ST: An Adventure of the American Mind by b39eXK

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									        Instructions for Students


The Immigrant Experience in the United
         States: 1850-1930
               A KnowledgeQuest for

     High School Social Studies Students



                          Designed by

      Julie Hyde-Porter, Kathy McKittrick, and Susan Roberts
                           August, 2005




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Introduction
The history of the United States is, at its core, the history of peoples coming together from
all over the world. Since the 16th century, the tide of immigration has ebbed and flowed .
Some people left their homelands because of difficult conditions. Others were attracted to
North America because of real or imagined opportunities.

From 1850 to 1930 marks a peak in immigration to the United States. We already discussed
many reasons that trigger immigration in the course of our study. However, we have not
touched on the immigrant experience:

       What was it like for the immigrants who came here?

       What were some of the difficulties they faced? How did they respond to the barriers
       they found?

       These are some of the questions that we will answer by looking and analyzing at
       primary sources. We will use the American Memories Collection and other print and
       online resources.

For this task your will be a “history detective,” using the evidence that has been compiled to
develop hypotheses to gain a greater understanding of the immigrant experience.


Task
To understand how it felt to be an immigrant during this timeframe you will listen to songs,
read primary documents, and view photos concerning the immigrant experience. You can
report you findings in a variety of ways:

      Write diary entries of an immigrant.

      Describe an immigrant experience using a multimedia presentation.

      Video tape a mock interview with an immigrant.

      Create a children’s story book about the immigrant experience.

      Write an article about an immigrant for a magazine or newspaper during this
       timeframe.


Process
To accomplish the task, there are a series of steps that you will complete over the course of
the next three days.

Developing skills for finding and analyzing primary sources

1. You will gain an understanding of the difference between primary and secondary
sources.




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2. You will learn search strategies to locate primary sources from the American Memories
Collections and other digitized source and print sources.

3. Teacher or librarian will model how to analyze a document for bias.

3. By filling in the Primary Source Chart provided with this learning activity, you will begin
to evaluate different types of sources for bias helping you to understand to immigrant
experience.

Examining and analyzing primary sources

1. You will work with one or two partners on this assignment. List your names on the
worksheet provided.

2. As you examine each document (including photos and songs) use the Primary Source
Analysis Form.

3.Take notes on the Compilation of Data Form provided. Each of the documents can help
you form hypotheses that relate to the following questions

          Question 1: What did it feel like to move to a new culture? What were some of
              the positive experiences? What were some of the negative experiences? :

          Question 2: What cultural, political, social, and economic barriers did immigrants
              need to overcome?

          Question 3: Did some immigrants think that moving here was a mistake? If so
              why, and what did they do about it?

          Question 4: How did those already living in America react when new ethnic
              groups arrived?

          Question 5: How did immigrants resolve their feelings for their old countries and
              their feelings for their new country (U.S.)

Note: Each document is unique and will not provide information for all of the questions
below. By examining all of the documents, you can address each of the questions.

Designing your presentation and dividing up tasks

      1. Use the “Designing Your Final Product Form” to plan your presentation. You and
       your partner(s) must agree on the format you will use to report your findings. (See
       “Task” above)

      Designate tasks on the form. What materials will you require? Who will be
       responsible for the written or spoken portion of your presentation? Who will be
       responsible for compiling the visuals you will use?

      Carefully read the “Rubric for this exercise. Although the design is up to you, it must
       fulfill the requirements set forth in the rubric.




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Presentations

Whether you diary, a children’s book or created a videotape or multimedia presentation,
you will share your work with your fellow students.




Evaluation Rubric
Use the rubric on the next page to evaluate your final project.

Have you completed all the necessary requirements?

What can you improve?




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                  Beginning           Developing          Accomplished           Exemplary             Score

                      (1)                  (2)                  (3)                  (4)


Understand      Takes a position     Takes a position     Takes a position     Takes a position
     an               that is       that the situation          that is               that is
immigrant’s     inappropriate for        does not          appropriate for      appropriate for    1   2   3   4
 experience       the situation.        completely                the                   the
                    Presents a      warrant or that is      circumstances        circumstances
                  position that     redundant. Does       and supports an      and introduces a
                    cannot be          not provide       underrepresented         valuable and
                  supported by           sufficient          perspective.       unrepresented
                     evidence           supporting             Provides           perspective.
                                     evidence for the          sufficient       Provides strong
                                          position         justification for       supporting
                                                             the position      evidence for the
                                                                                     position


 Written or     Some questions       Most questions        All questions         All questions
oral material    answered, but      answered, some       answered, some         answered, all
  answers         hypotheses        hypotheses clear     hypotheses clear      hypotheses clear    1   2   3   4
  essential         unclear
 questions




Supporting      Some hypotheses      All hypotheses       All hypotheses        All hypotheses
 Evidence         supported by        supported by         supported by          supported by
                 primary sources    primary sources      primary sources       primary sources     1   2   3   4
                    but link to        but link to       and link to most       and all links to
                    hypotheses         hypotheses         hypotheses is        hypotheses clear
                      unclear            unclear               clear


Visual/Audio     Visual and/or       Visual and/or         Visual and/or          Visual and/or
 aesthetics     audio portion of    audio portion of      audio portion of      audio portion of
                presentation is     presentation is       presentation is        presentation is   1   2   3   4
                  incomplete         complete but          complete and          complete, well
                                    presented in an        well organized        organized, and
                                      unorganized                               includes related
                                        fashion                                elements that go
                                                                                   beyond the
                                                                               sources provided
                                                                                      or the
                                                                                requirements of
                                                                                the assignment




                                                 Overall Score
                                              ______ / 9 = ______




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Conclusion
Immigrants who came to the United States had many different experiences. There is no
single “immigrant story,” but by examining and analyzing individual and collective
experiences through primary source material, we can move a little closer to understanding
the courage and perseverance required to become a member of a new society.


Credits
The Administration and the ‘Chinese in Transit.” The Chinese in California, 1850-
       1925 Digital Library SunSITE. U. of California, Berkeley. 2005
       <http://sunsite3.berkeley.edu/cgi-
       bin/flipomatic/cic/images@ViewHiRes?img=brk00001703_16a> Retrieved 3
       Aug. 2005 The Library of Congress: American Memory.
       <http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/index.html>

Affidavit for immigration, Pon Yun Cheong. The Chinese in California, 1850-1925
         Digital Library SunSITE. U. of California, Berkeley. 2005
         http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/cgi-bin/flipomatic/cic/brk3760> Retrieved 3
         Aug. 2005 The Library of Congress: American Memory.
         <http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/index.html>

Affidavit: Inspection card, The Chinese in California, 1850-1925. Digital Library
         SunSITE. U. of California, Berkeley. 2005. <
         http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/cgi-bin/flipomatic/cic/brk3913> Retrieved 3
         Aug. 2005 The Library of Congress: American Memory.
         <http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/index.html>

Bell, Alexander Graham. Is Race Suicide Possible? Journal of Heredity. Nov. 1920.
        American Memory: Alexander Graham Bell Family Papers. Retrieved 3 Aug.
        2005 The Library of Congress: American Memory
        <http://memory.loc.gov/cgibin/ampage?collId=magbell&f
        ileName=376/37600201/bellpage.db&recNum=0/body/html>

The Chicago Daily News. Scandinavians leaving for Europe, going home to Norway.
        American Memory: Photographs from the Chicago Daily News, 1902-1933
        <http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/ndlpcoop/ichihtml/cdnhome.html>
        Retrieved 3 Aug. 2005 The Library of Congress: American Memory.
        <http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/ndlpcoop/ichihtml/cdnhome.html>

Chinese couple seated, The Chinese in California, 1850-1925. Digital Library
       SunSITE. U. of California, Berkeley. 2005
       <http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/cgibin/flipomatic/cic/images@ViewImage?img
       =brk00003922_16a> Retrieved 3 Aug. 2005 The Library of Congress:
       American Memory. <http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/index.html>



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"Commentary on Immigration Blues, 13." American Journey Online: The Asian
     American Experience. Primary Source Microfilm, 1999. Student Resource
     Center. Thomson Gale. 11 August 2005
     <http://galenet.galegroup.com/servlet/SRC>

Ellis, Pearl Idelia. Americanization Through Homemaking. Department of
         Americanization and Homemaking, Covina City Elementary Schools.
         LA:Wetzel Publishing. 1929. American Memory: Prosperity and Thrift: The
         Coolidge Era and Consumer Economy, 1921-29. Retrieved 5 Aug. 2005 The
         Library of Congress: American Memory
         <http://memory.loc.gov/cgibin/ampage?collId=amrlg&fileName=lg35page.d
         b&recNum=4/body/html>

Immigration Restriction League. Report of the Commissioner-General of
    Immigration. New York. American Memory. Lib. of Congress, Washington.
    2 Aug. 2005 <http://lcweb2.loc.gov/rbc/rbpeo79/079021001/001
    dr.jpg>.

Man seated inside laundry, The Chinese in California, 1850-1925. Digital Library
      SunSITE. U. of California, Berkeley. 2005.
      <http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/cgibin/flipomatic/cic/images@ViewImage?img
      =brk00003921_16a> Retrieved 3 Aug. 2005 The Library of Congress:
      American Memory. <http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/index.html>

Manuel, Mr., interviewer. Portrait of a Franco-American Grandmother, Victoria
      Langlois. American Memory: American Life Histories: Manuscripts from the
      Federal Writers' Project, 1936-1940
      http://memory.loc.gov/mss/wpalh1/18/1803/18030113/18030101.tif



Morgan, Jimmie. Don't Bite the Hand That's Feeding You. Perf. Walter Van Brunt
    Rec. 1916. American Memory. Ed. Edison Co. Library of Congress
    11 Aug 2005 <http://memory.loc.gov/mbrs/edrs/50357r.wav.>



Noteware, J.H. State Superintendents of Immigration. Nebraska, The Garden of the
    West. 50 Million Acres Of Grain & Grazing Land. Emergence of Advertising in
    America, 1850-1920: Selections from the Collections of Duke University. Rare
    Books, Manuscript, and Special Collections Lib., Duke U. 4 Aug. 2005
    <http://scriptorium.lib.duke.edu/eaa/broadsides/B01/B0157/B0157-02-.
    150dpi.html> Retrieved 4 Aug. 2005 The Library of Congress: American
    Memory <http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/index.html>

Ole Myrvik's sod house, Milton, North Dakota : Mr. & Mrs. Ole Myrvik and child.


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       Institute for Regional Studies, North Dakota State University, Fargo, N.D.,
       The Northern Great Plains, 1880-1920. Photographs from the Fred
       Hultstrand and F.A. Pazano Photograph Collection
       <http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/award97/ndfahtml/ngphome.html>
       Retrieved 4 Aug. 2005 The Library of Congress: American Memory.
       <http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/index.html>

Richmond, Roaldus. Interviewer. Spanish Granite Worker. American Memory:
       American Life Histories: Manuscripts from the Federal Writers' Project,
       1936-1940
       <http://memory.loc.gov/cgibin/ampage?collId=wpa3&fileName=38/3801/3
       8011106/wpa338011106.db&recNum=0/body/html> Retrieved 3 Aug. 2005
       The Library of Congress: American Memory.
       <http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/index.html>

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