Revised Preschool Tomatoes by bwIjXO

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									Food $ense Kids
Tomatoes
Written by Kelsey Eller RD and Heidi LeBlanc
Brought to you by the Utah Food $ense program
Part 3 of the Preschool Obesity Prevention: Meal Planning and Quick Meals

Objectives
Participant will:
   1.   Participate in a cooking/food sensory experience and sample food.
   2.   Participate in a physical activity or game that reinforces food concept.
   3.   Identify food name through reading, writing or other activity.
   4.   Participate in a food exposure experience by doing an art, craft or other activity.

Teacher Instructions:
*Background facts and information for the teacher is included on page 8.

This curriculum is to be used in a variety of ways. If time is limited, pick one food experience and one
activity to supplement. Each activity is to be approximately 10-15 minutes. Additional activities are
included in the back of this lesson that can be substituted or included in the lesson.

Required Materials:
   Introduction materials – Fresh tomatoes to pass around.
   Ingredients and materials for food demonstration (page 4).
   Physical activity materials (page 2).
   Reading/writing activity materials (page 3).
   Art, craft and other activity materials (page 3).
   Take Home message (page 8).
       Utah Food $ense – required paperwork for program.
Optional Supplemental Materials:
   Extra tomato picture included on page 9.

Preparation Required:
   Review lesson plan.
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     Review teacher background information.
     Gather ingredients and materials needed to demonstrate the recipe (see pg. 4-5).
     Make copies of recipes and take home messages handout you wish to distribute (see page 4-5) –
        enough for all class participants to take home to families.

                                                       LESSON PLAN

Introduction
Time: 5 minutes
What am I?
    Ask the following questions (have a tomato in a brown bag)
    I am red, what am I?
    I grow on a vine, what am I?
    I have good vitamins called lycopene, what am I?
    I make a great salsa, what am I?
    I make a great pizza sauce, what am I?
    I make an awesome spaghetti sauce, what am I?
    A tomato!
    Then have the children touch and feel and smell the tomato – ask them about the texture, about
       the color, size. Have them talk to you about what they see.
    If there is time, have the children draw tomatoes and write down the responses they had for the
       tomato (texture, color, size, etc.)
    Types of tomatoes: grape, cherry, roma, plum, red round, etc.

Objective 1: Participate in a cooking/ food sensory experience and sample food.
Time: 5 minutes
    Bruschetta
    Grape tomatoes and mozzarella cheese skewers
    Broiled tomatoes


Objective 2: Participate in a physical activity or game that reinforces food concept.
Time: 5-10minutes
I am a tomato and I won’t squirt you--(play to ‘I have a little doggy and he won’t bite you’).
To Play:
    Have children sit in a circle and one person walks around and taps them on the shoulder and says ,
       I am a tomato and I won’t squirt you and I won’t . . . .but I will squirt you. And then they run
       around the circle trying to get back into their place without being tagged.




Objective 3: Identify food name through a reading, writing or other activity.
Time: 10-15 minutes

Read “I Will Not Ever Never Eat A Tomato” by Lauren Child.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________
Objective 4: Participate in a food exposure experience by doing an art, craft, or
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other activity.
Time: 10 minutes
Tomato Face
    Give each child a copy of pages 6-7.
    Each child can cut out, color, and paste the mouths and eyes onto the tomato.

_____________________________________________________________________________
Conclusion:
Time: 5 minutes
    Did you like the tomato?
    When you eat tomatoes do they squirt?
    How do you keep your tomato from squirting? Do you like it squirting into your mouth?


Resources :

www.thefashionary.net
http://www.makingfriends.com/preschool/fruit_eyes.htm




This material was funded by USDA’s Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program – SNAP. The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)
provides nutrition assistance to people with low income. It can help you buy nutritious foods for a better diet. To find out more, contact 1-800-221-5689
or visit online at http://www.fns.usda.gov/snap/. In accordance with Federal Law and U.S. Department of Agriculture policy, this institution is prohibited
from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, religion, political beliefs or disability.
To file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, 1400 Independence
Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20250-9410 or call (800)795-3572.



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                                             RECIPES
                                            TOPIC: Tomatoes

Bruschetta

Ingredients

Tomatoes (4 largely diced)
Red Onion (1 qtr – diced very small)
Garlic (1 clove – diced very small)
Basil (6 or 7 leaves – diced very small)
Dried Oregano (1 ½ teaspoon)
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
French Baguette – toast 5-10 minutes in 375 degree oven – until golden crispy.

Directions

Dice all ingredients as listed above. Put in a large bowl. Mix. Toast bread and top with bruschetta. Enjoy!

Grape Tomatoes and Mozzarella Cheese Skewers

Ingredients

Grape Tomatoes (2 or 3 per person)
Soft Mozzarella balls (2 or 3 per person)
Olive Oil
Salt and Pepper

Directions

Place tomatoes and mozzarella balls on skewer, alternating. Drizzle or spray (with a Pam Olive Oil) and
salt and pepper to taste.



      Tomato Fun Facts:
              Tomatoes are a good source of Vitamin A and C.

              Tomatoes are very versatile. They can be prepared stuffed, baked,
               boiled, stewed, pickled, and fried, and are the base of many sauces.

              The average American consumes 22 pounds of tomatoes a year.

              There are more than 4,000 varieties of tomatoes!



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Broiled Tomatoes

Ingredients

4 tomatoes
¼ C balsamic vinaigrette dressing
½ C grated parmesan cheese

Directions

Preheat broiler. Wash tomatoes and remove the center. Cut tomatoes in half. Place each tomato half
right side up on a cooking sheet. Sprinkle grated parmesan cheese over each tomato. Broil the tomatoes
halves until the cheese has melted, approximately 8-12 minutes.




This material was funded by USDA’s Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program – SNAP. The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)
provides nutrition assistance to people with low income. It can help you buy nutritious foods for a better diet. To find out more, contact 1-800-221-5689
or visit online at http://www.fns.usda.gov/snap/. In accordance with Federal Law and U.S. Department of Agriculture policy, this institution is prohibited
from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, religion, political beliefs or disability.
To file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, 1400 Independence
Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20250-9410 or call (800)795-3572.


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                                                    Preschool Curriculum
                                                         Tomatoes
                                               Background Teaching Information
Varieties:
Varieties are commonly divided into these categories, based mostly on shape, use and size:
    Cherry: sweet tomatoes, usually eaten whole in salads
    Plum: pear-shaped, more meaty, ideal for tomato products, also called Italian or Roma
    Slicing: round or globe-shaped, used mainly for commerce and processed products
    Beefsteak: round, juicy, used mainly for sandwiches

Nutrition/Eating:
Tomatoes are:
      An excellent source of Vitamins A and C.
      A source of potassium, Vitamin B6 and thiamin.
      Rich in lycopene, the carotenoid responsible for the red color in tomatoes and other red fruits and
         vegetables. Lycopene is a powerful antioxidant that may decrease the risk of certain cancers and heart
         disease. Cooked tomato products, sauces and juices contain higher amounts of lycopene than raw
         tomatoes due to greater concentration.

                One serving of tomatoes is about one cup chopped tomato.
                Tomatoes are low fat, saturated fat free, very low in sodium, cholesterol free, low calorie, high in vitamin
                 A and C and a good source of potassium.
                Tomatoes are very versatile. They can be eaten raw on sandwiches, fried, stewed, sautéed; grill them,
                 broil them, stuff them, sauce them, add to salads, and so much more!

Fun Facts:
              In the 1893 U.S. Supreme Court case of “Nix v. Hedden,” the tomato was declared a vegetable, along with
               cucumbers, squashes, beans and peas. This came about as a result of tariff laws in 1887, which imposed a
               duty on vegetables but not fruits.
              There are more than 4,000 varieties of tomatoes ranging in size, shape and color.
              According to the USDA, Americans eat more than 22 pounds of tomatoes each year, more than half of this
               amount in the form of ketchup and/or tomato sauce.

Selection/Storage:
Cold temperatures damage tomatoes, so never buy tomatoes that are stored in a cold area. Choose plump tomatoes
with smooth skins that are free from bruises, cracks, or blemishes. Depending on the variety, ripe tomatoes should
be completely red or reddish-orange.

Try to store tomatoes out of direct sunlight, because sunlight will cause them to ripen unevenly. If you must store
them for a longer period of time, place them in the refrigerator.

Resources:
http://www.sps.lane.edu/157710231546560/lib/157710231546560/HOM/OR_tom_edu_Oct-1.pdf
http://extension.usu.edu/files/publications/publication/FN_Food$ense_2011-05pr.pdf
This material was funded by USDA’s Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program – SNAP. The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) provides nutrition assistance to people with low
income. It can help you buy nutritious foods for a better diet. To find out more, contact 1-800-221-5689 or visit online at http://www.fns.usda.gov/snap/. In accordance with Federal Law and U.S.
Department of Agriculture policy, this institution is prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, religion,
political beliefs or disability. To file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, 1400 Independence Avenue,
S.W., Washington, D.C. 20250-9410 or call (800)795-3572.




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        (800)795-3572.




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