To the Editor: by 8lhHc75x

VIEWS: 19 PAGES: 2

									To the Editor:

March is National Kidney Month, a time for raising awareness about chronic kidney disease (CKD) and
its associated health problems worldwide. This month, I encourage all of your readers to educate
themselves about CKD, how it is on the rise globally and here in [state], and how they and their loved
ones may be able to avoid developing it by learning more about its risk factors.

CKD is an incurable disease that often shows no symptoms. Once it progresses to kidney failure, patients
must undergo dialysis or a transplant for survival. CKD now affects more than 27 million Americans of
all ages, ethnicities and backgrounds, and as its risk factors – such as high blood pressure, diabetes and
obesity – increase, its impact is growing. As someone who has suffered from kidney failure for [#] years,
I know first-hand how early education about CKD is vital.

Taking simple steps, such as learning more about CKD and talking to your doctor if you believe you are
at risk, can make a difference. You can learn more and help support CKD education efforts by visiting
the website of a non-profit organization I volunteer with, Dialysis Patient Citizens:
www.dialysispatients.org.

Please take a moment to learn about this widespread disease; it can make a serious difference in your own
health or in that of a loved one.

Sincerely,
[Name]



To the Editor:

March is National Kidney Month, and during this time I encourage our community to learn more about
chronic kidney disease (CKD), a dangerous and incurable disease that is on the rise across the nation and
here in [state].

Common, widespread risk factors for CKD include high blood pressure, diabetes and obesity. If you have
one of these conditions or a family history of CKD, I encourage you to learn more about CKD and to talk
to your doctor. As someone who has been on dialysis for [#] years, I know first-hand the value of early
education about this disease.

If you are diagnosed, there are many things you can do to improve your quality of life while on dialysis,
and there are organizations that can help. I belong to a group called Dialysis Patient Citizens
(www.dialysispatients.org), which provides tips for healthy living and a community of inspiring,
empowered patients for ongoing support.

The most important thing is to educate yourself, because due to CKD’s lack of symptoms, you may have
lost kidney function without knowing it. I hope you will all take a moment during National Kidney
Month to learn more about the disease and what you can do to help educate others.

Sincerely,
[name]
To the Editor:

I have been living with chronic kidney disease (CKD), a condition now affecting more than 27 million
Americans nationwide, for [#] years. Because it was not diagnosed early, I must rely on dialysis three
times a week, every week, for my survival.

March is National Kidney Month, and I hope my story will help inspire others in our community to
become educated about CKD and its risk factors. Common conditions like diabetes, high blood pressure
and obesity can lead to CKD, and it is important to talk to your doctor if you have one or more of these
risk factors.

If you are diagnosed, there is hope, and you can maintain an active and healthy life while on dialysis. I
volunteer with an organization called Dialysis Patient Citizens (www.dialysispatients.org), which
provides tips for healthy living, education on CKD treatment and policies, and ways to get involved with
improving dialysis patients’ quality of life.

I hope people will take the time to learn more about this disease so that together, we can stop its
progression.

Sincerely,
[name]

								
To top