strategic plan 2010 - 2015 by KevenMealamu

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									strategic plan   2010 - 2015
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The mission of the District
        is a healthy, safe,
    and enhanced quality
         of living in Santa
   Clara County through
   watershed stewardship
      and comprehensive
          management of
          water resources
            in a practical,
       cost-effective, and
 environmentally sensitive
  manner for current and
       future generations.




                              strategic plan   2010 - 2015
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TABLE OF CONTENTS

                    LETTER FROM THE CHIEF OFFICERS ...................................................................... 1

                                 Introduction ................................................................................. 2
                                 Strategic Plan Overview ................................................................ 3


                    ISSUE BP: BUSINESS PRACTICES                                                                                          7

                                 Description and Goal ................................................................... 7
                                 Strategies .................................................................................... 7
                                 Strategy BP-1 and Tactics .............................................................. 7
                                 Strategy BP-2 and Tactics .............................................................. 8
                                 Strategy BP-3 and Tactics .............................................................. 8



                    ISSUE WF: WORKFORCE                                                                                                   9

                                 Description and Goal ................................................................... 9
                                 Strategies .................................................................................... 9
                                 Strategy WF-1 and Tactics ............................................................. 10
                                 Strategy WF-2 and Tactics .............................................................. 10



                    ISSUE AM: ASSETS                                                                                                    11

                                 Description and Goal ................................................................... 11
                                 Strategies ..................................................................................... 11
                                 Strategy AM-1 and Tactics ............................................................. 12
                                 Strategy AM-3 and Tactics ............................................................. 12
                                 Strategy AM-4 and Tactics ............................................................. 12



                    APPENDIX ............................................................................................................ 13

                                 Appendix 1: Definitions of strategic planning elements ................... 13
                                 Appendix 2: Related definitions .................................................... 14
                                 Appendix 3: Acknowledgements .................................................... 15



                                                                                                                                               i
    Letter from the Chief Officers
    The Santa Clara Valley Water District (District) is the primary water resources agency for
    Santa Clara County, with key water supply, water quality, flood protection and environmental
    stewardship responsibilities.

    Like many other water resources agencies in California, the District is facing a fast-changing
    operating environment with unprecedented challenges on many fronts, led by an uncertain
    local, state and national economic climate.

    To address these challenges, the District updated an agency-wide strategic plan that included
    business analyses and review of the vision, issues, goals, strategies and tactics for the next
    three to five years, 2010 – 2015. This process was led by the CEO and Chief Officers.

    In developing a strategic vision, the Chief Officers concluded that the District must continue
    to emphasize financial management and accountability, and demonstrate it effectively to
    our stakeholders. Especially in tough economic times, public agencies like the District have
    a greater need to improve transparency and accountability to stakeholders and the community.
    The District must focus on more efficient services, with maximum value for taxes paid to
    assure future sustainability. These realities are reflected in the District’s strategic vision for
    2010 – 2015:

    “We are a fiscally responsible water resources agency valued by the
    community”
    Our intent is to demonstrate this vision of fiscal responsibility and accountability to everything
    we do in carrying out the District’s mission, to strengthen the value of our products and
    services, and to renew our connections with the community we serve.

    Thank you for your continued support of the Santa Clara Valley Water District.


    Sincerely,
    Beau Goldie, Chief Executive Officer
    Sharon Judkins, Chief Administrative Officer
    Jim Fiedler, Chief Operating Officer, Water Utility Enterprise
    Marc Klemencic, Chief Operating Officer, Watershed Operations




1                                                                           Strategic Plan 2010 - 2015   Introduction
   Introduction
   The Santa Clara Valley Water District (District) is the primary water resources agency for
   Santa Clara County. An independent special district serving more than 1.8 million people,
   the District provides a reliable supply of clean, safe water; works to protect residents and
   businesses from flooding; and serves as environmental steward for many of the county’s
   800-plus miles of streams and creeks, groundwater basins and District-owned reservoirs.

   In addition to its water resources, flood protection and stewardship role, the District
   has worked hard to become a recognized leader in green business and environmental
   stewardship, winning many awards and maintaining its county “Green Business” designation.
   The District has also focused on performance excellence and continual improvement,
   achieving ISO 9001 and 14001 certification in 2008. These areas of emphasis enhance our
   ongoing commitment to the District mission:

   The mission of the District is a healthy, safe, and enhanced quality of living in Santa
   Clara County through watershed stewardship and comprehensive management of
   water resources in a practical, cost-effective and environmentally sensitive manner
   for current and future generations.

   Like many other water resources agencies in California, the District is facing a fast-changing
   operating environment with unprecedented challenges on many fronts. These challenges
   include an uncertain economic climate that will likely result in potential decreases in District
   revenue; water supply and quality problems in the San Joaquin Delta, threatening or
   reducing our imported water supplies; a persistent, ongoing drought; climate change and
   its future impacts on both water supply and flood protection; urgently needed infrastructure
   maintenance and upgrades; increasing public requests for leaner services; increasing media
   scrutiny; rising employee healthcare costs; and the impending retirement of many highly-
   trained staff.

   To address these challenges the District adopted a five-year (2009-2014) Strategic Plan
   in March 2009. This document is an update to that Plan for 2010-2015, and provides
   strategic direction for budget planning. The plan will be updated each year to respond to the
   challenges that will affect the District’s ability to deliver a reliable supply of clean, safe water;
   protect residents and businesses from flooding; and provide environmental stewardship for
   the communities in Santa Clara County.




Strategic Plan 2010 - 2015   Introduction                                                                  2
Strategic planning overview
In the fall of 2008 the District launched a series of strategic planning sessions, designed to precede
and inform our FY 2009-10 budget planning. Participants included the District’s Chief Officers, and
a selected core planning team comprised of staff with subject matter expertise.

The initial strategic planning sessions included gap and SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities
and Threats) analyses and development of issues, goals, strategies and tactics to achieve our strategic
vision. The result of this effort was the development of the District’s five-year (2009-2014) strategic
plan. As issues and strategies were developed, input from managers throughout the District was
obtained and incorporated in the plan. The strategic plan, including tactics and a schedule of
related tasks, have been incorporated into the District’s budget development process beginning
with FY 2009-10, to ensure that necessary resources are provided to implement strategic priorities.

The update to the strategic plan occurred in the summer of 2009 at accelerated and focused
workshop sessions, with the aim of completing the plan update to coincide with the development
of the fiscal year budget. The new CEO and Leadership Team identified major strategic issues and
challenges confronting the District in the next five years, and potential strategies to address these
challenges. As a result of the workshops, strategic goals and tactics were updated and revised, and
a multi-year (2010-2015) Implementation Plan was developed. The Management Leadership Team
also provided input and comments to the updated strategic plan.

The strategic plan affirms the vision and prioritized strategic goals. The implementation plan contains
the “road map” of tasks and milestones and measurable outcomes, to achieve our vision and goals.




3                                                         Strategic Plan 2010 - 2015   Strategic planning overview
  Vision
 The District’s strategic planning process defines a vision as a
 statement that provides a broad, “aspirational” image of the
 future that the organization is aiming to achieve. In developing
 a District vision for the next three to five years, the Chief Officers
 and core planning team concluded that the District must adopt a
 new emphasis on financial management and accountability that
 will be effectively demonstrated to our stakeholders, such as our
 customers, agency partners, retailers and employees. The District
 has received much public and media scrutiny over the last few
 years, pointing to a need to improve existing efforts to operate
 with transparency and accountability. Additionally, in the midst of
 the current economic recession, the District must be leaner and
 provide more efficient services with maximum value for taxes and
 water charges paid. These realities are reflected in the District’s
 strategic vision for 2010 – 2015:                                        Adopting this strategic
                                                                          vision does not mean
 “We are a fiscally responsible water resources agency                    that the District will
 valued by the community.”                                                de-emphasize its
                                                                          water resources
 In endorsing this vision for the District, executive leadership is
 emphasizing an agency-wide focus on fiscal responsibility and            or environmental
 accountability. This vision applies to all District activities.          enhancement work.
                                                                          Rather, the intent is
                                                                          to bring the vision of
                                                                          fiscal responsibility
                                                                          and accountability to
                                                                          everything we do in
                                                                          carrying out the District’s
                                                                          mission, to strengthen
                                                                          the value of our products
                                                                          and services as well
                                                                          as improve public
                                                                          understanding and
                                                                          support of our agency.
                                                                          The issues, strategies and
                                                                          tactics developed as part
                                                                          of this plan all support
                                                                          the vision and mission.




Stategic Plan 2010 - 2015   Vision                                                                      4
                                   Issues, goals and strategies
                                   In the District’s strategic planning, issues are defined as identified problems, concerns
                                   or challenges an organization must address. Goals are defined as the condition
                                   that exists once an issue has been addressed. Strategies are defined as high-level
                                   concepts or plans for resolving issues and reaching goals (See Appendix 1 for complete
                                   glossary).

                                   The following three issues were identified as the most critical challenges for the District
                                   to address in the next three to five years, expressed below as “must” statements.
                                   Related goals were also developed and are shown with each issue.



                                      Issue BP: Effective business practices and fiscal accountability must
                                                    be demonstrated.
ISSUES, GOALS AND STRATEGIES




                                      Issue WF: Workforce capability, adaptability, efficiency and
                                                    accountability must be achieved.

                                      Issue AM: The value of our assets must be maintained.



                                   The three issues and related goals, strategies and tactics of the District’s strategic plan
                                   are discussed in detail in the following pages. Tactics are defined as specific actions
                                   designed to carry out elements of a strategy. Milestones for tactics will be published as
                                   an addendum to the strategic plan so that it can be pulled out as a separate reference
                                   document that will be updated regularly, at least annually.
 1 BUSINESS PRACTICES




                               5                                              Strategic Plan 2010 - 2015   Issues, goals and strategies
Plan implementation
Implementation starts with the Chief Officers taking collective ownership as Sponsors to ensure that
the issues are addressed and/or resolved and that the associated key performance indicators are
met. A single Chief Officer is assigned the responsibility for a specific issue and has the authority to
represent the other Chief Officers when making changes to that issue’s strategies, tactics and tasks.
Champions are charged with ensuring that assigned strategies are implemented through completion
of tactics by the Project Leads.


Ongoing implementation requires regular review of the status of task accomplishment, at least
quarterly, not only by the Champions and Project Leads, but also by the Chief Officers for review and
revision of the Plan in response to changes in our operating environment. A change management
process is in place to ensure that a consistent method for review and revision is followed.

In keeping with the strategic plan’s emphasis on accountability, the District will utilize a variety of
methods to effectively communicate the plan and its implementation progress to key audiences.
Plans for internal communications include on-line messages from the CEO; feature stories on specific
strategic issues and goals on the employee news page; PowerPoint presentations by unit managers
to staff; a web page for internal and external audiences; and video interviews with strategic plan
Sponsoring Chiefs, Champions, and Leads. External communications will include targeted electronic
communications from the CEO to key stakeholders, with links to the strategic plan web page.




Strategic Plan 2010 - 2015   Plan Implementation                                                           6
                                 ISSUE BP          Effective business practices and fiscal
                                                   accountability must be demonstrated.
                                                   Sponsoring Chief – Sharon Judkins



                                As a public agency, the District should be expected to demonstrate the prudent
                                use of public funds, efforts are consistent with its intended purposes, and that its
                                products provide tangible benefits that are of value to the community. The District
                                incorporates transparency into its major planning and policy actions. However, with
                                the state and national economic crisis, the District has an even greater responsibility
                                to demonstrate effective and responsible use of public funds without waste. This
                                applies not only to financial and budget planning, but to every aspect of its work
                                and product and service delivery. Improving the business practices and fiscal
                                accountability does not change the ongoing mission and its stated commitment
                                to watershed stewardship, comprehensive water resources management and
                                environmental responsibility.



                                G       oal: Stakeholders acknowledge significant
                                                improvements in our business practices
                                                and fiscal accountability.
                                 The District invites public scrutiny of its activities and business practices.
                                  As it improves its ability to demonstrate operational achievements, financial
                                 accountability and tangible benefits to stakeholders, it must also continue to
                                 develop and implement systems to gather stakeholder feedback, assess our
                                 effectiveness and continually improve our processes.
BUSINESS PRACTICES




                      BP-1:     IMPROVE PRODUCT AND SERVICE DELIVERY

                      BP-2:     IMPLEMENT PRUDENT FINANCIAL PLANS

                      BP-3:     DEMONSTRATE VALUE TO KEY STAKEHOLDERS AND IMPROVE CONNECTION
                                WITH THE COMMUNITY



                     Strategies BP-1: Improve product and service delivery.
                                      Improve Deborah McClain and Liang Lee
                     Strategies BP-1: Champions: product and service delivery.
                                          Champion: Deborah McClain and Liang Lee
                     Reducing spending, increasing efficiency, and improving processes across the District are top
                      Reducing spending will continue to develop across the identify, evaluate and implement process
                     priorities the Districtand increasing efficiency a system toDistrict are top priorities as we engage
                      in FY 2009-10 budget planning and beyond. The District will also spending. The District’s implement
                     improvements to increase effectiveness and efficiency, and reduce continue to develop andQuality
                      our Environmental Management System (QEMS) will be utilized as a tool to include process
                     and quality and environmental management system (QEMS), expanding itto deploy a all functions
                     improvement system.
                      and work areas.

                     Tactic BP-1A
                     Tactic BP-1A      Establish criteria and take action to reduce spending and increase efficiency.
                                       Establish criteria and take action to reduce spending and increase efficiency.
                                       Lead: Deborah McClain and Ray Yep
                                       Lead: Deborah McClain

                     Tactic BP-1B       Reinforce continued implementation of an effective quality and environmental
                                        management system Districtwide.
                       7                Lead: Mary Ann Ruiz                  Strategic Plan 2010 - 2015   Business Practices

                     Tactic BP-1C       Insource or outsource functions when cost effective.
 in FY 2009-10 budget planning and beyond. The District will also continue to develop and implement
 our quality and environmental management system (QEMS), expanding it to include all functions
 and work areas.

 Tactic BP-1A          Establish criteria and take action to reduce spending and increase efficiency.
                       Lead: Deborah McClain and Ray Yep

Tactic BP-1B
Tactic BP-1B            Reinforce continued implementation of an implementation of environmental
                       Reinforce continued improvements througheffective quality andan effective QEMS
                       throughout the organization.
                        management system Districtwide.
                       Lead: Mary Ann Ruiz
                       Lead: Mary Ann Ruiz

Tactic BP-1C
Tactic BP-1C           Insource or outsource functions when cost effective as appropriate.
                        Insource or outsource functions when cost effective.
                       Lead: Melanie Richardson
                       Lead: Melanie Richardson


Strategy BP-2: Implement prudent financial plans.
Strategy BP-2: Implement prudent financial plans.
                      Champion: Deborah McClain
                      Champion: Deborah McClain

 The District is ranked highly by financial ratings organizations, and consistently achieves awards for
The District is ranked highly by financial ratings organizations, and consistently achieves awards for
 clear, well-documented budget documents. Our investment portfolio is strong, and we proven to be
clear, well-documented budget documents. Its investment portfolio is strong, and it has have proven
 ourselves to be a public funds. of public funds. The District can further improve our financial practices
a good steward of good steward The District can further improve financial practices by developing and
 by developing and implementing a comprehensive, plan, which will lay plan, which will respond
implementing a comprehensive, multi-year financial multi-year financial out strategies to lay out to
 strategies financial challenges; by financial challenges; by working to secure additional funding for
forecasted to respond to forecastedworking to secure additional funding for key programs; and by
 key programs; and by making strategic decisions whether savings may be some activities or by utilizing
making strategic decisions whether savings may be realized by outsourcingrealized by outsourcing some
 activities or by
in-house talent.utilizing in-house talent.

 Tactic BP-2A
Tactic BP-2A           Implement a 5-year financial plan.
                      Implement a 5-year financial plan.
                       Lead: Deborah McClain and Katherine Oven
                      Leads: Deborah McClain and Katherine Oven

 Tactic BP-2B
Tactic BP-2B           Secure the sunset of the Clean, Safe Creeks & Natural Flood Protection Program
                      Plan for continuity of funding for Clean, Safe Creeks.
                       Lead: parcel tax.
                      specialAnn Draper
                      Lead: Ann Draper

Strategy BP3: Demonstrate value to key stakeholders.
Tactic BP-2C          Secure fiscal stability in support of Water Utility Enterprise.
                      Champion: Gustavo De La Torre
                      Lead: Deborah McClain
The District works hard for the benefit of the public. However, our stakeholders do not always get a
clear picture of what we do and why, partly because as a wholesaler the District does not have regular
direct contact with customers through billing. key stakeholders and improve connection
Strategy BP3: Demonstrate value to It is critical for us to help stakeholders understand our
mission and services, and demonstrate to them that our work is worthy of their tax dollars. The District
                    with the community.
                                            key stakeholders—including customers, agency partners,
will strengthen existing efforts to engageLa Torre
                    Champion: Gustavo De
retailers and employees—in our work. We will also increase efforts to benchmark our service delivery
practices against hard for the benefit of the public. However, measure District effectiveness get make
The District works industry comparators, so that we may better its stakeholders do not always and a
improvements.
clear picture of what it does and why. It is critical for it to help stakeholders understand its products
and services, and demonstrate the effective use of their tax dollars. The District will strengthen existing
 Tactic BP-3A         Benchmark service delivery customers, agency partners,
efforts to engage key stakeholders — includingagainst industry standards. retailers and employees.
                      efforts to Yep and Melanie Richardson
It will also increase Lead: Ray benchmark service delivery practices against industry comparators, so
that it may better measure effectiveness and make improvements. In addition, the development of a
 Tactic BP-3B         Implement a stakeholder engagement system.
systematic measurement and reporting system to monitor the District’s fiscal and business results will
                      Lead: Susan Siravo
help provide transparency and understandable information to the community.

Tactic BP-3A           Benchmark service delivery against industry standards.
                       Leads: Ray Yep and
Strategic Plan 2010 - 2015 Business Practices Mary Ann Ruiz                                                   8

Tactic BP-3B           Implement a stakeholder engagement system.
                       Lead: Susan Siravo

Tactic BP-3C           Develop and implement a systematic measurement and reporting system.
                       Lead: Mary Ann Ruiz




Strategic Plan 2010 - 2015   Business Practices                                                               8
                   ISSUE WF           Workforce capability, adaptability, efficiency
                                      and accountability must be achieved.
                                      Sponsoring Chief – Sharon Judkins



                    The District is known for its highly-skilled staff and quality work. The workforce
                    is agency strength — in its expertise, its pride of service and its diversity. District
                    employees reflect the community they serve, and the District has emphasized
                    that recognizing and strengthening diversity of all kinds—cultural, generational,
                    professional and others — is a way to achieve high productivity and workforce
                    inclusion.

                    With uncertain economic times ahead for the near term, greater calls for efficiency
                    and responsiveness will require staff to be flexible and prepared to demonstrate
                    effectiveness and accountability. Additionally, a significant number of “Baby Boomer”
                    employees are already eligible for retirement. Succession planning has therefore
                    become a more urgent priority, and existing staff must be trained now to take on
                    new areas of responsibility for optimal business continuity.




                   G       oal: High workforce engagement is achieved
                                to meet business needs in a changing
                                and diverse environment.

                    To ensure a minimum of disruption from changes in the District work environment,
                    and to help employees adapt while staying productive, maintaining and building on
                    employee engagement in the District will be critical to our future. District managers
                    will need to improve their leadership and mentoring skills.



                WF-1:   IMPROVE WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT AND ORGANIZATIONAL
                        ADAPTABILITY

                WF-2:   CREATE AN ENVIRONMENT OF ACCOUNTABILITY
WORKFORCE




            9                                                           Strategic Plan 2010 - 2015   Workforce
Strategy WF-1: Improve workforce development and organizational
               adaptability.
                       Champion: Gustavo De La Torre

A comprehensive District-wide Workforce Plan will be developed and implemented that will include
succession planning, skill assessment, staff development, leadership management program, and
diversity/inclusion planning to ensure business continuity. The approach is to be prepared for key staff
retirements, and retain and manage knowledge and expertise in areas critical to the District’s core
services.

Tactic WF-1A          Develop and implement a comprehensive Workforce Plan.
                      Lead: Gustavo De La Torre

Tactic WF-1D          Implement the Diversity Master Plan.
                      Lead: Gustavo De La Torre




Strategy WF-2: Create an environment of accountability.
                       Champion: Rudy Medina

Strong, positive employee/manager relationships will play a central role in creating an environment
of trust, commitment and accountability. Improving these relationships will facilitate effective
communication between labor and management to address workforce issues including employee
performance.

Tactic WF-2A          Implement an effective work plan and employee performance evaluation
                      program.
                      Lead: Rudy Medina




Strategic Plan 2010 - 2015   Workforce                                                                     10
                 ISSUE AM          The value of our assets must be maintained.
                                    Sponsoring Chief – Jim Fielder



                 To reliably provide consumers with drinking water that meets or surpasses all state
                 and federal standards, many assets are required, including groundwater, imported
                 water contracts, pumping plants, reservoirs, pipelines, a laboratory and water
                 treatment plants. To protect residents and businesses from flooding, many other
                 kinds of assets are involved, including creeks, maintenance equipment, levees, and
                 other flood protection facilities.

                 These examples represent just some of the District’s many vital assets. Others
                 include dams, water rights, networked computers and other equipment, as well as
                 buildings and environmental assets. With so many different assets needed to fulfill
                 the District’s mission, effective asset management is both challenging and critically
                 important. Developing and applying asset management processes comprehensively,
                 consistently and effectively across all work areas is necessary to maintain the value
                 of all District assets. Such processes include establishing or understanding levels
                 of service, monitoring asset conditions against the level of service to manage
                 risk of failure; making asset management decisions in a coordinated strategic
                 fashion; understanding and planning for future funding needs to maintain business
                 continuity, and to anticipate and plan for uncertainties or changing levels of service.




                 G      oal: Assets are effectively and efficiently
                             managed and protected.
                 The ultimate purpose of District assets and infrastructure is to safely and reliably
                 provide necessary services to the public. Our goal is to maintain all assets for
                 optimal business continuity. Effective management of assets involves planning for
                 protection and maintenance, as corrective maintenance is generally more costly
                 than planned maintenance. Ensuring public safety is also a key part of asset
                 management, with safety of our 10 dams a top priority.



         AM-1:   MAKE COORDINATED, ENVIRONMENTALLY RESPONSIBLE
                 AND PRIORITIZED ASSET INVESTMENT

         AM-3:   PREPARE FOR CONTINUITY OF SERVICE DURING DISRUPTIONS

         AM-4:   IMPLEMENT A DISTRICT-WIDE ASSET MANAGEMENT PROGRAM
ASSETS




         11                                                            Strategic Plan 2010 - 2015   Assets
Strategy AM-1: Make coordinated, environmentally responsible and prioritized
               asset investment decisions
                      Champion: Sandy Oblonsky

To carry out District services on a 24/7 basis, critical assets must be considered in asset management
decisions. Prioritizing asset management and investment helps ensure that appropriate investments
are made and that no assets are overlooked. Such decisions also must consider and incorporate
environmental responsibility, pursuant to regulations and the District’s mission. The District will also
continue to develop and implement our Dam Safety Program Plan.

Tactic AM-1C          Develop and implement the Dam Safety Program Plan.
                      Lead: Frank Maitski

Tactic AM-1D          Develop and implement a long term Water Supply and Infrastructure Master Plan.
                      Lead: Sandy Oblonsky

Tactic AM-1E          Help protect District water rights through implementation of the Fisheries and
                      Aquatic Habitat Collaborative Effort (FAHCE) Three Creeks Habitat Conservation Plan
                      (HCP) Plan.
                      Lead: Keith Whitman


Strategy AM-3: Prepare for continuity of service during disruptions
                       Champion: Michael Hamer

As an agency with multiple, integrated functions, the District must be prepared at all times to deal with
potential catastrophes or emergencies and avoid service disruptions. The District will strengthen its
existing emergency operations efforts to develop and implement a comprehensive emergency response
and business continuity program. Key strategies will be the development of key performance indicators
(KPI’s) for Emergency Response Preparedness, Continuity of Operation, Operations Security, and QEMS
Procedures for the District’s three Department Emergency Operations Centers (Watersheds, Water
Utility, and Facilities).

Tactic AM-3A          Develop and implement a comprehensive emergency response and business
                      continuity program.
                      Lead: Michael Hamer



Strategy AM-4: Implement a District-wide asset management program
                       Champion: Sandy Oblonsky

The District will consolidate and integrate IT infrastructure, as well as implement a uniform asset
management framework. This framework will include full development of an asset management model
District-wide.

Tactic AM-4A          Develop and implement a uniform asset management framework.
                      Leads: Sandy Oblonsky and Ann Draper

Tactic AM-4B          Consolidate and integrate IT infrastructure for asset management.
                      Leads: Information Management Officer (Bill Knoff Acting)




Strategic Plan 2010 - 2015   Assets                                                                        12
           1    Definitions of strategic planning elements

                    Vision
                       A vision is a statement that provides a broad, “aspirational” image of the future that an
                       organization is aiming to achieve. Example: We are a fiscally responsible water resources
                       agency valued by the community.

                    Issues
                       Issues are statements of identified problems, concerns or challenges an organization
                       must address. Example: Effective business practices and fiscal accountability must be
                       demonstrated.

                    Goals
                       A goal is a statement of the condition that exists once the issue has been addressed.
                       Example: Stakeholders acknowledge significant improvements in our business practices and
                       fiscal accountability.

                    Key Performance Indicator (KPI)
                       KPIs are outcome measures to monitor achievement of goals. Each goal has one (1) KPI.
                       Example: Percent of critical assets assessed for current condition.

                    Strategies
                       Strategies are high-level concepts or plans for resolving issues and reaching goals.
                       Example: Implement prudent financial plans.

                    Tactics
                       Tactics are specific actions designed to carry out elements of a strategy.
                       Example: Implement a 5-year financial plan.

                    Task
                       Tasks are significant events to be achieved by a specific date that lead to the completion of a
                       tactic and, ultimately, the accomplishment of the strategy.

                    Chief Officers
                       Composed of the Chief Executive, Chief Administrative and Chief Operating Officers, the
                       Chief Officers have the collective responsibility for ensuring that the issues within the Plan
                       are addressed by achieving the stated goals and the authority to change the Strategic
                       Vision, issues, goals, KPIs and targets which they will review annually.

                    Sponsoring Chief
                       A single Chief Officer is assigned the responsibility for a specific issue and has the authority
                       to represent the Chief Officers when making changes to that issue’s strategies, tactics and
                       milestones.

                    Champion
                       The Champion is responsible for the implementation of the assigned strategy and ensures
                       that adequate staff and resources are provided. At the Quarterly Management Review,
                       the Champion reports implementation progress through the level of achievement of the
                       milestones for each tactic for the assigned strategy.
APPENDIX




               13                            Stategic Plan 2010 - 2015   Appendix - Definitions of strategic planning elements
2     Related definitions

      Asset
           Assets include infrastructure such as dams, pipelines, treatments plants, percolation
           ponds and flood protection facilities; groundwater; water rights; imported water contracts;
           computer networks; data; and the natural environment.

      Asset management
           A systematic process of maintaining, upgrading, and operating assets cost-effectively.
           It combines engineering principles with sound business practices and economic theory,
           and it provides tools to facilitate a more organized, logical approach to decision-making.
           Thus, asset management provides a frame work for handling both short and long-range
           planning.

      Diversity
           Diversity is comprised of all the ways people differ from one another, such as race,
           gender, religion, national origin, age, ancestry, physical ability, veteran status, gender
           identity and sexual orientation. Additionally, diversity includes components such as
           personal background, education, thinking process, approaches to problem solving and life
           experiences. Diversity is all-inclusive and, by its very nature, includes all individuals.

           Internal relationships are strengthened though an increased understanding of diversity.
           Better understanding also clarifies how diversity impacts district business and enables more
           effective outreach to and engagement with the community.

      Insource
           Work done internally rather than obtaining the same service from an external source.

      Outsource
           To obtain goods or services from an outside source.

      Prudent
           Careful and sensible; marked by sound judgment.

      Project Lead
           The Project Lead is responsible for the completion of the assigned Tactic, including ensuring
           that all associated activities are budgeted through the appropriate project number. The
           Project Lead is also responsible for the development and tracking of milestones, and
           reporting on a quarterly basis.




Strategic Plan 2010 - 2015   Related definitions                                                          14
           2   Related definitions

               Stakeholders
                    The term “stakeholders” refers to all groups that are or might be affected by an organization’s
                    actions and success. Examples of key stakeholders might include customers, the workforce,
                    partners, collaborators, governing boards, stockholders, donors, suppliers, taxpayers,
                    regulatory bodies, policy makers, funders, and local and professional communities.

               	    •	Customer: The term “customer” refers to actual and potential users or of your
                    organization’s products, programs, or services. Customers include the end users of your
                    products, programs, or services, as well as others who might be their immediate purchasers
                    or users. These others might include distributors, agents, or organizations that further process
                    your product as a component of their product.

               	    •	Collaborators: The term “collaborators” refers to those organizations or individuals who
                    cooperate with your organization to support a particular activity or event or who cooperate
                    on an intermittent basis when short-term goals are aligned or are the same. Typically,
                    collaborations do not involve formal agreements or arrangements.

               	    •	Partners: The term “partners” refers to those key organizations or individuals who
                    are working in concert with your organization to achieve a common goal or to improve
                    performance. Typically, partnerships are formal arrangements for a specific aim or purpose,
                    such as to achieve a strategic objective or to deliver a specific product or service. Formal
                    partnerships are usually for an extended period of time and involve a clear understanding of
                    the individual and mutual roles and benefits for the partners.


               Workforce
                    Persons employed by or working for or on behalf of the District.

               Workforce engagement
                    “Engagement” refers to the extent of the workforce’s commitment, both emotional and
                    intellectual, to accomplishing the work, mission, and vision of the organization. Organizations
                    with high levels of workforce engagement are often characterized by high-performing
                    work environments in which people are motivated to do their utmost for the benefit of their
                    customers and for the success of the organization.

                    In general, members of the workforce feel engaged when they find personal meaning
                    and motivation in their work and when they receive positive interpersonal and workplace
                    support. An engaged workforce benefits from trusting relationships, a safe and cooperative
                    environment, good communication and information flow, empowerment, and performance
                    accountability. Key factors contributing to engagement include training and career
                    development, effective recognition and reward systems, equal opportunity and fair treatment,
                    and family friendliness.
APPENDIX




               15                                                           Stategic Plan 2010 - 2015   Related definitions
3       Acknowledgements
        (in alpha order)


        The following staff contributed to the
        update of this Strategic Plan
        Rick Callender
        Debbie Cauble
        David Chesterman
        Emily Cote
        Gustavo De La Torre
        Ann Draper
        Chris Elias
        Jim Fiedler
        Beau Goldie
        Michael Hamer
        Sharon Judkins
        Bill Knoff
        Lauren Knoff
        Marc Klemencic
        Liang Lee
        Frank Maitski
        Deborah McClain
        Rudy Medina
        Sandy Oblonsky
        Katherine Oven
        Melanie Richardson
        Mary Ann Ruiz
        Alison Russell
        Susan Siravo
        Keith Whitman

         Special thanks to Ingrid Bella, Jeff Ham, and the Graphic Services Unit.

         For more information, please contact the Office of CEO
         Mary Ann Ruiz: 408-265-2600, ext 2633
         Jeff Ham: 408-265-2600, ext 2898




    Strategic Plan 2010 - 2015   Acknowledgements                                   16
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                             Santa Clara Valley Water District
                             5750 Almaden Expressway
                             San Jose, CA 95118
                             www.valleywater.org




Printed on recycled paper.                                       GS1621_StrategicPln2009_2014_082609_BA

								
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