverse than we are here.”

BACKGROUND: A group of businesses, charities and government agencies called the Colorado Springs
Diversity Forum put on the event. It was intended to celebrate the cultures of people who live in Colorado
Springs. The event ran into controversy in April, when some City Council members raised questions about gay
participation. The City Council agreed to contribute $10,320 in government support despite the participation of
gays. This month a few Jewish and black leaders said the festival doesn’t really reflect diversity.



SPRINGS WILL SPONSOR DIVERSITY FESTIVAL
March 26, 2008

                                                                                                                  18
By PERRY SWANSON THE GAZETTE

  City leaders Tuesday gave permanent support to a summer festival that’s intended to combat a
nationwide reputation for hostility to minorities.
  The Colorado Springs City Council’s vote to sponsor the “Everybody Welcome” festival was a dramatic
shift from less than a year ago, when some council members debated withholding city support because of
participation by gay-oriented groups.
  Council members Darryl Glenn and Margaret Radford worried that participation by gay groups would
add a political dimension to the event. Councilman Tom Gallagher said at the time that anti-war groups
could turn the event into a political rally.
  Those council members withdrew their concerns and voted to sponsor the event last year. On Tuesday,
the council unanimously voted to continue city support this year and in the future.
  The festival will “show what Colorado Springs is really all about,” said Jay Patel, co-chairman of the
Colorado Springs Diversity Forum, a group of business leaders and activists that’s putting on the event
Aug. 22 and 23.
  City sponsorship means the government will waive fees of $6,800 for police services, $3,320 for renting
Acacia Park downtown, City Auditorium and a mobile performance stage, and $4,750 for street
barricades borrowed from Colorado Springs Utilities.
  The city sponsors about 10 similar nonprofit events annually, such as the Pikes Peak or Bust Rodeo
Parade and the Colorado Balloon Classic.
  Members of the Diversity Forum sought city support last year but said they would go ahead even
without it. The forum began a few years ago when business leaders including the Colorado Springs
Chamber of Commerce said they wanted to counter the city’s reputation for intolerance.
  The reputation dates to 1992, when state voters passed a measure authored in Colorado Springs that
denied legal protections based on sexual orientation. Some celebrities and politicians responded by
calling Colorado the “hate state.” The U.S. Supreme Court struck down the measure in 1996.
  The festival is named for a sign on the Cotton Club, a popular nightclub during the 1950s and ‘60s
where owner Fannie Mae Duncan defied a city culture where blacks and whites rarely mixed.

City Holds First Multi-Cultural Festival
ENGAGE Colorado Springs - 2008 Business Development and Relocation Guide
March 2008

The Colorado Springs                                    benefit.
Diversity Forum believes                                As part of a community setting, this might
that communities derive                                 mean enhancing our quality of life by enjoying
a significant part of their                             the rich variety of artistic talents that exist
strength from the diversity                             within a diverse population. As part of a
of their population.                                    business setting, it might mean enhancing a
However, it’s not the diversity                         solution to a business problem by leveraging
itself that gives a                                     the different backgrounds, skills and
community that strength.                                experiences
Regardless of our ethnic,                               of our diverse employee population.
cultural, religious or sexual                           It is those leaders who recognize this
orientation, it is the                                  opportunity
commonalities among us                                  to practice proactive inclusiveness,
that provide the opportunity                            who enable communities and organizations
to come together.                                       to realize their potential.
There are far more aspirations                          Everybody welcome
that we have in common                                  Part of the mission of the Colorado
with everyone else in                                   Springs Diversity Forum is to ensure that,
this world than actual differences.                     as a community, we recognize, appreciate,
What makes a community                                  communicate and enjoy the diversity in our
stronger is its ability to come together                population.
based on common interests and proactively               Our inaugural “Everybody Welcome”
leverage that which is different for mutual

                                                                                                          19
event was and will continue to be a                         during the course of the event. We
demonstration                                               appreciate the support of all our volunteers,
of our commitment to this part                              along with the fine work of the Colorado
of our mission. This free, family event took                Springs Police Department and all those who
place in the center of downtown Colorado                    helped make this event so successful.
Springs and was open to everyone.                           Diversity a non-issue
Under very able leadership, a dedicated                     In the end, a community where inclusiveness
group of forum members was able to put our                  is as automatic as breathing,
first such event together in just four months.              where commonalities are more important
Led by generous support from the city, we                   than differences and where differences
were fortunate to receive funding, promotional              are valued rather than vilified, becomes a
and other logistical support from a                         community that has made diversity a non-issue.
fine group of sponsors.                                     The members of the Colorado Springs
There was a very strong response from                       Diversity Forum have come together to help
organizations wanting to be part of this                    leaders in the city, local businesses, civic
event. More than 60 exhibitors and vendors                  organizations
participated and a long list of excellent                   and individuals move our community
and varied performers filled three stages                   in this direction through education,
throughout the day.                                         communication and celebration.
The event team also assembled a fine group                  To join the Colorado Springs Diversity Forum,
of more than 70 volunteers, who helped with                 visit www.cospdiversityforum.org.
set up and tear down, as well as other                      Jay Patel and Jeff Murrell are co-chairmen
assistance                                                  of the Colorado Spring Diversity Forum.


everybody welcome festival embraces springs’ diversity
Annual event honors iconic city character
August 20, 2008
By PERRY SWANSON THE GAZETTE

   At the Cotton Club, a city institution for decades, owner Fannie Mae Duncan was always dressed to the
nines, presiding over bar patrons, dancers, GIs, businesspeople and some of the nation’s top musical
performers.

  “When you entered, you would always see her sitting at the end of the bar on a bar stool in the corner.
She had this presence about her. She dressed like no other. She wore furs and diamonds, but everybody
respected her,” said JJ Frazier, who performed at the club when she was 17. “People felt very
comfortable coming in there, of all races, and no one was ever turned away.”

  On the front of the building at 25 W. Colorado Ave., a sign read “Everybody Welcome,” at a time when
Colorado Springs was, at least informally, a segregated city.

   The Cotton Club closed in 1975 and was demolished amid a push for urban renewal. On Friday,
organizers of the second annual Everybody Welcome diversity festival hope to revive the old club at the
City Auditorium, complete with zoot suits, cat-eye glasses, dancing shoes and jazz bands.

   The festival runs through Saturday and is designed to draw attention to cultural diversity in the city. It’s
largely a push back against what organizers with the Colorado Springs Diversity Forum say is the city’s
undeserved reputation for intolerance of minorities. The festival has official sponsorship by the city
government, but the Diversity Forum is a private group of businesses and activists. Events at the festival
are free.

  Kay Esmiol, who has written a biography of Duncan, said Duncan would be thrilled to know the festival
was dedicated to her memory and ideals. Duncan died Sept. 13, 2005, at age 87.

                                                                                                             20
  “She would be so happy that it’s turned out that her legacy is to unite people,” Esmiol said.

  Duncan was not a civil rights crusader in the tradition of some activists of her time. Terry Shattuck, a
Colorado Springs native who frequented the Cotton Club in the mid-1960s, said he views Duncan as a
businesswoman who didn’t care what race her customers were.

  “Obviously it was probably 80 percent black or more, but with Fort Carson here, a lot of the soldiers
were there,” he said. “We never felt ill at ease or afraid to go in there as young, white whippersnappers.”

   Behind Duncan’s façade as a tough and savvy businesswoman was a softer side: She gave
generously to help people in need and stood up against segregationist policies of the time, Esmiol said.
At one point early in the history of the Cotton Club, the police chief confronted her with his worries over
the large number of whites patronizing a black club. She told him to go ahead and order the whites to stay
away, but look out if they decided to exercise their constitutional rights and come in anyway. The chief
backed down, and eventually he and Duncan became allies, Esmiol said.

   “More than being defiant, she was just an extremely bright woman who was a good businesswoman,
who had a generous nature and a sense of justice,” she said. “Instead of things happening the way they
did in terms of civil rights, it’s just a very unique story that Colorado Springs should be excited about.”

INCLUSION MAGAZINE
CS Business Journal
November 2008

Diversity:

Most of us are relieved that the elections are finally over and we are consumed in analyzing and
passionately debating the outcomes. Perhaps we would be better served if we, instead, celebrated the
evident victory of diversity and inclusion.
As a recent immigrant and proud American citizen of thirty years, I am elated that an African American will
be our next President. President-Elect Obama’s historic accomplishment is a tribute to the vision and
principles of our founding fathers and he sends a new wave of hope to all. We have proudly
demonstrated that we exemplify a resilient democracy that is yet to be matched anywhere else in the
world.
Our innate differences add value to organizations and civic engagements as we bring a diversity of
backgrounds, experiences, thought, faith and cultural ethnicity to our daily actions. We have always
considered this to be our most valuable strength. Look no further than the television ads of the US Army:
“We are the most powerful military force in the world...our strength is our...Diversity!”
These words should resonate profoundly in our city where we have such a large dependence on the
strong and expanding presence of the military bases.
         Not only is this a time to celebrate nationally, but also locally. The Colorado Springs Diversity
Forum, through its programs, initiatives, and “Everybody Welcome” events has accomplished much to
strengthen our community by promoting, recognizing and celebrating diversity and inclusion in our city.
         Yet, we can’t do it alone. The Diversity Forum needs you and your organizations to help create a
community where our rich diversity is recognized as an asset. Let us set the standard by which major
cities measure themselves and show everyone that they are not only welcome here but also valued.
We had a record turnout of voters at the elections because people            wanted to have their voices heard -
and they were - by the nation and the world. Make your voices heard in this community by joining the
Diversity Forum!

Jay Patel, Chair
Diversity Forum of Colorado Springs
www.cospdiversityforum.org



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Testimonials

Agilent Technologies - Mirta Walker, Diversity Specialist and Terry Poe, Order Fulfillment Manager
As Agilent continues to grow and change as a company, we have responded by ensuring that our policies
and practices support our core beliefs and values, our guiding principles and our goals to make Agilent
the best place to work for every employee. We have implemented policies and practices that support our
Global Diversity and Inclusion and work/life success such as Domestic Partner benefits, non-
discrimination policy, Employee Network Groups, Employee and Family Assistance Program and
numerous others to meet the needs of our employees. Our shared practices in open communication,
flexible work hours and a creative, energetic and innovative work environment all contribute to our
success.

Booz Allen Hamilton – Kurt Stevens, Vice President
Booz Allen Hamilton has been at the forefront of management and technology consulting for over 90
years, providing services in strategy, organization, operations, systems and technology to the world's
leading corporations, government and other public agencies, emerging growth companies, and
institutions.

Booz Allen's vision is to be the employer of choice in our industry for people of all backgrounds. At Booz
Allen Hamilton we define diversity as the process of valuing individual differences through action.

Our commitment to diversity in the workforce is evident at every level of the firm - from our corporate
Diversity Team and programs like the Board Diversity Initiative, to our community outreach activities and
grass-roots, employee-led Diversity Forums.

In late 2002, to ensure that the firm was addressing diversity at the highest level, our Board Diversity
Initiative (BDI) was implemented - aimed at ensuring that Booz Allen enhances, leverages, and
celebrates the diversity of its staff. The goal of the BDI is to increase the level of activism across the
firm's diversity efforts and to focus our internal processes on the needs of all staff, regardless of
background.

Booz Allen Hamilton recognizes that weaving together diverse talent, experience and perspectives helps
business, government and our communities solve today’s most important challenges. That is why
diversity and inclusion at Booz Allen is central to who we are and what we can do as a leading strategy
and technology consulting firm. Diverse minds and shared values - because only exceptional individuals,
working together as part of a vibrant team, can find creative solutions to the current challenges and
opportunities presented today, and tomorrow.

Cheyenne Village Inc. – Ann Turner, Executive Director
Cheyenne Village was the first residential program in the Pikes Peak Region for people with
developmental disabilities. Up until the founding of Cheyenne Village, most individuals with
developmental disabilities were segregated by being sent to state-run institutions or nursing homes.

Our founders’ vision was to help these people gain as much independence as possible by helping them
integrate into society, so they may have the opportunity to lead happy, healthy and fulfilling lives.

It is part of our value and culture to advocate and support inclusion. In promoting our mission and values,
Cheyenne Village actively engages in embracing people from different cultures and backgrounds as
employees, volunteers, and recipients of services. At Cheyenne Village, we respect and value the
individuality of all staff members. We know that valuing diversity makes good business sense and helps
to ensure our future success.




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