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					                ADVANCED PLACEMENT UNITED STATES HISTORY
                              Course Syllabus
                                2012/2013

Instructor: Dan Knight
Email: dknight2@sandi.net
Phone: 858-273-0201 ext 4308
Tutoring: Monday-Thursday after school until 3:00 p.m.

REQUIRED READING:
   Brinkley, Alan, American History: A Survey, Boston: McGraw Hill, 2007
   Davidson and Lytle, After the Fact: The Art of Historical Detection New York: McGraw-
    Hill, 2004
   Meltzer, Bennet, Cracking the AP U.S. History Exam, The Princeton Review, 2008
   Zinn, Howard, A People’s History of the United States, New York: Harper Perennial,
    2005


Materials used in the course:
*1 inch three-ring binder and spiral notebook
* Notebook for reading notes
*8 dividers
*Positive attitude towards success.


COURSE DESCRIPTION:
AP United States History is a two-semester course that offers an issue-oriented approach in the
study of the people of the United States and their history. Major themes and traditions that make
America exceptional will be explored in great detail. The course is designed to acquaint students
with core characteristics and values found throughout the history of the United States and its
people. An analysis of those events and significant individuals will be done on a continuous
basis.
By the end of this course, students should have completed the following course objectives:
    1. An understanding of the institutional, cultural and social forces that have shaped the
       people of this nation from the early Eighteenth Century to the present day.
    2. The ability to locate American cities and states whose particular histories have
       contributed to the development of the United States.
    3. An analysis of the roles of various important and influential individuals, especially
       women and minorities, which have contributed to American history.
    4. Develop a framework for understanding modern day issues and problems based on their
       respective histories.
    5. An examination of the forces and issues that currently dominate the American political
       arena and the historical relevance of current events and issues.

APUSH Themes: The College Board developed twelve themes to encourage students to think
conceptually about the American past and to focus on historical change over time. These themes
are woven through the curriculum of the course in order to help students unify concepts and
synthesize material and place the history of the United States into a larger analytical context.

   American Diversity
   American Identity
   Culture
   Demographic Changes
   Economic Transformations
   Environment
   Globalization
   Politics and Citizenship
   Reform
   Religion
   Slavery and Its Legacies in North America
   War and Diplomacy

While the course continuously explores all of the above themes, particular emphasis rests on
diversity, change over time in American culture, economic transformation, religion, politics and
citizenship.

COURSE EXPECTATIONS:
Remember that the goal for each student, while taking this college level course, is to
prepare for the AP American History exam in May! Each of the following expectations is
designed to prepare students to succeed on this examination and acquire the necessary
skills to excel in a college-level environment.

Readings: Students will be expected to read assigned passages from the required reading list
prior to class meetings. Students should also be prepared to read on a regular basis (6-10 hours
per week).

Assignments: All assignments and exams will be due on their assigned dates. In most cases, late
work will only be accepted for half credit. All late work must be completed in class. Sloppy,
cluttered, or inappropriately formatted assignments will not be accepted. Students are expected to
complete all assignments and examinations on time. Although students are expected to see the
instructor about missed or late work, a "study buddy" is encouraged. Being absent the day before
an assignment or exam does not excuse a student from taking that exam except in unusual
circumstances.

Methods of Evaluation: All work will be graded on a point system. Reading quizzes are worth 15
points and end of unit tests are worth 280 points (multiple choice -80 points, essay – 100 points,
DBQ – 100 points). There will be projects assigned throughout the school year that will also add
to the total points for the grade.

A.P. Binders: Students must provide binders to use specifically for A.P.U.S.H. The binders
contain materials that will be used throughout the entire year to organize information and help
students prepare for the exam. Each binder contains handouts and information from each unit
and a reading calendar. Binders will be collected and graded at the end of every unit.

Unit Exams: There are a total of seven unit exams given over the entire year. Each exam is
formatted like the A.P. test. Unit exams take place over a three day period and attendance for
those three days is critical. If absent, students must have a parent notify the teacher of the
absence before an appointment will be made to schedule a make-up exam. Document Based
Questions and Free Response Questions will be graded on the following points scale:
       9….100
       8….93
       7….85
       6….80
       5….75
       4….66
       3….50
       2….25
       1….10

Reading Quizzes: Nightly reading will be essential to student’s preparation for the A.P. test in
May. Reading assignments are typically between eight to ten pages in length and will ALWAYS
be followed by a 20 point quiz during the next class period. Students must have hand-written
notes in order to take each quiz. Students must complete quizzes taken during their absence on
the NEXT day they are present. Quiz grades will be assigned based on the following:

       20- Student explains the essential features and possible connections of the issue/term
       15-Student explains most of the essential features but does not provide analysis
       5-Student provides minimal details, response is in note format

Class Participation: Studies have consistently shown that students who participate in class
discussions and activities are more likely to grasp learning objectives. Class participation, or a
lack thereof, will make a difference in one’s grade. Extra credit will be awarded to students who
participate in in-class discussions.

Attendance: Regular class attendance is strongly recommended since a majority of the course
will involve group discussions and activities that will aid in an understanding of the material.

Formal Projects: The importance of formal projects cannot be understated. In addition to daily
course activities, students should be prepared to argue a formal debate, create a student made
DBQ, and other project ideas that may arise.

Parental Input: This instructor recognizes parents and guardians as the primary educators of
students. As such, parents and guardians will be used as resources making students motivated
and successful learners.

PROCEDURES FOR EVALUATION:
Grades will be based on unit exams, quizzes, notebooks and projects. All grades will be assessed
on a point system. Extra credit will be given at the discretion of the instructor.
Students who do not show up for the scheduled exam as well as the scheduled make up exam
will receive zero points

Grading Scale:
90% - 100% = A
80% - 89% = B
70% - 79% = C
60% - 69% = D
0% - 59% = F
The Deal: Students that receive a 4 or a 5 on the A.P. exam will receive an A in the class. If
students are receiving a D or an F in the class they will not be eligible to have their grade
changed regardless of their score on the Advanced Placement Test. Students will be notified
before the A.P. test if they do not qualify for “The Deal”.


Citizenship, Attendance and Tardy Policy:
The expectation is that you will have good behavior and be civil with everyone in the classroom.
A positive, healthy learning environment is crucial to our success.
Cheating and plagiarism are unacceptable and can result in failure of the class. Attendance is
crucial to your grade. The school’s tardy policy will be rigorously enforced. Multiple absences
and tardies will drastically lower a student’s academic and citizenship grade. If absent, see me
immediately upon your return to see what you have missed. Make arrangements to make up
work within 2 days of your return.


                                     APUSH UNIT TOPICS

                   Unit I (Outline 1 – 4 from Course Description Booklet)
                           Pre - Columbian to Constitution [Ch. 1-7]

Themes: Effect of colonization on Native American culture, genesis of the American identity,
demographic shifts and patterns of colonial development (Spain, France, England); evolution of
regional patterns in colonial settlement in North America.

           o   Native inhabitants of the “new” world
           o   Reasons behind exploration and colonization
           o   Columbian exchange
           o   Differences in development of colonial regions; relations with Native Americans
           o   Origins of slavery
           o   Colonial resistance to authority
           o   Social and religious movements – Enlightenment, Great Awakening, Salem witch
               trials
           o   Colonial culture
           o   Colonial governments
           o   Mercantilism
           o   French and Indian War – causes, effects, Treaty of Paris 1763
           o   Mid 18th century changes to British colonial policy
           o   Resistance to British rule and Colonial cooperation
           o   Continental Congress, Declaration of Independence
           o   Revolutionary War – causes and effects; American and British advantages and
               disadvantages; foreign aid; Treaty of Paris 1783; impact of war on social groups
           o   Republican motherhood
           o   Interpretations of the American Revolution
           o   Articles of Confederation – structure, strengths, weaknesses, accomplishments
           o   Constitution – compromises, strengths, weaknesses
           o   Federalists and Anti-federalists, Federalist Papers
           o   Ratification
           o   Bill of Rights
Major Assignments/Exams
    Three Levels of Questioning – this is the first of three steps for students to analyze
      document
    Seven Step Essay Process – This is the process for students to develop effective first draft
      timed-essay writing techniques for the Free-Response Questions
    Introduction to writing a DBQ activity
    Colonial Pamphlet – Students will develop a stock prospectus on why an investor should
      invest into one of the colonial regions (Northern, Middle or Southern Colonies)
    Who Fired the First Shot? - A class analysis and discussion based on eyewitness accounts
      of hostilities at Lexington and Concord.
    80 question multiple choice exam
    Essay topics – On the day of the essay exam, two Free Response Questions will be
      randomly chosen and the students will write on one.
    DBQ – Article of Confederation
    Matching – students will match 25 identifications with 25 definitions
    Students complete graphic organizer assignment to guide them how to construct Free
      Response Question essays on unit test. Special emphasis is given to thesis writing,
      composing body paragraphs interlaced with concrete detail from the unit’s reading and
      conclusion.
    Students will practice writing the following FRQ in class. “Describe the Jeffersonian-
      Federalist struggle over the Judiciary. What were the causes, points of conflict and
      consequences of the struggle?”


                    Unit II (Outline 5 from Course Description Booklet)
                      New Republic to Era of Good Feelings [Ch. 8-10]

       Themes: The peaceful exchange of power, changing party philosophies, territorial growth,
       the growth of nationalism.

           o Hamilton’s financial plan
           o Washington’s cabinet, domestic policy, Whiskey Rebellion, foreign policy,
             relations with Native Americans
           o British and French relations and their impact on American politics
           o Emergence of political parties (Hamilton and Jefferson)
           o Concept of nullification (VA and KY Resolutions)
           o Jefferson’s domestic and foreign policy
           o War of 1812 – causes and effects; war hawks
           o Era of Good Feeling – is that an accurate title?
           o Clay’s American system
           o Nationalism
           o Missouri Compromise
           o Monroe Doctrine
           o Expansion of transportation networks, industry, and the market economy
           o Growth of the west
           o Native American relations and Indian removal
           o Entrenchment of slavery
           o Republican motherhood
           o Social classes in the north and south
           o Marshall Court

Major Assignments/Exams
    Essay Mobile – students will create a 3-demsional graphic organizer to help with their
      writing skills
    3 Levels of Questionings – Students will continue to develop their document analysis
      skills on a variety of primary and secondary documents
    80 question multiple choice exam
    Essay topics – On the day of the essay exam, two essays will be randomly chosen and the
      students will write on one
    DBQ – Jeffersonian Republicans and Constitution construction
    Matching – students will match 25 identifications with 25 definitions
    Students complete graphic organizer assignments to guide them how to construct Free
      Response Question essays on unit test. Special emphasis is given to thesis writing,
      composing body paragraphs interlaced with concrete detail from the unit’s reading and
      conclusion.
    In class DBQ from 1998 AP Released Exam: “With respect to the federal Constitution,
      The Jeffersonian Republicans are usually characterized as strict constructionist who were
      opposed to the Federalists’ broad constructionism. To what extent was this
      characterization of the tow parties accurate during the presidencies of Jefferson and
      Madison?”

                 Unit III (Outline 6 – 9 from Course Description Booklet)
                            Jackson to Mexican War [Ch. 11 – 13]
                  Zinn, “As Long As Grass Grows Or Water Runs” (CH.7)

       Themes: Development of the two-party system, “triumph of the common man,” economic
       issues of the 1830s and 1840s, reform movements in U.S. history

           o Democratization of American politics
           o Jackson’s administration – tariff crisis and nullification, Bank war, relationship
             with Calhoun, states’ rights debates
           o Jacksonian democracy – successes and limitations
           o Emergence of the second two party system
           o Second Great Awakening, Evangelical Protestantism, religious sects,
           o Transcendentalism and Utopian communities
           o Role of women in reform movements
           o Reforms – temperance, education, women, abolition, penitentiaries, asylums,
             almshouses
           o American culture – art, literature, music
           o Slavery – changes in 19th century slavery, impact on white social classes, impact
             on industrialization in the South, relationship with organized religion, impact on
             relationship between north and south
           o Westward expansion; Manifest Destiny; political differences regarding expansion
           o Immigration and nativism
           o Territorial acquisitions
           o Texas independence
           o War with Mexico
           o Options (and compromises) for dealing with slavery in the territories
Major Assignments/Exams
    SOAPSS – The students will go into the second step of document analysis
    PowerPoint Presentation – Students will create a PowerPoint presentation on one of the
      topics from section six of the course description booklet
    Debates – Students will debate a historical topic on
    80 question multiple choice exam
    Essay topics – On the day of the essay exam, two essays will be randomly chosen and the
      students will write on one
    DBQ – Jeffersonian Republicans and Constitution construction
    Matching – students will match 25 identifications with 25 definitions
    Students will analyze and answer the following FRQ question. “How did the American
      population change between 1820 and 1860? What were some of the responses of the
      Americans to these changes?”



                Unit IV (Outline 10 – 12 from Course Description Booklet)
                           Sectionalism to Reconstruction [14-17]
       Themes: Cultural and Social change, the country grapples with Civil War, slavery and
       segregation leading postponing.

          o Compromise of 1850 and popular sovereignty
            Great Triumvirate of Clay, Calhoun and Webster
          o Sectionalism
          o Kansas-Nebraska Act and Bleeding Kansas
          o Beginning of the Republican Party
          o Dred Scott Case
          o Election of 1860 and secession
          o Civil War – mobilization, causes, effects, advantages and disadvantages of both
            sides, strategies of both sides, foreign diplomacy, role of women, key battles,
            technology
          o Emancipation
          o Post war issues and changes in both regions
          o Presidential and Congressional Reconstruction plans; Judicial reconstruction
          o Southern state governments in the post-war years
          o Life for freedmen
          o Impeachment of Johnson
          o Jim Crow and disenfranchisement; KKK

Major Assignments/Exams
    Historical Information and Historical Inferences – This is the third and final step to
      document analysis
    Create a DBQ – Students will create their own DBQ
    Students will analyze various slave graphs and develop conclusions about slavery
    80 question multiple choice exam
    Essay topics – On the day of the essay exam, two essays will be randomly chosen and the
      students will write on one
    DBQ – Reconstruction
    Matching – students will match 25 identifications with 25 definitions
   Students complete graphic organizer assignments to guide them how to construct Free
    Response Question essays on unit test. Special emphasis is given to thesis writing,
    composing body paragraphs interlaced with concrete detail from the unit’s reading and
    conclusion.
   After completing graphic organizer students will answer the following essay question,
    “Describe the emergence of both the Republican Party and Abraham Lincoln as leading
    opponents of the westward expansion of slavery. How did the Dred Scott decision, the
    Lincoln Douglas debates, and John Brown’s raid on Harper’s Ferry escalate the sectional
    conflict and bring America to the brink of the Civil War?”



                                   Semester Break

             Unit V (Outline 13 – 18 from Course Description Booklet)
                         Gilded Age to Imperialism [Ch. 18 – 23]
       o   Expansion of railroads
       o   The West – miners, ranchers, cowboys
       o   Turner’s Frontier Thesis
       o   Conflicts with Native Americans
       o   Environmental impact of westward expansion and settlement
       o   Gilded Age
       o   Corporate consolidation of industry
       o   Robber Barons v. Captains of Industry
       o   Effects of technological advancements on workers and the workplace
       o   Labor unions – methods, successes, limitations
       o   Relationship between government and big business (tariff, land grants, role in
           strikes, court rulings)
       o   Immigration (old v new)
       o   Urbanization
       o   Differing opinions on the benefits and drawbacks of industrialization and
           urbanization (Social Darwinism, Gospel of Wealth, Social Gospel)
       o   City problems (public health, crime, sanitation, political machines)
       o   Politics in the Gilded Age – dominance of Republicans, patronage, civil service
           reform
       o   Agrarian discontent (railroads, big business, money supply)
       o   Alliance movement – success and limitations
       o   Populist Party – success and limitations
       o   Money issue – inflation, deflation, William Jennings Bryan
       o   Origins of Progressive reforms, state reformers
       o   Progressive thinker and writers, muckrakers
       o   Political, social, and economic reforms of the Progressive Era
       o   Domestic policies of Roosevelt, Taft and Wilson
       o   Push for women’s rights – success and limitations, key leaders
       o   Push for African American equality – NAACP, Washington, DuBois
       o   Conservation
       o   American imperialism in the Caribbean and Pacific – motives, results, debate over
       o   Spanish American War – causes, territory gained
       o   Roosevelt’s Big Stick policy – Roosevelt Corollary, Panama
       o   Taft’s Dollar Diplomacy
          o Wilson’s Moral Diplomacy
          o Growth of US navy
          o American neutrality
          o American entry into war – why?
          o American role in the war, mobilization
          o Impact of the war at home – Propaganda, Creel Committee, Sedition Act, growth
            of business, women, African Americans, Urbanization
          o Fourteen Points
          o Treaty of Versailles and the fight over the League of Nations


Major Assignments/Exams
    Historical Information and Historical Inferences – Students will continue to work on their
      document analysis skills on primary and secondary documents
    Storybook – Students will create a illustrated children’s storybook about a topic from
      U.S. History
    80 question multiple choice exam
    Essay topics – On the day of the essay exam, two essays will be randomly chosen and the
      students will write on one
    DBQ – Treaty of Versailles
    Matching – students will match 25 identifications with 25 definitions
    Students complete graphic organizer assignments to guide them how to construct Free
      Response Question essays on unit test. Special emphasis is given to thesis writing,
      composing body paragraphs interlaced with concrete detail from the unit’s reading and
      conclusion.
    Free-Response Question. United States Failure to join the League of Nations resulted
      from the unwillingness of the American people to abandon the country’s traditional
      policy of isolationism. Evaluate this statement.


                Unit VI (Outline 19 – 24 from Course Description Booklet)
                     After The Fact, Sacco and Vanzetti (Chapter 11)

       Themes: America fights against the Nazis but imprisons the Japanese. The American Culture
       changes in many ways during this era.
          o 1920s – Depression [Ch. 24 – 25] Growth of big business
          o Dominance of the Republican Party – Harding, Coolidge, Hoover
          o Consumerism
          o Conflict – Nativism (Sacco and Vanzetti), Racism (KKK), Religion v. science
             (fundamentalism, Scopes Trial), Prohibition; Rural v. urban; Labor v business
          o Red Scare
          o Changing roles and behavior of women
          o Culture – art, literature, music, fashion; Harlem Renaissance
          o Stock market
          o Causes of the Great Depression
          o Hoover’s response to the Great Depression
          o Roosevelt’s response to the Great Depression – New Deal
          o 3 R’s – relief, recovery, reform
          o Critics of the New Deal
          o Dust Bowl, Okies, moving west
          o Life for average Americans during the Depression
          o Culture during the 1930s

                                  WWII – 1960 [Ch. 26 – 28]
          o Rise of fascism and militarism in Spain, Italy, Japan, Germany
          o Totalitarianism
          o US neutrality
          o US aid to the Allies, mobilization
          o Attack on Pearl Harbor and US entry into war
          o Fighting in Europe – second front
          o Fighting in the Pacific – island hopping, atomic bomb
          o Wartime diplomacy; wartime conferences; goals of the war
          o Impact of the war on the American homefront - Propaganda and public opinion;
             civil liberties during war time; growth of the American economy; expansion of
             the federal government; Japanese internment; demographic changes
          o Contributions of women to the war effort – Rosie the Riveter
          o Beginning of the atomic age; arms race
          o Marshall Plan
          o United Nations
          o Origins of the Cold War
          o Containment under Truman and Eisenhower administrations
          o Cold War in Europe – Greece and Turkey, Berlin, NATO, Warsaw Pact
          o Iron Curtain
          o Cold War in Asia – China, Korea, Vietnam
          o Red scare; McCarthyism
          o Impact of Cold War on culture, science and technology
          o Demographic changes before and after the war (baby boom)
          o 1950s women
          o Truman’s domestic policy – Fair Deal, GI Bill, Taft Hartley Act
          o Beginnings of a teen culture
          o Cars, highways (Highway Act), growth of the suburbs
          o Conformity and its social critics
          o Affluence and poverty (The Other America)
          o Beginnings of the Modern Civil Rights Movement – Brown v Board, Little Rock,
             Montgomery, Martin Luther King, SCLC, Southern Resistance, actions taken by
             the Eisenhower administration
Major Assignments/Exams
    Historical Information and Historical Inferences – Students will continue to work on their
      document analysis skills on primary and secondary documents
    Great Trials of the 1920s – Students will present an argument on why a particular trial
      from the 1920s epitomizes the Jazz Age.
    Stock Market Crash – Students will experience the joys and pains of the stock market in
      the 1920s
    80 question multiple choice exam
    Essay topics – On the day of the essay exam, two essays will be randomly chosen and the
      students will write on one
    DBQ – 1950s Cold War
    Matching – students will match 25 identifications with 25 definitions
    Students complete graphic organizer assignments to guide them how to construct Free
      Response Question essays on unit test.
      Free Response Question on 1950s society.

               Unit VII (Outline 25 – 28 from Course Description Booklet)
                               1960 – Present [Ch. 29 – 33]
                            Zinn “Or Does It Explode” (Ch 17)
                  After the Fact, “Breaking into Watergate” (Chapter 15)

       Themes: Vietnam War, American diversity and tremendous social pressure lead the
       American society to change drastically in this time period.

          o Civil rights movement – SNCC, Black Power, Black Panthers, Nation of Islam,
            Birmingham, March on Washington, Civil Rights Act, Selma, Voting Rights Act,
            assassinations, actions taken by the Kennedy and Johnson administrations
          o Other movements for equality – Women, Hispanics, Native Americans; Key
            people, successes, limitations
          o Election of 1960
          o New Frontier
          o Great Society
          o Warren Court
          o Cold war confrontations – Bay of Pigs, Cuban Missile crisis, Vietnam, Latin
            America
          o Antiwar movement and the counterculture
          o 1960s culture – art, literature, music (Woodstock), hippies
          o Election of 1968
          o Silent Majority
          o Watergate
          o Nixon’s foreign policy – détente, China, USSR
          o Fall of Vietnam
          o Energy crisis – actions taken by Ford and Carter administrations
          o Changes in the US economy (move towards service sector)
          o Environmentalism
          o Carter – Camp David accords, Panama, Afghanistan and the Olympic boycott,
            Iranian hostage crisis
          o Reagan and the New Right
          o End of the Cold War
          o Demographic changes – Aging population, growth of sunbelt, immigration,
            multiculturalism
          o Modern challenges – economy, terrorism, environment

Major Assignments/Exams
    Historical Information and Historical Inferences – Students will continue to work on their
      document analysis skills on primary and secondary documents
    80 question multiple choice exam
    Essay topics – On the day of the essay exam, two essays will be randomly chosen and the
      students will write on one
    DBQ – Civil Rights
    Matching – students will match 25 identifications with 25 definitions
    Decade project-Students will analyze several decades using their textbooks, primary
      source documents and outside resources
       Students complete graphic organizer assignments to guide them how to construct Free
        Response Question essays on unit test.
       Debate: Will History forgive Richard Nixon?
       Free-Response question: “What factors account for the growing movement for minority
        rights in the period between 1960 and 19775? Discuss with regard to two of the following
        three groups: Women, Latinos and Native Americans.”

           Parent Acknowledgement of AP United States History Requirements



I have read the syllabus for Advanced Placement United States History and I am aware of the
 course requirements and commitment this class entails.

Parent Name: __________________________________

Parent Signature: _______________________________

Student Name: _________________________________

Student Signature: ______________________________




Please provide me with the following contact information:


Number: Home/Cell __________________________________________

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