SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS FOR USE OF by 5SjJdD

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									                 QUICK TIPS FOR DRY ICE
                       POTENTIAL HAZARDS
                 SEVERE FROSTBITE
                 SUFFOCATION
                 INCREASED HEART RATE, DAMAGE
                  TO NERVOUS SYSTEM, DIZZINESS
PROPERTIES
   Dry ice is extremely cold, -109°F (-79°C).
   Dry ice does not melt; it sublimates (changes directly from solid to
    gas), releasing CO2, which is heavier than air.
   In poorly ventilated spaces it can displace air, causing asphyxiation.

SAFE HANDLING
   Personal protective equipment – insulated gloves or tongs, safety
    glasses, lab coat or long sleeve shirt, long pants and closed toe shoes.
   Ventilate! (Don’t put your head in the dry ice freezer).
   Avoid unprotected contact with skin and eyes.
   Do not ingest.
   If possible, cover with a cloth before breaking into smaller pieces.
   Never store dry ice in glass or other sealed containers. Store in a
    Styrofoam chest with a loose fitting lid.
   Do not place on a tile or laminated countertop; use a solid surface.
   Do not store in a refrigerator freezer, as it may cause the thermostat to
    turn off the freezer.
FIRST AID
   Frozen tissues should be soaked with tepid, not hot, water. See a
    doctor if the skin blisters or comes off.
   Apply antibiotic ointment to prevent infection.
DISPOSAL
   Allow it to sublimate to the atmosphere in a well-ventilated area.
   Do not dispose of in sewers, sinks or garbage bins.
   Do not dispose of in areas accessible to the general public.

                                                      FHSc. Safety Office, December 2007

								
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