Pandemic Flu Plan Polk by bwIjXO

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									                                        TABLE OF CONTENTS

Polk County Pandemic Flu Plan ...................................................................................... 2
  How will the Community be Affected? .......................................................................... 2
  Journey to Polk County School Board’s Pandemic Flu Plan begins… .......................... 2
  Pandemic Flu Planning Begins….. ................................................................................. 3
  Long Road Begins…………………............................................................................... 3

So what is the Pandemic Flu? .......................................................................................... 3
  Epidemic vs. Pandemic ................................................................................................... 3
  Over the past 500 years……… ....................................................................................... 3
  Historical Perspective ..................................................................................................... 3
  Lessons from Past Pandemics ......................................................................................... 3

Pandemic Influenza Summary......................................................................................... 3

Pandemic vs. Epidemic Influenza .................................................................................... 4
  Influenza ......................................................................................................................... 4
  Symptoms of Influenza ................................................................................................... 4
  Influenza Transmission ................................................................................................... 4
  Influenza Complications ................................................................................................. 4
  When Children Get Influenza ......................................................................................... 5

Influenza Vaccines ............................................................................................................ 5

What Can We Do Now To Prepare For Possible Pandemic Flu? ................................ 5

How Will A Pandemic Affect Our Schools? ................................................................... 5
 Closing Schools .............................................................................................................. 6
 How Will The District Keep All Children From Falling Behind?.................................. 6
 What Can We Do Now To Prepare For Possible Pandemic Flu? ................................... 6
 Impact on School Personnel............................................................................................ 6
 Psychosocial Issues For School Personnel ..................................................................... 7
 Psychosocial Issues For Families Of School Personnel ................................................. 7

Pandemic Preparation ...................................................................................................... 8

It’s Here And It’s Bad! ..................................................................................................... 8
   References ....................................................................................................................... 8




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Polk County Pandemic Flu Plan

Presented by Robbin Chapman RN MSN
September 17, 2009

Are You Ready? Are We Ready?
Journey Began on August 15, 2006
   Attended Avian Flu Pandemic Tabletop Exercise
   Objectives included: Raise awareness on potential impact of: Bird Flu and Pandemic
    Flu
   Increase understanding of responsibilities for: agencies, institutions, and private
    industries and businesses

Members in Attendance from Polk County School District
   Director of Student Services
   Director of Safety
   Sr. Manager of Prevention, Health and Wellness
   RN-Teacher Resource Specialist, Trainer of Health Services and Prevention
    Education

How will the Community be Affected?
   Social distancing, isolation, or quarantine may be needed
   Could involve school closures and sporting event, entertainment, and social gathering
    cancellations
   Utility providers (electricity, water, sewer, telephone, Internet) could see service
    interruptions due to staffing shortages
   Business community develops alternate service delivery methods to ensure their
    continued viability. Telecommuting and video conferencing will likely increase.
   Call-in orders, home delivery, and mail-order businesses could thrive
   On-line banking will likely increase.
   Restaurants may convert to a home delivery model

Journey to Polk County School Board’s Pandemic Flu Plan
begins…
   Attended Pandemic Flu Summits in Orlando, Florida
   Decisions may be made for ventilator or ICU beds and patients
   Attended teleconferences AND OR webcasts
   Met with Polk County Health Department
   Department of Education teleconferences




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Pandemic Flu Planning Begins…..
   Subcommittee meeting to be organized.
   Subcommittee consists of: Director of Student Services, Director of Safety, Sr.
    Manager of Prevention, Health and Wellness, and RN-Teacher Resource Specialist
    Trainer of Health Services and Prevention Education

Long Road Begins…
   Developed preliminary Pandemic Flu Response Plan
   Preliminary Pandemic Flu Response Plan presented to subcommittee members
   Pandemic Flu Action Plan customized for Polk County School District

So what is the Pandemic Flu?
Epidemic vs. Pandemic
   Epidemic: serious outbreak in a single community, population, or region
   Pandemic: epidemic spreading around the world affecting hundreds of thousands of
    people, across many countries

Over the past 500 years…
   Three to four pandemics have occurred per century
   The longest period of time between pandemics is 42 years
   As of 2009, it has been 41 years since the last influenza pandemic

Historical Perspective
   Three influenza Pandemics in the last century
   1918 – 1919: (“Spanish Flu” H1N1) about 500,000 US deaths and up to 40 million
    deaths worldwide
   1957 – 1958: (“Asian Flu” H2N2) about 70,000 US deaths and 1-2 million deaths
    worldwide
   1968 – 1969: (“Hong Kong Flu” H3N2) about 34,000 US deaths and 700,000 deaths
    worldwide

Lessons from Past Pandemics
   Occurs unpredictably, not always in winter
   Great variations in mortality, severity of illness, and pattern of illness or age most
    severely affected
   Rapid surge in number of cases over brief period of time, often measured in weeks
   Tend to occur in waves – subsequent waves may be more or less severe

Pandemic Influenza Summary
   Highly infectious virus
   May mutate to infect animals and humans
   Most of population has no immunity


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   Easily transmitted from person to person
   Limited antiviral medications available
   Limited excess capacity in health care system
   No vaccine at onset. H1N1 vaccine ready in late September

Pandemic vs. Epidemic Influenza
Pandemic Flu
   New influenza virus
   More severe symptoms, more complications
   Entire population at risk of severe illness
   May cause social disruption
   Influenza

Seasonal Flu
   Virus is similar to previous strains
   Usual symptoms
   Very young and very old people at greatest risk
   Modest impact on society

Influenza
   Transmission from person to person
   Large-particle droplets
   Direct contact with infected secretions
   Incubation period: 5 to10 days

Symptoms of Influenza
   Sudden fever and or high fever
   Dry cough
   Sore throat
   Runny or stuffy nose
   Headache
   Muscle aches and body aches
   Stomach symptoms (generally no gastrointestinal symptoms, except children)

Influenza Transmission
   Coughing and sneezing within three feet
   Touching a surface with the virus

Influenza Complications
   Viral pneumonia
   Bacterial pneumonia
   Dehydration


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   Otitis (ear infection)
   Sinus problems
   Encephalitis (seizures, coma)
   Worsening of chronic conditions (asthma, diabetes)

When Children Get Influenza
   Rates of influenza infection are highest among children
   Rapid spread through schools, day care
   Influenza spreads to families and amplifies throughout the community
   Serious illness and deaths in people older than 2 years of age and younger than 65
    years of age
   Parents are absent from work
   Visit to the Pediatrician or Emergency Room
   Younger children may be hospitalized (especially infants under 6 months)
   (Inappropriate) antibiotics may be prescribed

Newer Recommendations for Children:
   Increased use of influenza vaccines
   Increased rapid testing for influenza infection in Physician offices, Emergency
    Rooms, and Walk-In Clinics
   Recommendations for limited use of antiviral medications (Tamiflu, Relenza)
   Emphasis on hand hygiene and “cough etiquette”

Influenza Vaccines
   Inactivated vaccine: traditional, injected vaccine. NOTE: you cannot get “the flu”
    from the vaccine!
   Live, attenuated intranasal vaccine: FluMist…..for healthy people 5 to 49 years of
    age.

What Can We Do Now To Prepare For Possible
Pandemic Flu?
   Hand washing: wash hands frequently with soap and water
   Respiratory hygiene: Coughs and sneezes cause diseases, use of social distancing
   “Cover Your Cough”
   Use tissues and dispose of them properly
   Stay home if you are ill
   Self-sufficiency: Stockpile water and non perishable food, prescribed medication, and
    health supplies
   Stay informed

How Will A Pandemic Affect Our Schools?
   Who coordinates decisions on closing schools or quarantining kids?
   If classes shut down for weeks, how will a district keep kids from falling behind?


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   Who will keep the payroll running, or ease the fear of parents?
   Who will provide food to children who count on school meals?

Closing Schools
•Severity of the Pandemic will determine a school closing.
   School closings are based on the characteristics of a pandemic.
   It is unlikely that schools will be closed for less than 2 weeks (based on incubation
    period of the disease and length of time people are contagious) and could be as long
    as 8 weeks.
   The Superintendent of Schools and the Polk County Health Department will
    determine school closures.

How Will The District Keep All Children From Falling Behind?
   Distance learning for reading, math, and science via:
     Instructional TV
     Internet
     Radio
     Telephone
     Community outreach

Anticipate Needs of Faculty and Staff
   How to help staff with health-care coverage and family concerns
   Ways to compensate for staff interruptions and work from home requests
   Faculty and staff leave requests, disability claims, medical leave policies
   Absentee policies, student attendance issues
   Transportation issues

Food For Children
   Make preparations at home: stock foods, water, and medicines.
   Be prepared for food supply disruption.
   Reliable communication within and across school communities (employees, parents,
    students, vendors, and community members) for food delivery if needed.

What Can We Do Now To Prepare For Possible Pandemic Flu?
   Staff and students that are sick should stay home!
   Cover nose and mouth with a tissue.
   “Cough etiquette” “Cover your cough”
   Wash hands often with soap and water
   Try not to touch eyes, nose, or mouth
   Disinfect keyboards, phones, and desks daily

Impact on School Personnel
   Increased risk of exposure


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   Illness and death among children and staff
   Ethical dilemmas
   Frustration with “business as usual”
   Physical isolation associated with infection control

Psychosocial Issues for School Personnel
   Concern about children and family
   Constant pressure to keep performing
   Domestic pressures caused by school closures
   Stress of working with symptomatic others
   Difficulty maintaining self-care
   Fear of contagion and transmitting to others

Psychosocial Issues For Families Of School Personnel
   Staff may be tired, worried, irritable, etc.
   Staff may be less optimistic and understanding
   Increased emergency workload may complicate communication with family
   Family members may be at risk of contagion

At The School Level
   Plan on a 30 percent reduction in work force and or school closure for two months.
   An education plan for isolated and quarantined students who are sick for at least two
    weeks.
   Resource needs such as soap, masks, gloves, etc.
   Increased symptom and attendance monitoring to ensure accurate reporting.

At the District Office
   Life, health, safety issues essential to accomplishing the mission of the school
    district…
   Standard Operating Procedures of critical functions, processes (payroll, insurance,
    etc.)
   “Daily” mission essential services and priorities
   Assign key team leaders and alternates.
   Assign team members by location.
   Develop and implement task checklists.
   Assign critical functions to be performed via telecommuting and other technology
    needs.
   Look at flex scheduling: shifts, longer hours of operations, alternate work days,
    etc.
   Identify staff that can be cross trained to backfill critical function.
   Identify functions that can be suspended while staff is reassigned to more critical
    roles.
   Track department absenteeism daily and report the percentages to the Polk County
    Health Department.


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Pandemic Preparation
   Train teachers and administrators on how to implement the district plan.
   Teach students and inform families so they understand what to do in the event of an
    influenza pandemic.

www.cdc.gov/flu/school/
   Recommendations for schools and child care providers
   Questions and answers: Flu information for schools
   Stopping germs at home, work, and school
   School materials and posters

www.PandemicFlu.gov
   One-stop resource for pandemic flu information, including school checklist to
    address…
   Planning and coordination
   Continuity of student learning and core operations
   Infection control policy and procedures
   Ongoing communication

It’s Here And It’s Bad!
References
   Avian influenza – fact sheet. (04, January 15). Retrieved November 22, 06, from
    World Health Organization Web Site: http://www.who.int/csr/don/2004_01_15/en
   Avian influenza frequently asked questions. (n.d.). Retrieved November 22, 06, from
    World Health Organization Web Site:
    http://www.who.int/csr/disease/avian_influenza/avian_faqs/en/
   Carr, N. (2006). Bracing for bird flu. American School Board Journal, , 37-47.
   Chettle, C. C., & Cohn, S. (2007). Are you prepared for a flu pandemic? Nursing
    Spectrum,, 16-19. Retrieved January 22, 2007, from Nursing Spectrum Web Site:
    http://www.nurse.com
   Dayton, L. V. (2006). Influenza concerns: Increased awareness of avian, pandemic,
    seasonal flu. Advance for Nurses, , 19. Retrieved December 25, 06, from
    http://www.advanceweb.com
   HHS Pandemic Influenza plan. (2005, November). Retrieved January 24, 07, from
    U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Web Site:
    http://www.pandemicflu.gov
   How is Florida preparing for Avian Flu? (n.d.). Retrieved August 31, 06, from
    Department of Health Website Web Site:
    http://www.doh.state.fl.us/rw_Bulletins/panfluplanindex.html
   Influenza: Are your schools ready? (n.d.). Retrieved October 30, 06, from
    Department of Homeland Security, Federal Emergency Management Agency, FEMA
    Independent Study Program (Emergency Management Institute) Web Site:
    http://www.training.fema.gov/emiweb/is/crslist.asp


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   Leavitt, M. O. (06, June 20). Department of Health and Human Services pandemic
    planning update ll, a report from Secretary Michael O. Leavitt. Retrieved December
    1, 06, from PandemicFlu.govWebsite Web Site:
    http://www.pandemicflu.gov/plan/pdf/panflureport2.pdf
   Lister, G. (2006). Chicken little, wash your hands. American School Board Journal, ,
    50-54.
   Osterholm, M. (2005). Preparing for the next pandemic. New England Journal of
    Medicine, 352, 1839-1842.
   Pandemic Influenza. (06, December 1). Retrieved December 1, 06, from Center for
    infectious Disease Research and Policy. Pandemic influenza Web Site:
    www.cidrap.umn.edu/cidrap/content/influenza/panflu/biofacts/panflu.html
   Pandemic influenza. (2005, November 11). Retrieved January 23, 2007, from
    Homeland Security Web Site: http//www.globalsecurity.org
   School district (K-12) pandemic influenza checklist and pandemic influenza planning:
    Checklist for individuals and families. (n.d.). Retrieved September 9, 06, from
    Pandemic Flu Website Web Site: http://www.pandemicflu.gov
   Taubenberger, J., & Morens, D. (06, December 1). 1918 influenza: The mother of all
    pandemics. Retrieved December 1, 06, from CDC website Web Site:
    http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/EID/vol12no01/05-0979.htm
   U. S. Department of Education. (n.d.). Practical information on crisis planning: A
    guide for schools and communities. Retrieved October 22, 06, from
    PandemicFlu.gov. Website Web Site:
    http://www.ed.gov/admins/lead/safety/emergencyplan/crisisplanning.pdf
   What is a Pandemic? (2007). Safer School News, 107, 1-5.
   What is a Pandemic? (n.d.). Retrieved January 25, 07, from World Health
    Organization Web Site: http://www.who.gov




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