New Jersey_Wildlife Action Plan.indd by KevenMealamu

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									New Jersey Wildlife Action Plan
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What is a wildlife action plan?
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Congress asked each state copy.           a wildlife action Main known
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technically as a comprehensive
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                                                                                                     Plan will provide a
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proactive plans examine the health of wildlife and body copy. actions                            brighter future for New
to conserve wildlife and vital habitat before they become more rare                                 Jersey’s rare species
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and copy. costly to protect.
body moreMain body copy. Main body             body copy. Main body copy. Main body                 and important habi-
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                                               the same time, the state’s Atlantic and
New Jersey snapshot
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                                                                                                 focuses on special need
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                                               Delaware Bay coastal habitats are body
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Geography: New Jersey sits at the              to bald eagles, northern harriers, black
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convergence point of the east coast’s          Main body copy. Main and copy.Main
                                               rails and piping ploversbody are critical to       the conservation work
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northern and southern ecosystems. Con-         body copy.Main body copy. Main body
                                               millions of migratory raptors, waterfowl,          that will benefit those
sequently, body copy. Main body copy.
copy. Mainthe state consists of a variety of   copy. Main body copy. Main body and
                                               shorebirds, butterflies, dragonflies, copy.           species, ultimately all
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mountains, valleys,                            Main body copy. Main body copy.Main
                                                                           fishes.
                                                                                                 fish and wildlife species
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rolling hills, wet-                            body copy. Main body copy.Main body
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lands, pinelands,                              copy.Main body copy. Main body copy.              in New Jersey will ben-
                                                                           New Jersey’s             efit from this work.”
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beaches, estuar-                               Main body copy. Main body copy.Main
ies and riverine
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                                               body copy. Main body copy.Main body                      –Lisa P. Jackson,
systems. The state’s
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                                               copy. Main body copy. Main body copy.             Commissioner, NJ Department
larger, unfragment-
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ed forest tracts are                                                       Under the
among the copy.
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on the mid-Atlantic
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coast.
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                                               copy.Main body copy. MainWildlife,
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Landscape: The
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nation’s most
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densely populated                                                          groups from
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state, however, has                                                        across the state
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a rapidly changing                                                         collaborated
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creates an unprec-                                                         of our Action
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edented wildlife                                              Bobcat/NJDEP Plan, which is
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conservation challenge for its citizens.       Main body copy. Main body copy.Main
                                               a blueprint for statewide protection of
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wildlife populations abound, some being        copy.Main body is based on accurate
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the result of unsustainable development        Main body data, is an ecosystem based
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while others include increased human           body copy. Main body copy. Main body
                                               management strategy that focuses heavily
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competition with wildlife for natural          copy.Main body copy. protection, man-
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resources, copy. Main body copy. Main
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influx of exotic or invasive species.           body copy. embodies copy.Main body
                                               Action PlanMain body the collective
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Wildlife highlights: New Jersey’s inland
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forests are Main body copy.Main body
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                                                                                              New Jersey Wildlife Action Plan   1
                                      Primary challenges to                                      timber rattlesnakes and red-shouldered
                                                                                                 hawks, as well as to grassland species
                                      conserving wildlife in                                     such as the grasshopper and vesper
                                      New Jersey                                                 sparrows.

                                      New Jersey’s action plan identifies state-                  Invasive species include native and
                                      wide threats as well as specific regional                   exotic, terrestrial and aquatic animals,
                                                      threats. The primary                       plants, invertebrates and exotic
                                                      threats to state wildlife                  pathogens that cause significant im-
                                                      include habitat fragmen-                   pacts and permanent loss of terrestrial
                                                      tation, invasive species,                  and aquatic ecosystems. The cost of
                                                      and contaminants.                          restoring habitat destroyed by invasive
                                                                                                 species can be prohibitive and requires
                                                           Habitat fragmentation                 persistent and long-term management.
                                                           resulting from suburban
                                                           sprawl and increased                  Contaminants include point and
                                                           housing and road                      non-point source pollution and oil
                                                           development breaks up                 spills. Oil spills threaten freshwater
                                                           large critical habitats into          and salt marsh ecosystems and the
                                                           smaller patches, which                wildlife that rely on them, while con-
                                             Eaglets/NJDEP do not provide suitable               taminants from point and non-point
                                      habitat for many of the state’s rare spe-                  sources degrade habitat and cause
                                      cies. Fragmentation can be especially                      developmental and behavioral abnor-
                                      harmful to interior forest species that                    malities and reproductive failure in
                                      need large habitats such as bobcats,                       wildlife.


                                       Wildlife              Total number of               Species in need of       Threatened/endangered
                                                             species                       conservation1            listed species

                                       Mussels                                       143                        9                                       8
                                       Snails2                                        85                        0                                       0
                                       Insects                                 > 10,000                        66                                       9
                                       Fish                                        4004                        20                                       1

                                       Amphibians                                     33                       11                                       6
                                       Reptiles                                       44                       17                                  11
                                       Birds                                       3275                       149                                  29
                                       Mammals                                       896                       17                                       9

                                       Totals                                                                289                                   73
                                       1 Each state is using its own criteria for this category. New Jersey focuses on wildlife species with small or
                                       declining populations or other characteristics that may make them vulnerable to state extirpation or future
                                       listing. This group includes legally recognized threatened/endangered species, species of regional priority,
                                       nongame fish and game species which are recognized by Division of Fish and Wildlife staff as species of
                                       potential concern.
                                       2 Snails are not included within the NJ Wildlife Action Plan as little or no research has been done to
                                       determine their population status within the state.
                                       3 Includes two introduced species.
                                       4 Figure represents marine and freshwater fish species, twenty-one of which have been recorded in both
                                       marine/estuarine and freshwater environments (or ecosystems).
                                       5 Figure includes migratory and resident species.
                                       6 Figure includes 29 marine mammals including 25 cetacean species and four pinniped species.


                                      Wildlife highlights




2   New Jersey Wildlife Action Plan
Highlight habitats   Wildlife (examples)             Issue (examples)    Action (examples)
Atlantic Coast-      • Bobcat • Timber               • Impacts           • Develop beach management agreements with municipalities that address
Beaches & Dunes      rattlesnake • Pine snake •      of beach            impacts of recreation and municipal beach management in collaboration with
Ownership: mix       Cerulean warbler • Black-       nourishment         the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and NJDEP will implement features of the
of private/public    throated green warbler          projects            agreement into beach nourishment projects to increase availability of and
                                                                         access to nesting and foraging habitat.

Cape May-            • Migratory birds including:    • Habitat           • Require environmental review of all development projects in the Cape
Forests and          peregrine falcon, red-          loss and            May peninsula that would affect field, forest, and shrub habitats.
Wetlands             shouldered hawk, American       fragmentation       • Minimize impacts by requiring clustered design & mitigating habitat loss.
Ownership: mix       kestrel, Cooper’s hawk,         due to              • Institute and promote backyard habitat management with incentives to
of private/public    sharp-shinned hawk              development         landowners and municipalities that adopt habitat management.

Delaware Bay-        • Migratory shorebirds          • Over-harvest      • Identify a population level of horseshoe crabs that sustains the horseshoe
Beaches and          including: red knots and        of horseshoe        crab (HSC) population in Delaware Bay while also meeting the nutritional
Marshes              sanderlings                     crabs               needs of the migratory shorebirds that depend on horseshoe crab eggs.
Ownership: mix                                       • Bulkheading       • Restrict commercial harvest of HSC to a level that sustains crabs & birds.
of private/public                                    • Development       • Don’t issue state permits for bulkheading along Delaware Bay beaches in
                                                     of shoreline        areas suitable for HSC spawning and shorebird resting, feeding & roosting.

Delaware River       • Shortnose sturgeon •          • Dredging          • Minimize impacts on shortnose and Atlantic sturgeon and on rare mussels
Ownership:           Dwarf wedgemussel, brook        • Water quality     during spawning and glochidial release times from dredging.
States of            floater, yellow lampmussel       • Instream          • Seek antidegradation stream classification or critical areas designation
New Jersey,          and other rare mussels          projects            in spawning and nursery areas to protect water quality for shortnose and
Pennsylvania,                                        (e.g. bridge        Atlantic sturgeon and where rare mussels occur.
New York                                             modifications)       • Work with water watch groups, etc. to plant native vegetation and
                                                                         encourage stream bank restoration efforts.

Piedmont-            • Wood turtle • Pine snake      • Habitat           • Establish a working group with NJ Department of Transportation (NJDOT)
Upland and           • Migratory & resident          loss and            to increase wildlife egress and reduce mortality byincreasing habitat
Wetland forest       species of bats (eg. hoary &    fragmentation       connectivity and road permeability.
Ownership: mix       Indiana bats), & breeding       • Lack of           • Incorporate extant data from conservation organizations into Landscape
of public/private    birds (eg. northern goshawk),   species and         Project mapping and use data to to define important stop over locations and
                                                     habitat data        target systematic surveys of these sites through Citizen Science Program.

Piedmont-Early       • Migratory & resident          • Habitat           • Establish a working group with NJDOT to develop actions to increase habitat
Successional         breeding birds (eg. golden-     loss and            along secondary roads for invertebrates and early successional bird species
Habitat              winged warbler, Henslow &       fragmentation       with reduced mowing and planting of host and native plants.
Ownership: mix       vesper sparrow) • Migratory     • Lack of           • Use Landscape Project to protect critical stopover and breeding areas
of public/private    & resident invertebrates        species and         through targeted land acquisition and conservation easements; enhance
                     (eg. Appalachian grizzled       habitat data        sites through incentives to landowners & municipalities that adopt habitat
                     skipper)                                            standards.

Piedmont-            • Migratory and resident        • Habitat loss,     • Increase fish passage through multiple bridge culverts w/ natural bottoms.
Riparian             species of bats (eg. eastern    degradation, and    • Increase the effective size and connectivity of open space in suburban
Ownership: mix       red & silver-haired bats) and   fragmentation       landscape and reduce the influence of developed edge through non-
of public/private    breeding birds (eg. Louisiana   • Lack of           regulatory methods such as increased enrollment in landowner incentive
                     waterthrush) • Freshwater       species and         and backyard habitat management programs targeting properties adjacent to
                     fish • Wood turtle               habitat data        public lands and bordering riparian areas.

Pinelands-Forest     • Timber rattlesnake • Pine     • Habitat           • Create larger and more contiguous patches of permanently preserved land
Ownership: mix       snake • Corn Snake              loss and            through targeted land acquisition.
of private/public                                    fragmentation       • Reevaluate the boundaries of the existing Pinelands Management Zones &
                                                     • Altered natural   incorporate new species information into regional planning in the Pinelands.
                                                     fire cycles          • Develop and implement management techniques that can safely be used
                                                                         to mimic the historic role of fire in shaping the Pinelands ecosystem.

Northern             • Bog turtle                    • Habitat           • Use the Landscape Map to identify critical wetland habitats for bog turtles
NJ-Emergent                                          loss and            and/or other wetland dependent species and manage them through fee simple
Wetlands & Wet                                       fragmentation       acquisition, conservation easements, development of management plans w/
Meadows                                              • Alteration to     public agencies and through private landowner incentives/agreements.
Ownership: mix                                       hydrology           • Use the Landscape Map to identify important corridors that form a system
of private/public;                                   • Nest predation    of large, connected wetland habitat and protect these areas through land
mostly private                                                           acquisition, conservation easements, acquisition of development rights and
                                                                         transfer of development rights.

Highlands-           • Timber rattlesnake            • Habitat loss &    • Implement forest management plans and increase the acreage of existing
Forests              • Indiana bat                   fragmentation       large, contiguous forest tracts by developing partnerships with public
Ownership: mix                                       • Wanton            agencies and private landowners to increase enrollment in the landowner
of private/public                                    killing; poaching   incentive programs.

Recommended actions to conserve New Jersey’s wildlife


                                                                                                              New Jersey Wildlife Action Plan           3
                                      Working together for                          ulation, landowner incentive program,
                                      New Jersey’s wildlife                         public and private acquisition, infrastruc-
                                                                                    ture, invasive and overabundant species
                                      The New Jersey Department of Environ-         management, habitat restoration and
                                                 mental Protection (NJDEP),         management, and public land manage-
                                                 Division of Fish and Wildlife      ment). Participants included state and
                                                 (DFW) worked internally to         federal agencies such as the US Fish and
                                                 create a draft Wildlife Action     Wildlife Service-N.J. Field Office, N.J.
                                                 Plan to be used as guid-           Dept. of Agriculture, National Park Ser-
                                                 ance. Leaders representing         vice, National Wildlife Refuges through-
                                                 the constituencies of vari-        out the state, the governor’s office, the
                                                 ous conservation organiza-         N.J. Department of Transportation, the
                                                 tions including NJ Audubon         N.J. Forest Service, and N.J. Office of
                                                 Society, The Nature Conser-        Smart Growth. In addition, a wide range
                                                 vancy-NJ Chapter and the           of conservation organizations, watershed
                                                 NJ Conservation Foundation         associations, sportsmen’s groups and
                                                 then reviewed the draft.           regional planning councils participated
                                                                                    in the Summit. Comments were submit-
       Grasslands Management/ NJDEP
                                                   NJDEP then co-hosted a           ted during the Summit and via a website
                                      Wildlife Summit with N.J. Future where        comment form after the Summit.
                                      more than 150 attendees from numer-
                                      ous organizations actively participated in    The final draft was then posted on the
    “New Jersey has an                                                              DFW’s website. The NJDEP continues to
                                      discussions focused on nine key topics
     incredible diversity             (municipal land use planning, state and       receive public comment for consider-
      and abundance of                regional land use planning, land use reg-     ation and incorporation into the plan.
      wildlife and habi-
      tats. Our Wildlife
    Action Plan will en-
     sure future genera-
     tions can enjoy the
     same diversity and
    abundance we enjoy
            today.”
     - Dave Chanda, Director,
     NJ Division of Fish and
               Wildlife
                                                                                     Forested Wetland/NJDEP



                                      Assn. of Fish & Wildlife Agencies            State Contact
                                      David Chadwick                               NJ Division of Fish and Wildlife, Endangered
                                      Wildlife Diversity Associate                 and Nongame Species Program
                                      444 North Capitol St., NW
                                                                                   Larry Niles, PhD., Bureau Chief
                                      Suite 725
                                                                                   Tel: 609.292.9101
                                      Washington D.C., 20001
                                                                                   Larry.niles@dep.state.nj.us
                                      Tel: 202.624.7890
                                      chadwick@fishwildlife.org                     Kris Schantz, Senior Zoologist,
                                      www.teaming.com • www.fishwildlife.org        Wildlife Action Pland Coordinator
                                                                                   Tel: 908.735.9281
                                                                                   kschantz.ensp@earthlink.net

                                                                                   www.njfishandwildlife.com



4   New Jersey Wildlife Action Plan

								
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