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Bulletin 2011-2013

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Bulletin 2011-2013 Powered By Docstoc
					Bulletin 2011-2013
 Graduate Program
                                        Accreditations
                                        Association of Collegiate Business Schools and Programs
                                        Department of Education of the State of Pennsylvania
                                        Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools

                                        Memberships
                                        American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers
                                        Association of Catholic Colleges and Universities
                                        Association of American Colleges and Universities
                                        Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges
                                        Association of Independent Colleges and Universities of Pennsylvania
                                        C-Cue, Inc. (Consortium for Computing in Undergraduate Education, Inc.)
                                        College Entrance Examination Board
                                        Cooperative Education Association of Pennsylvania
                                        Council for the Advancement and Support of Education (CASE)
                                        Council of Independent Colleges
                                        Economic Growth Connection of Westmoreland
                                        Latrobe Area Chamber of Commerce
                                        Laurel Highlands, Inc.
                                        Ligonier Valley Chamber of Commerce
                                        Middle States Association of Collegiate Registrars and Officers of Admission
                                        National Association of College Admissions Counselors
                                        National Association of College and University Business Officers
                                        National Association of Colleges and Employers
                                        National Association of Foreign Student Advisors
                                        National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities
                                        National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators
                                        National Catholic Educational Association
                                        National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA)
                                        Pennsylvania Association of Colleges and Universities
                                        Pennsylvania Association of College Admissions Counselors
                                        Pennsylvania Association of Colleges and Employers
                                        Pennsylvania Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators
                                        Pennsylvania School Counselors Association
                                        Pennsylvania Association of Colleges for Teacher Education
                                        The College Board
                                        Westmoreland Cooperating for Economic Development

                                        Affiliations
                                        Duquesne University (cooperative program)
                                        Fu Jen Catholic University, Taiwan
Saint Vincent College is accredited
                                        Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine
by the Commission on Higher             Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine (podiatry)
Education of the Middle States          Pennsylvania State University (3-2 engineering)
Association of Colleges and             Pennsylvania College of Podiatric Medicine (podiatry)
Schools, 3624 Market Street,            Saint Vincent Seminary
Philadelphia, PA 19104,                 Seton Hill University (cross-registration)
215-662-5606. The Commission on         Shandong University, China
Higher Education is an institutional    The Catholic University of America (3-2 engineering)
accrediting agency recognized by        University of Pittsburgh (3-2 engineering)
the U.S.Secretary of Education and
                                        Participation
the Commission on Recognition of        Advanced Placement Program (AP)
Postsecondary Accreditation.            Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps (at University of Pittsburgh)
                                        Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation
                                        College Level Examination Program (CLEP)
                                        Guaranteed Student Loan Program
                                        Pell Grant Program
                                        Pennsylvania Higher Education Assistance Agency
FOR INFORMATION about admission,        Perkins Loan
                                        Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants
contact:
                                        The statements in this Bulletin are for information only and do not constitute a Contract between the
Office of Admission and Financial Aid   student and Saint Vincent College. The College reserves the right to change any policy, requirement,
Saint Vincent College                   course offering, or fee; and also reserves the right to exclude students whose conduct or academic
300 Fraser Purchase Road                standing is deemed by the College not to be in accord with the requirements set forth in this Bulletin.
Latrobe, Pennsylvania 15650-2690
                                        Saint Vincent College subscribes to a policy of equal opportunity. In so doing, Saint Vincent does not dis-
Phone    724-805-2500                   criminate against any individual of the basis of race, color, sex, religion, age, veteran status, ethnic origin
         1-800-782-5549                 or handicap in any of its programs, activities or employment decisions. The Director of Human Resources,
                                        Saint Vincent College, Latrobe, Pennsylvania 15650-2690 is the officer with responsibility for overseeing
e-mail: admission@stvincent.edu
                                        the implementation of this equal opportunity policy and the affirmative action plan.
home page: www.stvincent.edu
                                        This school is authorized under Federal law to enroll nonimmigrant alien students.
2011-2012 Calendar
Fall Semester 2011                                                      Spring Semester 2012
August 29          Final registration and adjustments; Classes begin    January   15         Students return
September  5       Labor Day; no classes                                January   16         Final registration and adjustments; Classes begin
September  6       Last Day for adding courses                          January   23         Last Day for adding courses
September  13      Last Day for withdrawal without permanent record     January   30         Last Day for withdrawal without permanent record
September  14-October 28                                                January   31-March  23
                   Withdrawals receive “W”                                                   Withdrawals receive “W”
September 23       Last day to change to P/F designation; last day to   February 10          Last day to change to P/F designation; last day to
                   change to Audit                                                           change to Audit
September 29       Spring & Summer 2011 incomplete grades not           February 16          Fall 2011 incomplete grades not changed become “F”
                   changed become “F”                                   February 29          Mid-semester grades due for First Year Students
October 12         Mid-semester grades due                              March 3-11           Spring break for undergraduates; begins after last
October 15-18      Extended weekend for undergraduates begins after                          class on March 2
                   last class on October 14                             March 12             Classes resume
October 19         Graduate Fall Term “F2” courses begin                March 12             Graduate Spring Term “W2” course begin
October 19         Classes resume                                       March 26             Withdrawals receive WF
October 31         Withdrawals receive WF                               April 5-9            Easter Vacation begins after last class on April 4
November 2, 3, 4, 7 & 8                                                 April 10             Classes resume
                   Registration for Spring Semester 2012                April 11, 12, 13, 16 & 17
November 17        Founders' Day (classes canceled 3:30pm – 7pm)                             Registration for Fall Semester 2012
November 23-27 Thanksgiving vacation begins after last class on         April 25             Honors Convocation and Undergraduate Conference
                   Novmember 22                                                              (classes cancelled from 11:30-7:00)
November 28        Classes resume                                       May 4                Last day of class
December 9         Last day of class                                    May 5-6              Reading Days
December 10, 11 Reading Days                                            May 7-10             Final examinations
December 12-15 Final Examinations                                       May 10               Graduating senior grades are due by noon
December 15        Graduating senior grades due at noon                 May 12               Commencement
December 17        December Commencement                                May 15               Final grades are due at noon
December 20        Final grades are due at noon                         May 21               Summer Session begins




2012-2013 Calendar
Fall Semester 2012                                                      Spring Semester 2013
August 27         Final registration and adjustments; Classes begin     January   13         Students return
September  3      Labor Day; no classes                                 January   14         Final registration and adjustments; Classes begin
September  4      Last Day for adding courses                           January   21         Last Day for adding courses
September  11     Last Day for withdrawal without permanent record      January   28         Last Day for withdrawal without permanent record
September  12-October 26                                                January   29-March  22
                  Withdrawals receive “W”                                                    Withdrawals receive “W”
September 21      Last day to change to P/F designation; last day to    February 8           Last day to change to P/F designation; last day to
                  change to Audit                                                            change to Audit
September 27      Spring & Summer 2012 incomplete grades not            February 14          Fall 2012 incomplete grades not changed become “F”
                  changed become “F”                                    February 27          Mid-semester grades due
October 10        Mid-semester grades due                               March 2-10           Spring break for undergraduates; begins after last
October 13-16     Extended weekend for undergraduates begins after                           class on March 1
                  last class on October 12                              March 11             Classes resume
October 17        Classes resume                                        March 11             Graduate Spring Term “W2” course begin
October 29        Withdrawals receive WF                                March 25             Withdrawals receive WF
October 30, November 1, 2, 5 & 6                                        March 28-April 1 Easter Vacation begins after last class on March 27
                  Registration for Spring Semester 2013                 April 2              Classes resume
November 15       Founders' Day (classes canceled 3:30pm – 7pm)         April 10, 11, 12, 15 & 16
November 21-25 Thanksgiving vacation begins after last class on                              Registration for Fall Semester 2013
                  November 20                                           April 24             Honors Convocation and Undergraduate Conference
November 26       Classes resume                                                             (classes cancelled from 11:30-7:00)
December 7        Last day of class                                     May 3                Last day of class
December 8-9      Reading Days                                          May 4-5              Reading Days
December 10-13 Final examinations                                       May 6-9              Final examinations
December 13       Graduating senior grades due at noon                  May 9                Graduating senior grades are due at noon
December 15       December Commencement                                 May 11               Commencement
December 18       Final grades are due at noon                          May 14               Final grades are due at noon
                                                                        May 20               Summer Session begins




*Students enrolled in courses at Seton Hill University under the cross-registration agreement should obtain a calendar from SHU with
the applicable dates.


2 – Introduction to the College
Introduction to the College
Mission Statement                                                          Liberal Arts and Sciences
      Saint Vincent College is an educational community rooted in                Liberal arts education is integrative, challenging students to
the tradition of the Catholic faith, the heritage of Benedictine           explore the principles, perspectives, and goals of many different
monasticism, and the love of values inherent in the liberal                disciplines and modes of learning. Saint Vincent’s particular
approach to life and learning. Its mission is to provide quality           approach to liberal arts education, undergirded by the values of
under-graduate and graduate education for men and women to                 its Catholic, Benedictine heritage, provides an education for life
enable them to integrate their professional aims with the broader          and for lifelong learning. It espouses a love of learning and a
purposes of human life. The programs, activities, and encounters           belief in the intrinsic worth of higher education. The College seeks
that make up student life at Saint Vincent College encourage the           to instill the following educational virtues:
intellectual gifts, professional aptitudes and personal aspirations              • Facility to comprehend particular phenomena conceptually
of students to mature harmoniously.                                        and to look for patterns and regularities in experience.
                                                                                 • Ability to evaluate ranges of evidence and to revise
                                                                           previous theory or hypotheses accordingly.
Catholic, Benedictine and Liberal Arts Values                                    • Skill in discovering relationships between seemingly
     Central to the Mission of the College are its Catholic tradition,     divergent phenomena.
its Benedictine heritage, and its commitment to liberal arts educa-              • Ability to be an independent learner rather than a mere
tion. Outlined below are some of the values of a Catholic,                 consumer of others’ interpretations.
Benedictine, liberal arts education as defined and operated upon                 • Facility to articulate and express one’s thoughts clearly.
by the Saint Vincent College community.                                          • Self-assurance in adhering to mature social and ethical
                                                                           values, coupled with tolerance for alternate values in others.
                                                                                 • Skill in making informed decisions and courage to act on
Catholic                                                                   them.
     Saint Vincent College seeks to provide an understanding of                  • Appreciation for the fine arts, especially art, music, and
the positive contributions which the Catholic Church has made,             literature.
and continues to make, to human progress. Faculty, administra-                   • Receptivity to uncommon opinions and unfamiliar cultures.
tors, staff, and students of all faiths work together in a common
search for truth in an environment that does the following:
     • Affirms that the love of God and faith in Jesus Christ are          An Invitation to Learning
authentic values for believers. The life of faith and the life of learn-         During your college years, you as a student are faced with
ing are regarded as inclusive and mutually compatible; as                  some important decisions. One of them is to determine your
expressed in the College motto, veri justique scientia vindex,             approach to education—your own “aims and objectives.” You will
“learning is the best advocate of truth and justice.”                      have to determine whether your objective is merely to fulfill the
     • Represents a sacramental view which consecrates all                 minimum requirements in order “to get a degree,” or whether it is
visible creation as a pledge, reminder, and active instrument of           to become more creatively engaged in learning as an integral
God’s invisible presence and grace.                                        part of your life.
     • Supports the integration of religious and temporal values in              This Bulletin concerns itself for the most part with the less
everyday life.                                                             significant objective, which is the first. It contains the basic infor-
     • Promotes appreciation for the positive contributions of all         mation about courses, procedures, and requirements necessary
peoples and cultures to world civilization. In this sense, Saint           for obtaining a degree: it is your responsibility to have and to use
Vincent is truly “catholic,” ecumenical, and international.                this information. If you have problems or questions about this part
                                                                           of college life, be sure to ask your faculty advisor for help. If you
Benedictine                                                                are in the process of changing majors or career plans, a thorough
     The traditional Benedictine apostolate of education is charac-        discussion with your faculty advisor and with a member of the
terized by an appreciation of truth wherever it is found and by            Career Services staff is more imperative. Finally, if you have unre-
respect for the unique person and talents of every student. In an          solved problems and don’t know where to turn, stop to see the
authentic Benedictine environment, students are not just objects           Dean of Studies. The Dean of Studies may know resources at the
of an educational enterprise; they are valued partners in a com-           College or elsewhere with which you are not familiar.
mon search for truth and beauty. Saint Vincent College is ground-                The more significant objective, which touches upon a person-
ed in the following core values of Benedictinism:                          al commitment to learning, is more difficult to deal with than infor-
     • Hospitality, as exemplified by a tolerant spirit that recog-        mation about degree requirements. Your openness to new experi-
nizes the mystery of God’s presence in all creation and the sacred         ences, your friendships with faculty and fellow students are more
dignity of each person.                                                    essential to the realization of this objective than the information
     • Commitment to a concept of community that advocates                 contained in any college bulletin.
tranquility and order and is nourished by mutual respect, appreci-               As a preamble, faculty members will tell you that if you wish
ation, and charity. Even in times of historical and personal               to be serious about learning, you must practice critical reading
upheaval, Benedictine life seeks to preserve peace and solidarity,         and listening in all your courses: you must be able to tell the dif-
maintained by the communal effort of prayer and work.                      ference between essentials and non-essentials. And you must be
     • Care and concern for each individual as evidenced in per-           able to express yourself well, both verbally and in writing. Few
sonal interactions that anticipate the needs of others, bear               people have been able to achieve these essential skills for learn-
patiently with others, and promote the personal growth of others.          ing without diligently working at them over a long period of time.
     • Stewardship for all work spaces, living spaces, and the nat-              In your college experience try to learn as much as you can
ural environment.                                                          about change: your personal and spiritual developmental change,
                                                                           social change, change we call failure, even the change we call
                                                                           death. Many of the courses of the Core Curriculum are designed
                                                                           to help you think about change—from a chemical reaction to a
                                                                           political revolution or a religious experience. Secondly, it is impor-


                                                                                                                       Introduction to the College – 3
tant to have possible careers in mind in determining what you will       view of the countryside. In January of 1963 a fire destroyed part
learn; and it is important to gain a reasonable mastery in some          of the campus and in the years which have followed a new age in
field while at college. However, it would be a mistake to think of       the history of the college has begun. Out of the ashes of the past
your college education exclusively in terms of the work you want         a new Saint Vincent has emerged. With a deep awareness of the
to do. The much larger part of your waking hours, even before            heritage and tradition which is its foundation, the community has
retirement, will be taken up by self-directed activities. Courses in     once again turned its face toward the future. And perhaps no bet-
the Core Curriculum outside your major are important for develop-        ter image of this dynamic commitment to a creative relationship
ing meaningful self-directed activities outside the world of paid        between old and new exists than the campus itself, whose newly
work. In addition, social service, religious activities, art, medita-    constructed and aesthetically pleasing modern buildings blend
tion, dance, drama, music, sports, friendships are all elements of       harmoniously with the older structures built by the pioneer monks
a good college experience. The Rule of Saint Benedict is a clas-         themselves.
sic text about achieving a peaceful balance between work and                  Saint Vincent College became coeducational in 1983 as a
other activities and values of life. Finally, your personal philosophy   major step to strengthen all aspects of the community life and
about learning should take cognizance of the fact that human             educational services of the College. The decision was based on a
beings must live in the context of a variety of systems. Your col-       belief that the College was in a strong position to offer men and
lege education will help you learn about systems: how they work,         women the opportunity of personal development and solid career
and how to make them work justly for you and your neighbor. To           preparation in a wholesome environment grounded in the time-
achieve this, however, it is not sufficient to learn about political,    tested Benedictine educational and religious tradition.
economic, and social systems only in class. First-hand experi-                Saint Vincent College, along with the other units of the Saint
ence through participation in clubs and organizations seems nec-         Vincent Community—Archabbey, Seminary and Parish—observed
essary to learn how to negotiate with other interest groups, and         the 150th anniversary of its founding in 1996 with an 18-month
how to get things done in an effective and morally acceptable            series of activities and events which recognized the rich history
way. You may be able to start a new organization to meet a need,         and heritage of Saint Vincent while focusing attention on planning
many extracurricular activities at Saint Vincent were begun and          and preparing for the future.
are run by students.
      These dimensions of learning which touch upon a person’s           The Campus
relation to the basic realities of life are also suggested when the           In a pattern characteristic of many Benedictine communities,
College describes its “viewpoint and tendencies” as Catholic,            the first buildings were grouped in a quadrangle. At least ten of
Benedictine, and liberal. A college education at Saint Vincent pro-      the original buildings were “home-made.’’ That is, the architects
vides the opportunity for a student to come to grips with some of        and workmen were Benedictines who cut the trees, sawed the
the basic questions of life in company with faculty and fellow stu-      timber, and fashioned clay into bricks.
dents.                                                                        Alcuin Hall (1964) is used for social affairs and recreation and
                                                                         features a glass wall that provides a dramatic view of the College
History and Heritage                                                     athletic fields and the mountains to the east. It also houses a day
     Saint Vincent Archabbey and College was founded in 1846             care center.
by Boniface Wimmer, a monk from the Benedictine Abbey of                      Alfred Hall (1907) houses the administration offices and also
Metten in Bavaria.                                                       provides space for language laboratories, computer labs, class-
     Wimmer came to America with the intention of educating the          rooms and some faculty offices.
sons of German immigrants and training a native clergy for the                Andrew Hall (1905) extends from the Archabbey Basilica and
German-speaking peoples of the United States. He settled on the          contains the monastic refectory.
site of a parish established for English and Irish Catholics in 1789,         Anselm Hall (1875-1879) connecting Andrew Hall with Placid
and very quickly learned that his monks would not be able to limit       Hall provides space for small dining-meeting rooms.
their attention to Germans alone. With the aid of several American            Aquinas Hall (1952) connects Wimmer Hall with the
bishops, friends and benefactors in Europe, and a strong commu-          Archabbey Basilica and provides classrooms for the seminary.
nity of Benedictine monks at the monastery of Saint Vincent, he               Archabbey Basilica (1892-1905) dominates the campus at
established the first Benedictine college in the United States.          Saint Vincent. The cornerstone was laid in 1892, and the conse-
From modest beginnings the college grew rapidly, and on 18 April         cration took place August 24,1905. Beneath the Basilica is the
1870 the State Legislature of Pennsylvania incorporated the              Crypt, which contains altars and many works of modern art in
school, empowering it “to grant and confer degrees in the arts           glass, wood, stone, and acrylic and oil paintings. The Basilica
and sciences as are granted in other colleges and universities in        was completely restored in 1996.
the United States, and to grant to graduates, or persons on whom              Aurelius Hall (1923) served as a College residence hall until
such degrees may be conferred, diplomas or certificates as is            2002 and traditionally housed freshmen. Today, Aurelius Hall
usual in colleges and universities.’’                                    houses the McKenna School of Business, Economics, and
     From its earliest days Saint Vincent College has striven to         Government and serves as a residence hall.
embody the ideals and character of the fifteen-hundred-year-old               Chapel of St. Gregory the Great (1998) is the Seminary
heritage of Benedictine education and scholarship. Based firmly          chapel.
on the ideal of Christian community, this heritage has contributed            Community Center (1979) adjoins Anselm, Benedict and
to both the survival and dissemination of Western culture. It has        Placid Halls. It houses the main student dining room and food
been an enduring heritage because of its capacity to adjust to the       preparation facilities.
exigencies of successive ages. For almost one hundred and fifty               Elizabeth J. Roderick Center (1998) houses Seminary and
years the monks of Saint Vincent have worked to exemplify and to         Archabbey offices, seminary residence rooms and guest rooms.
carry on this living tradition. From their ranks men have estab-              Gerard and Bonaventure Halls (1963) are residence halls pro-
lished Benedictine colleges and schools in Minnesota, Kansas,            viding accommodations for 459 students in double rooms.
North Carolina, New Jersey, Illinois, and Georgia, among other                Headmaster Hall and Placid Hall (built in sections from 1855-
places.                                                                  1877) house the post office, dining and conference rooms, aca-
     In the words of a college catalogue of the 1850’s, Saint            demic affairs, the faculty commons, faculty offices and class-
Vincent is located in an “elevated and healthy” area. Situated on a      rooms for the School of Humanities and Fine Arts, as well as the
foothill of the Alleghenies, the school commands a panoramic             School of Social Science, Communication and Education.



4 – Introduction to the College
     Mary, Mother of Wisdom Chapel (2003) is the College               The Library
Student Chapel.                                                              Benedictine institutions have traditionally granted a place of
     Monastery Building (1967) is the home of the Benedictine          honor to the library. The Latimer Family Library continues this tra-
monks.                                                                 dition by providing a climate-controlled repository of the institu-
     Parish Center (1997) provides a gathering space for parish        tion’s bibliographic holdings and a continually growing resource in
activities, parish offices and the Basilica Gift Shop.                 support of the College’s teaching mission.
     Prep Hall (1998), named in honor of all of the alumni of the            Borrowing privileges are available to enrolled students, facul-
former Saint Vincent Preparatory School and in thanksgiving for        ty, administrators and staff members of the College. The Saint
the leadership of Prep alumni in providing the funding necessary       Vincent identification card serves as the Library card. The Library
to make the building a reality. It houses “smart” classrooms, multi-   is open to patrons 89 hours each week when school is in session.
media laboratory, media suite, communication and education fac-        Special hours are in effect during vacation periods and on holi-
ulty offices.                                                          days; schedule changes are posted in the Library, distributed to
     Robert S. Carey Student Center (1952-1954; The Frank and          the offices of the College, and available on the College website.
Elizabeth Resnik Swimming Pool, 1993; Student Union, 1996,                   Private study carrels and tables are available throughout the
2003) covering more than an acre of ground, contains the gymna-        Library. A central reference room provides access to more than
sium, Performing Arts Center, swimming pool, Mary, Mother of           3,500 resource titles such as encyclopedias, abstracts, dictionar-
Wisdom Student Chapel, wellness center, book center, snack bar,        ies, indexes, handbooks, atlases, concordances, and gazetteers.
student union, classrooms, game room, fitness center with free         The periodical area displays approximately 400 current periodical
weights, weight machines, and cardiovascular machines, art             subscriptions arranged alphabetically by title. A collection of
gallery, art studios, music practice rooms, and the fine arts          audio tapes and a video and DVD collection with monitor/VCRs
department and education faculty offices and classrooms.               and monitor/DVD players are included in this section. The Library
     Rooney Hall (1995) is a College residence hall that houses        also has extensive microfilm and microfiche collections with
125 students in double rooms and 50 students in 15 apartments.         appropriate readers and printers available for patron use.
     Saint Benedict Hall (2002) is the residence hall for first-year         The collection contains nearly 280,000 print volumes, 47,000
students. The hall accommodates 368 students in double rooms.          bound periodicals and approximately 100,000 microforms. The
     The Sis and Herman Dupré Science Pavilion houses the              Library houses unique resources in religion and theology and
Herbert W. Boyer School of Natural Sciences, Mathematics, and          special collections of Pennsylvania and Benedictina. The Library
Computing and is currently under renovation. The project will ren-     also safeguards a collection of rare books housed in climate-con-
ovate nearly 60,000 square feet of space and add another 45,000        trolled vault; access to this collection is available by special
square feet of new construction to the original Science Center         request. The collection is classified according to the Library of
built in 1969. All the disciplines – natural sciences, mathematics,    Congress classification system. The Library uses a fully automat-
and computing – share classrooms, lab space, computer labs,            ed catalog (OPAC), utilizing the integrated system of Innovative
conference rooms, lounges and a 75-seat lecture hall. A three-         Interfaces, Inc. Electronic searches are made through
story all-glass atrium serves as a window to the natural world and     EBSCOhost, LexisNexis, and JSTOR, which provide online access
a welcoming gateway into the building.                                 to an extensive list of bibliographic and full-text information. The
     Leander Hall (1913) is a residence hall for seminary students     Library currently houses a computer lab, and has both hard-wire
and monastic guests.                                                   connections and wireless access for laptop users to access the
     Wimmer Hall (1952) is a College residence hall. It has 135        campus network and the Internet.
private rooms.                                                               Materials not available at Saint Vincent Library may be
                                                                       requested from other libraries through the Interlibrary Loan serv-
    The names of most of the buildings honor early Benedictine         ice (ILL). This service is available through the Assistant Public
educators and deceased abbots who served the College as pres-          Services Librarian, at the Circulation Desk, or by completing the
ident.                                                                 on-line ILL Request Form on the Saint Vincent College website.




                                                                                                                  Introduction to the College – 5
Graduate Program
Graduate Program Policies                                                     • A completed application form.
                                                                              • An official transcript from each undergraduate institution
Admission to Graduate Study                                              attended sent directly to Saint Vincent College.
    Admission requirements for all graduate programs have been                • All other required materials as stated by the graduate pro-
established by Saint Vincent College. Specific graduate programs         gram of choice. (See specific program requirements)
may require additional items to the admission process of any indi-
vidual program of study.                                                 **Graduate applicants must have a bachelor’s degree prior to offi-
                                                                         cial acceptance into the program.
Regular Admission
(Please see specific application requirements for each program           Provisional Acceptance
as they vary)                                                                 An applicant not meeting the specified requirements for the
      • Possess an earned Bachelor’s degree from an accredited           graduate program may be offered a provisional acceptance. (Not
institution. Official transcripts must be submitted from each institu-   applicable to the graduate program in nurse anesthesia). The can-
tion attended.                                                           didate can take up to nine (9) credits in the graduate program.
      • Have a minimum undergraduate grade point average of              Once the nine (9) credits have been earned, the program director
3.0.                                                                     must review the student’s status. The program director may: a)
      • Three letters of recommendation attesting to the applicant’s     allow the student to become a regular, degree-seeking graduate
capacity and commitment to graduate study.                               student; b) refuse further enrollment.
      • Scores on the Graduate Record Examination, the Graduate               Appeals of admission decisions are made to the Dean of
Management Aptitude Test, or the Miller Analogies Test, as appro-        Studies. Applicant is eligible for financial aid.
priate to the program, will be required if the undergraduate grade
point average was below 3.00 and may be requested in other               Non-Degree Students
cases at the discretion of the program director.                              A person who wishes to pursue graduate studies at Saint
      • Programs require a personal statement and/or interview for       Vincent College without becoming a candidate for a master’s
all applicants or for certain applicants at the discretion of the pro-   degree may take up to nine (9) credits as a graduate non-degree
gram director.                                                           student. (Not applicable to the graduate program in nurse anesthe-
      • For international applications, a TOEFL score of 79 on the       sia). Non-degree students must complete and return the graduate
IBT, 550 on the PBT, 213 on the CBT, and 6.5 on the IELTS or             non-degree application for admission and send official under-
higher is required for applicants.                                       graduate transcripts to the Office of Graduate & Continuing
                                                                         Education in order to register for classes. The non-degree student
Graduate Admission                                                       must follow the same policies and procedures as a degree-seek-
     Saint Vincent College has a rolling admission policy; that is,      ing graduate student. Non-degree students are ineligible for finan-
the applicant is notified of the decision of the Graduate                cial aid.
Committee soon after all credentials are received. (Acceptance of             If a non-degree student wishes to become a candidate for
applicants into the graduate program of nurse anesthesia is the          the graduate program, the applicant must officially apply to the
sole responsibility of the Excela Health School of Anesthesia).          graduate program and must follow the graduate application
                                                                         requirements.
Application Deadlines
     Completed applications must be submitted two weeks prior            Transfer credits
to the first day of class to be admitted for that semester. If the            Certain programs may allow applicants to transfer up to nine
application is not complete by the deadline, the candidate will be       (9) credits toward graduate level courses into the program. The
reviewed for admission for the following term. (Applications, along      applicant must submit graduate transcripts to the Office of
with complete submission of all required documentation for the           Graduate & Continuing Education along with a copy of the course
graduate program in nurse anesthesia, must be sent directly to the       catalog that describes the course at time of application. The pro-
Excela Health School of Anesthesia, and be received no later             gram director will evaluate the courses and make a decision on
than December 15th of the year prior to the year of prospective          whether the credits will be transferred. Credits earned by another
matriculation).                                                          accredited institution must be graded as a B- or better in order to
                                                                         be considered. Applicants will be notified of credits transferred
Admission to Program                                                     upon acceptance into the graduate program. (Transfer credits are
      Graduate students are admitted to a specific program of            not accepted for the graduate program in nurse anesthesia).
study. Graduate students who wish to shift from one graduate pro-
gram to another must complete a Graduate Change of Program               Second Graduate Degree
form and obtain signatures from their advisors and program direc-             A student who wishes to attain a second graduate degree
tor. The graduate program director reviews applications for admis-       after their first graduate degree from Saint Vincent College must
sion to their respective programs.                                       apply through the Office of Graduate and Continuing Education,
                                                                         and complete a program of study that includes:
Graduate Applicants                                                           a) Have taken 18 or more credits beyond the graduation date
     An applicant for graduate programs should submit the follow-                of the their first masters degree
ing to the Office of Graduate & Continuing Education:                         b) Completed all of the required courses for the second mas-
Applications will not be reviewed until all materials are received               ters program
and completed.                                                                c) Passed the comprehensive exam (if applicable) for the
                                                                                 second masters program.




6 – Graduate Program Policies and Rules
Saint Vincent College Alumni                                          Financial Aid
      Graduates of Saint Vincent College will enjoy a 15% discount         A 15% tuition discount is awarded to teachers in parochial or
for any graduate level course they take. Alumni must complete         charter schools, Saint Vincent College alumni and Excela Health
the application requirements listed above, but the application fee    employees who are enrolled in the Health Services Leadership
will be waived and official transcripts will not be required          Program. In-service teachers in parochial or charter schools must
                                                                      provide documentation of employment each year in order to
                                                                      receive the tuition discount.
Financial Information                                                      Students taking at least five (5) credits per semester and
     At Saint Vincent College the cost is kept at the lowest possi-   have been admitted to the master’s program are eligible for feder-
ble level consistent with a financially responsible operation.        al student loans and/or work-study.
The payment of the student’s bill is due before the beginning of
classes each semester or session                                      Application for Financial Aid
                                                                           To apply for financial aid, a student must file the Free
Tuition and Fees for 2012-2013                                        Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). This can be done
The following tuition and fees apply to graduate students:            online at www.fafsa.ed.gov, or a paper application can be
Graduate Course Tuition (per credit)                                  obtained by calling 1-800-4-FED-AID. A student who has not filed
      Graduate programs in Education:                 $545.00         the FAFSA will not be eligible to receive financial aid
      Graduate programs in Business:                  $562.00
      Graduate programs in Health Sciences:           $670.00         Federal Stafford Student Loan
Technology Fee (per semester)                                               Enables a student to borrow directly from a bank, credit
      0-8 credits                                      $71.00         union, savings and loan association, or other participating lender.
      9 or more credits                               $178.00         The loan is guaranteed by a state or private nonprofit agency and
Initial Registration (One time charge for special                     insured by the Federal Government. To be eligible for a Federal
students who have not previously attended Saint                       Stafford Student Loan, a student in one of the graduate programs
Vincent College.)                                      $25.00         must be enrolled for a minimum of five (5) credits per semester.
Adding/Dropping class after first day of semester,                          To apply for the Federal Stafford Student Loan a student must
per add/drop form                                      $18.00         fill out the FAFSA and a Master Promissory Note (MPN), which is a
Graduation Fee                                         $85.00         common loan application. The maximum a graduate student may
Late Graduation Fee                                    $35.00         borrow is $8,500 in subsidized loans per year. The interest will not
Transcript                                               $5.00        be more than 8.5% (fixed rate). In the event the student does not
Fee for finalizing each incomplete “G” grade           $35.00         demonstrate need for all or part of the subsidized loan mentioned
Parking and Vehicle Registration                                      above, unsubsidized loans are available. Interest on the loan
      Full-time                                        $70.00         accrues even while in school, but all other conditions of the loan
      Part-time                                        $32.50         are the same. A student may borrow an additional $12,000 per
Fitness Facility (optional)                            $50.00         year in unsubsidized loans for a total of up to $20,500 per year.
Additional fees may apply to the graduate program in nurse
anesthesia. (Contact the Excela Health School of Anesthesia for       Graduate PLUS Loans
additional information).                                                   The GradPLUS is available to graduate students but is not
                                                                      guaranteed like the Stafford Loan; credit guidelines do apply.
Undergraduate Courses                                                 Eligibility is not based on need or income. Students can borrow
     Students may need to enroll in certain undergraduate cours-      up to the cost of education less any other financial aid awarded.
es to meet prerequisites or to complete certification requirements.   Students are encouraged to borrow through the Stafford Loan
Students who have completed a baccalaureate degree are                Program first. More information and the application can be found
charged the Continuing Education tuition rate of one-half of the      at ww.aesSuccess.org.
regular undergraduate tuition.
                                                                      Financial Aid Questions
Term                                 Regular      Continuing               Questions concerning financial aid should be addressed to
                                                  Education Rate      the Office of Admission and Financial Aid, Saint Vincent College,
Summer 2012                          $860.00      $430.00             Latrobe, Pennsylvania 15650-2690; telephone 724-805-2500 or
Fall 2012, Spring 2013               $892.00      $446.00             1-800-782-5549.

Employer Reimbursement Program
Students whose employer will reimburse the cost of their courses
may participate in a deferred billing program. For further informa-
tion, contact the Saint Vincent College Business Office at
724-805-2577.

Deferred Payment Plans
For students desiring to pay educational expenses in partial
installments, the College provides short-term and long-term monthly
     budget plans. For information about these plans, contact the
     Saint Vincent College Business Office at 724-805-2577.




                                                                                                       Graduate Program Policies and Rules – 7
Degree and Graduation Requirements                                            • Include no more than nine credit hours in graduate transfer
     In order to be eligible for the conferral of a graduate degree       credit toward degree requirements; (Not applicable to the gradu-
from Saint Vincent College, the student must:                             ate program in nurse anesthesia).
     • Be admitted as a degree-seeking student;                               • Apply for the degree with the Registrar by the announced
     • Have completed all course work within six calendar years           deadline and pay the graduation fee; and
from the date of initial enrollment; (Not applicable to the graduate          • All charges and fees owed to Saint Vincent College must
program in nurse anesthesia).                                             be settled before the degree will be granted.
     • Complete satisfactorily all other program requirements list-
ed in the program of study (e.g. written or oral examinations,            Refund of Tuition
practicum, thesis, assessment requirements, etc.);                             A 100% tuition refund is issued to students who drop a
     • Achieve a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 in all             course before the session begins. Students who drop a course
graduate work;                                                            during the first week of the course will receive a 95% tuition
     • Present no more than six hours of “C” grade                        refund. Tuition is not refundable beginning the second week of
(including + or – grades) toward a degree;                                the course. Because of varying graduate course formats, please
                                                                          check with the Business Office for refund schedule.



Academic Regulations
Registration                                                              Dismissal
     A student must be accepted into the graduate program                      A student on probation is subject to dismissal at any time and
before registering for classes. After acceptance, applicants may          each student on probation will be reviewed by the Academic
reserve a place on the roster by making a deposit of $100                 Status Committee. The Academic Status Committee shall seek the
required of all students. The deposit will be credited to the appli-      advice of the program director, and may recommend dismissal or
cant’s account but is not refundable. After reservation deposit is        continuation. A student may be dismissed for academic honesty
received, applicant may register for classes.                             violations whether on probation or not. Any student in the graduate
     Academic registration is concluded for a student when the            program of nurse anesthesia will be dismissed from the program
program advisor has approved the schedule and forms provided              when he/she has accumulated greater than 6 credit hours of C
by the Office of the Registrar have been properly filed.                  grades +/-, or failure of a course. Graduate students in the nurse
Registration changes must be filed at the Office of the Registrar.        anesthesia program may also be dismissed for clinical reasons.
Simply not attending a course for which you have registered does
not constitute official withdrawal. Students may not attend a             Appeal of Dismissal
course for which they have not registered.                                     A student who is dismissed has a right of appeal. The appeal
                                                                          shall be filed with the Dean of Studies. The College’s Graduate
Transfer Credits                                                          Study Committee reviews all appeals of dismissals and may rec-
     No more than nine credit hours of graduate coursework may            ommend readmission to the Dean of Studies. Appeal of dismissal
be applied toward a master’s degree at Saint Vincent College.             in the graduate program for nurse anesthetists will follow the poli-
Courses with grades below B-, (2.70) will not be accepted in              cies of the Excela Health School of Anesthesia.
transfer. (Not applicable to the graduate program in nurse
anesthesia).                                                              Repetition of Courses
                                                                               With the exception of the Master’s in Health Sciences, with
Graduate Grading Scale                                                    permission of the program director, a student who has received a
Letter Grade     Grade Points per credit Hour   Descriptive Meaning       C (including C+ and C-), or F in a course may retake it. The stu-
     A           4.00                          Exceptional performance    dent must request the replacement of grade at the Registrar’s
     A-          3.70                          Excellent work             Office. The original grade remains on the student’s transcript,
     B+          3.30                          Very good work             however the last grade earned will replace the first in the compu-
     B           3.00                          Good work                  tation of the grade point average.
     B-          2.70                          Fair Work
     C+          2.30                          Below average for a        Courses with Undergraduate and Graduate Enrollment
                                               graduate degree                 Graduate programs, with the permission of the Dean of
      C           2.00                         Inferior work for a        Studies, may include courses designed primarily for advanced
                                               graduate degree            undergraduate students. However, graduate credit may be award-
      C-          1.70                         Poor work for a graduate   ed for selected courses upon approval of a distinct graduate syl-
                                               degree                     labus which provides for readings, assignments, laboratories, etc.
      F           0.00                         Failure                    that are appropriately greater in quantity and level of difficulty as
      G - Incomplete (Graduate) An incomplete course must be completed    well as distinct, graduate versions of examinations. The instructor
within thirty calendar days or the grade becomes an F. An extension of    should meet separately with graduate students as appropriate to
time may be granted by the Dean of Studies after consultation with the    assure the achievement of a higher level of competency with
instructor.                                                               course material.
      P - Acceptable work for courses graded on the Pass-Fail basis.           No more than two such courses may be included in a gradu-
      W - Withdrawal                                                      ate program; students are not permitted to count such course
                                                                          credits for both an undergraduate and a graduate degree.
Probation
     Students will be placed on probation whenever their grade            Continuing Activity
point average falls below 3.00 or when the student has accumu-                Students are expected to be continuously active in their grad-
lated six credit hours of coursework with C grades or lower               uate program. Students who wish to withdraw should Contact the
(including + or – grades).                                                Dean of Studies office. (Students who wish to withdrawal from the



8 – Graduate Program Policies and Rules
graduate program in nurse anesthesia must directly contact the          general welfare.
Excela Health School of Anesthesia program director). A student               Fundamental to the principle of independent learning and
who has not registered for at least one course within a 12 month        professional growth is the requirement of honesty and integrity in
period will be dropped from the program. The student must apply         the performance of academic assignments; both in the classroom
for readmission before he or she will be permitted to enroll in         and outside, and in the conduct of personal life. Accordingly,
courses. Readmission is not automatic. Payment of any past-due          Saint Vincent College holds its students to the highest standards
charges will be required before readmission.                            of intellectual integrity and thus the attempt of any student to
                                                                        present as his or her own any work which he or she has not per-
Records Policy and Directory Information                                formed or to pass any examinations by improper means is regard-
     The College makes available a statement informing students         ed by the faculty as a most serious offense. In any case of aca-
and parents of their rights under the “Family Educational Rights        demic dishonesty, the professor together with the Dean of
and Privacy Act of 1974” (the Buckley Amendment). The purpose           Studies, who confers with the student, decide on the appropriate
of the act is to establish procedures which govern access to and        sanction. Depending on the seriousness of the offense, possible
release of student records kept by the College. Questions about         sanctions are failure for the assignment, failure for the course,
the access to and release of student records should be directed         suspension or expulsion. If a student receives the sanction of a
to the Registrar and/or the Dean of Students. Copies of the             failure for the course during the withdrawal period and drops the
Buckley Amendment together with the College statement are               course, a WF will be recorded on the transcript.
made available in the offices of the Registrar and the Dean of                In the event of academic dishonesty involving a student in the
Students. Students have the right to file a complaint with the          graduate program for nurse anesthesia, the professor of the
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare concerning failure         involved class will confer with the Excela Health School of
of the College to comply with the Act.                                  Anesthesia program director. Appropriate disciplinary action will be
     Academic transcripts, grade reports and other correspon-           taken based on the seriousness of the occurrence. Actions taken
dence concerned with the student’s status at Saint Vincent are          are not limited to, but may include failure for the assignment, fail-
sent directly to the students. Therefore, the parts of the Bulletin     ure for the course, suspension, or expulsion.
and/or the Student Handbook entitled “Academic Warning
System,” “Academic Dismissal” and “Corrective Action” should be         Transcript Request Policy
carefully noted by the students as well as parents and other per-
sons financially responsible for the education of students.             Unofficial Transcripts
Students and other interested parties outlined in the Act who are             1. Only currently enrolled students may receive a copy of
entitled to access to the students’ records will be requested by        their unofficial transcript. There is no charge for an unofficial tran-
the College to follow ordinary request procedures established by        script.
the offices involved. Access to or release of student records                 2. In compliance with The Family Educational Rights and
under circumstances other than those provided for in the Act will       Privacy Act of 1974 officials of Saint Vincent College who have a
not be permitted by the College without a signed waiver of the          legitimate educational interest in a student may have unofficial
student.                                                                copies of a student’s transcript for their use only; parents, or those
     Because academic transcripts, grade reports and other cor-         who can prove financial responsibility for a student may receive
respondence concerning a student’s status are forwarded directly        an unofficial copy for their use only; no one else may receive or
to the student, it is strongly advised that parents or others finan-    view a student’s transcript without a written waiver from that stu-
cially responsible for the education of the student anticipate this     dent.
arrangement by working out a satisfactory agreement between                  3. All other requests must be for an official transcript.
themselves and the student relative to records and correspon-
dence from Saint Vincent College.                                       Official Transcripts
     A student’s record maintained in the Registrar’s Office will be         1. There is a fee of five dollars ($5.00) for each official tran-
kept intact for five (5) years after the student graduates, with-       script. When a student graduates, he/she will receive one free offi-
draws or is dismissed. At the end of the five years the files will be   cial transcript which will be marked “Issued to Student.”
purged of everything with the exception of the academic tran-                2. Due to legal restrictions in “The Family Educational Rights
script and essential material pertaining to it.                         and Privacy Act of 1974,” requests for transcripts will not be taken
     Each semester the Registrar’s Office prepares a Student            over the telephone. The Office of the Registrar must have a
Directory. The directory includes the name, major, year, home           signed, written request from the student (whether it is on the pre-
address, home telephone, campus address and telephone exten-            printed form, available in the Office of the Registrar, or a student’s
sion, and SVC post office box number of each student enrolled in        letter) before a transcript can be sent to a third party. In order to
the semester for which the directory is published.                      get a request to us sooner, you may fax the request to (724) 805-
     According to the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act         2063. A transcript, however, cannot be faxed.
of 1974, a student has the right to refuse disclosure of any or all          3. All official transcript requests require at least one business
of the above items in the directory. If a Saint Vincent College stu-    day to process.
dent wishes to exercise this right, this must be done by the end of          4. The Business Office must approve each request for an offi-
the first week of each semester by filing a written statement in the    cial transcript before it can be sent. If the Business Office denies
Registrar’s Office.                                                     a request because of an outstanding balance, the request and
                                                                        fee (if one was paid in advance) will be returned to the student
Academic Honesty                                                        with a letter explaining why the request cannot be honored.
     Saint Vincent College assumes that all students come for a              5. If the student wishes to have an official transcript sent to
serious purpose and expects them to be responsible individuals          himself/herself, it will be stamped “Issued to Student.” If it is to go
who demand of themselves high standards of honesty and per-             to another institution via the student, it will be placed in a sealed
sonal conduct. Therefore, it is college policy to have as few rules     envelope and the seal must remain unbroken for the other institu-
and regulations as are consistent with efficient administration and     tion to consider it officia.l




                                                                                                           Graduate Program Policies and Rules – 9
Program Requirements
                                                                           4. Understand standards of professional behavior and ethical
Master of Science in                                                  conduct appropriate to management and apply these standards
Management: Operational                                               in ways consistent with social justice and respect for human digni-
                                                                      ty;
Excellence                                                                 5. Demonstrate information literacy and the capacity to
                                                                      design and execute research;
Richard F. Kunkle, MD, FACEP, Director                                     6. Apply knowledge of theories and models in advanced
Thomas Cline; Jeff Godwin; William Hisker; Robert Markley             management areas;
                                                                           7. Demonstrate higher level skills in oral and written commu-
Adjunct: Mark Abramovic; David Cofer; Bonaventure Curtis, O.S.B.;     nications, oral presentation, critical thinking, and creative prob-
Douglas Hagy; Sacha Kathuria; Brian Long                              lem-solving appropriate to top management;
                                                                           8. Show a commitment to continuing learning and profession-
     The program leading to the Master in Science in                  al development;
Management: Operational Excellence is a 36-credit curriculum               9. Examine and understand management techniques utilized
designed to prepare management professionals for positions in         for improving safety, quality, productivity, and;
organizations focused on utilizing the Operational Excellence phi-         10. Explore, understand and appreciate the issues and com-
losophy to conduct their operations. Operational Excellence is        plexities associated with change efforts in organizations.
heavily based on material from the Toyota Production System as
culturally adapted under the guidance of our Executive in             Admission Requirements
Residence, Rodger Lewis. Mr. Lewis has studied, practiced,                  1. Possess an earned Bachelor’s degree from an accredited
implemented and culturally adapted the Toyota Production              institution. Official transcripts must be submitted from each institu-
System concepts around the world in multiple cultures during his      tion attended.
impressive career. The program is designed for those individuals            2. Students must have attained an overall 3.0 GPA on a 4
who have had management experience and who seek a more                point scale or complete the Graduate Management Aptitude Test
effective means of building mutual trust and respect within their     (GMAT). The sum of the GMAT score plus (200 X GPA) must
organization, empowering their employees and releasing their          exceed 1000 for students to be considered for acceptance into
employee’s creativity and innovation. The program is administered     the program.
by the management division of the Alex G. McKenna School of                 3. Three letters of recommendation. At least one of the rec-
Business, Economics, and Government. The program is designed          ommendations must be from a supervisor. The other may be aca-
so that it can be finished within two years. The program utilizes a   demic or professional. All reference should clearly state the rela-
combination of classroom instruction, field research and experi-      tionship between the individual providing the reference and the
ence, case studies and other material and venues as necessary         applicant.
to explain and clarify Operational Excellence concepts.                     4. At least one year of relevant work experience.
                                                                            5. A personal statement from the applicant addressing the
Program Goals                                                         reasons you wish to enter the graduate program in management:
     1. To expose management professionals to the concepts of         Operational Excellence at Saint Vincent College. This should be a
the Toyota Production System and Operational Excellence.              separate document that also includes some detail on your work
     2. To prepare management professionals to become effective       experience that might qualify you for this program and why this
leaders and implementers of cultural change towards Operational       program will help you in your current or desired career.
Excellence.                                                                 6. International applicants require a TOEFL score of TOEFL
     3. To develop a deep understanding of the balance neces-         computer 232, TOEFL iBT of 90-91 and a 6.5 or higher in the
sary between operations and human development needed to               IELTS. Some exceptions may be made for those international stu-
effectively grow an Operational Excellence system.                    dents who are from English speaking countries and have complet-
     4. To actively involve management professionals in research-     ed undergraduate degrees in the United States.
ing, exploring and deliberating evolving concepts in Operational            7. All completed application materials for the Master of
Excellence.                                                           Science in Management: Operational Excellence should be sub-
     5. To engage management professionals in lively inter-profes-    mitted to the Graduate Admission Office.
sional discussions and analysis of real life problems that occur in         8. All admissions decisions are at the sole and final discretion
the manufacturing, service and healthcare arenas.                     of the Graduate Director of the program.
     6. To enhance teamwork and team function in the Operational            9. All students must have completed the Business Core
Excellence environment.                                               Competency Requirements as required by our Accreditation
                                                                      Agency, ACBSP. The Core consists of 12 business classes. If
Objectives                                                            these are not complete prior to entering the masters program,
At the completion of the master’s level program, the student will     they may be accomplished at any time prior to conferral of the
be able to:                                                           Master’s Degree. A Master’s Degree may not be conferred until
      1.Conduct research and evaluate current professional litera-    the business core is complete. The Business Core Competencies
ture;                                                                 consists of:
      2. Assume a leadership role in collaboration with team mem-           a. Accounting
bers and serve as a role model for team efforts;                            b. Management
      3. Design and conduct performance appraisals of staff mem-            c. Marketing
bers and be able to create and supervise strategies of profession-          d. Business Ethics
al development to increase the performance of staff members as              e. Business Finance
well as the larger organization;                                            f. Legal Environment of Business
                                                                            g. Statistics



10 – Master of Science in Management
    h. Business Policies                                                   GCBA 630 Advanced Accounting and Finance in Operational
    i. Economics                                                           Excellence
    j. Quantitative Skills                                                 As a result of the success of the Toyota Production System, the
    k. Global Dimensions of Business                                       Lean Philosophy has emerged as one of the most significant busi-
    l. Information Systems                                                 ness strategies in the last three decades. Although the information
                                                                           needs are much different for the Lean enterprise, management
Courses Required for the Master’s Degree                                   accounting has been slow in evolving to meet these needs. This
GCBA 601      Culture in Operational Excellence                            class will focus on how management accountants can become an
GCBA 605      Advanced Management Law                                      integral part of the “Lean Team” by eliminating waste in their own
GCBA 630      Advanced Finance and Accounting in Operational               process and providing relevant information and timely feedback
              Excellence                                                   that support Lean environments. Three credits.
GCBA   665    Management Information Systems
GCBA   690    Quantitative Analysis                                        GCBA 665 Management Information Systems
GCBA   692    Operations Management (GCBA 601 is a prerequisite)           Students are provided with an introduction to the information tech-
GCBA   693    Supply Chain Management in Operational Excellence            nology hardware and software platforms, tools, and methodolo-
GCBA   694    Operational Excellence                                       gies utilized in the corporate systems environment. Topics
GCBA   695    Strategic Management of Complex Organizations                include: hardware, networks, operating systems, databases (e.g.
GCBA   697    Leadership and Ethics                                        SAP, Oracle, IBM DB/2, MySQL), Business Intelligence, Desktop
                                                                           Applications, Business Applications, Electronic Commerce, and
Elective Courses for Masters Degree                                        Systems Design and Development. The course will also include a
GCBA 689      Marketing Strategy                                           detailed examination of the SAP Business One application soft-
GCBA 691      Quality Improvement in the Healthcare and Service            ware. Three credits.
              Industries
GCBA 698      Introduction to Research in Operational Excellence           GCBA 689 Marketing Strategy
GCBA 699      Research Problems in Operational Excellence                  This masters-level overview of marketing emphasizes the deci-
              (GCBA 698 is a prerequisite)                                 sions that professionals will face in their efforts to bring together
GCBA 700      Advanced Statistical Process Control in Operational          the objectives and resources of their organizations with the needs
              Excellence (GCBA 694 is a prerequisite)                      and opportunities in the market place. Building on customer seg-
              (not available until Spring 2012)                            mentation, product, pricing, distribution, and promotional meth-
GCBA 750      Independent Study (only available with approval of faculty   ods, the centerpiece of the course is a The Marketing Game, a
              mentor and Graduate Director)                                comprehensive marketing simulation that requires teams of stu-
GCBA 751      Graduate level internship (limited availability)             dents to perform research, planning, implementation, and control
                                                                           activities for a simulated firm. Teams will also complete a
                                                                           Marketing Plan for their firm, including sales, costs, and profitabili-
                                                                           ty projections. Three credits
Course Descriptions                                                        GCBA 690 Quantitative Analysis
                                                                           This course is a survey of inferential statistics, with special
GCBA 601 Culture in Operational Excellence                                 emphasis on business and economic applications. Statistical
This course will focus on the cultural characteristics that are            models, techniques, and tools for aiding management decisions
required for a successful and sustained implementation of                  are introduced using spreadsheets and SPSS. Topics include
Operational Excellence in an organization. During the course we            probability distributions, hypothesis testing, multiple regression,
will explore more deeply what makes up culture, how culture can            ANOVA, nonparametric tests and the statistical foundations of sta-
be modified and what characteristics are necessary for a culture           tistical process control and six sigma. Three credits.
to support a continuous learning organization. During the second
half of the course we will review a methodology to implement               GCBA 691 Quality Improvement in the Healthcare and Service
these cultural concepts within an organization. We will study how          Industries
this methodology can lead to an organization that is nimble, effi-         An in-depth study of the principles of Operational Excellence as
cient, customer focused and constantly learning. The student will          applied primarily to the healthcare industry. The approach will
be able to take with them techniques to begin the introduction of          focus heavily on the cultural change to mutual trust and respect
Operational Excellence in their organization. Three credits.               which is needed to effectively implement Operational Excellence
                                                                           in the healthcare environment. We will study the methods to
GCBA 605 Advanced Management Law                                           empower and engage employees in continuous improvement.
The study of the legal regulatory environment faced by today’s             The tools and concepts of the Toyota Production System will be
managers. Emphasis on human resources issues and employ-                   introduced and their application in healthcare will be explored.
ment law including employee handbooks and policies, codes of               The course utilizes field observation, case studies and inter-per-
conduct, employment and non-competition agreements, state and              sonal exploration to understand critical concepts. Three credits.
federal laws governing all aspects of the employment relationship
from hiring to termination, employment discrimination, harass-             GCBA 692 Operations Management
ment, workers compensation, unemployment compensation,                     This course focuses on introducing students to the basic manu-
health and safety. Other topics include anti-trust and fair competi-       facturing concepts in the Toyota Production System and
tion, advertising and product liability. Offered spring semester.          Operational Excellence. Students will be introduced to cultural
Three credits.                                                             aspects of Operational Excellence. This course involves hands on
                                                                           learning in the manufacturing setting, team work on the shop floor
                                                                           and individual and team presentations in class. Students will have
                                                                           an opportunity to try their hand at designing improvements in the
                                                                           industrial setting utilizing the tools and concepts of continuous
                                                                           improvement. Three credits.



                                                                                                                Master of Science in Management – 11
GCBA 693 Supply Chain Management                                      GCBA 699 Research Problems in Operational Excellence
This course is designed to help the student acquire an under-         GBCA 698 is a prerequisite. During this course you will work with
standing of the most current practices being implemented by           a faculty mentor who will coach you in using the techniques of
businesses as they compete to bring to the market place their         Operational Excellence to complete data collection and analysis
products and services in an ever more demanding global econo-         to address a significant research question designed by you in
my. Students will be introduced to new, and sometime unconven-        concert with your mentor. You will be expected to complete the
tional, tools companies are currently using in an effort to delete    research and compile your original research problem in a format
inefficiencies from their manufacturing, expenditure and revenue      which will be acceptable for publication. Three credits.
cycles by improving supply chain relationships. Three credits.
                                                                      GCBA 700 Advanced Statistical Process Control in
GCBA 694 Operational Excellence                                       Operational Excellence
This course presents a variety of techniques for ensuring that        Statistical Process Control focuses on the use of statistical meth-
organizational processes are operating at the pinnacle of their       ods to insure that the requirements of the organization's cus-
capability. Students examine ways companies apply strategy, tac-      tomers are meet. It begins with the specifications required by the
tics, and technology to achieve and sustain operational advan-        customer of a firm's product or service and using acceptable sta-
tage. Students become more conversant with OE lexicon, learn          tistical methods Statistical Process Control (SPC) seeks to prevent
conventional and outside-the-box OE thinking processes, apply         process errors before they occur. By focusing on proper data
quantitative techniques to assess process capability, and through     gathering and interpretation the Statistical Process Control seeks
OE projects, deploy change to organizations, their customers,         the reduction of waste and cost in the operations of the firm.
and their suppliers. Three credits.                                   Three credits.

GCBA 695 Business Policy and Strategy                                 GCBA 750 Independent Study
Strategic management involves utilizing the tools and techniques      This course is designed for those students wishing to work on a
of strategic analysis to craft, implement, and execute company        focused, unique area of Operational Excellence with a faculty
strategies. The central theme of the strategic management course      member who they have enlisted as a mentor for the course. The
is that a company’s chances for sustained success are greatly         student must have established written goals and objectives for the
improved when managers (1) develop an astute, timely strategic        course which must be approved by the mentor and Graduate
“game plan” for running the company and then (2) implement and        Director prior to registering for the course. This course has limited
execute the strategic plan with great proficiency. The overriding     availability. Duration and credits are variable.
pedagogical objectives are to sharpen students’ abilities to “think
strategically” in a lean environment, to evaluate a company’s situ-   GCBA 751 Graduate Level Internship in Operational
ation from the perspective of its competitiveness and perform-        Excellence
ance prospects, and to draw sound conclusions about what              This is a limited availability program highly dependent upon
actions a company’s management needs to take in light of all the      development of a mutually beneficial and synergistic relationship
relevant circumstances. Three credits.                                between the student and an outside organization willing to spon-
                                                                      sor the student as an intern. These internships may be either paid
GCBA 697 Leadership and Ethics                                        or unpaid. The scope of the internship, the goals and objectives,
This course presents a theoretical and applied treatment of a per-    compensation if any and the master plan for the internship must
vasive and challenging task of leading in the new global econo-       be approved by the Graduate Director prior to registration for the
my—continuously and successfully dealing with the issues of con-      internship. Duration and credits are variable.
stant improvement within a framework of ethical leadership.
Students will learn the leadership theories, concepts, and applica-
tions that will allow them to successfully initiate, analyze, and
implement various types of organizational changes. Specifically,
through a series of case studies, students will demonstrate their
capacity to isolate key ethical issues as they are related to
Operational Excellence decisions. Seven core ethical standards
will be emphasized in the analysis of the case studies: The
Common Good, Human Dignity, Care, Hospitality, Stewardship,
Solidarity, and Subsidarity. Three credits.

GCBA 698 Introduction to Research in Operational
Excellence
Research enables us to make informed decisions. Research in
business, particularly operational excellence, allows managers to
make their organizations more effective and efficient. This course
will not only look to traditional means of conducting research but
also innovative methods particularly suited to the arena of opera-
tional excellence. While students are expected to produce their
own polished research paper at the end of the course, they will
work with each other throughout the semester in developing and
refining their research skills. Three credits




12 – Master of Science in Management
Master Degrees in Education                                            Courses Required for Master in Curriculum and Instruction
Curriculum and Instruction (optional K-12 Curriculum Supervisor)       (30 credits):
Special Education (PreK-8 or 7-12 Special Education)                   GCED 600            Educational Leadership and Professional
Educational Media and Technology (K-12 Library Science or                                  Development                                       3
Instructional Technology Specialist)                                   GCED   605          Statistics and Research Design                    3
Environmental Education (optional K-12 Environmental Science)          GCED   610          Current Issues and Trends                         3
School Administration and Supervision (K-12 School Principal)          GCED   615          Curriculum and Systems Design                     3
Science Education                                                      GCED   620          Assessment and Diagnostics                        3
                                                                       GCED   625          Instructional Technology                          3
Veronica Ent, Chairperson, Graduate Director                           GCED   635          Instructional Methodology                         3
Russell Edwards; Janet Franicola; Kristin Harty; Philip Kanfush                            3 electives                                       9
O.S.B.; Taundra Krall; Robert Michalow; C. Richard Nichols;
Mary Beth Spore, Robert Thomas                                         Combining an initial Pennsylvania teaching certification with
                                                                       a Master of Science In Curriculum and Instruction:
Adjunct Graduate Faculty: Angela Belli; Trent Bocan;                   “Masters-Cert” Students
Chris Colbert; Daniel Esper; Sharon Greene; Jeanne Hammer;                  Students may become certified in a specialty area of choice
Tracy McNeilly; Sandy Reidmiller; William Scheeren; Cindy Soltys;      offered by the Education Department while taking graduate cours-
Kathy Tobolewski; Carrie Vottero; Cindy Walters                        es. Most “masters-cert” students take the following courses along
                                                                       with the necessary coursework and take the required Praxis
Master of Science in Curriculum and Instruction                        exams for their desired specialty area. The student’s academic
      The Master of Science Degree in Curriculum and Instruction       advisor in the Education Department determines the additional
at Saint Vincent College focuses on three critical elements of         courses.
learning: curriculum, instruction, and assessment. Candidates will
investigate various frameworks and programs of curriculum              ED 101         Observation and Interaction Lab
design; explore methods of making instruction meaningful to all            or
students; and evaluate diagnostic and assessment strategies and        ED 207          Practicum in Education                                 1
products for use in their school or in the workplace. The              ED 205          Strategies and Techniques of Instruction               2
Curriculum and Instruction master’s program also provides a            ED 206          Field Experience II: Strategies and Techniques of
research component so that students can document need, pro-                            Instruction                                            1
pose change, and evaluate the effect of that change. Perhaps           PY 290          Psychology and Education for the
most importantly, the Saint Vincent Curriculum and Instruction pro-                    Exceptional Student*                                   3
gram will place emphasis on developing instructional leaders who       PY 115          Educational Psychology                                 3
will be resources to their schools, school districts, and other work   ED 208          Classroom Partnerships and Inclusion*                  3
sites in developing and implementing change and improvements           ED 390          Teaching Nonnative and Culturally Diverse Students* 3
that need to occur. The program is very versatile in that students           Additional Early Childhood, Middle Grade, K-12, or Secondary meth-
can obtain their initial Pennsylvania teaching certification in an     ods, fieldwork, and/or content courses will be specific to each applicant
area while taking graduate courses. Additionally, the program also     depending on prior coursework.
offers an optional accreditation track for veteran professionals       *See advisor, course may be substituted with an similar graduate course
with five years of teaching experience to obtain Pennsylvania          offering
Certification in K-12 Curriculum and Supervision.
                                                                       Pennsylvania K-12 Curriculum and Supervision Certification
Goals                                                                        Veteran teachers or educational professionals with five or
     The Master of Science Degree in Curriculum and Instruction        more years of experience can add Pennsylvania K-12 Curriculum
pursues three goals:                                                   Supervisor certification to their degree by meeting the PA
     • To provide an advanced and individualized program of            Department of Education required nine (9) credits* in special edu-
study in curriculum and instruction designed for school, business,     cation and three (3) credits* in English language learners (ELL)
health care and human services professionals.                          and by adding one (1) additional required course GCED 680
     • To provide opportunities for in-depth study and investiga-      Supervision of Instruction. Additionally, these students must enroll
tion of recent research, emergent knowledge, and current trends        in three credits of internship in Curriculum Supervision (GCED
and issues concerning educational policies, practices, and regu-       685, GCED 690 and GCED 695). A competency evaluation crite-
lations.                                                               ria is used to ensure that all students complete 360 hours in the
     • To prepare professionals in education, as well as in busi-      field and have sufficient experience in K-12 Curriculum
ness, health care, and human services endeavors, to assume             Supervision. Students take an additional six (6) credits to the 30
leadership roles in stimulation, planning, managing, and evalua-       credits in Curriculum and Instruction and the Praxis exam:
tion educational change.                                               Educational Leadership: Administration and Supervision.

Master of Science In Curriculum and Instruction                        GCED 680            Supervision of Instruction                        3
Sequence and offering schedule                                         GCED 685            Internship in School Administration: Fall Term    1
     The Curriculum and Instruction Master’s degree is designed        GCED 690            Internship in School Administration: Spr Term     1
to be an accelerated 30-credit hours that can be completed in          GCED 695            Internship in School Administration: Sum Term     1
approximately 18 months (seven required courses, three elective        *Undergraduate credits and/or graduate credits can be counted toward
courses). The courses are held all year around in the same ‘one-       the PDE requirement of nine credits in special education and three credits
night a week for seven weeks’ fashion. Thus, students can take         in ELL. If candidates do not already have these courses taken, Saint
two courses a term only driving to campus one evening per week.        Vincent College offers these courses at the graduate level which can be
At the close of the student’s degree coursework, students take a       taken while seeking K-12 Curriculum Supervision Certification.
comprehensive exam. The exam is offered every term, which
enables students to graduate year round.



                                                                                                                  Master Degrees in Education – 13
Comprehensive Exam Requirement                                          Courses Required for Master’s Degree in Special Education
      At the completion of the graduate degree program, all stu-        (36 credits):
dents are required to respond to a battery of essay questions           GCSE 607      Family and Professional Collaboration                3
posed by their professors. This requirement acts as an academic         GCSE 617      Diagnosis and Evaluation of Students with High
collective exercise that formally admits students into the exclusive                  Incidence Disabilities                               3
group of scholars who hold a master’s degree in education.              GCSE 627      Theory and Practice of Teaching Students with
Students are graded by their professors and are ranked in their                       High Incidence Disabilities                          3
ability to fully address the questions. Students are permitted to       GCSE 637      Methods of Instruction and Assessment for
retake the exam twice in the event of failure.                                        Students with Significant and Multiple Disabilities  3
                                                                        GCSE 647      Educating Students with Emotional and
Master of Science in Special Education                                                Behavioral Disorders                                 3
                                                                        GCSE 657      Technological Applications for Differentiated
      The Master of Science Degree in Special Education at Saint
                                                                                      Instruction                                          3
Vincent College will provide specialized training in educating stu-
                                                                        GCSE 667      Advanced Intervention Strategies in Reading,
dents with disabilities. The program is designed for certified
                                                                                      Writing, and Mathematics                             3
teachers who desire additional Pennsylvania certification in spe-
                                                                        GCSE 687      Teaching Students with Autistic Spectrum and
cial education PreK-8 or 7-12. Candidates will explore assess-
                                                                                      Developmental Disorders                             3*
ment and instruction strategies and techniques for high inci-
                                                                        GCSE 697*     Teaching Culturally Diverse Students with
dence, low incidence and emotional disabilities; research the nec-
                                                                                      Limited English Proficiencies                        3
essary components for writing and implementing individualized
                                                                        GCSE 707      Internship in Special Education (PreK-8 or 7-12)     3
education programs, evaluation reports, and behavioral analyses;
                                                                        GCED 675      Inclusionary Education                               3
and investigate the laws and legislation relevant to special educa-
                                                                        GCED 605      Statistics and Research Design                       3
tion.
                                                                        *Candidates already having a 3-credit English Language Learners
                                                                        undergraduate or graduate course may take an elective.
Goals
     The Master of Science Degree in Special Education pursues
three goals:                                                            Fieldwork and Special Education Mentoring Site Requirement
     • To provide quality instruction, scholarly achievement oppor-           Upon application to the M.S. in Special Education program,
tunities, best practices for the classroom, and diverse field prac-     each candidate must identify a special educator mentor that will
tice for teaching and working with students with disabilities.          facilitate field experiences required by the courses above. If a
     • To offer opportunities to collaborate as a community team        candidate is unable to identify a mentor one will be assigned to
member and as a pre-service teacher to encourage high and low           them. This special educator mentor must be currently working in a
incidence students and their parents’ work together to produce          special education classroom, have three (3) or more years of
and implement individualized education program goals, activities,       experience, and are in good standing with their school organiza-
and objectives.                                                         tion. The candidate must complete a minimum of 150 hours divid-
     • To provide the necessary methods and field instruction for       ed between courses and assignments. In addition to required
certified teachers to feel confident and prepared for the chal-         embedded field hours, candidates will be supervised in a formal
lenges of special education preK-8 or 7-12.                             teaching practicum associated with GCSE 707. The professors,
                                                                        assignments, and the special education mentor will verify that the
Master of Science In Special Education                                  candidate has successfully completed the fieldwork. Journals,
Sequence and traditional offering schedule                              projects, shadowing, teaching, etc. are examples of assignments
     The Special Education Master’s degree is traditionally             that maybe required.
designed to be an accelerated 36-credit hours that can be com-
pleted in approximately 21 months (12 required courses). The            Obtaining Pennsylvania teaching certification with a Master of
courses are held all year around and students can enter the pro-        Science In Special Education
gram each term. Most students can take two courses a term only               Students may add PA certification in Special Education with
one or two evenings per week. At the close of the student’s             this program. Two tracks are available: Prek-8 (previously early
degree coursework, students take a comprehensive exam. The              childhood, elementary or middle grade certified candidates) or 7-
exam is offered every term, which enables students to graduate          12 (previously secondary or K-12 certified candidates).
year around.                                                            Candidates that are not previously certified may enter the post-
                                                                        baccalaureate certification program to earn their initial certification
One-year “summer- summer” offering schedule                             and then, complete the GCSE 707 Internship in Special Education
      In response to recent graduates interested in quickly adding      after successfully completing their student teaching in an initial
a special education certification to their initial certification, the   area. All students pursuing certification must pass the state
one-year “summer-summer” format was created. To enroll in this          Praxis exam: Special Education.
36-credit program, candidates must begin in May and follow the
sequence of courses (four courses in summers and three courses          Saint Vincent College graduates and admittance into the
fall and spring) until the following August. The courses are held in    Master of Science in Special Education
a “cohort” year-around pattern, including one fall, one spring and            As a privilege for recent undergraduate or post-baccalaure-
two summer sessions. The courses are held at night enabling             ate teacher certification students from Saint Vincent College,
candidates to hold daytime or full-time employment. Candidates          admission to the Master of Science Degree in Special Education
of this program plan to take the comprehensive exam in August           is streamlined. Upon certification, satisfactory PDE 430 evalua-
                                                                        tions, and positive recommendations for pre-student teaching,
                                                                        students can be enrolled without a full review. In addition, candi-
                                                                        dates that have already taken ED 390 Teaching Nonnative and
                                                                        Culturally Diverse Students are permitted to take an elective
                                                                        instead of the GCSE 697 Teaching Culturally Diverse Students
                                                                        with Limited English Proficiencies.




14 – Master Degrees in Education
Comprehensive Exam Requirement                                           Master of Science Degree Educational Media and Technology
 At the completion of the graduate degree program, all students          Instructional Technology Specialist K-12 (36 credits):
are required to respond to a battery of essay questions posed by         GCEM 603      Introduction to Multimodal Research and
their professors. This requirement acts as an academic collective                      Information Literacy                                    3
exercise that formally admits students into the exclusive group of       GCEM 623      Creative Programs for Children and Young Adults         3
scholars who hold a master’s degree in education. Students are           GCEM 673      Management of Information Systems                       3
graded by their professors and are ranked in their ability to fully      GCEM 683      Advanced Instructional Design for Online Education 3
address the questions. Students are permitted to retake the exam         GCEM 693      Practicum in Instructional Technology                   3
twice in the event of failure                                            GCSE 657      Technological Applications for Differentiated Instruction3
                                                                         GCED 605      Statistics and Research Design                          3
Master of Science in Educational Media and                               GCED 625      Instructional Technology                                3
                                                                         GCED 635      Instructional Methodology                               3
Technology                                                               GCED 615      Curriculum and Systems Design                           3
     The Master of Science Degree in Educational Media and               GCED 665      Creative Message Design and Motivation                  3
Technology will certify candidates in K-12 library science or                 or
instructional technology specialist. The program is designed for         GCED 670      Visual Thinking and Learning                           3
certified and non-certified teachers wishing to obtain school            1 elective                                                           3
library certification in grades K-12 and/or add an instructional
technology specialist certification to an existing certification. Two    Pennsylvania K-12 Instructional Technology Specialist
tracks are available for candidates to select. All courses in either     Certification
track will meet the requirements for certification by the                     Certified teachers can add Pennsylvania K-12 Instructional
Pennsylvania Department of Education. Candidates will collabo-           Technology Specialist certification to their degree by taking the
rate with current instructional technology specialists and/or librari-   above coursework and meeting the PA Department of Education
ans to develop the skills and knowledge of school technology             required nine (9) credits in special education and three (3) credits
operations; utilize technology and software; and explore various         in English language learners (ELL). GCSE 657 Technological
topics relevant to school librarians or instructional technologists.     Applications for Differentiated Instruction, a required course, will
                                                                         count for three (3) of the nine credits (9) in special education.
Goals                                                                    Undergraduate credits and/or graduate credits can be counted
     The Master of Science Degree in Educational Media and               toward the remainder of the PDE requirement of nine (9) credits in
Technology pursues three goals:                                          special education and three (3) credits in ELL. If candidates do
     • To provide students with collaborative experiences with cur-      not already have these courses taken, Saint Vincent College offers
rent school instructional technologists or librarians, technologies,     these courses at the graduate level which can be taken as elec-
professional organizations, and curricula to perform as a well-          tives while seeking the K-12 Instructional Technology Specialist
schooled and proficient technology specialist or librarian.              certification.
     • To offer students the necessary training and instruction in
new technologies, information and media literacy, budgeting,             Master of Science Degree Education Media and Technology
managing, and media acquisition for K -12 schools and like set-          Library Science K-12 Certification (36 credits):
tings.                                                                   GCEM 603           Introduction to Multimodal Research and
     • To provide students with knowledge of children’s and young                           Information Literacy                                  3
adult materials, creative methods for technology or library instruc-     GCEM 613           Electronic Library Automation and Cataloging          3
tion, and overall media management to foster the best education          GCEM 623           Creative Programs for Children and Young Adults       3
environment for school students.                                         GCEM 633           Advanced Studies in Children's Literature             3
                                                                         GCEM 643           School Library Administration and Management          3
Master of Science In Educational Media and Technology                    GCEM 653           Internship in the School Library                      3
Sequence and offering schedule                                           GCEM 663           Literature and Reading for Young Adults               3
     The Educational Media and Technology master’s degree is             GCEM 673           Management of Information Systems                     3
designed in two tracks. The accelerated 36-credit program that           GCED 605           Statistics and Research Design                        3
can be completed in approximately 21 months (11 required                 GCED 625           Instructional Technology                              3
courses, one elective course). The courses are held all year             GCED 635           Instructional Methodology                             3
around in the same ‘one-night a week for seven weeks’ fashion.           1 elective                                                               3
Thus, students can take two courses a term only driving to cam-
pus one evening per week. At the close of the student’s degree           Pennsylvania K-12 Library Science teaching certification with
coursework, students take a comprehensive exam. The exam is              a Master of Science In Educational Media and Technology
offered every term, which enables students to graduate year                   Students may add or become PA certified in Library Science
around.                                                                  with this program. If a student is not previously certified, the pre-
                                                                         requisite courses and a full 14-week student teaching experience
                                                                         are required. If a student is already certified in another teaching
                                                                         area and selects to add PA certification in Library Science, GCEM
                                                                         653 Internship in the School Library is all that is required for field-
                                                                         work. For these students, the requirements of this course can be
                                                                         met at off hours, summer, and other times when the student is
                                                                         available to gather field experiences. Students may combine the
                                                                         requirements of this course with a current position or employment
                                                                         opportunity. As with all initial and add-on certifications, the PA
                                                                         Department of Education requires nine (9) credits in special edu-
                                                                         cation and three (3) credits in English language learners (ELL).
                                                                         Undergraduate credits and/or graduate credits can be counted




                                                                                                                    Master Degrees in Education – 15
toward the PDE requirement of nine (9) credits in special educa-         Master of Science In Environmental Education
tion and three (3) credits in ELL. If candidates have not already        Sequence and offering schedule
taken these courses, Saint Vincent College offers them at the                 The Environmental Education Master’s degree is designed to
graduate level which can be taken as electives while seeking the         be an accelerated 36-credit hours that can be completed in
K-12 Library Science Certification. All students pursuing certifica-     approximately 21 months (11 required courses, one elective
tion must pass the Praxis exam: Library Media Specialist.                course). The courses are held all year around in the same ‘one-
     Prerequisites for students pursuing their first teaching certifi-   night a week for seven weeks’ fashion. Thus, students can take
cate (includes PA Department requirements for math and English,          two courses a term only driving to campus one evening per week.
special education and ELL) are listed below.                             At the close of the student’s degree coursework, students take a
                                                                         comprehensive exam. The exam is offered every term, which
6 credits of Mathematics and English                              12     enables students to graduate year round.
ED 101 Observation and Interaction Lab                            1
      or 1                                                               Master of Science In Environmental Education (36 credits):
ED 207 Practicum in Education                                     1      GCEE 608           Environmental Education: An Integrated
ED 205 Strategies and Techniques of Instruction                   2                         Approach                                           3
ED 206 Field Experience II: Strategies and Techniques of                 GCEE 618           Soil Science, Agriculture and Terrestrial
Instruction                                                       1                         Ecosystems                                         3
ED 208 Classroom Partnerships in Inclusion                        3      GCEE 628           Meteorology and Air Quality                        3
ED 3--     Field Experience III:                                  3      GCEE 638           Groundwater Hydrology, Aquatic Ecosystems
ED 390 Teaching Nonnative and Culturally Diverse Students         3                         and Resources                                      3
PY 290 Psychology and Education for the Exceptional Student       3      GCEE 648           Environmental Law and Ethics                       3
PY 115 Educational Psychology                                     3      GCEE 658           Social Issues and the Environment                  3
PY 381 Educational Testing                                        3      GCED 605           Statistics and Research Design                     3
                                                                         GCED 610           Current Issues and Trends in Education             3
After advanced standing (First time certification only)                  GCED 615           Curriculum and Systems Design                      3
ED 400 Field Experience IV – Pre-Student Teaching                 2      GCED 625           Instructional Technology                           3
ED 410 Field Experience V – Student Teaching                      8      GCED 635           Instructional Methodology                          3
ED 411 Professional Seminar                                       3      1 elective                                                            3

Comprehensive Exam Requirement                                           Obtaining Pennsylvania K-12 Environmental Science teaching
      At the completion of the graduate degree program, all stu-         certification with a Master of Science In Environmental
dents are required to respond to a battery of essay questions            Education
posed by their professors. This requirement acts as an academic               Students may add or become PA certified in Environmental
collective exercise that formally admits students into the exclusive     Science with this program. If a student is not previously certified,
group of scholars who hold a master’s degree in education.               they would be required to take the needed education and envi-
Students are graded by their professors and are ranked in their          ronmental science courses along with a full 14-week student
ability to fully address the questions. Students are permitted to        teaching experience. As with all initial certifications, the PA
retake the exam twice in the event of failure.                           Department of Education requires nine (9) credits in special edu-
                                                                         cation and three (3) credits in English language learners (ELL).
Master of Science in Environmental Education                             Undergraduate credits and/or graduate credits can be counted
     The Master of Science Degree in Environmental Education             toward the PDE requirement of nine (9) credits in special educa-
offers current teachers and non-teachers with the training neces-        tion and three (3) credits in ELL. If candidates have not already
sary to broaden their skills in areas pertaining to environmental        taken these courses, Saint Vincent College offers them at the
science and instruction. If desired, students may acquire a certifi-     graduate level which can be taken as electives while seeking the
cation in K-12 Environmental Science by taking the master’s              K-12 Environmental Science certification. If a student is already
degree coursework along with the undergraduate courses to meet           certified in another teaching area and selects to add PA certifica-
the state guidelines. This program is designed for the general           tion in Environmental Science, they may only need to take just the
practicing teacher or related professional with either a science or      necessary content courses in order to pass the state Praxis exam
non-science background. Interested elementary, middle school,            for K-12 environmental science. All students should consult their
and high school teachers are encouraged to consider this grow-           Education Department advisor to determine the needed course-
ing field for advanced study or to become more marketable in             work. The Praxis exam required for PA certification is
school education. Extensive background in science is not                 Environmental Education.
required.                                                                     Prerequisites for students pursuing their first teaching certifi-
                                                                         cate (includes PA Department requirements for math and English,
Goals                                                                    special education and ELL) are listed below.
     The Master of Science Degree in Environmental Education
                                                                         6 credits of Mathematics and English                             12
pursues three goals:
                                                                         ED 101         Observation and Interaction Lab                    1
     • To provide students with the broad understanding of the
                                                                              or
historical impact of the environment and topics that encompass
                                                                         ED 207         Practicum in Education                             1
how humans have impacted the atmosphere, lithosphere, and
                                                                         ED 205         Strategies and Techniques of Instruction           2
hydrosphere.
                                                                         ED 206         Field Experience II: Strategies and Techniques of
     • To offer resources that will encourage the use of environ-
                                                                                        Instruction                                        1
mental activities to both formal and non-formal classroom settings
                                                                         ED 208         Classroom Partnerships in Inclusion                3
and to foster an understanding of legal and ethical issues in envi-
                                                                         ED 3--         Field Experience III:                              3
ronmental education that face the our children.
                                                                         ED 390         Teaching Nonnative and Culturally Diverse Students 3
     • To provide instruction in the main areas pertaining to envi-
                                                                         PY 290         Psychology and Education for the Exceptional
ronmental science and the social issues of the environment and
                                                                                        Student                                            3
society that can be used in the classroom or education setting.



16 – Master Degrees in Education
PY 115         Educational Psychology                              3    Master of Science in Science Education (36 Credits):
PY 381         Educational Testing                                 3    GCSC 608          Principles, History and Issues of
Additional science content courses (if needed) to meet PDE guidelines                     Science Education                                 3
(see education advisor)                                                 GCSC 618          Forestry and Wildlife Management and
                                                                                          Field Techniques                                  3
After advanced standing (First time certification only)                 GCSC 628          Materials Science and Engineering                 3
ED 400        Field Experience IV – Pre-Student Teaching          2     GCSC 638          Cell Systems and Functions                        3
ED 410        Field Experience V – Student Teaching               8     GCSC 648          Science Classroom Management and
ED 411        Professional Seminar                                3                       Laboratory Experiences                            3
                                                                        GCSC 658          Science Practicum                                 3
Comprehensive Exam Requirement                                          GCED 605          Statistics and Research Design                    3
      At the completion of the graduate degree program, all stu-        GCED 610          Current Issues and Trends in Education            3
dents are required to respond to a battery of essay questions           GCED 615          Curriculum and Systems Design                     3
posed by their professors. This requirement acts as an academic         GCED 625          Instructional Technology                          3
collective exercise that formally admits students into the exclusive    GCED 635          Instructional Methodology                         3
group of scholars that hold a master’s degree in education.             1 elective                                                          3
Students are graded by their professors and are ranked in their
ability to fully address the questions. Students are permitted to       Comprehensive Exam Requirement
retake the exam twice in the event of failure.                                At the completion of the graduate degree program, all stu-
                                                                        dents are required to respond to a battery of essay questions
                                                                        posed by their professors. This requirement acts as an academic
Master of Science in Science Education                                  collective exercise that formally admits students into the exclusive
     The Master of Science Degree in Science Education offers           group of scholars that hold a master’s degree in education.
current teachers and non-teachers with the training necessary to        Students are graded by their professors and are ranked in their
broaden their skills in areas pertaining to all fields of science and   ability to fully address the questions. Students are permitted to
instruction. This program is designed for the general practicing        retake the exam twice in the event of failure.
science teacher, science-orientated educator or related profes-
sional with either a science or non-science background. Interested      Master of Science in School Administration
elementary, middle school, and high school teachers are encour-         and Supervision
aged to consider this field for advanced study or to become more             The Master of Science Degree in School Administration and
marketable in school education. Extensive background in science         Supervision offers veteran educators a degree program to obtain
is not required, but having introductory science coursework in the      Pennsylvania certification as a K-12 Principal that is in full compli-
main areas of science is strongly recommended.                          ance with the PA Department of Education Core and Corollary
                                                                        Standards for Principals. This 39-credit graduate degree requires
Goals                                                                   students to have five years of documented teaching experience.
     The Master of Science Degree in Science Education pursues          However, students can enroll in the some of the same courses
three goals:                                                            required for the Master of Science in Curriculum and Instruction;
     • To provide students with the broad understanding of the          therefore, allowing students to still work toward a degree while
science education, general science-content areas, advanced cur-         concluding their five years of teaching. Students can transfer to
riculum and instruction methodology and history of American sci-        the School Administration and Supervision degree program from
ence education.                                                         the Curriculum and Instruction or they can just simply add the
     • To offer resources that will encourage the use of inquiry-       needed K-12 Principal courses to become certified. This program
based and content-deepening science activities to both formal           is designed with the school administrator in mind; therefore, most
and non-formal classroom settings and to foster an understanding        courses will be addressing current issues, techniques, and nec-
of legal and ethical issues in science education that face the our      essary information needed for school principals.
children.
     • To provide instruction in the main areas pertaining to the       Goals
sciences and curriculum and instruction that can be used in the               The Master of Science Degree in School Administration and
classroom or education setting.                                         Supervision pursues three goals:
                                                                              • To provide excellent training and experiences in current
Master of Science In Environmental Education                            methods, trends, and strategies to become an effective school
Sequence and offering schedule                                          leader and administrator.
     The Science Education Master’s degree is designed to be an               • To offer resources, professional contacts, and tools that will
accelerated 36-credit hours that can be completed in approxi-           enable a pre-service school administrator to become successful
mately 21 months (11 required courses, one elective course). The        and effective in leading a school building or district.
courses are held all year around in the same ‘one- night a week               • To provide insight into newer philosophies, assessment
for seven weeks’ fashion. Thus, students can take two courses a         reporting, community collaboration, creative practices, and proac-
term only driving to campus one evening per week. At the close          tive leadership trends that can develop a strong community and
of the student’s degree coursework, students take a comprehen-          student rapport and support.
sive exam. The exam is offered every term, which enables stu-
dents to graduate year around.                                          Master of Science In School Administration and Supervision
                                                                        Sequence and offering schedule
                                                                             The School Administration and Supervision master’s degree is
                                                                        designed to be an accelerated 39-credit hours that can be com-
                                                                        pleted in approximately 20 months. The courses are held all year
                                                                        around in the same ‘one night a week for seven weeks’ fashion.
                                                                        Thus, students can take two courses a term only driving to cam-
                                                                        pus one evening per week. At the close of the student’s degree



                                                                                                                 Master Degrees in Education – 17
coursework, students take a comprehensive exam. The exam is              cal research as it reported in the periodic literature and to design
offered every term, which enables students to graduate year              educational research instruments and projects. This advanced
around. An additional final competency evaluation will be                course will include instruction in educational test and measure-
assessed along with a portfolio of experiences and resources             ments that will provide the educator with the prerequisite mathe-
illustrating a student’s proficiency in school administration.           matical skills to compute, read, and interpret statistical data as
                                                                         reported on standardized achievement tests, group and individual
Courses Required for Master’s in School Administration and               tests, and research monographs. The major emphasis of the
Supervision (39 credits):                                                course is to develop the observational, investigative, and interpre-
GCED 600       Educational Leadership and Professional                   tive skills of a reflective educator/practitioner. Three credits.
               Development                                        3
GCED   605     Statistics and Research Design                     3      GCED 610 Current Issues and Trends in Education
GCED   610     Current Issues and Trends                          3      This course is designed to involve the student in an examination
GCED   615     Curriculum and Systems Design                      3      and analysis of significant contemporary issues in education.
GCED   620     Assessment and Diagnostics                         3      Current literature and research studies are explored through inde-
GCED   630     Managing Financial and Material Resources          3      pendent research assignments and seminar-type group discus-
GCED   645     Philosophical and Ethical Perspectives                    sions. Students are encouraged to develop substantiated person-
               in Education                                       3      al positions regarding topics such as school reform initiatives,
GCED 655       Educational Jurisprudence                          3      charter schools, school violence, problems in urban/rural schools,
GCED 675       Inclusionary Education                             3      and the integration of technology in the classroom. Research proj-
GCED 680       Supervision of Instruction                         3      ects can be initiated in this course. Three credits.
GCSE 607       Family and Professional Collaboration              3
GCSE 697       Teaching Culturally Diverse Students with                 GCED 615 Curriculum and Systems Design
               Limited English Proficiencies                      3      This course is designed to include theories of curriculum, instruc-
GCED 685       Internship in School Administration: Fall Term     1      tion, and the design of instructional systems. Emphasis will be on
GCED 690       Internship in School Administration: Spring Term   1      translating theory into practice, particularly for curriculum imple-
GCED 695       Internship in School Administration: Summer Term   1      mentation in public or private schools and/or in industry training.
                                                                         Students will have an opportunity to actually design curricula for
Obtaining Pennsylvania K-12 School Principal certification               use in an educational setting. This course will involve field trips,
with a Master of Science In School Administration and                    in-field experiences, classroom lecture, technological training,
Supervision                                                              and project assignments. Three credits.
     Students will be eligible for K-12 school principal certification
upon completion of their degree, passed comprehensive exam,              GCED 620 Assessment and Diagnostics
satisfactory final competency evaluation and portfolio review.           The fundamental principles of diagnostic theory and practice are
Students are also required to have completed and documented              analyzed with an emphasis on the application of these principles
five or more years of professional teaching experience and have          to a variety of educational settings. Students are acquainted with
passed the Praxis test for K-12 School Principal.                        the guidelines and techniques for diagnosing students’ needs
                                                                         and abilities by implementing and interpreting developmentally
Comprehensive Exam Requirement                                           appropriate assessments, both quantitative and qualitative.
      At the completion of the graduate degree program, all stu-         Procedures and problems in test construction and in the analysis,
dents are required to respond to a battery of essay questions            summarization, and reporting of student outcomes are examined.
posed by their professors. This requirement acts as an academic          Three credits.
collective exercise that formally admits students into the exclusive
group of scholars who hold a master’s degree in education.               GCED 625 Instructional Technology
Students are graded by their professors and are ranked in their          Students will explore the use of technology as an important edu-
ability to fully address the questions. Students are permitted to        cation resource. They will develop the knowledge, technical
retake the exam twice in the event of failure.                           expertise, and instructional strategies necessary for effective
                                                                         application of technology in a variety of educational and profes-
                                                                         sional settings. “Hands-on” experience is emphasized. Three
                                                                         credits.
Course Descriptions                                                      GCED 630 Managing Financial and Material Resources
                                                                         This course will examine the changing financial realities facing
GCED 600 Educational Leadership and Professional                         schools, especially as they relate to the effective and efficient
Development                                                              management of the school’s fiscal and material resources. The
The primary focus of professional development and instructional          influences of state, city or municipality, and the school district,
leadership is the enhancement of learning in the classroom and           with its specific governance structure will be addressed. The
other dedicated settings in which students grow and develop to           management principles and managerial problems of the pub-
their maximum potential. Educational leadership is established           lic/private education setting will be studied. Students will research
within the context of the master teacher and professional educa-         various philosophies regarding resource management including:
tor. Self-study projects and human development workshops foster          technology services, personnel, busing, facilities, etc. Budgeting
school and community leadership potential of the master teacher.         methods and school maintenance are considered. Three credits.
Multiple assessments are used to develop career goal objectives
leading to the Master’s Degree in Curriculum and Instruction.            GCED 635 Instructional Methodology
Three credits.                                                           Students will examine the rationale for and development of viable
                                                                         theories of instructional design; apply instructional models to vari-
GCED 605 Statistics and Research Design                                  ous learning environments and evaluate the learning outcomes;
This course will enable the educator to read and interpret empiri-       develop an expanded and integrated repertoire of teaching strate-




18 – Master Degrees in Education
gies and techniques for use in their classrooms. Three credits.         demonstrate mastery of creative methods, use technology, and
                                                                        relate classroom topics and assignments to their personal set-
GCED 640 Classroom Management                                           tings. Three credits.
This course provides an overview of management models and
practical techniques that foster the creation and maintenance of a      GCED 670 Visual Thinking and Learning
functional, effective learning environment in the classroom. It         This course introduces the students to the study and use of the
focuses on behavior analysis, management strategies, and the            instructional visual modalities within the curriculum. The course
legal and/or policy constraints affecting implementation. Students      emphasizes how students learn and benefit from “instructionally
examine the use of techniques in a variety of settings and apply        balanced” picture-based media (film, television, photography,
procedures in their own classes. Three credits.                         graphic arts, computer-based instruction, 3-D imagery, and the
                                                                        Internet). Topics include: visual interpretation, creativity and imagi-
GCED 645 Philosophical and Ethical Perspectives in                      nation studies, instructional image manipulation and presentation
Education                                                               techniques, social/political influences of visual imagery on chil-
The course will explore the idea that education reflects the wider      dren, and the role of the visual media in education. Three credits.
society in which we live. Students will examine schools and class-
rooms and try to understand how what goes on in schools is relat-       GCED 675 Inclusionary Education
ed to the values, beliefs, and structures of the world outside          This course will offer students an introduction to inclusive environ-
school walls. During the course students will consider why chil-        ments and services. Students will learn the techniques and skills
dren succeed or fail at school; the process of tracking and label-      needed to address current inclusive classroom management
ing children; what it is that we learn in school—both explicitly and    issues as well as how to develop effective teaching strategies for
covertly; how factors such as gender, social class, race and eth-       an inclusive classroom. This course will involve practical applica-
nicity, and sexual orientation affect our educational experiences.      tion and discussion. Three credits.
Students will also explore historical philosophical perspectives in
American education, and how other philosophies have developed           GCED 680 Supervision of Instruction
over the years in education. Three credits.                             Students will be introduced to the basic concepts and theories of
                                                                        instructional supervision. Emphasis on the roles, tasks, and
GCED 650 Human Learning                                                 processes involved in supervisory practice based on theory and
Brain research and the psycho/social bases of learning from             research in education and ancillary fields such as psychology,
infancy to adolescence are investigated in this course. The study       social work, human resources management, communications, and
of cognitive learning theory, intelligence, instrumental and genera-    organizational/ business administration. Prerequisite: Five or more
tive learning, the contributions of differential psychology, informa-   years of teaching experience. Three credits.
tion processing, and expectancy theory help the educational
practitioner to individualize and differentiate instructional strate-   GCED 685 Internship in School Administration: Fall Tem
gies for diverse learners. Learning styles, shaping and pacing          Students will participate in 80 hours of fieldwork in collaboration
strategies, contingency management, concept learning, and               with a curriculum supervisor and/or K-12 administrator or similar
problem solving strategies are applied to lesson planning and the       professional mentor from an approved educational setting. The
enhancement of instruction. The course’s major emphasis is on           student is required to generate and professionally submit a proj-
the systematic application of the principles of learning within the     ect within the field of curriculum and supervision to the education-
learning environment. Three credits.                                    al setting in which the 80 hours are served. Supervision orienta-
                                                                        tion, practical hands-on curriculum examination, shadowing and
GCED 655 Educational Jurisprudence                                      professional development opportunities are encouraged. Class
This course investigates a wide range of legal issues that influ-       meets seven (7) sessions during a 14-week semester. On-site
ence the lives of teachers, students, parents, administrators, and      mentor evaluations, journal entries, and other written assignments
school boards. The legal aspects of teaching and teachers’ and          are required. Prerequisites: GCED 680 and five or more years of
students’ rights receive extensive treatment. Contract law, condi-      professional experience with teaching certification. Three credits.
tions of employment, collective bargaining, liability, child abuse,
copyright law, and constitutional provisions of the law affecting the   GCED 690 Internship in School Administration: Spring Term
school, the child, and the teacher are investigated. Controversial      Interns will perform 140 hours shadowing and performing duties
and emerging legal issues are also examined. Three credits.             in curriculum supervision or K-12 administration (all levels: central
                                                                        office and school building) under a mentor advisor(s) from the
GCED 660 Adult Learning                                                 sponsoring K-12 school district. Candidates seeking supervision
This course will define adult education and distinguish it from         of curriculum certification may be asked to perform different field-
other adult-learning activities. The historic, social, and pedagogic    work duties than those seeking K-12 school principal certification.
origins of adult education will be surveyed, and it will be contrast-   All students will be required to complete journal entries and
ed to other types of education. Examples of curricula, selected         assignments as well as attend seven (7) campus meetings during
goals and objectives, and learning activities will be reviewed, and     the fourteen- week semester. Interns will be supervised at the site
consideration will be given to how these educational components         and evaluated by both the college instructor and the mentor(s).
are influenced by theories of adult learning. Three credits.            Prerequisites: GCED 680 and five or more years of professional
                                                                        experience with teaching certification. Three credits.
GCED 665 Creative Message Design and Motivation
This course will examine creativity in the learning setting from all    GCED 695 Internship in School Administration: Summer Term
sides: education administrators, teachers, instructional designers,     Interns will perform 140 hours shadowing and performing duties
presenters, and learners. Topics will include a concentrated study      in curriculum supervision or K-12 administration (all levels: central
on motivation, creativity in the classroom, innovative media pres-      office and school building) under a mentor advisor(s) from the
entation, divergent thinking skills, creative problem solving meth-     sponsoring K-12 school district. Candidates seeking supervision
ods, analogous reasoning and much more. This class is geared            of curriculum certification may be asked to perform different field-
toward both K-12 educators and related educational professionals        work duties than those seeking K-12 school principal certification.
that work or desire to work with learners of all ages and abilities.    All students will be required to complete journal entries and
Students will be expected to participate in creative activities,        assignments as well as attend seven (7) campus meetings during


                                                                                                                 Master Degrees in Education – 19
the summer semester. Interns will be supervised at the site and         riculums such as sensory (art, music, physical education) and
evaluated by both the college instructor and the mentor(s).             daily life (family and consumer sciences). Course requirements
Prerequisites: GCED 680 and five or more years of professional          include practice teachings and field experiences, lesson planning
experience with teaching certification. Three credits.                  and curriculum development, consultation and research of avail-
                                                                        able journals and resources for teaching, and membership to a
GCED 700 Independent Study                                              national special education organization. Three credits.
Open to graduate and non-degree graduate, post-baccalaureate
students with approval of the Chairperson. Independent studies          GCSE 637 Methods of Instruction and Assessment for
are granted on a case by case basis. Variable credit. May be            Students with Significant and Multiple Disabilities
repeated.                                                               This course focuses on the methods in which teachers use to
                                                                        organize curriculum and implement assessment and instruction to
GCED 705 Museums in Education                                           ensure maximum learning for students with moderate and/or
This course will assist students of history and educators in devel-     severe disabilities. Students will be exposed to the curriculum
oping awareness and confidence in using museum resources as             emphasis of significant and multiple disabled students such as
a planned and significant aspects of curriculum. Opportunities to       life, vocational, and social skills, and functional academics.
examine learning styles, learning contexts, and teaching methods        Students are required to complete a significant action research
around the use object, exhibit, and site-based visual and interac-      project with a learner and present findings in manuscript and
tive experiences will be provided. Research and development of          poster forms. Three credits.
exhibits along with teaching methods and materials will be
expected of students. Students will participate in traditional class-   GCSE 647 Educating Students with Emotional and Behavioral
room instruction as well as field visits to historical places. Three    Disorders
credits.                                                                This course is designed to inform students about the techniques
                                                                        for instruction of emotionally impaired students, the principles of
GCED 710 School Planning and Classroom Design                           applied behavior analysis, and the use of behavior assessments in
This course instructs how design and planning impacts cognitive         the classroom. Students will learn how to conduct a functional
learning and student performance. Students will investigate how         behavior assessment and develop a behavior intervention plan.
to properly design a classrooms and learning settings that meet         This course will also focus on the implementation of various posi-
the needs of the 21st century students. Issues around safety,           tive behavior techniques in order for special educators to ensure
accreditations, codes, and curriculum will be discussed as well         maximum learning and class management. Students are required
as maximizing resources in fundraising and donations. Space             to complete a significant action research project with a learner and
usability and retrofitting of older settings to meet the newer          present findings in manuscript and poster forms. Three credits.
instructional technology-rich classrooms will be addressed. Last,
students will expected to consider their own settings and devise        GCSE 657 Technological Applications for Differentiated
plans to improve learning and management. Model PreK through            Instruction
secondary education settings will be examined. Three credits.           This course is designed to provide exposure and hands-on expe-
                                                                        rience with software applications and instructional medias used to
GCSE 607 Family and Professional Collaboration                          improve the education and meeting needs of diverse learners. An
This course focuses on the special education teacher as a team          additional course concentration will be accessing, managing, pur-
member within the field of education. Students will learn about         chasing, and recommending software and emerging technologies
family centered practices and how to work with families from cul-       for today’s classroom. Students will be required to plan a budget,
turally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. Various models of       and prepare technological training for professionals and aides.
collaboration and career consultation techniques for disabled           Three credits.
individuals within the general community will also be discussed.
Finally, the creation of classroom plan(s) and simulated practices      GCSE 667 Advanced Intervention Strategies in Reading,
for proper diffusion and implementation of professional strategies      Writing, and Mathematics
to foster public collaboration for the special education population     This course provides an advanced application of recent research
will be required. Three credits.                                        and reviews of interventions with individuals with disabilities,
                                                                        including mild disabilities and learning disabilities. Topics will
GCSE 617 Diagnosis and Evaluation of Students with High                 include the following: recent intervention research, effective
Incidence Disabilities                                                  instructional practices, learning strategies approaches, attention
This course concentrates on diagnostic and evaluation tech-             interventions, motivation interventions, reading instruction strate-
niques for students with high incidence disabilities. The use of for-   gies, written expression strategies, math instruction strategies,
mal and informal assessment tools in areas specific to reading,         content area accommodations, testing accommodations, and
writing, and mathematics will be emphasized. Students will              early intervention methods. Prerequisite: GCSE 627. Three credits.
acquire knowledge of various assessment procedures used to
identify students for special education and for individual educa-       GCSE 677 Introduction to American Sign Language
tion program designs often implemented within the traditional or        Students will engage in conversations, provide and obtain infor-
non-traditional classroom. This course will require students to per-    mation, express feelings and emotions, and exchange opinions to
form simulated hands-on and practical implementation of assess-         an audience of listeners or readers on a variety of topics.
ment tools to monitor students’ academic progress. Three credits.       Students will demonstrate an understanding of the relationship
                                                                        between practices, perspectives and products of Deaf culture.
GCSE 627 Theory and Practice of Teaching Students with                  Students will demonstrate understanding of the nature of lan-
High Incidence Disabilities                                             guage through comparisons of American Sign Language and
This course will address various strategies and techniques for          their own language. Students will demonstrate the concept of cul-
successful teaching of students with high incidence disabilities        ture through comparisons of the Deaf culture with their own cul-
Concentration will be on the special education curriculums of           ture. Three credits.
reading, written and spoken language, and mathematics.
Students will also be exposed to the practice of subsidiary cur-



20 – Master Degrees in Education
GCSE 697 Teaching Culturally Diverse Student with Limited                    GCEM 643 School Library Administration and Management
English Proficiencies in the Classroom                                       This course emphasizes principles of school library organization
This course is designed to equip students with essential knowl-              and management: acquisition of materials, personnel administra-
edge and skills to effectively administer, organize and implement            tion, budgeting and finance, housing and equipment, student
content area instruction appropriate for English Language                    record keeping, district public relations, preparation of teaching
Learners at different levels of English proficiency. Course activities       guides and forms, use of basic statistics for usage and reporting.
and assignments are designed to be interactive and inquiry-                  Students will be asked to prepare a portfolio of resources and
based. This course meets new guidelines required by the                      materials necessary for the development a strong school library
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania to prepare all teachers with                    program. Three credits.
knowledge of language systems, structures, functions, and varia-
tions along with the skills to identify cultural characteristics that        GCEM 653 Internship in the School Library
influence learning. The first half of the course will focus on               This course will allow students to observe and work with a quali-
Culture, approaches to Multicultural Education and the English               fied school librarian in both elementary and secondary library set-
Language Learner. The second half of the course will focus on the            tings for a total of 100 hours. Students will gain experience in
English Language Learner and language acquisition; school cur-               school library services and will perform bibliographic instruction
riculum, assessment and instruction; and the culture of school.              to students. They will also have opportunities for practical experi-
Three credits.                                                               ence in selection of materials, processing, classification, adminis-
                                                                             tration, and working with other libraries. A college supervisor will
GCSE 707 Internship in Special Education (PK-8 or 7-12)                      observe this internship periodically. The student is expected to
Internship in Special Education is a course that focuses on obser-           keep a log of activities and submit a final written report about the
vation and demonstration of teaching competencies as well as                 experience. Prerequisites or co-requisites: GCEM 643 and
participation in seminars that discuss the current issues in transi-         advanced graduate standing. Three credits.
tion and special education today. Students will refine and increase
sophistication of teaching competencies with a qualified special             GCEM 663 Literature and Reading for Young Adults
educator in both a public and private school setting for a mini-             This course is a study of literature for and about the young adult.
mum of 150 hours. Students will have opportunities for practical             A critical study and evaluation of the genre; pedagogical tech-
experience in collaboration, design, and implementation of                   niques for the promotion of YA reading; study of the relationship of
instruction for both high and low incidence disorders along the              the genre to literature for children and adults will be covered. The
continuum of placements in the least restrictive environment avail-          course also examines the librarians’ and/or teachers’ role in
able to students with disabilities. Students will be expected to             establishing criteria and selection related to student interests,
demonstrate competency in professional and ethical practice as               reading levels, quality of materials, and psychological, historical,
well as the overall pedagogy of special education including tran-            cultural, political and social issues. Three credits.
sition services. A college supervisor will observe the practicum
periodically and students are expected to keep a log of activities           GCEM 673 Management of Information Systems
and submit a final written report regarding the experience.                  This course provides an understanding of various applications
Seminar topics will include: current legal issues, educational and           and limitations of the computer and other technologies in the
community systems available to assist individuals with disabilities,         management process. It includes instruction in concepts such as
professional and ethical practices related to special education,             file structure, data storage and retrieval, networking, and telecom-
procedural safeguards afforded to individuals with disabilities,             munications. Students address internal controls that ensure accu-
and transition planning. Internship hours and assignments will be            racy, integrity and the confidentiality of information. The course
completed at PK-8 or 7-12 level depending on student’s initial cer-          also includes the use of information for effective management.
tification. Three credits.                                                   Three credits.

GCEM 623 Creative Programs for Children and Young Adults                     GCEM 683 Advanced Instructional Design for Online
This course concentrates on how creative programming for chil-               Education
dren and young adults can enhance public relations and school                This course is a systems design based approach to developing
students’ life-long interest in education. Students will develop             online or computer-delivered education. Students will be engag-
skills for book talking, storytelling, poetry reading, puppetry, read-       ing in authentic instructional design activities and project man-
er’s theater, and other creative theatrical methods for encouraging          agement to produce online instruction using course management
interdisciplinary academics. The course will also address spon-              and module authoring tools. Students analyze given instructional
soring clubs, reading competitions, fundraising, and other promo-            design problems, having access to a wide range of software tools
tions that schools and libraries can employ to cultivate school              and research, working with diverse teams and individuals, creat-
community and students’ awareness and excitement toward edu-                 ing real instructional design products, and giving and receiving
cation. Three credits.                                                       constructive feedback. Students will be required to anticipate
                                                                             cost-benefits and training needs for delivering instruction online.
GCEM 633 Advanced Studies in Children's Literature                           Prerequisites: GCED 615 and GCED 625. Three credits.
This course will address confident selection, evaluation, and use
of literature for children. The role of literature in the K-12 curriculum,   GCEM 693 Practicum in Instructional Technology
reading supplementation, and as an examination of the changing               Students will participate in 75 hours of field-based experiences in
social and cultural pattern in children's reading will be covered.           instructional technology and class seminars. Class seminars
Students will become evaluators of children’s literature and able to         include discussions of management of instructional technology
expand their current knowledge of children’s literature to become            services, developing technology plans, creating in-service work-
well-informed school librarians. (Required) Three credits.                   shops or classes for school personnel, and budgeting for technol-
                                                                             ogy. Prerequisite or co-requisite: GCEM 683. Three credits.




                                                                                                                     Master Degrees in Education – 21
GCEE 608 Environmental Education: An Integrated Approach               GCEE 658 Social Issues and the Environment
This course is designed to introduce the concepts of environmen-       This course investigates a wide range of social issues and their
tal education by providing candidates with the knowledge for           relation to the environment. Homelessness, famine, world popula-
resource management and sustainable development. This course,          tion, violence, and environmental protection are some areas con-
in the broadest sense, encompasses environmental education             sidered. The course examines the link between the social and
awareness by presenting new perspectives, values, knowledge            global environment through case studies, philosophies, theories,
and skills, through both the formal and informal processes used in     environmental models, and research. Students will explore cur-
education. Overall, this course seeks to incorporate environmental     rent, emerging, and controversial local and global social prob-
goals into mainstream society while valuing and linking other legit-   lems, and learn how to implement these sensitive environmental
imate social and economic objectives. Three credits.                   and social issues in instruction. Three credits.

GCEE 618 Soil Science, Agriculture and Terrestrial                     GCEE 668 Field Institute for Environmental Learning
Ecosystems                                                             This course is designed to offer field-based experiences in envi-
This course is designed to study the impacts of humankind on           ronmental science on fresh water ecosystems. Participants are
urban and rural terrestrial ecosystems, soil and agriculture. This     required to conduct field monitoring and data analysis as well as
course will raise awareness of the issues that surround agricultur-    develop a five-day field and classroom unit plan meeting stan-
al practices and multiple-use polices that lead to a sustainable       dards in the area of fresh water ecosystems. May be repeated.
environment. Topics for this course include pest management,           One credit.
agricultural techniques, forest and land management, nutrient
cycles, soil composition and chemical/physical properties, urban       GCSC 608 Principles, History and Issues of Science
and rural sprawl, solid waste disposal, pollution clean-up meth-       Education
ods, and wildlife management techniques. Three credits.                This course is designed to introduce and redefine today’s science
                                                                       pedagogy with respect to constructivism, questioning skills, tradi-
GCEE 628 Meteorology and Air Quality                                   tional and non-traditional science assessment, science curriculum
This course is designed to study the impacts of humankind on air       development, science learning cycles, textbook analysis, teacher
quality and climatic factors and the use of environmental field        centered versus student centered activities and inquiry based sci-
methods to measure the impact. This course will raise awareness        ence education. This course will also investigate a wide range of
of the issues that surround outdoor and indoor air quality that lead   historical, social and religious issues and their relation to science
to a sustainable environment. Topics for this course include early     education. Students will explore current classroom science-edu-
atmospheric composition and history, meteorology, air pollution        cation problems and learn how to overcome these issues. Three
and control mechanisms, regulatory measures related to the             credits
Clean Air Act, indoor and outdoor air pollution, global atmospher-
ic issues (such as the Greenhouse effect and ozone depletion)          GCSC 618 Forestry and Wildlife Management and Field
and local atmospheric issues (such as acid precipitation and           Techniques
ozone). Three credits.                                                 This course explores the concepts and theories of sustainable
                                                                       forestry and wildlife management practices. Topics include tem-
GCEE 638 Groundwater Hydrology, Aquatic Ecosystems and                 perate forest ecology and conservation, roles of wildlife in forest
Resources                                                              ecosystems, key concepts in forest and wildlife conservation,
This course is designed to study the impacts of humankind on           impacts of forestry practices and landscape modification on
groundwater hydrology, aquatic ecosystems and its resources.           wildlife populations, ecology and viability of wildlife populations
This course will raise awareness of the issues that surround water     and human uses and abuses of our natural resources. Three
quality that lead to a sustainable fresh water supply. Topics for      credits
this course include water quality, stream assessment, wastewater
management, groundwater flow as it is related to lithospheric          GCSC 628 Materials Science and Engineering
composition, flood control, water pollution (including acid mine       This course introduces the basic concepts of materials science
drainage and acid precipitation), and regulatory measures related      and engineering. The concepts of atomic, crystal, micro- and
to the Clean Water Act. Three credits.                                 macrostructure, and their control and effects on chemical, electri-
                                                                       cal, magnetic, optical, and mechanical properties. Furthermore,
GCEE 648 Environmental Law and Ethics                                  students will study the effects of stress and temperature on struc-
This course will first examine the legislative and regulatory          tures, mechanical properties, characteristics of metals, ceramics
process, discussing the bases, guidelines, and proceedings             and polymers, materials processing, electrical and optical materi-
involved in the creation, implementation, oversight and enforce-       als, and materials selection. Three credits
ment of environmental laws, rules and regulations. To this end, a
brief review of the legislative process will be covered, followed by   GCSC 638 Cell Systems and Functions
an explanation and examination of the Administrative Procedures        This course examines cellular regulation with a focus largely on
Act (APA), which is the foundation for all actions and proceedings     macromolecular events and themes centered on: cellular commu-
by and before regulatory agencies. Students will engage in dis-        nication, homeostasis and response to stress. Topics will also
cussions about the Clean Air Act and the differences between           cover receptor function, cell adhesion and migration, dynamics of
legal and ethical decision-making. Three credits.                      the cellular cytoskeleton, intracellular transport, and regulation of
                                                                       endocrine responses. Emphasis will be on regulation of these
                                                                       processes with a focus on basic properties, mechanisms, histori-
                                                                       cal discoveries where relevant, and current models and controver-
                                                                       sies. Three credits




22 – Master Degrees in Education
GCSC 648 Science Classroom Management and Laboratory
Experiences                                                          Master of Science in Health
This course is designed to introduce and refine classroom man-
agement skills specifically related to teaching science in the       Services Leadership
classroom and in the laboratory setting. Topics of discussion will   Dawn Edmiston, Director
include classroom and laboratory safety, current science safety      A. Mark Abramovic, Jeff Godwin, William Hisker, Richard Kunkle,
rules and regulations, chemical storage and disposal, laboratory     Carla Zema
room design and laboratory reports. Student will also be provided
an opportunity to explore science education technology related to    Adjunct Faculty: Jackie Heisler
their specific certification. Three credits
                                                                          The Health Services Leadership program seeks to prepare
GCSC 658 Science Practicum                                           qualified health care professionals for positions of leadership in
The purpose of the practicum is to provide a student with a          health care organizations. Students enrolled in this program can
research experience of working on a large project emphasizing        earn either a Master of Science degree or graduate certificate.
the synthesis of material covered in previous courses. The           This program is administered by the public policy program of the
practicum is generally an off-campus field experience/laboratory     Alex G. McKenna School of Business, Economics, and
based course where students may work independently or in a           Government.
small group on a project of realistic magnitude. The project will
involve the following: problem definition and design, implementa-    Program Goals
tion, validation, documentation, written and oral communication.          • To prepare qualified health care practitioners to become
Although each project will be supervised, the students are to        effective leaders in complex health care environments.
manage their project in an independent atmosphere and insure              • To develop individuals with a strong understanding of the
that the above project segments are completed in the time            organizational and social context of American health care.
imposed. Three credits                                                    • To enhance understanding of health care operations in
                                                                     order to assure ethical, responsible, and effective care for
                                                                     patients.
                                                                          • To prepare leaders who will be innovators, educators, and
                                                                     role models in health care organizations.
                                                                          • To provide students with a solid foundation for further aca-
                                                                     demic studies or advancement to senior management.

                                                                           Upon completion of the program, students will have acquired
                                                                     the abilities to:
                                                                           • Understand the health care system including organization-
                                                                     al, financial and economic dynamics and one’s own role in the
                                                                     context of these factors;
                                                                           • Apply knowledge of theories and models in advanced
                                                                     health care management areas;
                                                                           • Comprehend the standards of professional behavior and
                                                                     ethical conduct appropriate to health care and apply these stan-
                                                                     dards across their organization;
                                                                           • Demonstrate information literacy and the capacity to design
                                                                     and execute research in a targeted health care area;
                                                                           • Conduct research and evaluate current professional litera-
                                                                     ture in order to develop evidence based practice procedures and
                                                                     policies;
                                                                           • Design performance improvement techniques to determine
                                                                     optimal care by linking relevant measures of patient characteris-
                                                                     tics, processes, and outcomes;
                                                                           • Exhibit higher level skills in communication, critical thinking,
                                                                     and creative problem-solving appropriate to senior administration
                                                                     in a health care organization;
                                                                           • Assume a leadership role in collaboration with health care
                                                                     colleagues and serve as a role model for future health care
                                                                     providers.

                                                                     Admission
                                                                          For acceptance into the Health Services Leadership Master
                                                                     of Science degree track, applicants must possess an earned
                                                                     Bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution with a minimum
                                                                     undergraduate grade point average of a 3.0. Students with an
                                                                     undergraduate grade point average below a 3.0 must complete
                                                                     the Graduate Management Aptitude Test with a minimum score of
                                                                     500 and a minimum analytical writing assessment score of 4.0.
                                                                     Students should have foundational coursework in mathematics
                                                                     (sufficient to begin a course in statistics and research methods)
                                                                     and should have basic Microsoft Word and Excel skills. A TOEFL
                                                                     score of 550 or higher is required for applicants for whom English
                                                                     is not their native language.


                                                                                                        Master in Health Services Leadership – 23
     Applicants must submit a curriculum vitae/resume and two
professional recommendations. Recommenders should be super-
visors, instructors, or individuals in similar roles that can attest to
the academic and leadership potential of the applicant. All refer-        Course Descriptions
ence letters should clearly state the relationship between the indi-
vidual providing the reference and the applicant. Applicants must         HSL 550 U.S. Health Care Systems
also submit a personal statement of no more than 500 words                A comprehensive overview of U.S. health care systems covering
describing applicant’s professional experience and why they wish          structure, finance, governance, personnel, history, and cultural
to enroll in the Health Services Leadership program.                      values. Examination of critical challenges and interactions with
     For acceptance into the Health Services Leadership graduate          economic, technological, political, and social forces to include the
certificate track, applicants must possess an earned Bachelor’s           health care systems’ response to these influences. Three credits.
degree from an accredited institution. Official transcripts must be
submitted from each institution attended. In addition, applicants         HSL 560 Organization Development
must submit a completed application for Graduate Admission for            An introduction to perspectives on organization development and
Health Services Leadership, and indicate the certificate track on         change at the individual, group and organization levels.
the application. Applications for the Health Services Leadership          Considers key ideas in leadership, motivation, communication,
graduate certificate track will be reviewed on a case by case             human relations, decision-making, and policy formation as these
basis; therefore, a specific GPA requirement has not been set.            factors relate to health services administration. Course will inte-
     A person may register for up to nine (9) credits of graduate         grate case studies and provide opportunities to develop effective
study as a non-degree student by completing a non-degree stu-             communication skills. Three credits.
dent application and submitting official transcripts to the Office of
Graduate & Continuing Education. The non-degree student must              HSL 565 Health Care Economics and Public Policy
follow the same policies as the degree seeking graduate student.          An introduction to economic and public policy factors that affect
Non-degree students are ineligible for financial aid. If a non-           health care systems. Provides a review of relevant economic con-
degree student wishes to become a candidate for either the                cepts and covers topics such as demand for health services,
Master of Science degree or graduate certificate, the applicant           health care provider behavior, implications of insurance strate-
must officially apply to the program following all application pro-       gies, cost containment, health technologies and government reg-
cedures outlined above.                                                   ulations. Pre-requisite: Basic knowledge of Microsoft Excel. Three
     See Saint Vincent College Rules for Graduate Study for addi-         credits.
tional information on special student status and rules for the trans-
fer of credits. International students are required to meet the col-      HSL 580 Financial Administration for Health Care
lege standards set forth in the Admission Requirements for                Organizations
International Students. Contact the Office of Graduate &                  Introduction to key concepts of financial management as applied
Continuing Education for International Admissions requirements.           to health care organizations. Examines practical financial issues
                                                                          that are faced in the operation of a health care institution. Sources
Courses Required for the Master of Science Degree (36 credits)            of funds, budget creation and implementation, interpretation of
HSL   550       U.S. Health Care Systems                          3       financial information, and the use of financial analysis in organiza-
HSL   560       Organization Development                          3       tional decision-making. Examples from both profit and non-profit
HSL   565       Health Care Economics and Public Policy           3       sectors will be examined. Three credits.
HSL   580       Financial Administration for Health Care
                Organizations                                     3       HSL 590 Human Resource Management
HSL 590         Human Resource Management                         3       Topics in human resource management related to health care
HSL 600         Leadership and Ethics                             3       organizations including recruitment and selection, assessment of
HSL 605         Quality Improvement in Health Care                        performance, compensation strategies and staff development will
                Organizations                                     3       be examined. This course will utilize applied exercises to develop
HSL 610         Strategic Management of Complex                           skills needed to leverage human resource talent and to administer
                Organizations                                     3       policies in the most effective manner. Three credits.
HSL 630         Research Development                              3
HSL 640         Research Methods                                  3       HSL 600 Leadership and Ethics
HSL 650         Directed Research (topic determined by student)   3       A theoretical and applied treatment of the pervasive and challeng-
Approved    Elective Course                                       3       ing task of leading in a complex global environment and address-
                                                                          ing the issues of continuous improvement within a framework of
Courses Required for the Graduate Certificate (18 credits)                ethical leadership. Students will learn leadership theories, con-
HSL   550     U.S. Health Care Systems                            3       cepts, and applications that will allow them to successfully initiate,
HSL   560     Organization Development                            3       analyze, and implement various types of organizational changes.
HSL   565     Health Care Economics and Public Policy             3       Specifically, through a series of case studies, students will
HSL   605     Quality Improvement in Health Care                          demonstrate their understanding of key ethical issues as they are
              Organizations                                       3       related to operational excellence decisions. Three credits.
Additional HSL course selected from HSL 570 – HSL 610             3
Additional HSL course selected from HSL 570 – HSL 610             3       HSL 605 Quality Improvement in Health Care Organizations
                                                                          A comprehensive study of the philosophy, methodologies, tools,
                                                                          and issues related to quality improvement in health care organiza-
                                                                          tions. Introduction to main approaches to operational improve-
                                                                          ment with an emphasis on quality standard setting, system design
                                                                          and organizational change strategies, reporting mechanisms, and
                                                                          effectiveness assessment. The relationship between quality
                                                                          improvement programs, risk management, and utilization review
                                                                          will be emphasized. Three credits.



24 – Master in Health Science
HSL 610 Strategic Management of Complex Organizations
Strategies for envisioning, developing, and managing change           Master of Science in Health
within complex organizations. Critical course concepts include
environmental scanning, translation of data into knowledge, and       Sciences
the development of a business case that advances larger organi-
zational strategy. The course will also consider the impact of com-   Nurse Anesthetist Program
munication, decision-making, and resource mobilization. Three
credits.                                                              Bettie A. Davis, Ph.D., Coordinator
                                                                      James Barnett; Bettie A. Davis; Daryle Fish; Michael Rhodes;
HSL 630 Research Development                                          Michael Sierk
This course guides each graduate degree student in selecting a
directed research topic, completing a literature review, examining    Adjunct Faculty: Howard Armour; Mike DeBroeck; Angelo
research design and constructing a conceptual framework for the       DeMezza; Beverly J. Silvis; Daniel Stairs
topic. A comprehensive concept paper that considers the select-
ed topic is developed. Three credits.                                      This program is designed to prepare practitioners in the area
                                                                      of anesthesia, to prepare nurse anesthetists to serve as leaders,
HSL 640 Research Methods                                              educators and role models in anesthesia and health care teams,
This course examines strategies for gathering and organizing          to prepare specialists who are able to facilitate managerial
data and undertaking statistical data analysis in health care envi-   improvement in the delivery of anesthesia service.
ronments. Introduction to statistical reasoning and interpretation         Upon completion of the master’s level nurse anesthetist pro-
with an emphasis on operational excellence methods and data           gram, the students will be able to demonstrate in-depth knowl-
analysis using Microsoft Excel. Pre-requisite: Basic knowledge of     edge of the fundamental sciences to insure greater competence
Microsoft Excel. Three credits.                                       in anesthesia practice, engage in collateral reading in anatomy,
                                                                      physiology, chemistry, pharmacology and clinical subjects related
HSL 650 Directed Research                                             to the field of anesthesia. The program will help the student to
Individual research project that applies and integrates knowledge     assume a leadership role in collaboration with health care team
gained in the program. Emphasis on action research and the            members, function as a resource person in the training of para-
development of evidence based programs and practices in health        medical personnel and in nursing care of the acutely ill. The stu-
care settings. Must be taken as the final course in the program.      dent will be able to apply principles of research to the clinical
Transfer credit cannot be earned for this course. Three credits.      anesthesia setting, design, evaluate and implement an anesthetic
                                                                      care plan for a patient, utilize appropriate scientific principles
                                                                      related to asepsis, anesthesia and respiratory technique, apply
                                                                      knowledge of nursing theories and modes in advanced nursing
                                                                      and specialty areas of nurse anesthesia.

                                                                      The program requires 57 credits of courses taken in the following
                                                                      sequence:
                                                                      Fall: Year One
                                                                      HSC   001    Professional Aspects of Anesthesia Practice
                                                                      HSC   500    Pharmacology I
                                                                      HSC   503    Organic and Medicinal Chemistry
                                                                      HSC   505    Introduction to Principles of Anesthesia
                                                                      HSC   515    Physical Assessment
                                                                      HSC   521    Anatomy, Physiology and Pathophysiology I

                                                                      Spring: Year One
                                                                      HSC   501    Pharmacology II
                                                                      HSC   504    Biochemistry
                                                                      HSC   522    Anatomy, Physiology and Pathophysiology II
                                                                      HSC   530    Didactics I

                                                                      Summer: Year One
                                                                      HSC 510      Nursing Research I (first six weeks)
                                                                      HSC 512      Medical Physics (second six weeks)

                                                                      Fall: Year Two
                                                                      HSC 612      Nursing Research II
                                                                      HSC 630      Didactics II

                                                                      Spring: Year Two
                                                                      HSC 655      Advanced Theory and Practice of Anesthesia
                                                                      HSC 700      Leadership and Management for the Nurse Anesthetist




                                                                                                                   Master in Health Science – 25
                                                                       HSC 515 Physical Assessment
                                                                       This course in physical assessment provides the nurse anesthesia
Course Descriptions                                                    student with the needed skills and knowledge to perform a thor-
                                                                       ough preoperative assessment and evaluations of the surgical
HSC 001 Professional Aspects of Anesthesia Practice                    patients. History taking and physical examination presented in
This course includes an introduction to the ethics, psychology,        this course will enable the nurse anesthesia student to develop
and professional adjustments associated with a career in anesthe-      the strong assessment skills that are required of a certified regis-
sia. The history of anesthesia and nurse anesthesia is presented       tered nurse anesthetist. Two credits.
as well as a discussion of the role of the CRNA in department
management and organization. Zero credits..                            HSC 521 Human Anatomy, Physiology and Pathophysiology I
                                                                       This course is a study of the principles of structure and function of
HSC 500 Pharmacology I                 Three credits                   the human body. It deals primarily with the muscle, nervous, and
HSC 501 Pharmacology II                Three credits                   cardiovascular systems. The thorough investigation of these sys-
This is a two-semester course which will cover the basic princi-       tems in the healthy body enables the student to study the patho-
ples of pharmacology needed in daily practice. This includes           physiology of the above systems. Five credits.
drug effect, mechanism and interactions. In most cases, empha-
sis will be on the pharmacological action of drugs on specific         HSC 522 Human Anatomy, Physiology and Pathophysiology II
organ systems. In some instances, drugs will be discussed in           This course is a continuation of HSC 521, Human Anatomy,
relation to their clinical use in anesthesia. Three credits.           Physiology and Pathophysiology I. The cardiovascular, respiratory,
                                                                       renal, hepatic and endocrine systems will be studies.
HSC 503 Organic and Medicinal Chemistry                                Representative pathophysiology of each system will also be dis-
This is a one-semester survey course in organic chemistry organ-       cussed. Five credits.
ized around functional groups of compounds. Aspects of organic
chemistry pertinent to health, environment, and biochemistry are       HSC 530 Didactics
stressed. Time permitting; classes of drug molecules will also be      Anesthesia didactics integrates previous classes that the anesthe-
examined. Because concepts such as spatial orientation and             sia student has taken with new material in a seminar fashion. Six
geometric, optical and conformational isomerisms are essential to      credits.
an understanding of drug action, these concepts are essential to
the course. Three credits.                                             HSC 612 Research II
                                                                       This second research course is designed to provide the student
HSC 504 Biochemistry                                                   with the opportunity to apply theoretical concepts and skills
This introduction to the chemistry of living organisms includes a      derived from the first research course to the development of a
discussion of cellular macromolecules, metabolic pathways, ener-       thesis or an alternate research activity. The student is assisted in
gy transformation and respiratory mechanisms. The composition          the preparation of a thesis/project specific to a phenomenon relat-
of body fluids is also considered. The effects of anesthesia on        ed to nursing practice. Particular emphasis is placed on responsi-
body fluids, on the function of major organs, and on the activity of   bility of participation in scientific inquiry and on adhering to ethics
specialized molecules is also considered. Finally, the major theo-     in the design and conduct of research. Three credits.
ries of narcosis and their biochemical implications will be cov-
ered. Four credits.                                                    HSC 630 Didactics II
                                                                       This is a continuation of Didactics I. This course will increase the
HSC 505 Introduction to Principles of Anesthesia                       level of information and integration. Six credits.
This introductory course will introduce the basics of anesthesia for
the beginning nurse anesthesia student. Methods of anesthesia          HSC 655 Advanced Theory and Practice of Anesthesia
and specialized equipment will be introduced. Students will be         This course is designed to build upon the students’ basic knowl-
afforded the opportunity to practice basic anesthesia techniques       edge and skills. It will encompass and integrate a variety of input
on the computerized human simulator. Two credits.                      for medical and anesthetic management. It will focus on a greater
                                                                       depth of understanding and the ability to analyze concurrent
HSC 510 Research Methodology                                           problems that can arise in patient care and propose and appro-
This course will critically examine the steps of the research          priate course of management. Four credits.
process. Emphasis will be placed on research needs and the
identification of researchable problems in nursing. Utilization of     HSC 700 Leadership and management for the Nurse
research knowledge as applied in nursing practice will be dis-         Anesthetist
cussed. Students will develop skills in evaluating and critically      This course will explore critical topics in healthcare organizational
analyzing nursing research. Three credits.                             and systems leadership as relevant to the nurse anesthetist. The
                                                                       course will emphasize the primacy of clinical work, quality mod-
HSC 512 Medical Physics                                                els, and continuous healthcare quality improvement. Leadership
This course deals with a basic review of math, the metric system,      and managerial communication strategies necessary to move
organic chemistry and physics. The instructor will attempt to          interdisciplinary groups toward common goals and objectives will
demonstrate the anesthetic applications of these basic concepts.       be studied Students will learn to create missions and visions for
Specific topics to be covered include, but are not limited to, pres-   cultures of excellence in healthcare organizations. Leadership
sure, hydrostatics, hydrodynamics, ideal gas laws, osmosis,            models and their effects on healthcare organizational structure will
vaporization, heat and temperature, fire and explosions, CO2           be examined. Three credits.
absorption, Archimedes principle, flow meters, diffusion, acid-
base, and a review of chemistry. Four credits.




26 – Master in Health Science

				
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